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Artichoke — Australia’s interiors and design magazine

Feasting on the 2017 Eat Drink Design Awards

Issue 61 Aus $14.95

The Design Institute of Australia’s official magazine


WAKING THE WORLD UP SINCE 1917


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Contents

(79) Regulars Comment — Sharing our community’s voice (12)

Scope — In Brief (15, 101) Artichoke Night School (106)

Profile — Studio Truly Truly (79) Industrial designers Joel and Kate Booy

Exhibition — Marion Hall Best: Interiors (94) An exhibition charting the work of one of Australia’s most influential interior designers 8—9


In This Issue

(26) (116) 2017 Eat Drink Design Awards From the jury (24) Best Bar Design (26) The Dolphin Hotel by George Livissianis Highly Commended (30) Best Restaurant Design (32) Viet Next Door by Genesin Studio Highly Commended (36)

Best Installation Design (58) Noma Australia by Foolscap Studio Highly Commended (62) Hall of Fame (64) Fratelli Paradiso by the late Mike Murphy with later additions by Mike Hanna and Don Cameron Shortlist (70)

Best Cafe Design (40) Morris and Heath by Ritz&Ghougassian Highly Commended (44) Best Retail Design (46) Campos Barangaroo by Woods Bagot Highly Commended (50) Best Identity Design (52) Jackalope Hotel by Fabio Ongarato Design Highly Commended (56)

Artichoke

Projects — Four Points by Sheraton (84) DKO Architecture Nubo (108) PAL Design Group Frenches Interior (116) Sibling Architecture Issue 61


Welcome

Issue 61 December 2017 — February 2018

Many of the world’s greatest interiors are hidden inside buildings that are difficult or impossible for the general public to enter. But the great thing about bars, restaurants and cafes is that anyone can pull up a chair and start a conversation about what they see around them. When the public can engage with, reflect on and scrutinize a space, it connects them with that interior and, on a grander scale, with the power of design. Over the past decade in Australia and New Zealand, diners have become accustomed to a high level of design and have become more and more discerning – even dogmatic – about what they expect from the spaces they eat and drink in. As we’ve seen in this year’s Eat Drink Design Awards entries (pages 22–77), designers are responding by creating more detailed and thoughtful interiors. As my fellow jurors and I noted in reviewing this year’s entries, we saw few hospitality interiors with a “big idea” or theme and instead saw many projects where attention to detail and materiality reigned. It seems that as diners’ tastes have matured, so have the spaces they frequent, and it’s exciting to imagine how hospitality spaces will evolve in the future. Also this issue we check in at Four Points by Sheraton at Docklands designed by DKO Architecture (page 84), play around at Nubo by PAL Design Group (108), learn from a shining example of accessible design with Frenches Interior by Sibling Architecture (page 116) and meet Studio Truly Truly (page 79), the former Brisbane couple making a name for themselves in the Netherlands.

Editor — Cassie Hansen MDIA Editorial enquiries — Cassie Hansen +61 3 8699 1000 artichoke@archmedia.com.au Editorial director — Cameron Bruhn FDIA Editorial team — Josh Harris, Melinda Knight, Mary Mann, Ricky Ricardo Production — Simone Wall Design — Metrik, studiometrik.com Managing director — Ian Close FDIA (Hon) Publisher — Sue Harris MDIA Associate publisher — Jacinta Reedy FDIA (Hon) Sales manager — Eva Dixon Account managers — Lana Golubinsky, Victoria Hawthorne, Brunetta Stocco, Bianca Weir Advertising enquiries — All states: advertising@ archmedia.com.au +61 3 8699 1000 WA only: OKeeffe Media WA Licia Salomone +61 412 080 600

Distribution — Australia: Gordon & Gotch Australia (bookshops) International: Eight Point Distribution Subscriptions — Four issues per year. Print: $55 Australia/ New Zealand (AUD). $78 Overseas (AUD). Digital: $35 (AUD).

Cassie Hansen, Editor, Artichoke Share your thoughts — email me at artichoke@archmedia.com.au

Follow us on Twitter — @Artichoke_Mag Cover image — The Dolphin Hotel by George Livissianis, winner of Best Bar Design in the 2017 Eat Drink Design Awards. Photography: Tom Ferguson

Follow us on Instagram — @Artichoke_Magazine

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National office: Level 1, 175 Collins Street, Melbourne Vic 3000 GPO Box 355, Melbourne Vic 3001 1300 888 056 admin@design.org.au design.org.au The DIA is the only multidisciplinary professional organization of designers in Australia with affiliations to major international design organizations. Statements and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the DIA. All material is copyright. No responsibility is accepted by the publishers or the DIA for the accuracy of the information contained in the text, illustrations or advertisements. Artichoke® is published and owned by Architecture Media Pty Ltd ACN 008 626 686. Level 6, 163 Eastern Road, South Melbourne Vic 3205 +61 3 8699 1000 publisher@archmedia.com.au architecturemedia.com Member Circulations Audit Board ISSN 1442-0953

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Endorsed as the official magazine of the Design Institute of Australia.


Comment

Sharing our community’s voice

Despite an unpredictable and disruptive social, political and economic climate, the Australian design community still shares a common language and a common goal. Words — Claire Beale (FDIA), National President, Design Institute of Australia

The advantage of being part of a community is that you are never alone … the disadvantage of being part of a community is that you are never alone! Seems a simple and obvious point to make, but as I begin my time as national president of the Design Institute of Australia, I am deeply aware of the community of professional designers that surrounds, supports and challenges me in my daily practice. That community is now celebrating its seventieth year – tracing its heritage to the founding of the Society of Designers for Industry around 1947, and incorporating a number of smaller discipline-based associations over the years (Australian Textile Design Association, Society of Interior Designers and others), to finally become the unique multidisciplinary organization that we see today. What made each of these associations and societies decide to become part of the DIA? While a quick survey of the various minutes, reports and memoranda in the archives could proffer many reasons, I believe the common motivating factor is the desire to be united in shared purpose

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and vision – to be part of “the voice of professional design in Australia.” Perhaps now is an appropriate time in our history to raise the question: a voice for whom, exactly? The design community in Australia is diverse, much more so than when the founders of the DIA envisaged an organization to advocate for and represent their interests. Our membership comprises professional designers, emerging designers and others who value design services and engage with designers in their day-to-day business. DIA members have gained their qualifications and expertise via a combination of formal study and practical experience in the workplace, building their professional portfolios through practice in a global environment. Design disciplines are shifting, changing and continuously evolving in response to the “new normal” – an unpredictable and disruptive social, political and economic climate. Put all this together and you may assume that the result is a cacophony of voices with no clear consensus, or worse, a watered-down, compromised message with a weakened voice. But – and this is no small “but” – amidst all this noise, the Australian design community still shares a common language enabling us to reach a clear point of congruity. Designers are good at adapting to change. The very nature of what we do requires us to anticipate and interpret shifts in behaviours and values, and develop products, services and systems that deliver what society needs – rather than what it wants. We understand that the way we work is complex, that a broader public awareness of concepts such as design thinking, collaboration, co-creation, user-centred design and experience design brings a new richness to the relationship between designer and client. Recently at one of our DIAlogue AM events, I was reminded anew of the importance of developing authentic relationships.

The narratives of each of the speakers emphasized the need for us to not only remain true to our own story, but also to ensure that our client’s stories are embraced and responded to with empathy and creativity. For a nation that is starting to realize that the work of the future will be reliant on such intangible, “soft skills” as creativity, empathy, innovation, communication, teamwork and so on, it seems to me that designers are perfectly placed to lead this shift. “Quelle surprise,” I hear you say. The core pillars of the DIA1 provide us with a framework to develop programs to help our members succeed in business, enjoy their working lives and grow Australia’s reputation as a design nation. Fundamentally, this focus and purpose is to contribute to, connect with, support and engage the professional design community, to the lasting benefit of all. But what about the wider audience? Designers are good at speaking with and to each other, but what about when we encounter those who don’t speak the language of intellectual privilege and belonging? We are part of a broader community, and in order to remain relevant to that community we need to ensure that we make a meaningful contribution. How often have you engaged in a conversation about design with someone not of the sector? That was not about providing an estimate, developing a brief or seeking payment? And if you did so, what did you discover, about yourself, about the broader perception of design? It’s time for the DIA to draw from our legacy of seventy years as the voice of the design profession, and begin to listen. Let new voices become part of ours. After all, being part of a community means you are never alone. a 1.

Design Institute of Australia ‘6 Pillars’

design.org.au/about-us/purpose (accessed 6 August 2017)


TAO Collection parisi.com.au


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In Brief

In Brief The latest projects, products and people collated to inspire.

The Night Market by Alexi Robinson and Adam Goodrum

The Ro chair, designed by Jaime Hayon for Fritz Hansen, has been given a new look with the introduction of the Ro two-seater sofa. Showcasing the curvy characteristics and playful, colourful expression characteristic of Jaime Hayon’s design, the Ro two-seater is suitable for a hallway, living room or any other setting that is in need of a small “shelter.” The sofa comes fully upholstered in a selection of unique colours and a wide range of fabrics.

The third instalment of Hong Kong’s The Night Market restaurant, by Australian designers Alexi Robinson and Adam Goodrum, has opened in Tai Koo Shing Shopping Mall. Created in just four months, the contemporary Taiwanese restaurant was conceived and developed remotely across multiple cities. The design takes visual elements from the street market and more abstract ones around finding value in the broken or discarded. The concept carefully translates an authentic narrative into a removed context and for a new audience.

Cult — cultdesign.com.au

Photography — Andrew Loiterton

Ro two-seater sofa by Fritz Hansen

Alexi Robinson — alexirobinson.com Adam Goodrum — adamgoodrum.com

The Bonnie and Neil × Byzantine Design collection Independent textile design studio Bonnie and Neil has launched its new vinyl rugs and porcelain tile collection, a collaboration with Byzantine Design. Celebrating colour and pattern, The Bonnie and Neil × Byzantine Design collection includes five distinct designs – 70s, Cuba, Aegean, Deco and Coastal. Ranging from simple patterns and repetition in the 70s design, to the more intricate patterns inspired by Art Deco, the tiles and vinyl rugs are available in a range of colourways. Bonnie and Neil — bonnieandneil.com.au

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Scope

Dormitorium by Studiobird Dormitorium, displayed at McClelland Gallery and Sculpture Park in Langwarrin, Victoria, is the latest interactive sculptural project by Melbourne-based architect Matthew Bird of Studiobird. Based on research into the changing traditions of bedchamber aesthetics and the potential these spaces have to profoundly affect the way people rest and rejuvenate, Dormitorium is presented as a communal sleep chamber and exploratory environment. It encourages audiences to engage with “a complexity of sensory propositions,” from textures and materials to the immersive effects of moving light and sound technologies. Photography — Peter Bennetts Studio Bird — studiobird.com.au

Au79 by Mim Design A former auto repair garage in Abbotsford, Melbourne, has been transformed by Mim Design into Au79, a contemporary hospitality space in the guise of a sprawling indoor botanical garden. Taking its name from the periodic symbol for gold, Au79 references the element throughout. It encompasses a cafe, bakery, patisserie and coffee roaster, as well as a variety of small and large event spaces. Photography — Peter Clarke Mim Design — mimdesign.com.au

Tommy Ruff by Studio Equator Studio Equator has designed a new Tommy Ruff – a fish bar with a focus on premium seafood – on Chapel Street, Windsor. The coastal-themed space sees a pastel colour palette and oak furnishings adorned with Tommy Ruff’s signature graffiti. Tommy Ruff features a “hipster captain” mural; branded beers showing krakens, mermaids and pirates; and custom fishing rod lighting features. Photography — Hayley Benoit Studio Euator — studioequator.com.au

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In Brief

Halo collection by Something Beginning With The Halo collection, designed by Australian design studio Something Beginning With, employs a clean-cut design and carries a visual lightness that makes it suitable for a range of applications. Taking the arc form as its focal point, the collection is crafted from a combination of solid American oak and circular steel tube. It comprises a chair, high stool, lounge chair and three-seater sofa, complemented by a side table and coffee table. Something Beginning With — somethingbeginningwith.com

