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Kitchens & Baths Chefs, Grooming Experts, and Other Pros Share Their Spaces Island Escape An Architect’s Dream Retreat on a Chilean Islet At Home in the Modern World

Bold Perspectives Reimagining the Home

A small cabin emerges from an untamed coastline in the ChiloĂŠ Archipelago.

dwell.com January / February 2019 Display until March 18, 2019


January/February 2019 “We were inspired by memories of the space—full of life and entertainment, warmth and familiarity.” Allegra Henry, resident Page 70

CONTENTS

features

COVER PHOTO BY:

Cristóbal Palma ABOVE:

The Henry family gathers in the dining area of their Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, home.

60 Fjord Explorer An architect builds a series of elemental shelters for himself, friends, and family on a secluded tidalisland in southern Chile. TEXT

Kelly VencillSanchez

PHOTO BY

PHOTOS

Jonathan Pilkington

CristóbalPalma

70 Everything Is Relative An extended clan pulls together to transform a late 1970s house in eastern Pennsylvania that’s freighted with personalhistory. TEXT

Georgina Gustin PHOTOS

78 Ground Rules

86 Texas Rearrangers

For a winery owner who knows good soil, it’s only fitting that his house in New Zealand’s Southern Alps should be made of rammed earth.

Two empty-nesters embrace new ways of living, starting with downsizing from the suburbs to a smaller house in Austin.

TEXT

TEXT

Sam Eichblatt

Helen Thompson

PHOTOS

PHOTOS

Matthieu Salvaing

Casey Dunn

Jonathan Pilkington

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January/February 2019 34

CONTENTS

54

44

departments

PHOTOS: JOE SCHMELZER ( 34) ; BRIAN FLAHERTY ( 30 )

11 Editor’s Letter 16 Community

98 Sourcing See it? Want it? Need it? Buy it!

100 One Last Thing MichaelGraves’s legacy—and toaster—inspires Bobby Berk.

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27 Modern World

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For our annualdeep dive on kitchens and baths, an array of unofficialexperts—from chefs and cookbook authors to a beauty YouTuber and the creator of a bed-and-bath company—invite us to step inside their homes and show us how they designed these critically important rooms. Plus, from hundreds of photos submitted on Instagram with the tags #dwellkitchen and #dwellbath, we share a selection of our top picks.

38 Smart

50 Renovation

Could smart homes become our virtualcaretakers as we grow older and need support?

Once used for generating electricity, an engine house in the English countryside is reborn as a gallery-like home.

TEXT BY

Jennifer Pattison Tuohy Linn Fritz

ILLUSTRATIONS BY

TEXT BY

Iain Aitch Jefferson Smith

PHOTOS BY

44 Studio Landscape artist Paula Hayes shares a glimpse into her charming Hudson Valley art studio as wellas her creative process. TEXT BY

Julie Lasky John Kernick

PHOTOS BY

54 Dispatch A tech professionalpivots to construction, building a mobile tiny home in centralTexas that’s available as a vacation rental. TEXT BY

Creede Fitch Benjamin Rasmussen

PHOTOS BY

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editor’s letter

Bold Perspectives

The Roman architect and engineer Vitruvius asserted that society should look to nature to create things that are firmitas, utilitas, venustas—solid, useful, beautiful. Nearly two thousand years later, in 1896, Chicago School affiliate and pioneer of the skyscraper Louis Sullivan distilled Vitruvius’s credo to its essence: “Form ever follows function.” Those four words, heard through the halls of 20th-century architecture— and later stricken of the word “ever”— became a foundational doctrine of modernism, and eventually shorthand for modernism itself. Funny how the basic concept dates back to antiquity. Good design really is timeless. In our homes, kitchens and bathrooms are the areas where function is most pronounced. These rooms need to perform—and we want them to look good doing it. This is especially true when the people who own them make their living, say, hosting a popular documentary series about eating good food, or vlogging about makeup. For this year’s special section on kitchens and bathrooms (p. 27), we visit the homes of seven experts who, through their assorted careers, have a professional perspective on what functionality really looks like. The appeal of their spaces is not derived from their irreproachable “style”—they’re not vacuum-sealed or glossy—but from their usefulness, from knowing that they work hard every day for people who demand the most. And as good modernists know, when function is achieved precisely, it is a thing of beauty.

Lara D eam, Founder, CEO lara@dwell.com / @larahdeam

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JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

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Explore the inspiration for Amy Kehoe’s own kitchen remodel at dacor.com.


“ O F T E N , W H AT G I V E S A N O B J E C T AUTHENTICITY IS THE ONE WHO IS B E H I N D T H E O B J E C T— I T S M A K E R — A N D I T S F I N I S H , I T S TO U C H . A N A U T H E N T I C PIECE ISN’T “OF THE MOMENT” O R TO O C O N T R I V E D. I T ’ S S I M P LY S O M E T H I N G YO U N E V E R T I R E O F.”

The Designer’s Mind AMY KEHOE Designer/Co-Founder Nickey Kehoe

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RARE FORM

THE LEXUS LS 500. LIVE IN THE NEW. We didn’t merely try something different. We crafted an entirely originalexperience. With accents like Kiriko glass, designed by hand then delicately etched with thousands of cuts to catch the eye and transform in the light. A 416-horsepower1 twin-turbo engine paired with a 10-speed Direct-Shift automatic transmission takes you from 0 to 60 in just 4.6 seconds.1,2 Allthis is complemented by cutting-edge technology with one of the largest Head-Up Displays in the industry.3 The Lexus LS 500 isn’t simply unique. It redefines what a flagship luxury sedan can be.

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letters

Inspiring to see the use of common materials in slick modern design in the Nashville story—looks great! $115 a square foot, wow.

Clockwise from above: The Nashville home in “Adjusted for Inflation” was built on an enviable budget; “ Final Edit” featured the Brooklyn apartment of a pair of creatives; a guestroom in “ Italian Unification” was painted an Yves Klein blue.

From Dwell.com As a paper industry recruiter of 30-plus years, I was delighted to see the story on French Paper [“In the Black,” November/December]; you certainly stepped outside the box with this one.Not only do the article and video offer a mini-tutorial in the art of papermaking, but it is proof that small, family-owned manufacturing companies can endure. —Pat Irwin, Appleton, WI

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My overall impression of the November/ December issue is that it is very dark and shadowy, starting with the cover. Even the piece about making paper features black paper! Is somebody going through a goth phase? Lighten up, would you? —Wesley Hammond, Spartanburg, SC

“Adjusted for Inflation” November/ December

“Artist in Residence” November/ December

“Final Edit” November/ December

The materials and fitment remind me of Schindler homes in Los Angeles. The cost per square foot is a tough mark to hit.

Finally, someone who actually seems to care for a vintage house. We had the same (or similar) stove in the house we built in 1960.

—CC HAMPTON

—TED JONES

Nicely done piece. The photos, story, and video are well integrated. Nice to see Dwell focusing on people designing affordable living spaces.

What a great house, and how fortunate that someone who loves it owns it and cares for it. He is living his dream!

While nowhere near “affordable,” the Stauss-Blechman home in the last issue manages to blend modernist, witty, minimalist taste without looking icy or unattainable.

—BRETT BOSTON

—D OUGLAS SCOTT

—KERNANCOLEMAN

“Italian Unification” November/ December Absolutely incredible. What was done here

is what many concrete structures fail to do elsewhere—feel a part of their environment. —RYAN BURD ICK

Please, please tell me the color used for that blue wall in the bedroom. The name of the color and the brand. Thank you! —AYANNA BARTON ED ITOR’S NOTE:

The paint is Blue Oltremare from Morgan’s Paint by Toscano Vernici.

JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

DWELL

PHOTOS: PIPPA DRUMMOND ( NASHVILLE ) ; STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON ( BROOKLYN ) ; JULIAN BROAD ( ITALY )

COMMUNITY

—McElroy Architecture


dwell.com

Dive into the digital world of Dwell, where there’s much more to discover—and lots of ways to get involved.

COMMUNITY

JOURNEY BY DESIGN: AUSTIN, TEXAS Our new travelseries heads to ATX, a creative mecca bursting with boutiques, modern eateries, music venues, and outdoor adventures. Get our recommendations at dwell.com/austin-city-guide

Exposed steel, concrete, and cement-washed brick make up the material palette for a rural retreat outside Pretoria (top left). Within a brutalist concrete structure in Melbourne, wood accents and colorful tile make for a warm, breezy bathroom (bottom left).

VIDEO HOME TOURS Our coverage of outstanding modern homes doesn’t just end with these pages. Watch our videos to further explore these inspiring residences and hear what their owners have to say about them. dwell.com/videos

POLL: In building your dream home, would you opt for traditionalconstruction or prefab?

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63 Traditional

18

37% Prefab

JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

DWELL

PHOTOS: MATTHEW WILLIAMS ( HOME TOUR) ; MARSEL ROOTHMAN (SOUTH AFRICA ) ; DEREK SWALWELL ( MELBOURNE ) . ILLUSTRATION: PETER OUMANSKI

TOP INSTAGRAMS Our most popular recent posts include a barn-inspired South African home and a soothing spa-like bathroom in Melbourne. See more at instagram.com/dwellmagazine


Live Limitlessly.

