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LIFE & DEATH IN VENICE The Architecture of Health

Ryerson University Master of Architecture: Fall 2014 AR8101 Studio in Critical Practice


Ryerson University Department of Architectural Science 350 Victoria Street Toronto, ON M5B 2K3

All photographs and drawing are courtesy of the student and contributors unless otherwise noted. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Reproduction without written permission of the publishers is forbidden. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent volumes. The editors have made every effort to see that no inaccurate or misleading data, or opinions or statement appear in this journal, but they assume no liability for the accuracy or completeness of the text, or its fitness for any particular purpose. The data and opinions appearing in this article herein are the responsibility of the contributor concerned.


GRAZIE COURSE INSTRUCTORS Ian MacBurnie Arthur Wrigglesworth

GUEST CRITICS Andrew McAlpine Andrew Frontini Brad Miles Cheryl Atkinson David Campbell Derrick Lai Dustin Hooper Elsa Lam George Kapelos Jenn McArthur John Cirka John McMinn June Komisar Jurij Leshchyshyn Ken Brooks Ken Greenberg Kevin Hutchinson Leila Farah Marco Polo Mark Gorgolewski Maria Denegri Masha Etkind Miljana Horvat Paul Floerke Vincent Hui

SPECIAL THANKS Marco Polo Tamara Andruszkiewicz Irene Wrigglesworth


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION COURSE SUMMARY THE STUDIO READINGS 13 MASK

ASSIGNMENT 1 an introduction to venice

ASSIGNMENT 2 an understanding of venice

Design Theory

Design Projects Architecture of Health Venice

41 A TRIP T0 VENICE

134 Identity of Venice

74 The Healing Village

138 Order within Atrophy

80 Architecture of Hope

144 Venice Healthcare Center

Anna Pavia

Adrian Bica

Babak Teimoori

17 RESEARCH PROJECT

68 Inception of Venice

STUDY BREAK an experience of venice

55 DESIGN PROJECTS INTRODUCTION ASSIGNMENT 3 continuing care facility cannaregio, venice

Building Dialogue 86 Andrew Chiu

92 Reshaping Solid & Void Aviv Sarner

Victor Huynh

Shannon Clayton

Alykhan Neki

150 Metamorphosis Lisa Marshall

156 The Tumor of Cannaregio Adryanne Quenneville

98 Life is back to Venice

162 Venice 2.0

104 Metamorphosis

168 Acqua Culture

110 Adaptive Inversion

174 The Floating City

116 A Cultural Paradox

180 Healing Threshold Tower

Seyedehsara Ghorashi

Shiloh Lazar

Nazanin Sepehry Rad

Sandra Wojtecki

122 Interweaving Dualities Madison Dozzi-Perry

128 The Urban Nuclei

Chowdhury Tasneem Rahman

Tim Melnichuk

Rebecca Tsang

Calvin Fung

Nwamaka Onyenokwe

185 CONCLUSION


“Venice was, until the building of a railway bridge in the middle of the nineteenth century, a small island, or collection of islands. Venetians were islanders, with all the benefits and burdens that accrue to that especial status. To be insular is to be independent, but it is also to be alone. It secures a measure of safety, but it also attracts attention from those on the larger mainland. It exemplifies vulnerability, even when outward circumstances seem favourable. Yet as an island city Venice survived all the wars and invasions that have beset Italy since the eleventh century. It successfully defied both pope and emperor, French invasion and Spanish incursion, and the continual forays of the other city states of Italy. If it had not been surrounded by water, it would have been destroyed many centuries ago…” “Venice is associated with death and pestilence. It is in large part a dilapidated city, the water lapping against crumbling brick and plaster. John Addington Symonds, in A Venetian Medley, recounts that “the blackness of the water whispers in our ears a tale of death”. It is a city of shadows. The city is linked with pestilences, too, and with the hidden knife of the assassin. There is still a Rio Terra Degli Assassini. The most famous narrative to have emerged from the city is still Thomas Mann’s Death in Venice. Threnody suits the city well. Venice is doomed…” “In a city that seemed to have deserted the changing world of time, the only fate awaiting it is apocalypse. It will be submerged. It will descend into the water silently and permanently. It is the image of the city as the final end of all human achievement and aspiration…” Peter Ackryod, Venice: Pure City