Gio Evolution basins by Hidra Gio Evolution basins by Hidra combine softly contoured bowls with stylishly thin rims. The Gio Evolution collection comprises four geometric inset basin sizes, with and without internal built-in tap holders. Available in both square and rectangular forms, the basins’ thinly-cut, modern linear rims contribute to a stylishly designed collection that incorporates advanced technical and manufacturing technology. Parisi — parisi.com.au

Headlight Floor Lamp by Ligne Roset Designed by Lara Grand, the Ligne Roset Headlight Floor Lamp is a flexible light source that is easily manipulated. Its directional circular diffuser allows for control of light direction, while the lamp’s base allows for the light source to be angled around a single axis. Crafted from epoxy-lacquered metal, the Headlight Floor Lamp accompanies the Headlight Table Lamp. Domo — domo.com.au

Creative Spaces: Guild by Archier Designed by Archier, Creative Spaces: Guild is a new co-working space in Melbourne’s arts precinct. A collaboration between Creative Spaces and the Victorian government, it is designed to bring affordable and flexible working space to small businesses. Also part of the project is the new Cafe Godot and outdoor exhibition area, Assembly Point. Creative Spaces: Guild has transformed vacant retail space into something that is vibrant and friendly. Photography — Ben Hosking Archier — archier.com.au

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Scope

iTOPKer porcelain slabs by Inalco Mainly conceived for use as countertops, iTopker porcelain slabs encompass all of Inalco’s innovations and technological developments. With a thickness of 12 mm and a large 1500 mm x 3000 mm format, the slabs offer a variety of design applications. The extra-large size removes the need for tile joints, making the slabs ideal for ambitious, complex projects. iTOPKer solutions countertops come in a choice of colours and finishes, enabling elegant, clean, trend-setting design suitable for indoors or outdoors. G-Lux Enterprises — g-lux.com.au

Intergrain Timber Vision Awards announced The Intergrain Timber Vision Awards celebrate projects that showcase creative and visionary use of timber in five categories. The 2017 winners were announced on 21 September in Melbourne. The winners were: North Bondi Amenities by Sam Crawford Architects with Lymesmith (Commercial Exterior); City of Perth Library by Kerry Hill Architects (Commercial Interior, pictured); Amado House by Make Architecture (Residential Exterior); Little Sister’s House by Candelapas Associates (Residential Interior); Kopupaka Reserve by Isthmus Group (Landscape); and East Sydney Learning Centre by Andrew Burges (Travel Bursary Award). Category winners receive Intergrain product and $2,000, and the Travel Bursary Award winner receives $15,000. Photography — Nicholas Putrasia Intergrain — intergrain.com.au/timber-vision-awards

Goodstart Early Learning by Gray Puksand Working within difficult parameters, Gray Puksand has designed a 207-place childcare centre for Goodstart Early Learning in Adelaide Street, Brisbane. Presented with challenges including a heritage-listed facade, existing ground-floor tenancy and a lack of outdoor space, Gray Puksand responded by making the most of an existing atrium skylight area. Each learning environment opens onto an internal playground space lit by the skylight. Innovative indoor and rooftop gardens by landscape architecture firm Green Edge and natural timber and stone bring life and warmth to the space. Photography — Christopher Frederick Jones Gray Puksand — graypuksand.com.au

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Australian D e signe d & M anufac tur e d Archite c tural Lighting For over 60 years, Masson For Light have manufactured quality lighting in Melbourne, Australia. Specialising in architectural lighting for commercial, retail, hospitality, residential and public spaces.

96mm Comet Wall Light 96mm Spun Aluminium Body

70mm Apollo Pendant 70mm Round Extruded Aluminium Body

Project: Mister & Miss by Maria Danos, Mont Albert, VIC

massonforlight.com.au


Industry Insights — Taubmans —

A delicious design In Melbourne’s Glen Waverley, Studio Esteta has used rich, vibrant colours to give this cafe and restaurant a memorable and fresh interior.

Design practice — Studio Esteta Interior paint finishes — Taubmans Pure Performance ‘Rose Nude’ used on general walls, ceilings and doors. Taubmans Pure Performance ‘Garnet’ used on maitre d’ station, waiter’s station, cake stand joinery and amenities areas Photography — Tessa Ross-Phelan

Melbourne’s hospitality offerings just keep getting better and better, and it’s no surprise from the world’s most liveable city for the seventh year in a row. While its chefs are world-class and the food is some of the finest in Australia, the one thing truly distinguishing most of the Victorian capital’s newly opened restaurants and cafes is a high-quality dining experience. Service is important, as is an inviting interior and savvy restaurateurs have been quick to realise the value good design adds to their business. Consequently, many are working with some of the country’s best designers and architects to deliver fitouts nothing short of memorable. This includes Joe La and brothers Nolan and Brian Taing, who recently opened Workshop Brothers in Glen Waverley. The co-owners already operate three other locations and for their fourth, they engaged Melbourne-based Studio Esteta to refurbish the space. Their brief to Studio Esteta’s directors Sarah Cosentino and Felicity Slattery called for a fitout that both complements the contemporary Asian menu and can seamlessly transition from day to night service. Studio Esteta’s ensuing interior design is elegant and refined yet welcoming, ultimately drawing inspiration from the clients’ Chinese heritage. “We wanted to celebrate themes of family and tradition

and the uniting role of food,” Cosentino says. “As well as challenge the concept of a stereotypical Chinese restaurant.” Eschewing all unnecessary embellishment, Cosentino uses the circle – significantly a symbol of perfection and wholeness in Chinese culture – as a recurring motif. It’s applied to particularly great effect in the fitout’s series of limed ply openings. These divide the narrow 135-square-metre space into dining, bar and back-of-house areas, allowing the design to incrementally reveal itself as diners walk through the restaurant. The circle is also repeated in the refurbishment’s exquisite detailing, where it features as a mirror near the waiter’s station and in the bathroom, as well as in half-moon formations within the legs of the large communal table and bar tables. A key part of the design concept for Workshop Brothers involved playful reinterpretations of retro Chinese eatery cliches. Furnishings and finishes once thought of as undesirable, including vinyl upholstered chairs, chunky marble countertops and high-gloss surfaces, are given a new lease of life. However, the most striking refresh is the colour palette, where the ubiquitous red-and-gold is re-imagined with sophisticated shades of plum and pink, offset by brass accents.


Opposite page — The fitout’s vibrant colours were inspired by the clients’ Chinese heritage. Left — Taubmans Pure Performance ‘Rose Nude’ was used on the walls, ceiling and doors. Below — Taubmans Pure Performance ‘Garnet’ was used on the waiter’s station.

In choosing Rose Nude for the walls, ceiling and doors, and Garnet for the maître d’ and waiter’s stations, joinery details and bathroom, Studio Esteta couldn’t go past Taubmans. “We’ve used their Pure Performance in the past and always found the colour selection to be vibrant, varied and on-trend,” Cosentino notes. The product is also both versatile and hardwearing, with Rose Nude being mixed through the dining walls’ custom textured wall treatment, lending the scheme definitive expression. Certainly, the same outcome couldn’t have been achieved with a lesser-quality paint. Another advantage of using Taubmans is the provision of A4 Colour Brushouts to designers and architects. As Cosentino explains, “In commercial projects, where there are often time constraints, it’s not always easy to coordinate with builder, painter and client to make important colour decisions on site. So these hand-painted samples allowed me to refine the overall palette with everyone prior to construction.” It made the decision-making process run all the more smoothly and this is undeniably reflected in the interior’s stylish aesthetic and timeless appeal.

For more information on coatings or project services: taubmans.com.au/colourcentre


2017 Eat Drink Design Awards In this issue we celebrate the winning, highly commended and shortlisted projects in the 2017 Eat Drink Design Awards – an impressive collection of Australia and New Zealand’s best designed bars, restaurants, cafes, retail spaces for food and drink, installations, and visual identities for all. Visit eat-drink-design.com for more.

Organizers

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Principal Partner


Supporting Partners

Major Partners

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Eat Drink Design Awards

From the jury Despite swathes of “millennial pink” (look it up if you need to!), hanging plants and other moves of the moment seen in this year’s Eat Drink Design Awards entries, the jury found that there were perhaps fewer elements in common across the interiors, venues and identity projects judged in 2017. What did unite the entries was a sweeping sense of ambition across all categories, albeit one focused on detail at the expense of “big moves.” Within the scope of such ambition we saw more genteel and conservative entries, and entries with irony, verve and wit. The winners in each category display multiple such qualities, combined with a sense of rigour in the application of detail and materials. Another interesting observation made from the trenches of this year’s judging is that designers, and indeed operators, seem to be designing to and from a base of intrinsic practicality, whether that be the durability of materials and joinery, or the distinct lack of superfluous

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multi-million-dollar budgets. It is as if things have been taken down a notch in one way, and yet intensified in another. In the place of budgetary excess, there has been a renewed investment in and commitment to making by hand, and thoughtful, artisanal detail. This is nowhere more evident than in Viet Next Door in Adelaide, the winner of Best Restaurant Design. The overall impression is of a thoughtful, integrated and refined result. A trend that we saw last year, and that seems to have intensified amongst this year’s entrants, is the application of a “total design” methodology. Jackalope on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula (winner of Best Identity Design) is a good example of this, as is Noma Australia in Sydney (winner of Best Installation Design), with both projects giving equal attention to flatware and glasses, pepper grinders and tableware, and the graphics and the interior itself. The emphasis here is on holism, rather than mere decoration after the fact.

And yet, in contrast to this, The Dolphin Hotel in Sydney, winner of Best Bar Design, emerges as an exuberant “enhancing overlay,” the product of a fertile collaboration between operators and designers, one that is preoccupied with surface and lightness. The Dolphin Hotel is remarkable as it explores unfamiliar territory with this exuberance – it is not preoccupied with innovation, but perhaps a positive environment within which to relax and spend an entire day eating, drinking and generally being merry. On the topic of innovation, the jury felt we could have seen more this year. Perhaps this can be observed as the essence of the moment: less innovation, and more attention to handcrafting and detail, which, while perhaps not as sexy, is another pathway to success. The projects with the smallest budgets this year showed the most attention to such detail and created the most thoughtful design moments. In an uncertain world, perhaps this is just what we are craving right now. A


From the jury Previous pages — Charlie Parker’s by Acme & Co. Photography: Felix Forest. Right — The 2017 Eat Drink Design Awards jurors (left to right): Nat Cheshire, Cassie Hansen, Ingrid Richards, Vanessa Crichton and Ross Lusted. Photography: Kit Haselden.

2017 jury Nat Cheshire — Director, Cheshire Architects Nat works on development strategy, architecture, branding and product design. Nat works daily on everything from apron buttons, web design and light fittings, to basement cocktail dens, luxury retreats and the creation and transformation of huge chunks of the city. Among this work, Nat has built or fitout much of the nine-cityblock Britomart in downtown Auckland, and he invented the four-hectare City Works Depot.

Ingrid Richards — Co-founder, Richards & Spence Architects Ingrid co-founded Richards & Spence Architects in 2008 with partner Adrian Spence, with the aim of choreographing vibrant public spaces from private commissions. Operating in their home town of Brisbane, Richards & Spence has contributed to the retail and hospitality landscape of the city, including the Brisbane International Airport Retail refurbishment, the development of Burnett Lane in the CBD and the ongoing development of the James Street Retail Precinct, which includes the 178-room James Street Hotel scheduled for completion mid-2018.

Vanessa Crichton — General manager, Rockpool Dining Group Regarded as one of the best hospitality professionals in Australia, Vanessa started her career in 1990 as a waiter in Adelaide. She went on to work in senior management positions at Lloyd’s Brasserie in Dublin, Magill Estate Restaurant in Adelaide, and Langton’s Restaurant and Taxi Dining Room in Melbourne. When Neil Perry decided to open Rockpool Bar & Grill in Melbourne, Vanessa was handpicked for the general manager role and now oversees all of Rockpool Dining Group’s restaurants in Melbourne and Perth.