We are proud to reveal the new look of Resource Furniture. Honoring the past, and excited about our future, we invite you to join us in our new transformation. We hope you are inspired by our new website, and we look forward to helping you continue to design differently and live limitlessly.

ResourceFurniture.com | 212-753-2039 New York Los Angeles

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dwell asks

What’s the smallest space you’ve ever lived in?

COMMUNITY

Inspired by a tiny home vacation rental in Texas Hill Country featured in this issue (p. 54), we asked our online community about experiences living with less.

AllI’m saying is that I live in a 750sf apartment now and it’s too BIG. @curb_it on Instagram We live in a 540sf shipping container conversion. Started as just the two of us, but now we are welcoming a baby and have no plans to upsize. @miss_plant on Instagram

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400sf—my husband and I remodeled my family’s horse stall and tack room into a living space. @teresarieke on Instagram In Paris, in my “twostep apartment.” Two steps from the door to the bed, then two steps from the bed to either the kitchenette or bath. Fiona McOarsome on Facebook

A well-designed, not-quite 200sf studio. Huge by Hong Kong standards. And my neighbors lived in the same footprint with their two adult children. Puts things in perspective! @erinjjuhlhk on Instagram A 100sf converted short schoolbus! @stu.the.bus on Instagram

I lived for two years in a 32sf teardrop camper I built! Maine to Colorado to California and back... twice!! @sweetkiwipete on Instagram The cabin of a 28-foot sailboat, anchored at a marina in Longboat Key, Florida. When I graduated from college without a clear plan, it was either that or my parents’. Wiping

down the ceiling to keep mold at bay was worth it for the independence. @brandonnyc5 on Instagram A 20-foot-diameter traditionalMongolian yurt. Coziest year and a half of my life. Stacey McCarthy on Facebook A VW bus in Hawaii in the ’80s! I didn’t even know I was a tiny house pioneer! @cheryl.travels on Instagram A womb. Lived there nine months before being evicted, on my birthday no less. Reuben Viles on Facebook

JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

DWELL

ILLUSTRATION: JAY COVER

A 217sf apartment in Tokyo. Every piece of it was laid out perfectly. I had a bedroom, living room, full kitchen, full bathroom, and even a laundry area with a washing machine. Back in North America, we take space for granted and hence tend to waste it. @ideaengine on Instagram


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houses we love

Spanish Intuition In search of a home, a Barcelona couple sense a chance for something more. TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Tiffany Orvet

JosĂŠ Hevia

More at Dwell.com Do you have a project you’d like to see published in Dwell? Share it at dwell.com/add-a-home

A courtyard divides the live/work space of architect Masaaki Higashi and his wife, artist Esther Mir. For

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inclement weather, a steel panel and a glass door open beneath a triangular canopy (above left), providing

covered passage from the main living space to the office. A bedroom holds a Costes chair by Philippe Starck (above).

JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

DWELL


The dining area (left) features a PH5 pendant by Poul Henningsen for Louis Poulsen, a T12 table by Hay, and Møller Model 77 side chairs. A 1960s rocking chair by Vladimir Kagan sets off the living area. The workshop (below), with its concrete floor and painted brick walls, has a more industrial vibe. A Pedrera PD2 floor lamp by Barba Corsini for Gubi sits beneath artwork from Esther’s “Shinbun” collection.

COMMUNITY

“We envisioned our future to be set up like this. We wanted our own studio, and we needed space.” Masaaki Higashi, architect and resident

Looking to upsize from their condo in Barcelona’s Gràcia district, Masaaki Higashi and Esther Mir had their eye on a two-story apartment that was wedged at the back of a former printing warehouse next door. But when it turned out that the two spaces—partially attached, partially separated by a courtyard—were listed together, they had to reconsider. “It was rundown, dark, and divided,” recalls Masaaki of his first impression of the warehouse, the ground floor of a multistory apartment building. But after some thought, Masaaki, a Japanese-born architect, and Esther, an artist from Minorca, realized that owning the combined 2,700 square feet would allow them to headquarter Mas-aqui, the architecture and design firm they were planning to start, on-site. They bought the property and within months transformed it into a bright, modern live/work space.

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JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

Today the open-air interior courtyard— which Masaaki describes as the “heart of the residence”—is flanked by floor-toceiling glass. It separates the couple’s dining area, living room, kitchen, and spare bedroom, which are housed in the main building, from their office on the first floor of the two-story rear add-on. They placed their bedroom above the workspace, with slats of Finnish ThermoWood on the exterior to protect their privacy. New drainage systems and floating insulated flooring were also installed. Now Masaaki and Esther’s commute consists only of a flight of stairs. And, for the days when foul weather threatens to muck up the short trek across the courtyard, they even designed an overhang and a section of metal wall that swings open to create a “secret” corridor. Says Masaaki, “We’d like to give people a sense of ‘Wow!’ about how space can be used.”


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PHOTO BY | @TREASURBITE

Joe Schmelzer

M AK E IT YO URS I NTEGRATE D VE NTI L ATION Rather than a hood over the range‚ Ludo has a flush ventilation system in the ceiling above his island. “It’s a big open room‚ where we have the TV‚ sofa‚and kitchen‚so I didn’t want to see a big hood there‚” he says. It also keeps sightlines open for shooting his web-based show‚Ludo à la Maison.

T WO CO OKTOPS Ludo has both an induction and a gas cooktop from Fisher & Paykel. “I mainly use induction because it’s safe for kids‚ fast‚and easy to control‚” he says. But when he needs to burn an eggplant or brown toast‚ he turns on the gas.

COPPE R SI N K “The one nonnegotiable thing for me in the kitchen was having a large copper sink‚” says Ludo‚who chose a modelfrom Rohl. “To me‚it says farm and countryside‚which reminds me of where I come from in France.”

OVE RSIZE D DRAWE RS “I have lots of pots and pans‚so large drawers make a huge difference‚” he says. “No more having to remove every pot and pan to find the one I want.”

MORE AT DWELL.COM See Ludo Lefebvre’s fullspace at dwell.com/ ludo-lefebvre-kitchen

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My life is based around cooking 24/7‚so making the kitchen the star of our house was really the only choice. Our previous kitchen was tiny‚and with two smallchildren it became almost dangerous at times: too many people‚not enough space. I wanted an open area where family and friends could be part of the experience but also have breathing room.

I collaborated with a designer‚ Ginny Capo‚for the aesthetic. I know where to put my ovens and my burners‚but I’m more of a restaurant person. I wanted this to be more accessible‚and safer‚than a restaurant kitchen. She picked the Caesarstone‚ which I love. It’s almost better than marble‚because it’s so easy to clean.

SHERMAN OAKS‚ CALIFORNIA

Ludo Lefebvre The French-born Trois Mec chef, TV personality, and pop-up wizard dem onstrates how he plies his craft at hom e.

It’s also important to me that my kids‚Luca and Rêve‚who are twins‚learn about food and the importance of the family meal‚and not be intimidated by equipment. Luca is now obsessed with cooking. He’s always in the kitchen and knows how to use everything‚even a knife. He can do a pretty cool omelet in the morning. At seven and a half‚that’s pretty amazing.


Daymon Gardner

My husband‚ Larry Miller‚ and I live in a loft-style apartment above our new restaurant‚ Bywater American Bistro. People think I’m crazy for living upstairs from my work‚ but for me‚ it’s actually convenient. I don’t have to drive anywhere. I can go downstairs and check on people. And if I need a break‚ I can just come upstairs and decompress

for ten minutes before going back down. I like it a lot. The kitchen was already here when we moved in‚ and it’s pretty efficient. We wanted to keep the space open and informal‚ so the main thing we did was buy this wood table. We wanted something that was very simple and approachable. We have breakfast and dinner at it‚

and when I have friends over they can sit at the table and we can just chitchat and cook while nibbling on cheese and drinking some wine. I’ve also decorated the kitchen with things from all my travels‚ including cookbooks and photos. It may look like a hoarder’s kitchen‚ but those personalaccents really make the kitchen what it is.

ki tc h e n & b a th

PHOTO BY | @DAYMONGARDNER

NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

Nina Com pton The newly m inted Jam es Beard Award winner offers a glim pse into her personal kitchen, right upstairs from her work one.

MA K E IT YOURS

MORE AT DWELL.COM See Nina Compton’s fullspace at dwell.com/ nina-compton-kitchen

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JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

M ISMATCH E D DISH ES Nina’s collection of china and glassware includes many pieces from her mother’s home in St. Lucia. “Every time I go there‚ she gives me something she’s had for years‚” she says. “It’s about the memory. You can’t buy that.”

OPE N STORAGE

WORLD MAP

FRE NCH PRESS

“I don’t like to have things hidden‚” says Nina. “I want people to feelmy space and the energy of the kitchen.” For that reason‚ she uses a ledge above the kitchen counter to hold pots‚ pans‚ and cookbooks.

“We got that map because we want to remember allthe places we’ve traveled— as wellas where we haven’t‚” says Nina. “It’s a daily reminder of places we want to explore. Our goalis to try something different every year.”

For coffee‚ Nina likes nothing more than a simple French press. “It’s just slowly infused‚ and I think the taste is better‚” she says. “I drink the same thing in the restaurant‚ if I want to treat myself. It’s my reminder that I can slow down just a bit.”