INTRODUCTION

Life and death, growth and decay, new and old, light and dark, land and water. A city full of paradoxes, a city with many names: “La Dominante”, “Serenissima”, “Queen of the Adriatic”, “City of Water”, “City of Masks”, “City of Bridges”, “The Floating City”, “City of Canals” “Venice, Italy, a fantastical, utterly magical, and supremely creative city, one which has, ever since being founded over a thousand years ago, defied the conventional. A city not by the sea, but on the sea. With foundations bearing not in bedrock, but in the mud. Groundwork not of concrete pads, but of wooden piles. Transport not by subway, but by vaporetto. With a population not young, but ageing. Not growing, but shrinking – by the day. Venice the great, Venice the improbable, Venice the exceptional, Venice: the very emblem of the unconventional. And yet, at the same time, Venice the conservative. Venice, where tradition and modernity exist – or rather, co-exist – always in tension. Perhaps more than anywhere else, then, Venezia enables us – indeed Venezia compels us – to think, to think critically, to think outside the box.” This studio invites us to enter a world of criticality, to present our works grounded with a critical position supported by design research. The city of Venice offers unlimited potentials within the depths of its urban, social, and cultural layers, allowing us to explore the

architecture of health in a city which is dying. Tourism, rising sea levels, subsidence, acqua alta, crumbling structures, shrinking population, and aging population are just some things contributing to the city’s decline. Yet, for over a thousand years, Venice has always proven to be resilient enough to overcome itself. The city has grown, weakened, conquered, been conquered, and survived throughout the times. Life emerges from every corner of Venice. The calle, fondamenta, sotoportego, and campi are the arteries and organs of the city. Social life and culture pulsate from the streets, keeping the Venetian culture very much alive and active. Life and death co-exist within this city of paradoxes and our studio introduces an element of health and healthcare to bridge the two opposites. Through three separate assignments and a ten-day field trip to Venice, the studio immerses itself into the culture of Venice and the architecture of health, developing a critical design position while incorporating principles of mat building and mat urbanism with reference to Le Corbusier’s Unbuilt Hospital project in Cannaregio. How can architecture’s role as an agent of change address the rich layers of complexities within Venice? How can we graft a continuing care facility into the delicate fabric of Venice? What potentials are there for life in death of Venice? 1


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COURSE SUMMARY This Fall, AR 8101 Studio in Critical Practice investigates the subject of the Architecture of Health. The topic is explored critically within a discourse which privileges design as a dynamic process, one that seeks to bring into contact the diverse and oft-conflicting realms of architecture and urbanism, landscape and infrastructure. The Architecture of Health is considered within a context that highlights history and theory, culture and place. The exercise will result in a series of design provocations which, at their most basic, will seek to challenge conventional notions of the architecture of health, of what architecture is, and of what architecture should be. Our 13-week journey requires commitment, the capacity for hard work, and the ability to think, critically. Ours is, after all, a studio in critical practice, not one in contemporary practice. A good starting point, then, is for students to give thought to what it means exactly for an architect to be said – and seen – to practice “critically”. Studio is heavy on design research and analysis. It adopts a very specific method, or approach. Students will complete individual design projects. Design research will be undertaken collectively, as described in greater detail below. Course Objectives and intended learning outcomes This course affords students the opportunity to enquire: that is, to think critically, to research, to analyze, to question, to synthesize, and to conceive. Through readings and case study analyses, students will become more aware of how an individual’s values can and do influence their conception of architecture, as well as their architectural conception. The studio will further enhance their ability to undertake design research, and to conceive, formulate, and present a design project of a critical nature. Finally, this course is intended to enhance students’ understanding of the many, complex interrelationships between architecture, urbanism, landscape, and infrastructure, and in particular, how these interrelationships are informed by history, theory, and culture. 3


THE STUDIO AR8101 Fall 2014 Class of 2016 instructed by: Professor Ian Macburnie Professor Arthur Wrigglesworth book editors: Victor Huynh Rebecca Tsang