Cassie Hansen — Editor, Artichoke Cassie has served as editor of Artichoke magazine since 2013, after joining the Architecture Media team in 2010. She has a degree in creative industries, majoring in journalism. Cassie has written for a range of publications, including Houses, Landscape Architecture Australia and Kitchens + Bathrooms, and she has served as juror on national and international design awards, including the Asia Pacific Interior Design Awards.

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Ross Lusted — Chef and owner, The Bridge Room Ross is chef and owner of three-hatted restaurant The Bridge Room in Sydney, winner of the coveted Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide Awards’ Restaurant of the Year 2016 and Hottest Restaurant in Australia by The Australian. After an extensive career in restaurants and hotels around the globe, including Rockpool, Darley Street Thai, HarbourKitchen & Bar, Singapore’s Mezza9 and Aman Resorts, Ross returned home to Australia to open his own venture, The Bridge Room, with his wife Sunny.

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Best Bar Design

Designer George Livissianis Location Surry Hills, New South Wales

The Dolphin Hotel

Jury comment — The Dolphin Hotel is a treat. Both temporary and permanent, anarchic and cogent, this bar interior balances diametric opposites in exquisite tension. Originally a series of rooms for a series of art projects, the spaces work seamlessly together, united by a light-coloured palette. The Dolphin Hotel is successful both day and night, an achievement that is unusual in itself. The effect of the interior has been achieved in an economical and parsimonious way, and the overall impression is of an interior

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that doesn’t take itself or anything too seriously. Perhaps one of the most important outcomes of the creation of The Dolphin Hotel is that it has inserted itself provocatively into the conversation about Sydney’s lockout laws, as the temporary pop-up that stayed put. Imbued with underlying warmth, it is the ideal place to spend an entire afternoon, rolling merrily on into night. The ultimate success of The Dolphin Hotel is that it marries whimsy and discipline, and the result is outstanding.


Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Design statement — The Dolphin Hotel has three individual spaces: a public bar, dining room and wine room. The client, Maurice Terzini, and his team have built on the iconic venue’s heritage, adding an exciting new layer to its history by repurposing and transforming the space. The Dolphin Hotel challenged the notion of what a pub is. The brief was initially to design a pop-up and the designers adapted this way of thinking through the project, even though the solution is a more permanent one. The design team gave the artists Beni Single and Tracey Deep freedom of expression within parameters that helped realize and shape the direction of the overall space. The collaboration between the designers, client, artists and installers led to the greater outcome. It’s not on trend; it’s inventive, it’s different. It’s a new approach, using cost-effective materials in new and alternate ways that create curiosity. The approach forces us to revisit the space so its evolutionary – we are continually there to add, change, shift or rethink areas to create an ever-changing, evolving experience.

Project — The Dolphin Hotel 412 Crown Street Surry Hills, NSW 2010 dolphinhotel.com.au Design practice — George Livissianis 35 Glenmore Road Paddington NSW 2021 +61 2 9361 6685 georgelivissianis.com Project team — George Livissianis, Victoria Selia Photography — Tom Ferguson

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Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Bar Design The Buena — Designer: SJB + TRD Location: Mosman, New South Wales Photography: Felix Forest

Charlie Parker’s — Designer: ACME&Co. Location: Paddington, New South Wales Photography: Felix Forest

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Highly Commended

The George on Collins — Designer: Hecker Guthrie Location: Melbourne, Victoria Photography: Earl Carter

To see more images, visit eat-drink-design.com/gallery

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Best Restaurant Design

Designer Genesin Studio Location Pennington, South Australia

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Winner

Viet Next Door

Jury comment — Viet Next Door represents a pinnacle of artisanal crafting and an instance where a great deal of thought has clearly been invested in every detail. It is an impressive and strangely atmospheric interior for all its simplicity. All elements of the interior have been crafted from scratch and exist in delicate suspension with each other, even down to the alignment of the flex and the tension wire supporting the handmade light fittings. Adelaide has a long history of excellent Vietnamese food and this family-owned business has been taken in a unique and thoughtful direction by its interior. This space is something of a departure from the usual run of familyowned restaurants – it is a place where every detail has been considered and executed in an extremely disciplined way, while remaining highly inventive, playful and rich in attention to detail.

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Eat Drink Design Awards

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Winner

Design statement — The brief was to create a Vietnamese tapas bar for the owner and chef Ben Phan to express his creative culinary energy while paying resects to his traditionally trained background. The inspiration was drawn from his family’s humble beginnings in Vietnam, where simple materials were used in practical details. The space needed to reflect new energy, culinary maturity and familiarity all at the same time to create cultural connection. The flamed tiled granite floor and walls melt into the split face bar top, adding consistent imperfections and creating rustic minimalism. The entry is surrounded by simple blushed persimmon upholstered bench seats and granite tables. Oakstrapped walls with inlaid woven grass wallpaper sit above the booth areas, with the shaped upholstered seating that blends into the oak joinery providing contrast to the granite. Locally made tables use the traditional artisan craft of eggshell mosaic.

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Project — Viet Next Door 73a Addision Road Pennington SA 5013 vietnextdoor.com Design practice — Genesin Studio Level 9, 25 Franklin Street Adelaide SA 5000 +61 8 7009 4631 genesin.com.au Project team — Ryan Genesin, Lia van Dalen Photography — Jonathan VDK

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Restaurant Design

Ume Burger — Designer: Amber Road Location: Barangaroo, New South Wales Photography: Christopher Morris

Fred’s — Designer: ACME&Co. Location: Potts Point, New South Wales Photography: Felix Forest

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Highly Commended

12-Micron — Designer: SJB Location: Barangaroo, New South Wales Photography: Felix Forest

Cutler & Co. — Designer: IF Architecture Location: Fitzroy, Victoria Photography: Earl Carter

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Restaurant Design

Workshop Brothers, Glen Waverley — Designer: Studio Esteta Location: Glen Waverley, Victoria Photography: Tessa Ross-Phelan

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The George on Collins — Designer: Hecker Guthrie Location: Melbourne, Victoria Photography: Earl Carter


Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Best Cafe Design

Designer Ritz&Ghougassian Location Hoppers Crossing, Victoria

Morris and Heath Jury comment — Morris and Heath is a holistically considered interior, bringing high-end design to Melbourne’s western suburbs. The interior successfully creates its own moment, its own place, warm and comfortable with its disciplined palette of wood and strategically placed lighting. All is understated, nothing in this interior is extraneous, and it is one of the most remarkable outcomes seen among this year’s entrants. The timber panels and battens may not be an original idea, but they have been finely detailed and executed in this application, with such details as the “fingertip” scale of the battens giving tactility and a “must touch” aspect to the interior. The operable screen further multiplies the space – a detail that could have been omitted, but which would have diminished the pleasing complexity of the cafe’s spatial form. As the light changes over the course of the day, the screen is there to operate as a kind of veil. Overall, this is a deeply positive interior, timeless and anything but temporary.

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Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Design statement — Morris and Heath, set in Hoppers Crossing on the outskirts of Melbourne, was driven by the need to create a place of refuge in contrast with the vast expansiveness of eucalyptus forests and precast concrete that surround the site. The project, developed out of a desire for greater human scale, seeks to create a destination for the surrounding suburbs. The project is contextualized in its use of spotted gum timber juxtaposed with milled steel and concrete. Timber battens veil the interior from an exhausting industrial landscape while reflecting the natural elements and giving relief to shoppers. Large spotted gum vertical battens form retractable doors that greet the customer upon entry and cast ephemeral elongated shadows across the pitted exposed aggregate concrete floor. Generous leather cushions drape over orthogonal furniture to form banquette seats that mirror the six-metre-long milled steel coffee counter and display.

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Project — Morris and Heath 13/24–48 Old Geelong Road Hoppers Crossing Vic 3029 Design practice — Ritz&Ghougassian 5/589 Malvern Road Toorak Vic 3142 info@ritzghougassian. com ritzghougassian.com Project team — Jean-Paul Ghougassian, Gilad Ritz Photography — Tom Blachford


Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Cafe Design

Workshop Brothers, Glen Waverley — Designer: Studio Esteta Location: Glen Waverley, Victoria Photography: Tessa Ross-Phelan

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Moby 3143 — Designer: Golden Location: Armadale, Victoria Photography: Sharyn Cairns


Highly Commended

Pitch & Fork Cafe — Designer: Georgia Cannon Location: Toowong, Queensland Photography: Cathy Schusler

Sensory Lab — Designer: Foolscap Studio Location: Melbourne, Victoria Photography: Tom Blachford

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Best Retail Design

Designer Woods Bagot Location Barangaroo, New South Wales

Jury comment — Campos Barangaroo is one of those rare insertions that manages to complete, and thus make sense of, the space it occupies. It stands in rich, and somewhat glamorous, contrast to the bold sandstone wall nearby, and in harmony with the glass and steel detailing around it, Campos is a glittering “jewellery box” installation, positioned and at home exactly where it should be. Primarily providing coffee, this brass-

finished boxed venue, with woven brass mesh panels, puts a bold foot forward in a setting where some might have opted for a more neutral black, or something similar. More than equal to its materially rich setting, this exquisitely detailed cafe also occupies its chosen space asymmetrically, sitting in perfect tension to its framing surrounds. Campos is uplifting, bright, warm, light and welcoming, and a clear winner.

Campos Barangaroo

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Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

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Winner

Design statement — Designed as an integral part of the overarching design strategy for the lobby at International Towers Three in Sydney, Campos Barangaroo responds to the civic formality of the base building architecture and the surrounding lobby space. The project creates an experiential retail opportunity positioned within a high-traffic commercial office building, stocking coffee beans, equipment and merchandise. Featuring a lustrous brass frame likened to a sculptural installation, the design imbues a sense of place and permanency through a refined interiors scheme expressed via the modern application of traditional materials. The effervescent brass form was positioned as a jewel within the lobby expanse, its elegant design becoming a meeting place and destination for the building’s tenants and their guests. Affectionately coined the “jewellery box” for its lustrous aesthetic, Campos Barangaroo celebrates old-world craftsmanship in a contemporary form. The materiality of the scheme delivers a strong sense of coordination, restrained glamour and quality.

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Project — Campos Barangaroo Lobby, Tower 3, International Tower, 300 Barangaroo Avenue Sydney NSW 2000 camposcoffee.com Design practice — Woods Bagot Level 2, 60 Carrington Street Sydney NSW 2000 +61 2 9249 2500 woodsbagot.com Project team — Domenic Alvaro, Josephine Meldgaard, Simon Lee Photography — Trevor Mein

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Retail Design

Handpicked Wines Cellar Door — Designer: DesignOffice Location: Chippendale, New South Wales Photography: Tatjana Plitt

The Kitchens — Designer: Landini Associates Location: Robina, Queensland Photography: Ross Honeysett

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Best Identity Design

Designer Fabio Ongarato Design Location Mornington Peninsula, Victoria

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Winner

Jackalope Hotel Jury comment — With overtones and undertones of Donnie Darko hovering inevitably around the design, the identity collateral of Jackalope represents an ambitious and boldly coordinated, highly integrated relationship to the interior and venue it supports. The designers have managed to marshal and occupy multiple channels of attack to create an identity that cascades from supergraphics, environmental wayfinding, door signs and other placards, to menus, paper collateral, typography and uniforms. The supergraphics in particular highlight the main building, creating a moment of intensity. As the identity reveals itself through the visitor’s experience, it’s evident there is an overall inventiveness to each layer of the graphics. As a highly integrated, carefully considered overall experience, Jackalope is a singular achievement and a clear winner.