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PHOTOS BY | @BRIANFLAHERTY

Brian Flaherty

M AK E IT YO URS WORKTABLES Samin’s kitchen originally had almost no counter space‚so she added two stainless steelworktables and topped one with a leftover piece of wood countertop from a friend’s renovation. “It’s just like being in a restaurant kitchen‚” says Samin. “I cut directly on top.”

CABI N ETS Before adding cabinets‚she tried shelves. “But I came to hate open shelving‚” she says. “I don’t have great ventilation in my kitchen—there’s no hood—so everything got sticky and greasy.” The corner cabinet includes a lazy Susan for her extensive vinegar collection.

MAGN ETIC KN I FE STRI PS Samin uses wallmounted magnetic walnut strips from Mag-Blok to keep her knives handy. “They’re always there‚ and I like looking at them‚” she explains.

TRASHCAN A pedal-operated trashcan from Simplehuman is the perfect size and scale for Samin’s kitchen. “It helps to have some parts that just fit right‚” she says.

MORE AT DWELL.COM See Samin Nosrat’s fullspace at dwell.com/ samin-nosrat-kitchen

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I moved here when I was 29 and never would have guessed that I’d stillbe here when I was 39. I’ve slowly upgraded the kitchen. There’s always that balance when you’re a renter. You’re like‚“I’m going to save my money so I can fix up the place where I’llfinally live.” But at some point‚I just had to say‚“Well‚I do live here‚and I have to make it enjoyable.”

Two years ago‚I put in upper cabinets from IKEA. I don’t even understand where I stored food before. They’re chock full. My stove is just the jankiest‚and I used to resent it so much. There’s not enough power to cook a lot of stuff at the same time. I have to just figure it out. As I went further into my writing career‚with less professional

BERKELEY‚ CALIFORNIA

Sam in Nosrat The best-selling author of Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat— and host of the Netflix series of the sam e nam e— shows what’s possible in a rental kitchen.

cookery and more writing for home cooks‚I realized‚in a weird way‚that this is a blessing. It’s much more likely that the people I’m writing for have a situation like this than a six-burner Wolf range. The constraints of a tiny apartment kitchen are a great challenge: If I can figure out how to do stuff in here‚then I can explain it to people.


Nick Ballon

I have a lot of counter space‚ with an island that’s at least ten feet long and six across. That’s so precious in France‚ where kitchens tend to be small. I use it for cooking‚ my desk‚ entertaining‚ and everything else. I need it for work—it’s not a luxury—but it’s a challenge getting people to understand‚ because Parisians are very into compartmentalizing

things. The kitchen is supposed to have a door. It’s a new trend to have a cuisine américaine, or American kitchen‚ which is open. The only thing I kept from the originalapartment‚ which someone had slightly renovated before me‚ was a smallstainless steel counter‚ which made me realize how much I love that material. You can put a hot pan on it‚ you

can chop on it‚ and you won’t destroy it. I keep reading kitchen articles that say you shouldn’t use stainless steelbecause it will scratch. But that’s what’s supposed to happen. Don’t worry about it. It’s like marble‚ which is for cooking on‚ not just looking at. If I were to redo my kitchen again‚ I would do it allin either stainless steelor marble.

ki tc h e n & b a th

PHOTO BY | @NICKBALLON

PARIS‚ FRANCE

David Lebovitz The blogger, cookbook writer, and pastry chef presents a look at his Am erican-style kitchen in the 11th arrondissem ent.

MA K E IT YOURS

MORE AT DWELL.COM See David Lebovitz’s fullspace at dwell.com/ david-lebovitz-kitchen

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JAN UARY/FEB RUARY 2019

BIG SI N K

STORAGE BUCKETS

OPE N SH E LVES

FLO OR MAT

A huge plain white porcelain sink for containing piles of dirty dishes was a top requirement for David‚ who spent months searching for one online before finding a secondhand modelfrom Porcher that was large enough.

Preferring to keep his tools visible‚ David stores whisks‚ spatulas‚ and spoons in a hodgepodge of buckets‚ with little concern for whether or not they match. The guiding curatorialprinciple‚ he says‚ is that “it’s designed to be useful.”

David stacks pots‚ pans‚ and other supplies on open stainless steelshelves from Nisbets. “I hate rifling through cabinets‚” he says. “But for me‚ it’s also a decorative element‚” and a way to display collected cookware.

After struggling to find the right anti-fatigue mat‚ Lebovitz bought inexpensive‚ machinewashable carpet runners on Amazon. “They’re cushioned enough‚” he says‚ “and cheap enough that when you spillon them it’s no problem.”

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b a th

WE PUT OUT THE WORD ON INSTAGRAM FOR OUR FOLLOWERS TO SHARE THEIR KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS AND TAG US. FROM HUNDREDS OF SUBMISSIONS, WE PRESENT A HANDFUL OF OUR FAVORITES.

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NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA @studiowta

MALMÖ, SWEDEN @mmxyyz_architecture

PINTO, CHILE @lorenatroncosov

As she renovated a 1938 kitchen in Malmö‚ architect Nevena Krilic paid homage to the home’s funkis—or Swedish functionalist— roots. The backsplash is made of triangular tiles by Tonalite filled in with dark grout. The range is by IKEA.

For a 250-square-foot cabin in the Andes‚ architect Lorena Troncoso put a sleep loft above the kitchen to save space. The single room‚covered in Monterey pine‚centers on a handcrafted wood island supported by a tree trunk.

CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA @paul_tilse_architects

Designer Natan Diacon-Furtado of studioWTA relied on bamboo cabinetry and exposed brick to establish a warm‚welcoming ambience at a traditional-style home in New Orleans’City Park neighborhood.

At a kitchen in the Australian capital‚ designer Vanessa Hawes turned to Dusty Mule by Porter’s Paints for a soft‚friendly palette. Recesses with American oak veneers accent the flush cabinetry.

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PHOTOS: SARA ESSEX BRADLEY ( 1) ‚DAVID JOHANSSON ( 2) ‚CRISTOBAL CARO ( 3 ) ‚RODRIGO VARGAS ( 4 )

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TEXT BY

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BAARLE-NASSAU, NETHERLANDS @vivaarchitecture

AUSTIN, TEXAS @mf.architecture

WOODSTOCK, NEW YORK @dichotomy_interiors

BUDANJE, SLOVENIA @sanjapremrn

To create a muted‚ relaxing atmosphere‚ interior designer Megan Oldenburger combined clean lines and naturalwhite oak elements for a bathroom in upstate New York. The Pill pendants are by Pelle.

Homeowner Matej Peljhan gave designer Sanja Premrn total freedom to design his bathroom—and was pleasantly surprised by her decision to pair a bright red faucet with a concrete sink and a custom backlit mirror.

For a Dutch farmhouse‚ architect Sylvie Bruyninckx kept the bathroom as simple as farm life‚ combining exposed cross laminated timber walls with a graphic crosscurrent of square and rectangular tiles.

PHOTOS: KOEN BROOS ( 5 ) ‚ MF ARCHITECTURE ( 6 ) ‚ MEGAN OLDENBURGER ( 7)‚ SANJA PREMRN (8 )

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The team at Matt Fajkus Architecture laid Ann Sacks floor tiles in a chevron pattern to draw the eye toward a freestanding Victoria + Albert Barcelona tub in a sumptuous bathroom. The gold hardware is by Kohler.

FOLLOW US See more inspiring spaces on Instagram at @dwellmagazine

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Illustrations by LINN FRITZ

SMART

Text by J E N N I F E R PAT T I S O N T U O H Y

We’re getting older. Fast. The number of Americans over 65 is expected to double from roughly 50 million to nearly 100 million by 2060. Just where are we allgoing to live? Nursing homes and affordable assisted living facilities are in short supply. Besides, given the choice, more than eight out of 10 seniors say they want to stay in their own home. Aging in place makes intuitive sense. We’ve spent many years and lots of money making our homes the right place for us to live. The challenge as we grow older is how to do so safely and comfortably. Willwe need to rely on adult children or healthcare workers, or, as we need assistance and a bit of oversight, could our primary caretakers be our homes themselves? A new category of caregiving known as “ambient assisted living” is emerging to allow just that, by providing smart tech solutions that enable seniors to live at home longer, while helping them stay connected to outside caregivers, healthcare, and society. A smart house with a whole-home monitoring/ security system and some key connected devices can cost less than a single month in an assisted living facility. The question is, how does it work?

O N TA S K Healthcare professionals refer to five “activities of daily living,” or basic self-care tasks, to assess whether individuals can live independently or may need extra help: walking and getting around, meal prep and eating, dressing and grooming, bathing, and toileting.

Welcom e to Your Forever Hom e The sm art tech revolution holds particular prom ise for aging in place. 38

Ambient assisted living starts at the front door, with an alarm system that includes smoke and leak detectors. “Other technology isn’t so relevant if there’s a fire or flood in your home,” notes Laurie Orlov, founder of the research firm Aging in Place Technology Watch. Connected to motion and leak sensors, smoke alarms, and security cameras, a smart security system such as the Abode Iota, Nest Secure, or Ring Alarm can alert a homeowner, a callcenter, or a

loved one if there’s an issue. A video doorbell and smart door lock also provide security and can be criticalfor those with impaired mobility. The Nest Video Doorbell, for example, learns people’s faces and can announce who’s at the door, while showing them on a smart TV. With a smart door lock, the homeowner can let a guest in without leaving the comfort of a living room chair.