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Design statement — For the adventurous and curious, a fiercely original hotel called Jackalope is born. The duality of the Jackalope informs the experience, providing an escape from reality. The alchemic site narrative, tribute to both Jackalope’s transformative nature and the viticulture business, informed the hotel, bar and restaurant identities, expressing the hybrid through contrasts. The project demonstrates a holistic designdriven approach to brand and identity, with the environment and brand completely integrated. The result is a more memorable experience for patrons. The property and brand are positioned with a high level of design literacy. Every touchpoint was considered in a new, contemporary way, requiring collaboration between designer, client and suppliers. For example, through format and materiality, like the plastic jacket, cutting holes into the menu cover. The bespoke brand identity has cut-through and provides a suite of highly shareable assets for the business. The outcome is a true expression of the philosophy of the client.

Project — Jackalope Hotel 166 Balnarring Road Merricks North Vic 3926 jackalopehotels.com Design practice — Fabio Ongarato Design 40 King Street Prahran Vic 3181 +61 3 9421 2344 fabioongaratodesign. com.au Project team — Fabio Ongarato, John Wilson, Ben Kluger, Sarah Cope Photography — Sharyn Cairns, Mark Roper, Visual Thing

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Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Identity Design Kisume — Designer: Fabio Ongarato Design Location: Melbourne, Victoria Photography: Visual Thing

The Garden — Designer: Sonnet Location: Ashfield, New South Wales Photography: Sonnet

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Long Chim makes the short list. Welcome to downtown Bangkok, aka Melbourne’s Long Chim restaurant. The bright and busy 160-seat restaurant – a modern reinterpretation of Thailand’s typical bustling street food scene – was proudly shortlisted for Best Restaurant Design in the 2017 Eat Drink Design Awards. It was a pleasure to work with Techne to bring this eclectic slice of the east to life on the banks of the Yarra.

@schiavellogroup | schiavello.com/construction

MELBOURNE SYDNEY BRISBANE ADELAIDE PERTH

PROJECT_LONG CHIM, MELBOURNE


Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Best Installation Design

Designer Foolscap Studio Location Barangaroo, New South Wales

Noma Australia

Jury comment — Noma Australia managed to tread that fine line between representative materiality and realization that never descends into “featurism” or mawkishness. With a shelf life of only ten weeks, Noma Australia, through its collaborating creators, managed to embody the best the nation has to offer in terms of “ingredients,” both at the table and in the physical environment. The decision to create rammed earth counters is inspired. This is a material that is not

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suited to long-term hospitality use, but ideal for the short-term embodiment of the “earth beneath our feet” concept that reflects this great brown land – materially rich and satisfying, and highly evocative. “Fusion” is a word that’s been used practically to the extinction of all meaning in restaurant design, but Noma Australia truly managed to fuse the best of Noma and the best of Australia in a texturally satisfying tableau, executed with incredible finesse.


Winner

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Eat Drink Design Awards

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Winner

Design statement — Widely regarded as the world’s best restaurant, Noma decamped to Australia for a ten-week residency in early 2016. Not your average pop-up, the project required a full-scale restaurant fitout and a treatment to reflect Noma’s uniquely defining ethos, which is firmly grounded in time and place. Mirroring Noma’s foraging principles, Foolscap Studio “gathered” materials and techniques to form the fundament of a space that symbolizes the meeting point of land and water. Because Noma’s food references the majesty of wild, raw nature, so do our allusions to rugged red earth, salt lakes, sweeping coastlines and wide open skies. Noma’s offering requires a huge staff team, as did this project. Lendlease was instrumental at the nexus between client and delivery. Materiality responded to the challenge of creating a space that was “temporary” yet “sustainable” – how to create a suitably refined environment for a thousand-dollar dinner for two, that also responds to the unusual requirements of a 100-strong staff – but doesn’t literally cost the earth that the menu celebrates.

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Project — Noma Australia 23 Barangaroo Road Barangaroo NSW 2146 Design practice — Foolscap Studio Level 3, 75–77 Hardware Lane Melbourne Vic 3000 +61 3 9012 6637 foolscapstudio.com.au Project team — Adele Winteridge, Kathrin Wheib, Jason Nogoy, Aaron Shiperlee, Dhiren Dhas, Emily Gillis, Jennifer Kulas Photography — Paul Barbera

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Highly Commended Best Installation Design

Pizza Da Mario — Mobile Pop Up — Designer: Victoria Hampshire Design Location: Rosebery, New South Wales Photography: Tom Ferguson

To see more images, visit eat-drink-design.com/gallery

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Winner Hall of Fame

Designer Designed by Mike Murphy with later additions by Mike Hanna and Don Cameron Location Potts Point, New South Wales

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Hall of Fame

Fratelli Paradiso

Jury reflection — Where does one begin with Fratelli Paradiso? Established in 2001 in what was then a distinctly un-gentrified and rather seedy Potts Point, this institution sees so many key ingredients come together to give it its continuing and seemingly neverending moment in the sun. Fratelli Paradiso, the creation of the lyrically named Paradiso brothers Giovanni and Enrico and their business partner Marco Ambrosino, brought a distinctly “Melbourne� style of service and dining to the Sydney scene. From day one it was the differences to the typical local experience that made it both distinctive and a much-valued contribution to food culture in the city. The three founders strongly believe that the success of a restaurant rides on the front-of-house experience, and they rail against the current shift in emphasis to the kitchen and the ubiquitous celebrity chef. All three had their start in the industry as waiters, and the theatre of service is perhaps the key ingredient in the success of this restaurant. It is certainly where their focus lies, followed closely by the food, and of course the wine.

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Giovanni explains that an important part of dining at Fratelli Paradiso is the sense that from the moment you arrive, you are going to be looked after, that the waiters are going to help you navigate the menu and the wine list. Their task is to limit the amount of hard work and decision-making you have to do once you have settled in, and they satisfy this mission in style. “Theatre” is a good description of the style of service: blackboard menus written exclusively in Italian are explained to two-to-three tables at a time, drawing fellow diners into the performance. The interior that gave form to the dining and service concept is intentionally not a showpiece, but a backdrop to this theatre. As Giovanni explains, a lot of the dining rooms in Sydney have views, and are all about light and looking outward. Fratelli Paradiso is something else entirely – an introverted stage where diners view and interact with wait staff and each other,

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and there is “nothing to look at outside.” Built around this ethos, the interior, designed by the late Mike Murphy, is very dark. “We used to have complaints in the old days, but now the iPhone torches come out,” Giovanni says. Given these concerns, the interior of Fratelli Paradiso is all about the work of the waiting staff, and the “flow” of that work. It is a utilitarian environment, a workplace that has to function first, and look good second. This posed challenges, given the U-shaped nature of the shopfront and the need to create a working space on one side, where the baking and pasta-making happens, that would still be comfortable for diners to occupy. The shift in emphasis between day and night dining is also important given the kitchen stays open all day, and Giovanni is clear that the lighting design remains an essential part of making the interior work. Splashes of brass and marble, but not too much, combined with an “art wall,”

give the interior its distinctive flavour. It is currently being renovated in a way that extends Murphy’s legacy, while adapting to the ongoing evolution of the restaurant and its front-of-house experience. “Evolution” is the key word here: Fratelli Paradiso has remained of-the-moment by constantly adjusting itself. The art wall is a case in point. Giovanni explains that they keep any given work for about two years – until it is iconic – and then they “trash it,” in his words, to make way for the next installation. This resistance to attachment is not always to the approval of regulars, who might become enamoured by a single piece. But something about the way the restaurateur explains this gives me a hint at the essence of Fratelli Paradiso, and its interior in particular: evolve and change in order to remain constant, and in this way remain relevant – to dining, to wine, and to the life of the city.


Hall of Fame

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Project — Fratelli Paradiso 12–16 Challis Avenue Potts Point NSW 2011 +61 2 9357 1744 fratelliparadiso.com Design practice — Mike Murphy with later additions by Mike Hanna and Don Cameron Photography — Peter Bennetts

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Shortlist

Best Bar Design

Bang Bang — Biasol

The Waiting Room – Crown Towers Perth — Bates Smart

Caretaker — Britomart Hospitality Group

Sawmill Brewery + Smoko Room — Rachel O’Malley and Mike Petre

The Buena — SJB + TRD

The Dolphin Hotel — George Livissianis

Y14 Japanese Seafood Kitchen & Bar — Biasol

Stomping Ground Bar & Brewery — Studio Y.

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Shortlist

Best Bar Design continued

Headricks Lane — Scott Petherick

Arlechin — Six Degrees Architects

The George on Collins — Hecker Guthrie

Charlie Parker’s — ACME&Co.

Endeavour Tap Rooms — Welsh + Major Architects

Jackalope – Flaggerdoot — Carr in collaboration with Fabio Ongarato Design

Goodbar — AZBcreative

Zephyr, Hyatt Regency Sydney — Bates Smart

Best Restaurant Design

Mini Bar — Foolscap Studio

Brick Lane — AZBcreative

Shobosho — Studio-Gram

Atlas Dining — GelliKovic Architects

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Ume Burger — Amber Road

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Best Restaurant Design continued

Hurricanes Grill Narellan — Luchetti Krelle

Long Chim — Techne Architecture + Interior Design

Jade Temple — Grant Cheyne

Mode Kitchen and Bar — Luchetti Krelle

Giant Steps — Bergman & Co.

Mei Wei Dumplings — Luchetti Krelle

Piermont Restaurant — Hecker Guthrie

Mezz – Kitchen and Bar — Studio Y.

Cirrus Dining — Pascale Gomes McNabb (PGMD) in collaboration with Terroir

M&G Cafe and Bar — Luchetti Krelle

Madame Shanghai — Melissa Collison Design

Lazy Su — BrandWorks

Viet Next Door — Genesin Studio

Bekya (Tramsheds, Sydney) — Juicy Design

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Shortlist

Best Restaurant Design continued

Cutler & Co. — IF Architecture

Uncle Collins — Foolscap Studio

Etta — IF Architecture

Vasse Felix — Hecker Guthrie & Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects

Cairo Takeaway — Carnival Design Studio

12-Micron — SJB

Piccolino — Hachem Australia

Jackalope – Doot Doot Doot — Carr in collaboration with Fabio Ongarato Design

Workshop Brothers, Glen Waverley — Studio Esteta

Abacus — Architects EAT

Smallfry Seafood — Sans-Arc Studio

Fred’s — ACME&Co.

Attica — IF Architecture

Fratelli Fresh — Melissa Collison Design

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Best Restaurant Design continued

Anchovy — Fiona Lynch

Bessie — CTRL_Space

Glasshouse at Goonoo Goonoo Station — Tanner Kibble Denton Architects

The George on Collins — Hecker Guthrie

Edition Roasters | Tamate Bako — Amber Road

Sloane Ranger — Architects EAT

La Cantina — Blank Creatives

Moss Bro — Collectivus

Long Shot Cafe — Loopcreative

Penta — Ritz&Ghougassian

The Dessert Kitchen — Matt Woods Design

Morris and Heath — Ritz&Ghougassian

Wilson & Market — Kestie Lane Studio

Best Cafe Design

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Shortlist

Best Cafe Design continued

No. 19 — Biasol

Tom Thumb — Studio Edwards & Joseph Hoang

St Martins — Larritt-Evans

Sensory Lab — Foolscap Studio

333 Regiment — Guru Projects

Moby 3143 — Golden

STREAT Cromwell — Six Degrees Architects

Middletown — Studio Tate

Au79 Cafe — Mim Design

Maude — CTRL_Space

Brioche by Philip Eastland — T A Square

Middle South East — Biasol

Workshop Brothers, Glen Waverley — Studio Esteta

Pitch & Fork Cafe — Georgia Cannon

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Eat Drink Design Awards

Best Retail Design

Handpicked Wines Cellar Door — DesignOffice

XO Dining — Kosloff Architecture

The Kitchens — Landini Associates

Suki — Collectivus

Campos Barangaroo — Woods Bagot

St Hugo — Studio-Gram with JBG Architects

Romeo’s Food Hall Summer Hill — Loopcreative

Best Identity Design

Salsa’s – Identity — Juicy Design

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The Crux & Co. — Hue Studio

Cha Li Boi Yum Cha & Bar — Squad Ink

Lazy Su — BrandWorks

Jackalope Hotel, Mornington Peninsula — Fabio Ongarato Design


Shortlist

Best Identity Design continued

The Garden — Sonnet

Kisume — Fabio Ongarato Design

Pizza Da Mario – Mobile Pop Up — Victoria Hampshire Design

Great Southern Rail Platinum Club — Woods Bagot

Best Installation Design

Noma Australia — Foolscap Studio

Lexus Design Pavilion — Etic

To see more images, visit eat-drink-design.com/gallery

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Profile

Studio Truly Truly Words — Marcus Piper

Hailing from Brisbane, Joel and Kate Booy of Studio Truly Truly now reside in the Netherlands and their industrial design practice is enticing the eye of design-led manufacturers on either side of the equator.


Profile

Previous page — Joel and Kate Booy of Studio Truly Truly. Photography: Inga Powilleit. Above — Studio Truly Truly collaborated with Dutch ceramics manufacturer Cor Unum for the Bole vase. Photography: Alexander Popelier.

Above — Two colours intermingle as two grids mesh together on the wire-frame Wove chair. Photography: Alexander Popelier.

Above — The Seismic collection was inspired by the movement and vibrations that occur in an earthquake. Photography: Studio Truly Truly.

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Studio Truly Truly

Forming an enduring and successful creative partnership is not easy, but when it works, it truly works. In the combination of perspectives a brilliance is found with the culminating work perceived as one. Layering that creative relationship with one of a more personal nature requires respect and a cohesive way of thinking, enabling each party to speak their own voice while standing side-by-side. Meet Joel and Kate Booy, better known as Studio Truly Truly – partners in life and profession – who joined forces in their hometown of Brisbane and now reside in the Netherlands. Their industrial design practice is enticing the eye of design-led manufacturers on either side of the equator. Starting their careers in graphic design working with legendary Brisbanebased studio Inkahoots, they were invited by one of the studio’s founders, Jason Grant, to teach creative typography at Griffith University. In turn, a commission to create a window installation for the Judith Wright Centre of Contemporary Arts ushered Joel to make the transition to furniture and object design. As Kate recalls, “That was really crucial for us, especially for Joel – to be thinking in that extra dimension.” “I was a bit restless in graphic design, and I didn’t want to be one of those people who says ‘I’m a graphic designer who does industrial design now,’” Joel adds, and it was that desire that saw the couple make the move to Eindhoven. While Joel studied at the “local” Design Academy Eindhoven, Kate continued her work in graphics, both working from the Temporary Art Center – a space filled with all kinds of kindred creative spirits and the birthplace of Studio Truly Truly. At first glance their work is industrial, imbued with subtle textures and colour gradations, but on closer inspection it is a combination of their individual approaches and disciplines and an exploration of materials that make each piece sing. Their

Artichoke

Above — Levity is a poetic collection of lights featuring an LED source enclosed within a flexible loop. Photography: Studio Truly Truly.

Above — The Fuse cabinet is a contemporary exploration of decorative woodcraft with a strong graphic presence. Photography: Studio Truly Truly.

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Profile

Above — The IKEA-PS 2017 is an innovative, deconstructed sofa that allows comfort to be added to the frame as desired. Photography: Studio Truly Truly.

“ At first glance their work is industrial, imbued with subtle textures and gradations of colour, but on closer inspection it is a combination of their individual approaches and disciplines and an exploration of materials that make each piece sing.”

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entire portfolio layers the couple’s talents in equal measure, a visual orchestra of two, riffing on an exploration of process that draws out the end result. The LYOT project for the Dark Matter Light Collection and Touch Light epitomize this welcoming and rather hands-on approach. The LYOT – an interactive piece of lighting where a three-dimensional mesh is contorted by the movement of an illuminating rod, akin to the way a modern typographer controls the calligraphic curves of a letter through a single Bezier point, symbolizes much about the studio’s history. Similarly, the glass Touch Light is created using a mould with various insertion points, allowing pins to protrude into the molten glass, creating dimples at the creator’s discretion. It is an approach of tactility that has served them well in their relatively short existence as a studio and a chance visit from the IKEA team in October 2014 resulted in the IKEA-PS 2017 Sofa, which was launched in Milan in April 2017. From a distance the piece appears like a doona thrown over a metal frame; an invitation to relax in a familiar environment, though when taking a step closer you realize it is actually a series of cushions, each bound together with a simple clip. Kate’s attention

to detail shines through with a rhythmic pattern applied to each cushion. “There is a visual texture that might not be visible from a distance but there is also the texture of colour,” Kate says. It seems for the Booys that the processes of graphic design inform their work in many ways, as Joel shows off a sample of shifting colours on metal achieved through duo-toned powdercoating. When asked what inspires them the response is jokingly: “Not much!” Though that is quickly followed with, “We’ve been working with materials in a really close way and juxtaposition is a big part of our work, finely textured materials with gloss and matt.” What is next for the studio of two, who derived their name from the idea that one day they could grow? An extensive series of architectural lighting commissioned by Australian lighting manufacturer Rakumba is set to launch in Europe in early 2018. With a working title of Typography, the collection is a metaphor for their practice as it draws close to full circle, and as Joel describes, “It is inspired by the way two characters look side-by-side. Individually they look nothing alike but together they create something interesting.” A


Studio Truly Truly

Above — The Grove vessels play with translucency, opacity and light through the resin’s varying thickness. Photography: Alexander Popelier.

Above — LYOT was inspired by giant crystals piercing a cavernous space. Photography: Studio Truly Truly.

Above — Studio Truly Truly worked with the Netherlands National Glass Museum for the Touch light. Photography: Alexander Popelier.

Above — The Daze tables are built from architectural volumes with subtle slits that let colours “float” through. Photography: Alexander Popelier.

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Hotel

Words — Mark Scruby Photography — Tom Blachford and Kate Ballis

Four Points In Melbourne’s Docklands, DKO Architecture has designed an understated and elegant hotel that resonates with a distinctly Melburnian ambience.

by Sheraton Right — Four Points by Sheraton Docklands spans fifteen levels and houses 273 rooms. Artwork: Jeremy Blincoe.

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Four Points by Sheraton

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Hotel

Above — The monolithic welcome desks and grand staircase in the double-height entry space make a grand first impression. Left — The black bluestone-lined lift lobby is flanked by a dramatic in situ artwork by local artist Al Stark. Opposite page — Plush seating in striking blue velvet and teal bar stools line the natural stone bar, housed underneath the layered blackened steel and stone staircase.

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Four Points by Sheraton

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Hotel

French anthropologist Marc Augé famously coined the term “non-places” to describe the transient, generic spaces of the modern globalized world – railway stations, airports, motorways, big-box retail and hotels. Places where we feel “at home” because of the homogenized familiarity of the surroundings, and that yet are never truly home. Putting aside philosophical questions about what kind of world we want to live in, and how big business might contribute to this, it raises a pragmatic question for international hotel operators like Starwood Hotels and Resorts, which owns the new Four Points by Sheraton in Melbourne’s Docklands: is there valuable competitive advantage to be gained from differentiating its properties through the creation of authentic local experiences, or is the efficiency of a uniform global roll-out irresistible? Happily for Melbourne, and for DKO Architecture, which was engaged to design this newest Four Points iteration, Starwood chose the route of differentiation. The result is a new hotel that resonates with a distinctly Melburnian ambience – an understated elegance underpinned by natural materials and textures, and perhaps most noticeably for a hotel chain with a brightly coloured, abstracted windmill as its logo, a colour palette dominated by blacks, charcoals and dark blues. Welcome to Melbourne! Of course, true locals might dispute the location, given Docklands’ much-maligned connection to the city proper, and lingering questions about its appeal as a place. But these questions provide even more of an imperative to carve out a local identity for buildings here, to make Docklands a place in Melbourne rather than a non-place, and it’s a challenge that the architects are clearly invested in – their Melbourne head office is just around the corner, and Four Points is physically linked with another DKO project, the landmark Marina Tower apartment development. The entry to the hotel is on Docklands Drive, and the tram stop outside the front door doesn’t do any harm in placing guests squarely in Melbourne upon arrival. Inside, the narrow lobby area immediately sets the scene with large-format black bluestone tiles on the walls, honed bluestone floor tiles and, behind the marble reception counter, a wall of handmade brass clocks displaying the time in cities around the world. In some ways, the clocks are a motif for the entire project – a wall of clocks is not a new concept for a hotel reception, but here it’s given a bespoke twist and expressed in material we can easily imagine seeing in some laneway restaurant. Further into the building, there’s a beer-themed lobby bar just as we’d find in other Four Points hotels, but Melbournized with custom-patterned black-and-charcoal carpet, grey leather banquette seating, deep blue velvet armchairs and teal-upholstered bar stools. In the lift lobby opposite, a wall-to-ceiling mural has been painted by local artist and tattooist Al Stark. Stark’s immediately recognizable neon abstractions reference the city’s street art

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“... This hotel successfully delivers an experience for its guests that feels at one with the real world just outside its doors.” culture in the most explicit way possible; after all, similar murals by Stark can be seen everywhere from Carnegie to Coburg. The blue, black and teal in the lobby bar are picked out in the mural, creating a sense of cohesion in what is a place of circulation as much as sitting and relaxing. Beyond the bar, the space opens up into a casual dining area that feels a touch more familiar to the global traveller, with chestnut-brown leather banquette seating, light oak fittings and wire-trellised vines. The interior here is still elegant and sophisticated, but lighter than other parts of the hotel, which is wholly appropriate for a place where bleary-eyed corporates and tourists will mingle over the buffet and get ready for the day. The other essential element of the ground floor is a large staircase, again a familiar hotel lobby trope but again not quite as we’d expect. Constructed from blackened steel and natural stone, it rises up not so much in a sweeping gesture as with a muscular geometry, at once anchoring the lobby space and hinting at more to discover on the first floor. In the guest rooms, the materials palette adds textured wallpaper and heavily grained timber elements to the familiar black steel fixtures and custom-patterned carpet seen elsewhere in the building. On the walls, rent-a-artworks are eschewed for detail photography of local sights like Denton Corker Marshall’s Westgate Freeway portals, captured by local photographer Jeremy Blincoe. But then the outward views do a good job of placing the guest in a distinct location too, with full-height glazing providing outlooks from different rooms to the Bolte Bridge, the docks along the working part of the Yarra River and back into the CBD. Interestingly, for all of this focus on an aesthetic expression of the hotel’s location, perhaps the best connection with local culture will happen on the pool deck on level seven, which is shared between hotel guests and the residents of the interconnected Marina Tower. After all, if the non-place is a location of transient, communal anonymity, the best remedy is surely to create human connections. Either way, this hotel successfully delivers an experience for its guests that feels at one with the real world just outside its doors. Stepping out through the dark bluestone-clad lobby and hopping on a tram, the distinction between Docklands and the CBD almost feels irrelevant. Welcome to Melbourne! A


Four Points by Sheraton

Left — The handsome material palette fuses drama and style, and creates an atmosphere of refuge and calm. Below — The casual dining space offers rich leather seating in chestnut-brown tones, light oak timber highlights, black metal and climbing greenery.

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Opposite page, top — Hotel guests share the seventh-floor pool deck with residents of the interconnected Marina Tower. Opposite page, bottom — In the guest rooms, the materials palette adds textured wallpaper and timber elements to the familiar black steel fixtures and custom-patterned carpet seen elsewhere in the hotel. Artwork: Jeremy Blincoe.