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Top luxury brands. Every style. All online. P E R IG O L D . C O M


SMART

Kitchen B E I N G A B L E T O P R E PA R E F O O D S A F E LY I S K E Y T O I N D E P E N D E N T L I V I N G .

The kitchen poses hazards to people of any age. But with nearly half of seniors reporting at least occasionalmemory lapses, appliances that shut themselves off after use can be lifesaving. A product called Sense can be retrofitted to a home’s electricalpaneland will notify the homeowner if any device has been left on too long. Sense can also learn daily usage patterns and send alerts to a trusted caregiver if they change. Did the coffee maker not turn on this morning? That might be a cue to the caregiver to callDad to see if he’s okay. June is a smart countertop oven that recognizes food placed inside it and cooks it to the correct temperature—shutting off when done—making mealprep a breeze; it also connects to smartphones and Alexa for almost complete hands-free cooking—a particular boon for those with severe visualimpairment. A new Alexa-powered microwave from AmazonBasics can also be controlled with voice.

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Living Room VOICE CONTROL E M P OW E RS S E N I O RS AC R O S S L I V I N G S PAC E S .

Virtualassistants controlled by voice, like Amazon’s Alexa, Google’s Assistant, Samsung’s Bixby, and Apple’s Siri, are key to ambient assisted living, providing an easy-touse interface for seniors to communicate with both the home and the outside world. A smart speaker in the living room can perform a variety of usefultasks, such as turning on the TV, providing reminders about medication, or even calling for help in an emergency. Some voice assistants can also offer engagement, which is crucialfor those living alone; socialisolation is associated with poor health and higher rates of mortality. Enter LifePod, the first “proactive voice” assistant on the market. Working with Amazon devices, LifePod can have Alexa ask questions without needing a prompt. “A caregiver can set up a routine remotely that wakes Alexa at, say, 8 a.m. to ask the person, ‘How did you sleep last night?’” explains LifePod CEO Stuart Patterson. “If the person says, ‘I really slept poorly. I don’t feelwell,’ LifePod can say, ‘Oh, that’s too bad. I willsend a text message to your daughter telling her you didn’t sleep well.’ We call it a virtualcaregiver instead of an assistant, because the caregiver is setting it up and controlling it.”

A D D TO C A R T Mealprep and eating aren’t the only food challenges facing seniors. For those with mobility issues, getting to the store is the first obstacle. Using sensors, algorithms, and

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tiny RFID tags, the smart fridge of tomorrow could analyze its own contents and its owner’s consumption habits, then “talk” to the localgrocery store or an online shopping

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service and reorder food as needed. For now, caregivers can see inside camera-equipped refrigerators by LG or Samsung and find out what they need to purchase before their next visit.

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Bathroom A H I G H - R I S K A R E A W H E R E T E C H C A N S U P P O R T S A F E T Y.

Slippery and hard-surfaced, the bathroom is a major problem spot for falls, the leading cause of fatalinjuries and trauma-related hospitalvisits for seniors. Wearable personalemergency response systems can bring help, but they are not without flaws: You need to remember to wear one, and if you falland are unconscious, you won’t be able to press the callbutton. Walabot Home is a radar-style device that sits on the wall, constantly scanning for sudden motion. If a fall is detected, Walabot can alert a caregiver and open up two-way communication through the device. At night, smart toilets equipped with motion-sensing lights can play a role in preventing falls from happening in the first place. With fixtures such as Kohler’s Numi and Toto’s Neorest having features like voice-activated flushing and automatic lids that are helpfulfor those with limited range of motion, the high-tech toilet seems less like a punchline and more like a good idea.

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Bedroom N EW GAD GET S PROM ISE G REATE R W E LL-B E I NG, DAY A N D N I GH T.

T R I A L BY T E L E H E A LT H By turning things like scales and blood pressure cuffs into smart devices, it’s possible to send important health info directly to your doctor’s office. While this type of remote care, called “telehealth,” has existed for some time, clinical trials are underway to

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see if wireless electric devices can help with severe and chronic illnesses, including monitoring patients at home following hospitalization. Telehealth also reduces the need for patients to travelto a doctor by allowing for phone and video

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appointments. “Lack of transportation is a realbarrier for seniors,” says Rodney Harrell, director of Livability Thought Leadership at AARP. “There are still questions about cost and the types of things that can be done effectively with telehealth, but there’s potential.”

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SMART

Seniors complain of insomnia more than any other nighttime problem, and lack of good sleep can lead to allsorts of health issues. Fortunately, a range of new products can help. An air quality monitor can maintain the optimalsleep environment by turning on or adjusting a fan, dehumidifier, or thermostat if it senses humidity or temperature changes. The Awair monitor will even generate a sleep report to help you better understand and adjust your sleep environment. Smart light bulbs in bedside lamps can be set to emit a warm light and gradually fade out at bedtime to help your body wind down. Biometric sensors in the Sleep Number 360 Smart Bed track your sleep, capturing data on your heart rate, breathing, and tossing and turning to create a personalized report. In the future these sensors may be able to detect irregular breathing or heartbeat patterns, like a heart attack, and alert emergency services in realtime. The goal is to ultimately make beds part of the arsenalof smart equipment that could help monitor recovery after medicalprocedures, so you can safely return to and stay in your home.


studio

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY

Julie Lasky

John Kernick

Earthly Delights At her Hudson Valley studio, landscape artist Paula Hayes explores the intersection of art and nature.

Paula Hayes tends to a blown-glass terrarium in her studio in Athens, New York, a historic 1 860s house that she renovated with her husband, Teo Camporeale. A Brooklyn-based artist, Paula is known for her miniaturized landscapes as well as full-scale gardens.

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P R O M OT I O N

A Smarter Home That Keeps Learning Samsung ’s SmartThing s Wifi is a wholehome Wi-Fi solution that blasts a powerful sig nal to every corner of your home – in an eleg ant, compact packag e. Flexible and expandable, one device covers up to 1,500 square feet, with three devices covering up to 4,500 square feet. Bundling serious function into a small packag e, the device acts as both a powerful mesh Wi-Fi router and SmartThing s hub. SmartThing s Wifi is fast, reliable, and exceptionally efficient. Utilizing sophisticated band and client steering , Wi-Fi is directed throug h the fastest possible route. With multiple access points, SmartThing s Wifi innovates beyond traditional routers to

distribute secure and stable Wi-Fi to the whole home, with no dead zones. The incredibly smart, self-optimizing Wi-Fi system recog nizes individual devices, analyzes usag e, and diverts more capacity to the places that need it most – continually learning and constantly improving the performance of your network over time. The brain of your smart home, SmartThing s Wifi has a built-in hub that works with SmartThing s, Samsung , and 100+ compatible smart devices, all easily controlled via the SmartThing s app. Certified SmartThing s sensors connect wirelessly to the SmartThing s hub, keeping home environments comfortable and safe.

For more information please visit: www.samsung.com/us/smart-home/smartthings SAMSUNG

Offering cutting -edg e home security and monitoring , SmartThing s sensors let you know when doors and windows are opened, when there’s movement in your house, or even when there’s an unexpected water leak. In addition to its powerful tech features and forward-thinking functionality, SmartThing s Wifi is aesthetically pleasing with its streamlined and minimal desig n. Companions to everyday living , SmartThing s hubs are at home in modern kitchens, baths, and almost any interior space where smart devices are used. Seamlessly blending into their surrounding s, the sleek and understated SmartThing s products make smart look beautiful.


studio

Paula Hayes warns visitors to her studio in upstate New York not to walk under her neighbor’s black walnut tree:The nuts drop without warning, and they are big. Please also be careful of the poison ivy in the back garden, Paula advises. And maybe keep your distance from the bees buzzing around the black-eyed Susans. “I don’t know what your tolerance is,” she says. Paula, 60, is an artist who uses nature as a material. She is best known for blending succulents, ferns, orchids, creeping figs, and semiprecious stones and crystals in bubble-like glass terrariums, or embedding plants in puckered rubber containers that look like colorful Chinese soup dumplings. She also designs gardens for wealthy patrons and major commercial clients and institutions, including the W Hotel in Miami, the Lever House in New York, and the Baltimore Museum of Art, where she is the first landscape-artist-in-residence. But nature, for Paula, isn’t docile. It is self-willed and unpredictable. It blows in, like the redbud seeds that take root in her garden—and may one day take over, if she lets them. The real subject of her artistry is nurturing over time, or time itself. “What I really, really, really deeply desire is to tell people, let’s just let it grow, and then I’ll work with you,” she says about her landscapes for private clients. Most weekends, Paula and her husband, Teo Camporeale, an animator and musician, shuttle north from their home base in downtown Brooklyn to a 1780s 46

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“Everything is perfect and beautiful because of the unself-consciousness of it.” PAULA HAYES

The front portion of the studio’s second floor was cut away to create a double-height ceiling, from which one of Paula’s silicone pendant lamps hangs (opposite, left). The frosted glassware is from

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her “Barnyard Animal Banquet” series of handblown vessels. An abstract pale blue garden gnome has a peaked top, reminiscent of the pagoda roofs of Balinese architecture; a cake stand displays slabs of resin used as color

samples (opposite, insets). On the upper level is a catwalk lined with bookshelves (above). Paula bought the chair from Nancy Shaver, an artist who had a shop in Hudson called Henry.