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Entry Hotel lobby and reception Bar Kitchen All-day dining Lobby Vehicle entry Cafe/deli Gym Outdoor gym Sky Lounge Boardroom Pool

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Project — Four Points by Sheraton Melbourne Docklands 443 Docklands Drive Docklands Vic 3008 +61 3 8578 0000 fourpointsmelbournedocklands.com Design practice — DKO Architecture Suite 2, 112 Newquay Promenade Docklands Vic 3008 +61 3 8601 6000 info@dko.com.au dko.com.au Project team — Michael Drescher, Koos de Keijzer, Jesse Linardi, Mauro Miglino, Michael Fouche, Simone Ling, Luca Cicoli Time schedule — Design, documentation: 2 years Construction: 18 months Builder — Probuild Structural engineer — Webber Design Services engineer — MacCormack Associates Consultants Project manager — Sinclair Brook ESD — Ark Resources Landscaping — Oculus Products — Walls and ceilings: Ground-floor lobby walls are clad in black bluestone from Signature Stone detailed with bronze fins and timber batten ceilings from Woodform Architectural.

Restaurant has rendered walls and timber batten ceiling. Level 1 has black bluestone from Signature Stone with bronze detailing to the lifts, timber veneer wall panels from New Age Veneers and exposed precast concrete wall. Corridors feature bronze mirror from Melbourne Safety Glass to the lift core, timber veneer wall panels from New Age Veneers and custom wallpaper to the corridors. Level 7 features timber battens to the walls and ceiling from Woodform Architectural. Flooring: Honed bluestone from Signature Stone throughout the lobby, restaurant and Skylounge. Custom-made patterned carpet from Godfrey Hurst throughout the corridors, groundfloor bar, function and meeting rooms. Doors: Full-height timber panel doors from New Age Veneers with black metal hardware from Novas Architectural to the function rooms. Dark doors from Dulux with black signage to guest rooms. Lighting: Cloche table lamp designed by Lars Beller Fjetland for Hay to the reception desks. Ring Light designed and manufactured by Lee Broom and supplied by Cafe Culture Insitu installed over the ground-floor bar. Table Lamp No 317 by Lampe Gras to the groundfloor bar supplied by Luke Furniture. Potence Pivonte designed by Charlotte Perriand for Nemo to the ground-

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floor restaurant columns. Vox Table Lamp designed by Niclas Hoflin for Rubn to the ground-floor restaurant supplied by Fred International. Afra lamp by Anta to the Level 7 – 15 lift lobbies. Venn wall lights by Wever & Ducre to the airlock entry, supplied by est Lighting. Furniture: Leather upholstery supplied by Pelle Leather. Loose furniture supplied by Ramler. Fabric upholstery supplied by Warwick. Groundfloor bar and lobby features teal and navy velvet bar stools and armchairs, charcoal leather upholstery and dark timber veneer to the built-in seating, bronze and stone side tables. Ground-floor restaurant features tan leather upholstery to the banquette seating, light oak veneer from Elton Group to the tables and chairs. Level 1 features navy and light grey modular lounges and function chairs upholstered in a contemporary denim. Level 7 features sofas upholstered in a heather grey wool, armchairs in a blue grid textured fabric. Side tables have black bases with smoked glass tops. Other: Lift lobby wall art by Al Stark via Mars Gallery. Photographic artwork to guestrooms, corridors, function and meeting rooms by Jeremy Blincoe. Artwork to the groundfloor restaurant by Ryan Foote. Custom brass clocks behind reception by The Curious Craftsmen. Custom rugs to the Skylounge by Whitecliffe Imports.

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Industry Insights — Peter Clarke —

Left — Balnarring Retreat by Branch Studio Architects. Opposite page, top — Neue Black Workplace by B.E Architecture, featuring Peter Clarke “Editions” print. Opposite page, bottom — MAH Residence by Mim Design.

A moment in time with Peter Clarke Melbourne-based architectural photographer Peter Clarke of Latitude Group is behind the documentation of many of Australia’s most beautiful buildings and interiors.

Peter Clarke’s affiliation with the built form and appreciation for design has gained him a reputation as one Australia’s leading architectural photographers. His work spans more than twenty-five years in industry, working alongside some of Australia’s most progressive designers, landmark projects and natural and man-made landscapes. Clarke’s work successfully combines his passion for photography, architecture and design, working collectively to create a vision of the finished form. His collaborative approach and strong vision have seen his unique graphic style applied to a wide range of industries, including architecture, construction, mining and aviation. Like many photographers, Clarke is always looking for the next piece, which has led him to develop a limited-edition series of architectural landscape series prints. These prints have found their way into a number of commercial foyers and private homes, many of which appear at a large scale, designed to enhance an entrance statement. Clarke’s Editions series continues to be an ongoing project, which is not driven by volume but a lifelong study of the environment through the lens. The series captures a unique perspective and mix of on-ground and aerial imagery of stunning mountain ranges, ridges and valleys that each offers a unique perspective not often captured.

Clarke’s approach to photography maintains a level of sophistication that is supported by current technology, enabling greater detail to be captured more than ever before. It is within each image that a series of exposures or greater dynamic range can be further realized in post-production. On largescale photoshoots, it is this ability that sees Clarke’s work transcend to the next level. With many designers continuing to push the bounds of construction and a high level of materiality being used, Clarke’s affinity with design ensures that the right aspects and angles are captured. Clarke sees his role as being critical to the designer and works to best understand the intension of a building before developing an approach. The result is a tightly controlled visual mood and set of key shots for each project. As the complexity of projects continues to evolve, photography remains an ever-important part of every project. Clarke’s work continues to shine new light and composition onto completed projects that best articulate the designer’s vision in the first place. This is at the heart of Clarke’s work – an affiliation and appreciation of the built form through the lens as always. For more information about Peter Clarke: peterclarke.com.au latitudegroup.com.au


Exhibition

Marion Hall Best: Interiors

This Sydney Living Museum exhibition charts Marion Hall Best’s colourful career and visionary approach to interior design.

Words — Rebecca Gross Images courtesy of — Caroline Simpson Library & Research Collection, Sydney Living Museums Marion Hall Best: Interiors — 5 August – 12 November 2017 Museum of Sydney Phillip Street & Bridge Street Sydney NSW 2000

Above — Marion Hall Best in 1968. Photography: Rodney Weidland.

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Modern art, design and contemporary life were closely related in the 1930s when Marion Hall Best became one of Australia’s first independent interior decorators, and it would prove to be influential throughout her career. With a penchant for bright, bold colour and credited with introducing modern furnishings and fabrics to Australia, Best believed colour could inspire creativity and good design could improve people’s lives. In 2017, Sydney Living Museum looked back at the visionary designer’s work as part of its Modernist season. Marion Hall Best: Interiors, curated by Michael Lech, featured furniture, fabric, objects and ephemera that demonstrated Best’s trailblazing approach to interior design and decoration from the mid-1930s to 1970s. Best was born in 1905 in Dubbo, New South Wales, and her interest in art and design flourished in the 1930s. Having gained experience decorating her own homes (her family moved house seven times in five years), Best attended painting classes with artist Thea Proctor, studied first-year architecture at the University of Sydney and completed a New Yorkbased correspondence course on interior decorating. Best was inspired by the modernist movement and the colour theory of artists such as Roy de Maistre, and as with other modern architects, designers and artists of the era, her aesthetic marked a shift away from British design traditions toward more progressive American and European models. For one of her earlier projects, 7 Elizabeth Street, an Art Deco apartment block designed by Emil Sodersten completed in 1940, Best produced six different designs to be replicated across the fifty-four “luxury flats.” Each incorporated large blocks of solid colour, patterned textiles by Francis Burke and prints by Henri Matisse and other artists whose use of vibrant and expressive colour influenced


Marion Hall Best: Interiors

Best’s own approach. “Best attempted to capture the colour and form of modern art in three-dimensional space, producing interiors that an artist might create,” Lech explains. Of her own apartment in the early 1970s, Best described the multicoloured areas in the dining/sitting room as a “hardedged painting.” This daring and sophisticated approach to colour is certainly evident in her analogous palette for A Room for Mary Quant display room in 1967, and the discordant scheme for A Room for Mr Peter Sculthorpe in 1971. Along with colour, Best also used texture and tone to create spaces with greater depth and dimension, and with Above — A Room for Mary Quant from the Rooms on View exhibition (1967). Photography: Mary White

Above — A Room for Mr Peter Sculthorpe, designed by Marion Hall Best and Deirdre Broughton for the Rooms on View exhibition (1971). Photography: Michael Andrews.

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Above — Marion Hall Best’s shop at Queen Street in Woollahra (1968). Photography: Mary White.

“ Best redefined interior design in the mid-twentieth century with her pioneering and colourful approach inspired by modern art and contemporary living.”

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painter-decorator Fred Russell, she developed a glazed wall and ceiling finish based on artist Justin O’Brien’s technique of overlaying colour to create a translucent and glowing effect. Best was a passionate promoter of local designers, incorporating pieces by Gordon Andrews, Clement Meadmore and Roger McLay in her interiors, and commissioning artist friends to design textiles that she used in her work and sold in her stores in Queen Street, Woollahra, and Rowe Street in Sydney. From 1949 and through the 1970s, she travelled to Europe, North America, South America and Asia meeting manufacturers and designers of modern furniture and fabrics. Importing Knoll, Herman Miller, Marimekko, Cassina, Flos, Jim Thompson and other leading brands, Best introduced international

modernism to the Australian market with pieces that remain classics today. Firmly ahead of the pack, Best redefined interior design in the midtwentieth century with her pioneering and colourful approach inspired by modern art and contemporary living. Indeed, as interior designer Mary White wrote of Best in the Australian Home Journal in January 1968, and as the Sydney Living Museum exhibition relates: “There may be some who do not like her work. But most people feel she is not simply ‘way out’ but way ahead – vital, avant-garde, and a tremendous influence on progressive interior design in Australia.” A The Marion Hall Best: Interiors exhibition will travel to museums and galleries in regional New South Wales and Victoria from March 2018.


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Industry Insights — MAISON&OBJET —

Lifestyle products on show Held twice a year in Paris, MAISON&OBJET brings together the best in design, decoration and furniture while presenting the latest trends and inspiration. Photography — Anne-Emmanuelle Thion

MAISON&OBJET (M&O) is a major trade event for professionals working in the art of living. The lifestyle trade fair brings together a 360-degree product offering, including decoration, design, furniture, accessories, textiles, fragrances, children’s items and tableware. The inventive show design enlivens the space, allowing different styles to coexist in a multifaceted way. This extraordinary diversity falls in line with the varied expectations of global markets. The show’s lifestyle platform, at the intersection of business and creativity, gives solutions to the visitors that come from around the world in search of uniqueness. Keep on top of evolving consumer trends, inspiring experiences and brand offers, with a show that takes visitors to three major sections. The three sections are: Maison for interior decoration; Objet for concept and retail; and Influences for showcasing luxury, design and architecture. The show also includes two new spaces that are dedicated to textiles. M&O decodes emerging creativity

with its Observatoire, which identifies compelling new ideas. Each year, the show celebrates the Designers of the Year Award and the Rising Talents Award, which picks out emerging talents and celebrates the values of style. Through a lecture series on major themes explored by international experts, M&O provides a source of exclusive forward-looking information to help understand and predict market trends. September 2016 marked a major new transformation with the establishment of MOM, or MAISON&OBJET AND MORE, a new digital platform allowing exhibitors to present their collections online to buyers, architects, interior designers and product designers. By giving interior decoration, design and lifestyle professionals the opportunity to share continuously online, M&O now keeps its worldwide community abuzz all year round. MAISON&OBJET Paris: 19–23 January 2018 For more information: maison-objet.com


Opposite page — Visitors come from around the world in search of unique new products. Right — At M&O, international experts present insights into design ideas and trends. Below — The show’s design enlivens the space, allowing different styles to coexist in a multifaceted way.


ALYSOID design Ryosuke Fukusada ALYSOID is inspired by the world of geometry and architecture. A collection of aluminium handcrafted suspension lamps characterized by HOHJDQWGUDSHGFKDLQVZKLFKGHÀQH the diffuser. 20W LED dimmable.

mondoluce.com 272 Toorak Rd, South Yarra, VIC, 3141 P 03 9826 2232 439 Crown St, Surry Hills, NSW, 2010 P 02 9690 2667


In Brief

In Brief More of the latest projects, products and people collated to inspire.