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studio

Vintage armchairs covered in sheepskin are arranged around a crate table on the second floor (above). The painted papiermâché sculpture on the console table is “Transporter,” by Leif Goldberg, a member of a 1 990s collective in

Providence, Rhode Island, called Forcefield. The whimsical spoons are by local artist Paula Greif (near right). The ceramic bust (far right), found at an antique shop in Brooklyn, is among Paula’s favorite possessions.

clapboard house they bought in 2013 in the tiny Hudson River town of Athens. Nextdoor is Paula’s art/yoga studio, an 1860s building that they acquired shortly after. Touring this cedar-clad Italianate charmer can last 10 minutes or 10 hours, depending on how long one lingers over the architecture, furnishings, graphic works, sculptures, and, of course, growing things. Paula worked with engineer John Steele and builder Peter Galante to gut the building and raise the sloping roof in the back, increasing the usable space. Under her direction, a portion of the second floor was cut away to let light pour down to the first. A railing was installed at the edge of the truncated level, creating a catwalk bounded on the other side by bookshelves. 48

The main level has a pine plywood floor, which Paula specified down to the nail pattern. A niche off to the side is where she works at her computer on project renderings. (Tacked up near the desk is a photo of the living wall she designed for the restaurants that replaced the Four Seasons in the Seagram Building.) There’s a bathroom and a makeshift kitchenette with a four-burner stove and a rear glass wall looking out to the garden, with its laissez-faire tumble of rudbeckia, asters, native holly, and joe-pye weed. The single upstairs room has hemlock floorboards and ceiling beams, as well as vintage chairs stripped of upholstery and draped in sheepskin. A cluster of brass candlesticks supports knobby stalks of

beeswax. A handmade Japanese futon is furled on the floor, awaiting guests. Most delightful are the many domestic objects that Paula has made herself. Molded silicone pendant lamps alluding to morning glories hang from the ceiling. Dried thistles fill a vase that is nothing more than a painted paper cone. “You can look at it as everything is ugly or look at it as everything is perfectly beautiful—it’s not medium,” Paula says. She’s referring to the insulation bricks that were extracted during the renovation and are now piled in a mound out back, but also possibly to the world. The bricks will remain as a pedestal for one of her garden gnomes—sculptures molded in clay and cast in aluminum that evoke kitschy lawn

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“There’s so much in process here, and that’s part of the ambience.” PAULA HAYES

“How to make a vase for five dollars,” Paula says of the holder for wildflowers she fashioned from a cone of painted paper (below); she plans to cast it in bronze. A handmade Japanese futon awaits overnight guests. The ceiling height at the back of the upper level was boosted to create more headroom.

figurines as well as the roofs of Balinese pagodas. “It’s in process,” she says. That goes for the building, too. Paula has mapped out how it will one day be converted into a three-bedroom home for her children and grandchildren. In the short term, she and Teo are looking to relocate to Athens full-time. Paula has her eye on a vacant property in the commercial district, where she imagines opening some kind of store. The move from the city would be “totally counterintuitive,” she admits, because it would take her from the economic heart of the art world. But in other ways it makes sense to reside near the natural world that is her muse. “No more trying to fit a square peg into a round hole,” she says.

More at Dwell.com See more photos of Paula Hayes’s upstate New York art studio at dwell.com/earthly-delights

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renovation

TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY | @JEFFERSONSMITHPHOTOGRAPHY

Iain Aitch

Jefferson Smith

Little Engine A dormant industrial space in England is adapted into a cozy home.

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When designer Michael Corsar converted a late Victorian utility building in Suffolk into a home for his friend Sandy Suffield,

he kept the charming features, like the 1 7-foot ceilings (opposite, inset), while making the space habitable after years of neglect.

Deben Joinery built the kitchen cabinetry (opposite). The vintage Optima pendants are by Danish designer Hans Due.

For much of its 100-plus years, the double-height brick structure that became Sandy Suffield’s home in the English town of Bury St. Edmunds was a building without a purpose. It was constructed as an engine house in the early 1900s to provide electricity for an upper-class family, but the manor they lived in burned to the ground just a few years later. “I bought the property in 2014, exactly a hundred years after the fire,” says Sandy, a creative director who has worked internationally for Apple, Pentagram, and Time Out. “It was pretty much left alone.” Pretty much, yes, although old-timers speak of its having been used as a forge, and Sandy found its whitewashed brick walls covered with pencil calculations relating to what appears to have been a greengrocer business. It was this sense of history that made her fall in love with the raw space, along with its perfectly pitched roof,

“I think wrecks a re a lwa ys biza rrely a ttra ctive.” SAN DY SUFFIELD , RESID EN T

Although the original interior walls (inset) had to be removed to add insulation, Sandy had the new brickwork painted white to match. The kitchen/ dining area flows into a sunken lounge (top), with salvaged tile flooring giving way to concrete. The hangout features a vintage sofa that Sandy found on eBay and a Shaker woodstove by Antonio Citterio (right).

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renovation

The exterior masonry (inset) remains largely intact. Corsar, who works mostly on commercial projects through his firm MCVI, designed a new wing that forks off the existing structure at a right angle (below).

which allows for a cathedral ceiling crisscrossed with timber beams. Sandy saw potential and called on friend and designer Michael Corsar for a second opinion. “It was a beautifully made building with precise Victorian detailing,” Corsar recalls, citing the brick courses over the doors and window arches. “But I said, ‘You can’t keep it the way it is, you need to insulate it.’ The inner leaf was really rough.” After convincing her to add insulation, Corsar worked with Sandy to put in new interior brick walls in a “higgledy” layout that replicates the look of the original rough brickwork—sans grocers’ notes. But Corsar’s most drastic change was to more than double the amount of space, from about 555 square feet to about 1,250, by adding a sleeping loft and a new wing for a pair of guest rooms and bathrooms. Today, the original footprint contains the kitchen/dining area and a sunken lounge.

A simple staircase and a flush, push-toopen panel—Sandy calls it her “James Bond door”—knit together new and old. Sandy’s farflung tastes and eye for vintage furniture are reflected throughout. An inexpensive antique table is paired with Habitat chairs from her childhood home atop reclaimed Victorian tiling in the dining area. “I wanted to use old things as much as possible, both as an aesthetic choice and out of reluctance to contribute more stuff to a landfill,” she says. Bright prints and paintings by friends and family decorate the deliberately plain walls. “I’m such a magpie,” Sandy says. “The white walls are necessary, so I can see all I have collected.” Today, she is in awe of the gallery-like space she’s created within the formerly idle building. “The light, the brickwork— it’s all stupidly beautiful,” she says. “It was just exciting to breathe life back into it.”

ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

“We’ve rema ined fa ithful to the building —but it wa s helpful tha t it wa sn’t listed.” SAN DY SUFFIELD

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Sandy’s bedroom (above) is a dramatically updated version of the cramped attic that once occupied the structure (inset). The chair is vintage, the rug is from Morocco, and the ceramic sculpture on the sill of the

half-moon window is by Daniel Reynolds. A wire cage envelops the chimney for safety. In the bathroom (below), a Zyam tap by Aston Matthews is mounted on a Series 500 sink by Antonio Citterio for Pozzi-Ginori.

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The Engine House DESIGNER LOCATION

Michael Corsar Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, England

A Kitchen B Dining Area C Living Area

D Bathroom E Bedroom

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E

D

D

A

B

First Floor

C

E

Second Floor

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dispatch

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TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY | @BENJAMINRAS

Creede Fitch

Benjamin Rasmussen

dispatch

Cabin Achiever A tech professional heads to Hill Country and builds an off-the-grid vacation rental for $25,000.

Ryan McLaughlin watches the sunset from the deck of the 160-square-foot tiny home he built, with no prior experience, at his parents’ horse ranch in Georgetown,

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Texas (opposite). Soon, the trailer-mounted cabin will be moved to a vineyard, where it will operate grid-free and be available to rent for short stays. A fiberglass door covers

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a void in the wall that holds a solar-powered water heater, a propane tank, and wood for a fire bowl. A Hem table and Muuto rug center the living area (above).

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dispatch

3

1

2

1. SIDING

2. FLOORING

3. SOFA BED

4. DOOR

With prices starting in the low five figures, pretreated shou sugi ban siding was out of the question. “My girlfriend and I spent a week cutting, trimming, burning, scrubbing, and oiling the cedar ourselves,” says Ryan. The project cost a total of $550 in materials.

Interlocking rubber tiles from HiddenLock provide a watertight seal for the floor. Primarily used in garages, the tough, spill-friendly tiles cost about $3.15 per square foot.

In addition to having a queen bed upstairs, Ryan built a sofa that converts to a twin, based on a design by architect Sean O’Neill. The transformable unit cost $500 in upholstery, $35 in wood, and $4 in hinges.

The Premier folding door accounted for a third of the total budget, but Ryan felt it was worth the expense for its unobtrusive frame. “That was the cheapest, thinnest frame I could find—the most invisible door,” he says.

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4

In Texas, where everything is bigger, Ryan McLaughlin is placing his bets on something small. Specifically, a simple 160-square-foot cabin that he hopes city-dwellers will book for $149 a night to get away, find some focus, and reconnect with nature. Ryan, a Texas native, spent many years in Seattle as a digital product designer, but by 2017 he was looking to move beyond pushing pixels around a screen to something more three-dimensional. On weekends, he would escape to cottages in Washington’s evergreen forests, where the pace of life gave him time to think. He wanted to bring that meditative experience back to his home state. When a coworker introduced him to Seattle architect Sean O’Neill—who, like Ryan, is a fan of Scandinavian and Japanese design—he knew he had found the person to help him make his dream a reality. Of course, it wouldn’t be that easy. Almost immediately after Ryan and O’Neill connected, they were met by a cascading series of obstacles, starting with cost. To meet his budget of $25,000, Ryan, who had no background in construction, would have to build everything himself.

When the sofa is being used as a bed, blackout roller shades can be lowered to turn the living space into a proper sleeping area (below). Although the

kitchen is small, it comes equipped with a sink, a propane hot plate, a mini fridge/freezer, and other essentials, including (clockwise from top left) a Hario

ceramic coffee dripper; a space-efficient custom pegboard that holds Crow Canyon enamel mugs; hand towels from Ferm Living; and IKEA cooking utensils.

“I’ve always been a self-starter and wanted to do something with my hands.” Ryan McLaughlin, owner

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dispatch

N

Elsewhere Cabin A ARCHITECT

Sean O’Neill

Clockwise from top left: The bathroom’s plywood counter, which supports a vessel sink by Fine Fixtures, has a matte polyurethane finish; the flower pot is by Hay and the mirror is from Target. A simple rope pull functions as the handle to

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the cabin’s only internal door. A Milgard awning window provides ventilation. A Croma showerhead by Hansgrohe is mounted from a section of ceiling that was stained black; the U-shaped curtain track is an IKEA hack.

A B C D E F

Deck/Entrance Storage Living Area Kitchen Bathroom Sleeping Loft

B

A C

D

More at Dwell.com Find out how to book the Elsewhere cabin—and see more photos—online at dwell.com/cabin-achiever

F E

ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

The easiest way to do that, it turned out, would be to assemble the cabin at his parents’ horse ranch outside Austin and then transport it more than a hundred miles north to its intended final location, his brother’s vineyard in the Hill Country town of Mason. Making the structure mobile demanded that it be built on a trailer base. That trailer base then determined the footprint in which O’Neill would have to squeeze a living space, kitchenette, work nook, full bathroom, and sleeping area. To fit everything, the architect included a convertible sofa, a lofted bedroom, and a folding glass door to a deck that doubles the living area. And to compensate for Ryan’s lack of experience, he kept the design deliberately simple. Over an eight-month period, Ryan tackled everything from charring the cedar for the facade with a blowtorch to hammering together storage cubbies. To enable the home to function off the grid, he also installed solar panels for power, a composting toilet for waste, and a water tank for the shower and sinks. The result is a laidback, pitchedroof cabin in which every inch of space is thoughtfully allotted so that guests can spend the maximum amount of time outdoors. “Most tiny homes you see essentially replicate a normal house and downsize everything,” says Ryan. “We wanted to work our way from the inside out.”


dispatch

“When I first set foot in it, I said it was everything I hoped it would be and more.” Sean O’N eill, architect 4

1

3 2

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1. WOODWORK

2. GLASS WALL

3. LADDER

4. LIGHTING

Most of the interior, including the walls and storage, is made of Chilean pine plywood, which Ryan chose for its durability and lack of knots. Each sheet, purchased at Lowe’s, cost $20.

The frosted glass wall between the kitchen and the bathroom, which distributes light while protecting privacy, cost $160.

At $60, the sliding track hardware for the ladder to the loft cost twice as much as it cost to make the ladder itself.

Ryan fashioned the sconces for about $10 each. “The electrical was the most daunting task but also the most rewarding,” he says. “When you plug in a light and turn it on, it’s momentous.” His electrical work was later certified by a pro.

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dwellings

A SEAFARING ARCHITECT IN CHILE HAPPENS UPON AN UNINHABITED TIDAL ISLAND AND SETS ABOUT MAKING THE ULTIMATE RETREAT.

Architect Guillermo Acuña’s sprawling getaway lines the coast of Isla Lebe in the Chiloé Archipelago in Chile. He developed it in stages, first building a boathouse with a modest living space, then adding two cabins

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TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY | @EST U DIOPA L M A

KELLY VENCILL SANCHEZ

CRISTÓBAL PALMA

and later remodeling the boathouse. An avid sailor, he often sets out to explore the nearby fjords. The archipelago is midway between Santiago and Tierra del Fuego and comprises more than 30 islands and islets.

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FJORD EXPLORER

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dwellings

It was a dark and stormy night when architect Guillermo Acuña first glimpsed a narrow strip of land while looking for a place to dock his sailboat in Chile’s Chiloé Archipelago. When he got a closer look the next morning, he was intrigued by the changing landscape and its location on the Bay of Rilán, in the country’s southern region. Twice a day, with the rising of the tide, Lebe becomes an island, cut off from the Isla Grande de Chiloé of which it is part. Despite the region’s harsh weather— Charles Darwin described it as “detestable” in winter and “only a little better” in summer—Guillermo had a vision for a simple retreat on the water. The Santiago native has known Chiloé since the mid-1970s. Though the archipelago lies just off the mainland, it had long felt like a world of its own. “Now there are airports, ferries, and motorways,” he says. “It’s very well connected.” Later, while in architecture school at Chile’s Pontificia Universidad Católica, Guillermo got hands-on experience with timber construction when he rebuilt a home for his father on the island of Quihua, off Chiloé’s southern coast.

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The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse (opposite) was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “ the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo. Several years later, he installed an exterior staircase and divided the upper floor into two guest wings that accommodate up to six people apiece (top left and right). “ The idea was that children, friends, and visitors would have

space and independence,” he says. The first floor houses a kitchen/ dining area and family room (above and left). Guillermo worked with local professionals, such as builder and architect Magdalena Donoso and master carpenters Lalo and René Miranda, who crafted built-ins throughout. The ground floor is painted all in red—a nod to the native chilcos, or fuchsia.

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The fully glazed upper floors of the two cabins are designed to take in views of the archipelago, which was inhabited by nomadic tribes before Spanish explorers arrived in the 1 6th century. Guillermo first visited the area in the mid-1 970s. “It was

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very isolated then,” he says. “The Pan-American Highway reached only to the city of Valdivia. From there, a narrow dirt road covered the remaining 400 kilometers to the Chacao Channel, which separates Chiloé Island from the mainland.”


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“I arrived at Isla Lebe sailing, and I immediately recognized its splendid geographical location.” GUILLERMO ACUÑA, ARCHITECT AND RESID ENT

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“Chiloé ha s a tra dition of building a t the wa ter’s edge. I kept tha t tra dition, a universa l wa y of living in the fjords.” GUILLERMO ACUÑA

Guillermo used fast-growing, sustainable radiata pine for the cabins (opposite), both of which feature a living/dining area and kitchen on the upper level and three bedrooms on the ground floor. Some of

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the bedrooms seem to float on the water (above). The island has become a favorite gathering place for family and friends, who go from building to building via elevated pathways and boardwalks.

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After purchasing Lebe—all 12 acres of it—Guillermo began by building a barnlike boathouse in 2013 that featured a nearly 1,000-square-foot living space on the top floor. The project has since evolved to encompass several buildings, with Guillermo regularly making the nearly 700-mile trip to Chiloé from the Chilean capital, where he runs his architecture studio, Guillermo Acuña Arquitectos Asociados. Construction was overseen first by a friend, Chilote architect and builder Magdalena Donoso, and later by a pair of local master carpenters, the father-and-son team of Lalo and René Miranda. Guillermo followed the boathouse with a two-story, 650-square-foot cabin for himself and visiting family and friends, with communal spaces upstairs and three bedrooms and a bathroom downstairs. Next came an 800-square-foot, threebedroom cabin for Roberto Pons, who is now a partner on the island. Guillermo then remodeled the boathouse, adding an exterior staircase on one side and dividing the glass-walled upper 68

level into a pair of guest wings. No longer used for storing seacraft, the boathouse is where everyone gathers to cook, eat, lounge, and shoot pool. The entire space is painted bright red, echoing the vivid chilco flowers, or hummingbird fuchsia, that flourish in spring and summer. Pathways and elevated boardwalks connect the buildings, which sit at the water’s edge, their interiors minimally furnished and their all-windowed, high-ceilinged upper floors offering expansive views of the fjords. Guillermo has described the project as “a ship on land”—modest structures just comfortable enough for short stays yet designed to beckon visitors out to sea. Stylistically, they complement Chiloé’s tradition of wood architecture, seen in the 19th-century palafitos, or stilt houses, that populate the port town of Castro. Initially, Guillermo used native wood, but he now relies solely on laminated and certified radiata pine, a renewable, fastgrowing plantation species readily available in the region. “There are very few

forests left in Chile,” he explains. “To build with native wood is for me unsustainable and irresponsible.” The architect has dedicated himself to rehabilitating and preserving the natural resources of his tiny corner of Chiloé, whose ecosystem has been ravaged by Chile’s booming aquaculture industry and by the extraction of Sphagnum peat moss from its fragile wetlands, a critical source of fresh water. “The cultural poverty prevailing in the country means that it is going through an extremely delicate environmental moment,” Guillermo says. “One of the world’s most extensive archipelagos is hanging by a thread.” Today Guillermo divides his time between Santiago and Chiloé and spends the summer months on Lebe. Life there revolves around the weather. “From May to September, the days are very short, which promotes sleep and reading,” he says. “Between October and April the days are very long—sixteen hours of light—and we spend our time on the beach, with friends, and sailing.”