P2 Private Dining Suite at Vue de monde

Cappala collection by Didier With the Cappala collection, Didier has “domesticated” its classic outdoor Bombala range, delivering a range of seating and tables that bring personality to interior spaces. Fabricated with highquality stainless steel and tailored in a wide selection of fabrics and leathers, the Cappala range includes chairs, armchairs, stools, lounge chairs and wingback seating.

A new private dining suite at Melbourne restaurant Vue de monde has opened, intersecting gastronomy, art and luxury. The P2 Private Dining Suite was created to showcase Dom Pérignon’s P2 champagne to discerning customers. The dining, located fifty-five storeys high above the Melbourne skyline, was transformed by Australian contemporary artist Hiromi Tango. Inspired by the process of champagne making, Tango’s work presents a vine-like structure of soft sculptural forms. The installation appears like a constellation on the ceiling, using traditional Japanese wrapping method called Otedama. Photography — Lauren Bamford Vue de monde — www.vuedemonde.com.au

Coastal Neurosurgery by Ricci Bloch Architecture and Interiors

Didier — didier.com.au

For the Coastal Neurosurgery in North Gosford, New South Wales, Ricci Bloch Architecture and Interiors has explored the idea of a “room within a room.” An open bookcase acts as a visual spine, creating a formal entry experience and a more intimate reading room off the main waiting space. The sequence of spaces and use of warm, textured materials creates a sense of intimacy within a traditionally anonymous and detached environment. Furniture was customized to suit patients with impaired mobility, with side tables and magazine storage doubling as additional seating options. Photography — Katherine Lu Ricci Bloch Architecture and Interiors — info@riccibloch.com.au

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ADCO by Woods Bagot Woods Bagot has designed a workplace for ADCO in South Melbourne, delivering a contemporary environment for the construction company. Referencing the family-run firm’s approach to construction, the design reimagines how traditional building materials can be interpreted through methods of assembly. For instance, a unique screening element is crafted from timber but with a method of construction usually reserved for brick. This “brick wall” meanders through the workplace, defining a series of open and collaborative workspaces and exemplifying the approachable and cohesive culture of the business. Woods Bagot associate Debra Longin says, “The arrival experience offers an immediate view into the heart of the business and its people. The framed views expose the dynamics of the team as they work, share and socialize.” Photography — Shannon McGrath Woods Bagot — woodsbagot.com

Sen tapware and accessories by Agape Designed by Nicolas Gwenael and Reiko Miyamoto for Agape, Sen is designed to leave a distinctive mark on any space. Incorporating multiple functions, the collection features independent components that can be freely combined to make a unique design statement. Available in brushed grey or anodized black aluminium, Sen is suitable for use with baths, basins, showers or sanitary fittings. Options include wall-mounted taps, floor-mounted spouts, hand-held shower hoses, shelves, towel rails, hooks and flush plates. Artedomus — artedomus.com

Rugged Concrete by Caesarstone Rugged Concrete by Caesarstone delivers the authentic look of a hand-poured concrete benchtop, with its robust, industrial-inspired design. Each slab is unique, accentuated by high-movement grey textural variations, white surface patina and a new “Rough” matt surface finish. Rugged Concrete has a dramatic look, in line with a continuing shift toward industrial interiors and influenced by urban environments and the converted loft aesthetic. Caesarstone — caesarstone.com.au

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In Brief

The Boyd Collection by KFive and Kinnarps Manufactured in Melbourne, The Boyd Collection by KFive and Kinnarps working with the Robin Boyd Foundation features furniture designed by Robin Boyd in 1958 for the famed Walsh Street House in South Yarra. The beautiful and functional pieces, including a sofa, a chair, and coffee and dining tables, have been reproduced from Australian hardwoods, wool fabrics and cork tiles. The collection celebrates the creativity and versatility of Boyd’s work and is testament to the design principles of quality and clarity of form. KFive – kfive.com.au

Neptune by Ewert Leaf Neptune, designed by Ewert Leaf, is a restaurant and latenight bar in Prahran, Melbourne that successfully transforms an unremarkable dark and narrow building into a contemporary dining experience. The ground-floor bar, with its rustic palette of recycled timber, pressed metal and brushed copper, attracts a communal and bustling social atmosphere. A light-filled conservatory, framed in a white metal structure, creates a contemporary seated dining enclosure. Upstairs is a sophisticated saloon cocktail bar with Art Deco furnishings and a dark, refined palette. Photography— Steve Murray Ewert Leaf — ewertleaf.com.au

Majestic laminate flooring by Quick-Step The Majestic range by Quick-Step is comprised of extra-wide, extra-long planks that are designed to introduce a warm glow and a sense of glamour into the home. The range combines an authentic oak appearance and feel with advanced technical characteristics. The planks are highly water and scratch resistant, which makes them suitable for use in kitchens and bathrooms. A range of eight colours, inspired by the latest trends in architecture, offer a variety of design possibilities, from a vintage or rustic look, to trendy or contemporary. Quick-Step — quick-step.com.au

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Mode Kitchen and Bar by Luchetti Krelle

Active Stool by Velce

Dual Zone Single Door Wine Cellar Tower from Ilve

Luchetti Krelle has overhauled the former Pei Modern space at the Four Seasons in Sydney to create a restaurant that draws on the glamour of the 1920s. Finishes of velvet, polished brass, marble and leather all hark back to the grand days of Art Deco hotels. The restaurant has also been enclosed by fluted glass to create a more intimate dining room. Like the menu and attitude to service, the design was conceived as a marriage of the traditional and contemporary.

The Velce Active Stool, with its curved base, encourages healthy posture and gentle movement. Designed and handcrafted by Anna and Ricardo Velce to be both aesthetically appealing and ergonomic, it is made from sustainable timber and finished with natural oils and waxes. The stool’s ergonomic concept was inspired by the way children rock onto the front legs of their chairs, instinctively trying to maintain the natural curvature of the spine. The Active Stool allows movement side-to-side, forward and back, diagonally and even twisting while seated.

The Ilve Wine Cellars collection allows you to store wine in an optimum humidity and temperature-controlled environment, boasting an impressive array of features with a sleek look. Ilve Wine Cellars, such as the Dual Zone Single Door Cellar Tower (pictured), are a great option for long-term storage of wine. The humidity and single temperature control feature keeps wine stored between 12 and 16 degrees Celsius, ensuring that wine quality is maintained as it matures.

Photography — William Meppem Luchetti Krelle — luchettikrelle.com

Velce — velce.com.au

Relik reclaimed planks from Havwoods Havwoods’ reclaimed planks can be used on floors, walls, ceilings, doors, furniture and lighting, and are suitable for private residences as well as bars and restaurants. Authentic aged timber is not only visually inspiring, it also tells the story of its past. The Relik range includes genuine reclaimed planks, as well as a number of reproduction reclaimed engineered planks, which are made with distressing techniques that replicate the ageing process. The result is a rich, texture-centric timber board with exceptional durability. Havwoods — havwoods.com.au

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Ilve — ilve.com.au


Industry Insights — Living Edge —

A collection of modern-day modernism Inspired by the laid-back spirit of Australia with a nod to Scandinavian design, the QT/Chillax collection is being embraced by designers around the world.

Above — The Chillax Highback Chair has a voluptuous and contemporary shape.

Above — The QT/Chillax collection has a casual and welcoming appeal that is suited to hospitality interiors.

QT Hotels are some of Australia’s hippest hospitality hotspots, putting art and design front and centre while reflecting their unique locations and neighbourhoods. Leading Sydney architect Nic Graham has been responsible for designing the interiors of QT Sydney, Canberra, Gold Coast and Melbourne, and in doing so has created a growing furniture collection that is finding broader appeal in hospitality venues around the world. The resulting QT/Chillax collection, which is produced in partnership with Stellar Works, is now available at Living Edge. QT/Chillax is Graham’s modern-day tribute to the mid-century movement, embodying the laid-back spirit of Australian life with a nod to the pragmatism of Scandinavian design. “The stud work, turned walnut armrests and bent metalwork are a wink to vintage Australian design,” Graham explains. The collection evolves as Graham works on new projects with QT Hotels and it now includes a range of armchairs and coffee tables, a sofa and stool. “Every year we add pieces to the collection depending on the requirements of the project at the time. All are vintage inspired with the same characteristic details.” The QT Chair has rectangular forms and a thick cushioned seat, the Chillax Lounge Chair has a curving backrest and slender seat, and the Chillax Highback Chair – Graham’s favourite – has a voluptuous and contemporary shape. Graham

designed each chair to be seen in the round, making them particularly suitable for creating defined and flexible settings within open areas. “I wanted to make sure each chair was attractive to approach,” Graham says. “In many ways the front of the chair is simple and the back of the chair has the detail.” The accompanying coffee tables and stool have a powdercoated metal frame that shares the lines and detailing of the QT and Chillax chairs. Graham’s approach to design and construction is synergistic with that of Stellar Works. As Graham draws on vintage inspiration to imbue his work with warmth and comfort, Stellar Works also seeks to bridge the gap between old and new, creating fresh and modern originals that have a sense of tradition. QT/Chillax’s casual and welcoming appeal has been embraced by hospitality designers around the world, and recently seen in the public and private spaces of Fourvière Hotel in Lyon, France, and the Gordon Bar at SIXTY SoHo hotel in New York. The QT/Chillax collection is available now through Living Edge. For more information: livingedge.com.au 1300 132 154


Scope

The value of hotel design Four designers discussed the value of hotel design at the recent Artichoke Night School session in Melbourne. Words — Hannah Wolter Above — Artichoke Night School session twenty-four speakers (from left) Ronnen Goren, Tracey Wiles, Michael Drescher and Ben Kluger.

Photography — Jessica Prince

Whether it’s that our expectations of hotels have shifted or that the likes of Airbnb have altered the accommodation landscape, it seems that hotels have really upped the ante in recent years. A quick Google search for “boutique hotels Melbourne” will unveil a raft of possibilities, including luxurious rooftop glamping. Interestingly, it is not just the smaller boutique hotels that are going out of their way to provide guests with character rooms and “Instagram-able” experiences – it is the larger hotel groups too. This could be seen as a shift in design direction from an international viewpoint, with its star ratings and standardization of branding, toward more individualized responses to place. The twenty-fourth iteration of Artichoke Night School, held in Melbourne on 24 August, explored the value of hotel design. The presentations by Tracey Wiles, Michael Drescher, Ronnen Goren and Ben Kluger were indicative of current directions within hotel design, with holistic design, experience-, place- and narrative-driven design posed as core concepts. The first speaker of the night, Tracey Wiles of Make’s Sydney office, kicked off the evening by considering what value means for hotel design, be it value for money, cultural value or historical value. She presented projects including the ME Hotel in London, The Temple House in Chengdu and the Sandstone Buildings in Sydney. Wiles offered an international perspective on the social and cultural value of hotels, having recently moved from the United Kingdom. She explained that while visiting your local hotel

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for a drink or a meal is commonplace in countries such as England, it isn’t really “a thing” here. Hoteliers in Australia are seeking new ways of encouraging the public to socialize in their establishments, thus as designers, she urged, we need to figure out ways to hold visitors’ attention. Similarly, DKO Architecture director of interiors Michael Drescher addressed the difficulties in attracting non-staying guests into hotels, discussing the strategy of offering a smorgasbord of experiences, such as different wining and dining options, allowing visitors a variety of opportunities to encounter. Drescher explained that the Four Points by Sheraton Hotel was seminal for the practice, with the Melbourne office relocating to Docklands to better understand the unique challenges of this precinct. Drescher talked about the benefits of populating a precinct rarely frequented outside of business hours with a hotel. Rather than abiding by the international standards of the Four Points brand, DKO looked to local examples, local materials and local expectations to design a hotel that responds to its place holistically – from the massing of the towers down to the front of house staff uniforms. The final speakers of the night, Ronnen Goren and Ben Kluger of Fabio Ongarato Design (FOD), also showcased the value of holistic design. The graphic designers are known for their creative direction in placemaking, such as for W and QT hotels in Australia and Asia. Goren and Kluger primarily focused on the visual feast that is Jackalope Hotel, a recently

completed project by architecture firm Carr Design Group sited on Victoria’s Mornington Peninsula for which FOD directed the branding and guest experience. Jackalope is a lesson in narrative-driven design and Goren and Kluger talked through the fabled jackalope character and alchemic theme, which permeates every aspect of the project, illustrating the value of a thematic design framework to curate a unique guest experience. A major takeaway of the evening was that expectations of hotels require them to be more than just “a home away from home,” and that the design should seek to enhance and elevate its surroundings. Guests don’t want to feel like they could be anywhere, they want to be somewhere special – to revel in it, to document it on social media and take a story away from it. Consequently, it becomes the designer’s incentive to not only set the stage but to curate the experiences within it. a The Artichoke Night School series is presented by Artichoke magazine in partnership with Space Furniture. Night School session twentyfour was held at Space’s Melbourne showroom. Want to know about future Artichoke Night School events? Sign up at designspeaks.com.au

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Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane Singapore, Kuala Lumpur

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Education

Words — Rebecca Gross Photography — Michelle Young, Amy Piddington

Nubo PAL Design Group has created a new play environment in Sydney for children to make, create, build and explore as they exercise their imagination.