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Isla Lebe ARCHITECT

LOCATION

GAAA

ChiloĂŠ, Chile

Boathouse: Lower Level

B

A

Upper Level

C

C

D

D B

B E

E

Loft

F

F

Cabins: Lower Level G G E G C

Upper Level

A

A B C D

Guillermo, who left the landscaping mostly natural (opposite), is now planting trees to help offset deforestation in the region. Some bedrooms are just big enough for a mattress (top). The upper floor of one of the cabins features a woodburning stove, beanbag chairs, and a hanging paper lantern (above).

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Kitchen/Dining Area Living Area Entrance Kitchenette

B

E Bathroom F Sleeping Loft G Bedroom

More at Dwell.com Check out extra photos of this secluded island vacation home at dwell.com/fjord-explorer

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Relative

Everything

Is TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY | @JONATHANPILKINGTON

GEORGINA GUSTIN JONATHAN PILKINGTON

FOR a MODERN RENOVATION in PENNSYLVANIA, EVERYONE INVOLVED—CLIENTS, ARCHITECT, BUILDER, NEIGHBORS, EVEN the PREVIOUS OWNERS—IS PART of ONE EXTENDED FAMILY. 70

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Architect Erik Churchill of BLDGWORKS and his brother-inlaw, contractor Bill Henry of Field Modifications, teamed up to remodel a late ’70s home outside Philadelphia for Bill, his wife, Allegra, and their sons. The house is near family, including Erik and Allegra’s parents, Tasha Stonorov and Michael Churchill. “We knew it would be a

challenge,” says Allegra, “but the opportunity to be close to my parents in a place that could display Bill’s skills and Erik’s design made it irresistible.” Cedar planks wrap a new 900-squarefoot extension (opposite). Bill and the boys sit at a built-in oak-and-steel table. The sconce is from Restoration Hardware.

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“THERE WERE a LOT of COMPETING INTERESTS ABOUT HOW to HONOR the PAST WHILE LOOKING FORWARD to WHAT WAS to COME.” ERIK CHURCHILL, ARCHITECT 72

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Of the addition, which holds two bedrooms, a study, and a bathroom, Erik says, “ We wanted it to feel connected and integrated on the interior but read as a new, distinct volume on the exterior.” Floating against birch paneling, the main stair incorporates treads salvaged from old barn wood (opposite).

The kids play in a refurbished loft above the kitchen/dining area (left). Throughout, Erik and Bill repeated and “ wrapped” materials, like the birch plywood near the front entrance, which extends from the bench to the coat rack (below right). The original structure (below left) was built by relatives in 1 979.

More at Dwell.com Go online to see more photos of this family-friendly makeover at dwell.com/everything-is-relative

Pickering Road runs through a quiet valley outside Philadelphia, winding past fields hemmed by rock walls, barns topped with weather vanes, and stoic stone houses. It’s about as idyllic a country road as you can imagine, and for the StonorovChurchill family, it’s a conduit that threads its way through history and memory. “My parents live a hundred feet down the hill, one aunt lives that way, and another

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lives that way,” says Erik Churchill, indicating points along a stretch of the thoroughfare in the town of Phoenixville. “The road has always been the connection.” Erik, founder of the New York architecture firm BLDGWORKS, grew up with his sisters, Daphne and Allegra, in a farmhouse on the road. Later Allegra and her husband, Bill Henry, relocated to Virginia. But a few years ago, after having two children, they

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Black granite from Atlantis Tile & Marble frames the island in the vaulted kitchen, which Allegra and Bill envisioned as an open volume. “We were inspired by memories of the space—full of life and entertainment, warmth and familiarity,” says Allegra. Adds Erik, “We wanted to build on that legacy by preserving the great

entertaining spaces and using familiar materials in contemporary ways.” IKEA cabinets and a Whirlpool fridge are wrapped in pieces of birch plywood individually cut by cabinetmaker Joe Corsi with a CNC machine and glued into sections. The sconces are from Restoration Hardware and the pendants are from Schoolhouse.

The MOST IMPORTANT QUALITY ALLEGRA and BILL SOUGHT WAS a SENSE of a SHARED ENVIRONMENT, WHERE THEY COULD COMMUNICATE WITH EACH OTHER and THEIR KIDS from ROOM to ROOM. DWELL

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ARCHITECT

LOCATION

BLDGWORKS

Phoenixville, Pennsylvania

A B C D

Entrance Kitchen Living/Dining Area Mudroom

E F G H

Master Bathroom Master Closet Master Bedroom Family Room

I J K L

M Bathroom Laundry Room N Bedroom Powder Room O Storage Loft Study/Playroom

D

E

G

F

B I

J

H

C A First Floor

L

M

N N

K O

Second Floor

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decided to move back home, closer to the support of family. Allegra’s parents, Tasha Stonorov and Michael Churchill, were eager to have them nearby. So when one of their many local relatives offered to sell their quirky, customdesigned 1979 house at the edge of Pickering Road, Tasha and Michael scooped it up, intending to bring it back to life as a home for Allegra, Bill, and their growing family. Tasha and Michael were up for the challenge. Each is a child of a noted modern architect—Oskar Stonorov and Henry Churchill, respectively—and both grew up around blueprints and big concepts. Architecture skipped a generation, however, landing in Erik, who became the obvious choice to design the extensive renovation. Bill, a general contractor, was the natural pick to execute Erik’s ideas.   The original 3,200-square-foot, threebedroom house was an unusual structure, shaped in a half circle with the curved side tucked against a hill and the straight side facing the valley. It had been rented for a decade and was somewhat neglected, its

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ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

N

Stonorov-Churchill


The interior is painted SherwinWilliams Extra White. Jorgen Hovelskov’s Harp Chair sits in a guestroom (opposite, left). “The bedroom count stayed at three, but we added a new studio/playroom

interior a collection of dated, awkward spaces, some crawling with mold. But it was also home to a lot of memories. The extended Stonorov-Churchill clan had gathered there over the years and recalled the residence in happy times. “There were a lot of competing interests about how to honor the past while looking forward to what was to come,” Erik says. His primary goal was to expand the existing space, keeping the appealing elements of the original design, such as the heavy timber trusses and the sweeping main room designed for socializing. To make the house more livable for a growing family and guests, he devised a 900-square-foot, second-story addition. Erik wanted to avoid a building-block aesthetic, where the new volume might appear tacked on as an afterthought. By wrapping the exterior in cedar and using windows edged with mirroring angular frames, he fused the shapes together almost organically. “Cedar weathers—it’s not inert, it changes,” he says. “We tried to create movement with the window

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and converted one of the original bedrooms into a family room,” says Erik. Light streams into the upper floor of the addition (opposite, right), where exposed wood and steel trusses complement the

frames, so they have visual interest.” Inside, the team faced a similar puzzle: finding ways to merge old and new. They devised several solutions, including building a new stairwell to the addition, clad in birch plywood tiles, and opening up and connecting two “Hobbit rooms,” as Allegra called them, over the main living space. Using the same materials from one space to the next also created a sense of continuity. Handmade ceramic tiles line the kitchen and wrap into the living area. Porcelain tiles extend from the bathroom through the master bedroom suite. Contiguous birch plywood strips wrap an entry bench, cabinets, and the built-in dining nook. “Whenever we used a material on one plane, we used it on another,” Erik says. “The material usage and details were very precise and bespoke, and it’s a testament to the craftsmanship that it worked.” Marks of that craftsmanship are all around—in a flight of stairs made with double-tapered, reclaimed barn timbers and in bathroom counters refashioned by Bill from wood salvaged from the original

existing timber structure. The patio features Diamond chairs by Harry Bertoia (left). Radiant-heated porcelain tile floors warm the master bedroom on cold days (below). The bed and pillows are from IKEA.

kitchen. And there are uniquely personal elements, too:a bar of reclaimed wood that Erik crafted for the couple;a chandelier configured by Oskar Stonorov from a 1950s design for Venini by his famous Italian colleague Carlo Scarpa. The most important quality Allegra and Bill sought was a sense of a shared environment, where they could communicate with each other and their kids from room to room. “I can hear perfectly from here,” says Allegra, standing in the kitchen, looking up at a loft where her boys like to play. “We basically wanted to be in one big space.” Ultimately, the house tells a story of continuity—of materials and space as well as generations. Shortly after moving in, the couple hosted a big dinner, the first of many. “We’re trying to rival Mom’s,” Allegra jokes. “We had twenty people at the table, twelve kids running around. Everyone could sleep here.” For Erik that was the mark of success. “We wanted it to be a family house again,” he says. “Having this as one of the family spaces on this road is really special.” 77


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The use of rammed earth ties the home of a New Zealand vintner to the terroir. TEXT BY

PHOTOS BY | @M ATTHIEUSA LVA ING

Sam Eichblatt

Matthieu Salvaing

Ground Rules 78

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Set in a valley in Wanaka, New Zealand, the home of winemaker Nigel Greening was conceived as a series of “tubes” that disappear at one end into the sloped landscape. Architect Andrew Simpson

of WireDog Architecture worked with Dunlop Builders to create the 3,390-square-foot house, which features rammed-earth walls both inside and out, a reflection of the owner’s connection to the soil.

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The kitchen features a mix of rammed-earth walls, strandboardand-bamboo cabinets, and stainless steel counters. The appliances are by Fisher & Paykel, the faucet is by Plumbline, and the pendants are by Bruck. Simpson created niches for displaying

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objects, such as a cow skull (opposite, top) found on the property. Nigel, an accomplished furniture maker, built the oak-and-yew dining table (opposite, bottom). Reclaimed rimu wood was used for ceilings and floors. The sliding glass doors are by Thermadura.


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Embedded in the side of a valley in New Zealand’s Southern Alps, facing out over pristine Lake Wanaka, stands a new home meant to look as though it is part of the land around it. “It resembles the large schist rocks you see all over this region that are half-buried in the hillside and poke out at strange angles,” says Andrew Simpson of WireDog Architecture, the Wellington-based firm that designed it. Simpson’s client was Nigel Greening, a British-born former advertising creative director and musician who is now the proprietor of a local winery, Felton Road. Nigel, his wife, Kharis, and their two school-age children still live part of the time in England, but with plans to spend more of the year on New Zealand’s South Island, their brief for WireDog called for all the amenities of a primary residence— plus an extensive wine cellar.

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As Nigel and Simpson grappled with how to respectfully develop the enviable site, they kept returning to the idea of a rammed earth structure with an outer cladding of cedar and zinc-coated aluminum. “Rammed earth really fit with Nigel’s occupation as a winemaker and his connection to the soil,” says Simpson. “And in this cold, dry climate, it worked very well practically as the structural basis for the house.” The building technique is ancient and involves compacting successive layers of earth in wood frames. Since the 1970s, it has undergone a renaissance as a costand energy-efficient construction alternative. Like rock or brick, rammed earth forms a large thermal mass that balances extremes of temperature, absorbing and slowly releasing heat indoors during the winter and, especially when coupled

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“The interior is driven by these tubular forms looking down the valley and framing that view. It’s not a panorama—it’s something much more controlled.” AND REW SIMPSON, ARCHITECT

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Cutouts in the home’s volumes increase the number of viewing angles. A staircase lined with earthen walls (opposite) leads from the entrance to the lower-level living areas and courtyard. “ Rammed earth has a

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beautiful texture,” says Simpson. “ If you get oblique light across it, tiny shadows form. It’s quite stunning.” The handrail was designed by Nigel and made by English blacksmith Spencer Larcombe; the pendants are by Bruck.

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N

Kanuka Valley LOCATION

WireDog Architecture

Wanaka, New Zealand

Entrance Bathroom Bedroom Courtyard

E F G H

Deck Music Room Study Wine Cellar

I J K L

Pantry Kitchen Dining Area Living Area

M N O P

Dressing Area Laundry Master Bedroom Master Bathroom

F

G

C

D

A

E B

E

C

H L

K

P E

Lower Level

84

I

J

a divider wall are filled with vintage umbrellas Nigel picked up at a local secondhand shop (above). One of the home’s many sliding cedar shutters opens to reveal a spectacular vista (opposite, top). When closed, the screens blend in with the cedar siding (opposite, below).

M O N Upper Level

B

with roof overhangs, keeping interiors cool in the summer. As an added benefit, the material can have a pleasingly stratified texture left by the molds, similar to sedimentary rock formations. Simpson conceived the structure as a series of squared-off tubes, each containing a specific function. One end of each volume is partly submerged in the terrain, while the other is cantilevered over the slope with triple-glazed windows providing views of the kanuka trees tumbling down the hillside to the edge of Lake Wanaka, with the snow-capped mountains circling in the distance. The front door is at the highest point of the house. An inconspicuous entryway contains a narrow stairwell that turns at an acute angle between tall earthen walls. Only the children’s rooms, some storage, and a bathroom are located on the top level. “There’s no grand entrance or big reveal when you enter—it’s more like descending into an ancient tomb,” says Simpson.

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ILLUSTRATION: LOHNES + WRIGHT

ARCHITECT

A B C D

The master bathroom has a floor-to-ceiling windowed corner that holds a Belle freestanding tub by Progetto and in-wall fixtures by Copper Bath (far left). A vessel sink, also by Copper Bath, rests on the custom cedar-andstrandboard vanity (near left). Openings in


Down on the main floor there’s a study, a music room, and, at a slightly lower level, a kitchen/dining area and living room, which flows into a deck with cutaways in its walls to frame the view. The slanted ceiling in the dining area stops short of one wall, which travels up to a skylight, like a gap between two boulders that lets the light through. “I was thinking of a natural rock formation, like a canyon, where there are high walls around you that hide everything but the sky,” says Simpson. Down another short set of stairs, at the lowest point of the house, sits the master suite. The entire house wraps around a multilevel stone-chip courtyard, creating sightlines and connections between the seemingly disparate volumes. Nigel was heavily involved in the interior design and built all the home’s tables and beds himself. For the floors and ceilings, he chose reclaimed native rimu wood from a demolition that took place following the 2011 earthquake in

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Christchurch. “The imperfection of the timber really adds to the character of the interior spaces, because it has this incredibly rich luster to it,” says Simpson. The rimu is complemented by the cabinetry’s inexpensive combination of bamboo and strandboard, which has a grainy texture reminiscent of flattened wood chips. Though a few walls are plastered, there are no painted surfaces in the house, and the family has decided not to hang any of their art. Instead, the unadorned natural textures of reclaimed wood and rammed earth give the space a primitive quality, which Simpson accentuated by carving niches at varying heights to hold bric-abrac that Nigel collects from charity stores and junk shops. “While there are generous parts of the house, like the very large wine cellar, you never feel like you’re drowning in space,” says Simpson. “It’s large, but not massive. Instead, we aimed to create intimacy and poetry in every space.”

More at Dwell.com See more photos of this rammed-earth New Zealand retreat at dwell.com/ground-rules

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T E TE X A S

SWAPPING SUBURB FOR CITY, A PAIR OF EMPTY-NESTERS START A NEW LIFE IN AUSTIN WITH THE HELP OF A HOMESTAY UNIT.

R E A R

TEXT BY

HELEN THOMPSON PHOTOS BY | @CASEYCDU N N

CASEY DUNN

R A N G E R S

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As their younger son prepared to leave for college, Dana Baruch and Mike Krell tapped architecture firm Alterstudio to create a smaller, more efficient home for their next chapter, which they planned to spend in Austin’s Bouldin neighborhood. What they

got was a quiet urban oasis and a second floor that pulls triple duty as a guest suite, a home base for their kids when they visit, and a rental unit. Westshop Design was in charge of landscaping; Green Places oversaw the build.


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“NEITHER ONE OF US GREW UP IN A MODERN HOUSE, BUT WHAT APPEALED TO US WAS THE OPENNESS AND AIRINESS.” D AN A BARUCH, RESID EN T 88

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The geometrically disciplined facade is composed of blonde cypress, white stucco, and cedar that was charred black by Delta Millworks (opposite). A fence made of concrete masonry units and wood provides Mike and Dana with a secluded outdoor space that they can access from their bedroom

An idea popped into Dana Baruch’s head one sleepless night in 2012, upending the plans she and her husband, Mike Krell, had laid for their new house. At the time, the two were partway through designing a 2,300-square-foot, three-bedroom residence in the Bouldin area of Austin. But as Dana lay awake, she thought about their home-to-be and suddenly envisioned something more, a multitasking second level that could adapt to at least three configurations—guest suite, rental unit, and home base for their two sons, who were nearing adulthood— if Kevin Alter, Tim Whitehill, and Ernesto Cragnolino of Alterstudio Architecture could figure out how. Up to that point, Mike and Dana had been methodically ticking off items on their downsizing checklist. It was time, they had determined, to move out of their energy-guzzling 3,500-square-foot house

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(left). That fluidity extends to their bathroom, which features an indoor/outdoor shower (below). The Wetstyle sink is outfitted with a Blu Bathworks faucet. Facing another courtyard, an office nook features a Caesarstone countertop and walnut built-ins by Austin Wood Work (below left).

in the suburbs, where a car was needed to go almost anywhere. With one son nearly finished with college and the other soon to enroll, they no longer needed as much space as they did before. As Mike puts it, “We wanted to ‘right-size’ our life and reduce our carbon footprint.” Dana, a life coach and educator, and Mike, a tech industry analyst and consultant, had also carefully calculated what they could afford:$220 per square foot. The couple had discovered an L-shaped lot in a 1930s neighborhood within walking distance of downtown. Scouring the internet for architects, they’d come across Alterstudio and felt a connection with its warmly modern residential work. “Neither one of us grew up in a modern house,” says Dana, “but what appealed to us was the openness and airiness.” The three partners were intrigued by the couple’s determination to start over.

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