Right — The designers of Nubo took a minimalist approach, leaving just enough furniture and equipment for kids to invent their own games.

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Above — Signage and wayfinding by Frost Collective were designed so that they can be understood from a child’s perspective.

Above — The warehouse space accommodates areas for physical and dynamic movement, such as climbing, running, sliding and jumping.

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Imaginative and creative play is important for children’s cognitive development. By manipulating materials, experimenting with ideas, testing their abilities, contemplating different resolutions and trying different roles, children can develop critical thinking skills and problem-solving abilities. Imagination and creativity are also important for good architecture and design as Hong Kong firm PAL Design Group and local studio Frost Collective prove at Nubo in Alexandria, Sydney. Nubo is a new indoor playground where children are encouraged to “exercise [their] imagination,” and it required the design team to exercise their imagination to create a space that would stimulate children’s creativity and resourcefulness. Nubo opened in March 2017 as a space for children to engage in “pure play,” an experience intended to inspire curiosity, exploration and invention and to encourage parents to be present and part of that play. “Nubo wanted to emphasize how children engage in play by exploring their environment, so we created a simple, clean and uncomplicated space that focuses on the program,” says Joey Ho, design partner at PAL Design Group. Nubo is strikingly different to the highly colourful and overstimulating children’s playgrounds. Instead, the minimalist approach to colour (white, blue, light grey and brown), lowmaintenance materials (rubber, laminate and timber) and equipment and structures (just enough for children to invent their own games) have created a visually subdued environment that is overlaid with the noise and energy of children. The warehouse space has been designed to cater for facilitated and free play, providing areas for stationary but engaged activities such as reading, crafts, building and role play, as well as for more physical and dynamic movement such as climbing, running, sliding and jumping. At the entrance, a slide curves around the reception counter so that children can play while adults pay. They then store their shoes in lockers with white boards for their names before charging up the stairs to the library. Children can play in the hot air balloon that floats above the stepped reading area with other alcoves providing quiet places for children to enter the imaginative world of stories.

Artichoke

A two-storey structure is designed like a simplified castle with arched doorways sized for adults and children. Inside, children can play with materials to “make” and “create” things in the arts and crafts room, and with interlocking foam blocks and tubes to “build” things in the building block room. Two flexible rooms upstairs are used for parties, workshops and dance classes and have equipment for role play and pretend. Three free play areas with architectural play equipment enable children to develop their spatial awareness and coordination and to test their abilities, and in some cases, courage. Older children can climb and slide on the spaceship-like tower, and younger children can navigate the custom-designed cruise ship-like structure with a ball pit, slide, stairs, steps and trampoline. Toddlers can play in a separate but connected area with padded nooks and ocean-themed toys. The cafe is positioned so that it offers open sight lines to all play areas and it features toadstool-like tables and balloonshaped pendant lamps. A bathroom designed specifically for children has a large basin in the centre with an illuminated globe, six silver arms and a swirling light set into the ceiling. These octopus-like forms are intended to encourage children to play with the water and thereby wash their hands. “When children engage in play they forget the things they don’t like to do,” Ho says. Frost Collective designed Nubo’s branding and signage and the brand is expressed throughout the environment. Signage indicates the activity areas with the words “make,” “create,” “build,” “slide” and “explore,” and a wayfinding system of symbols for pre-school age children is sized and positioned where it can be understood from their perspective. If children can develop their critical thinking and problemsolving skills through imaginative and creative play – by manipulating materials, experimenting with ideas, testing their abilities, contemplating different resolutions and trying different roles, skills that are undoubtedly needed for architecture and design – then perhaps Nubo will help give rise to a budding new generation of architects and designers as they learn to make, create and build, gain spatial awareness and come into close contact with imaginative architectural structures. A

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Above — Children can play with materials to “make” and “create” things in the arts and crafts room.

Above — The cafe is positioned so that it offers open sight lines to all play areas and features toadstool-like tables and balloon-shaped pendant lamps.

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Above — In the upstairs library, children can read in alcoves and enter the imaginative world of stories.

Above — The minimalist colour palette creates a visually subdued environment that is overlaid with the noise and energy of children.

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Education Project — Nubo Unit 201, Building 2 160 Bourke Road Alexandria NSW 2015 +61 2 9317 3206 info@nubo.com.au nubo.com.au

Playground consultants — CCEP Consulting Coorindation Joinery — Nouva Group Products — Walls and ceilings: Formica laminate clad over MDF backing. Windows and doors: Alsupply aluminium with laminated and toughened glass from Gecko Glass Solutions. Formica laminate clad over MDF solid doors. Lockwood mortice locks. Madinoz door handles. Kaba door closers. Flooring: Surestep Original safety vinyl floorcoverings from Forbo. Rubber floor from Synthetic Grass & Rubber Surfaces. Lighting: Memory Collection lights from Brokis. Downlights and LED strip lighting by Omni Electrical and Lighting. Furniture: Customized furniture by Na Creator Design. Bathroom: Custombuilt children’s basin. Caroma Junior toilet suites. Geberit concealed cisterns. Wolfen hob sensor tap. Other: Play tower by Corocord. Blue blocks sets by Imagination Playground.

Design practice — PAL Design Group 14/F, Overseas Trust Bank Building 160 Gloucester Road, Wanchai, Hong Kong +852 2877 1233 hongkong@paldesign.cn paldesign.cn Project team — Joey Ho, Joslyn Lam Time schedule — Design, documentation: 6 months Construction: 10 months

Above — In the bathroom, an octopus-like form over the basin encourages children to play with water and wash their hands.

Branding and signage — Frost Collective Builder — Blue Group Projects Engineer — BVG Consultants Project manager — Argentum Group Lighting — Omni Electrical and Lighting

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Waiting area Shoe changing area Reception Library Reading stage Art room Big blue block room Play tower Cooking station Cafe Kitchen Baby play area Kid’s play tower Washroom Office Feeding room Store room Party room


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Accessible design

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Frenches Interior

Words — Deborah Rowe Photography — Christine Francis

Frenches Interior Sibling Architecture strikes a good balance between function and delight in this accessible home office in inner-city Melbourne.

Left — Theatrical curtains allow the house to be switched from work mode to home mode, adding a sense of the domestic to the workplace but also a sense of drama to the home.

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Accessible design

Left — The project’s circular motif is evident in the dining table where the circle acts as an enabler of sharing and equality through the application of a terrazzo lazy susan. Artwork: Thomas Jeppe. Below — The sofa is designed as highly mobile segments of a whole circle; it can form a “nest” in the room or be broken apart, allowing for wheelchairs.

Good-quality design in accessible environments can be difficult to get right. Often it seems the two are mutually exclusive, with the “design” component prioritized as less important than the function, resulting in impersonal, utilitarian spaces that do not reflect or engage with the people who use them. Sibling Architecture challenges this idea with its project Frenches Interior, instead realizing a series of fun and dynamic interior insertions that are pleasing to everyone, regardless of their ability. Project architect Jane Caught says, “Our motivation was to try to look at accessibility in a way that was desirable, rather than a strict interpretation of the code.” The brief required Sibling to work within the typical space constraints of an inner-city Melbourne property and called for an interior overhaul of a newly constructed terrace that would function as both a workplace and a home. The clients help people who have experienced significant physical or cognitive injuries to live a life with as much “normalcy” as possible, and wanted to reflect this in the design. They also have several friends who are wheelchair users, so a high level of accessibility was a critical consideration. Flexibility is evident throughout the project, enabling the clients to easily repurpose and reconfigure each room to suit their needs and maximize the small spaces. A large curtain in the front room can be drawn in part to conceal confidential files or desk

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Frenches Interior

“When looking at this project one can’t help but be reminded of the bold patterns and shapes of the Memphis Group and the playfulness that comes along with it.”

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Project — Frenches Interior Private residence, Fitzroy North Vic 3068

spaces, or completely closed to cover any evidence of an office, transforming it into a secondary living space. The furniture in the library downstairs is on wheels, and can be easily rearranged to become an accessible spare bedroom. A structural “lattice” fixed to the living room wall allows the clients to rotate their extensive art collection or display any number of objects as they see fit. This system continues upstairs in the bedroom but with hooks and custom shelves for the storage and display of trinkets and personal items. A custom-made couch in the living room is comprised of ten mobile segments that enable countless different arrangements and allow wheelchair users to sit among other people rather than “off to the side.” Similarly, two pink powdercoated grab rails on a segment can assist people to sit on the couch if they prefer, and have been cleverly designed as “good looking objects” that do not appear out of place. Just as important to the design is the stylistic approach. When looking at this project one can’t help but be reminded of the bold patterns and shapes of the Memphis Group and the playfulness that comes along with it. A circle motif recurs throughout, from the lazy susan through to the bedhead and all the furniture and fixtures in between, symbolic of unity, equality and family. Customdesigned joinery elements, described as “totems” by the architects, appear in each room, used to store the clients’ valued objects such as their book collection in the library and spirits collection in the bar. Bright, vibrant colours are applied throughout the living and working spaces, becoming more subtle upstairs in the bedroom and dressing room to promote a sense of rest. A diverse palette of materials, including honed terrazzo, velvet upholstery and faux fur cushions, add to the dynamism and richness of each space. Frenches Interior delivers a sense of dignity to a group of people who are often overlooked when it comes to living and experiencing good design. The project demonstrates that with the right approach and a little bit of forward thinking, goodquality domestic spaces are very achievable when creating accessible environments. A

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Design practice — Sibling Architecture Level 4, Curtin House 252 Swanston Street Melbourne Vic 3000 +61 3 9662 1357 sister@siblingnation.net siblingnation.net Project team — Jane Caught, Amelia Borg, Nicholas Braun, Qianyi Lim, Nick du Bern, Hooi Ling Gui, Kenneth Wu Time schedule — Design, documentation: 1 year Construction: 1 year Products — Windows: Windows layered with S-Fold Bautex-Stoffe sheer curtains and Silverstone Metallised blockout chain drive roller blinds. Doors: Doors painted in Wattyl Lustacryl in ‘Kumura’ and Resene ‘Crusta.’ Furniture and joinery: Custom-designed furniture and joinery by Sibling Architecture. Other: Circular Heather rug in lounge room from Tretford.

Bedroom Home office Library Dining

Opposite page, top left — Throughout the interior, “totems” contain valued objects such as books.

Frenches Interior first floor plan 1:200

Opposite page, top right — A custom-designed joinery piece in the living room stores a spirits collection.

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Frenches Interior ground floor plan 1:200

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Opposite page, bottom — Bright colours are applied throughout the ground-floor spaces, but colour is more subtle in the upstairs bedroom to promote rest.


Frenches Interior

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Interior architecture and design — Explore the inner workings

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Artichoke december 2017  
Artichoke december 2017  
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