Andrew Chiu

Chowdhury Tasneem Rahman

Adrian Bica

Calvin Fung

Seyedehsara Ghorashi

Shannon Clayton

Tim Melnichuk Lisa Marshall Shiloh Lazar Victor Huynh

Adryanne Quenneville

Nwamaka Onyenokwe

Anna Pavia

Madison Dozzi-Perry

Alykhan Neky

Aviv Sarner

Nazanin Sepehry Rad

Babak Teimoori

Rebecca Tsang

Sandra Wojtecki


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READINGS

Readings on Design Banham, Reyner. Theory and Design in the First Machine Age. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1980

Monacelli Press, 2011 Waldheim, Charles, ed. Landscape Urbanism Reader. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2006

Eco, Umberto. The Open Work. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1989, p19 Architecture Review, September 1974, pp179-90

Boyer, M. Christine. Le Corbusier, Homme de Lettres. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2011

Readings on Mat Building / Mat Urbanism / Non-figurative architecture

Smithson, Alison. “A Worried Man. Man in the Street. By Shadrach Woods”, Architecture Review, November 1976, pp317-18

Branzi, Andrea. Weak and Diffuse Modernity: The World of Projects at the beginning of the 21st Century. Skira, Milan, 2006

http://www.architectural-review.com/essays/the-strategies-of-matbuilding/8651102.article http://modulatingspace.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/the-thick-2d. pdf http://loveyousomat.tumblr.com/post/20104775898

Smithson, Alison & Peter. “Fix”, Architecture Review, December 1960, pp437-39

Gandelsonas, Mario. X Urbanism. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1999 Hays, Michael K. Architecture’s Desire: Reading the Late AvantGarde. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2010 Le Corbusier. Journey to the East (Translated by Ivan Žakni). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2007

Sarkis, Hashim (ed). Le Corbusier’s Venice Hospital and the Mat Building Revival, Case: Harvard Design School Munich, London, New York: Prestel Verlag, 2001 www.arcc-journal.org/index.php/repository/article/download/115/87

Shannon, Kelly, ed. Water Urbanisms. Amsterdam: SUN, 2008

http://www.openspace.eca.ac.uk/conference/proceedings/PDF/Eren. pdf http://www.styleofdesign.com/architecture/residential/childrenshospital-zurich-by-herzog-de-meuron/

Shannon, Kelly and Marcel Smets. The Landscape of Contemporary Infrastructure. Rotterdam: NAI Publishers, 2010

http://www.metalocus.es/content/en/blog/children%E2%80%99shospital-zurich-winning-project

Shannon, Kelly and Bruno de Meulder. Water Urbanisms 2 – East. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2014

Violeau, Jean-Louis. “Team 10 and Structuralism: Analogies and Discrepancies”, in Max Risselada and Dirk van den Heuvel. Team 10. 1953-81. In Search of a Utopia of the Present. Rotterdam: NAi Publishers, 2005, pp280-85.

Mostafavi, Mohsen, ed. Ecological Urbanism. Lars Müller Publishers, 2010

Vidler, Tony. The Scenes of the Street and Other Essays. New York:

Banham, Reyner. Megastructure: Urban Futures of the Recent Past, London: Thames and Hudson, 1976, p131 Readings on the Venice Hospital Sarkis, Hashim. Le Corbusier Venice Hospital. Berlin: Prestel Verlag, 2001 http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/projects/le-corbusier-venicehospital-1.html http://www.fondationlecorbusier.fr/corbuweb/morpheus. aspx?sysId=13&IrisObjectId=5784&sysLanguage= en-en&itemPos=55&itemSort=en-en_sort_string1%20 &itemCount=215&sysParentName=&sysParentId=65 http://vimeo.com/40468190 Fabrizi, Mariabruna. The Building is the City: Le Corbusier’s Unbuilt Hospital in Venice. May 18, 2014

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http://socks-studio.com/2014/05/18/the-building-is-the-city-le-corbusiers-unbuilt-hospital-in-venice/ http://www.architecture.com/WhatsOn/Exhibitions/lecorbusier/workshops/venice.aspx

Readings on Peter Eisenman http://www.archdaily.com/429925/eisenman-s-evolution-architecture-syntax-and-new-subjectivity/

Environments Research & Design Journal Special Issue Jiang, S. (2014 approved for publication). Therapeutic Landscapes and Healing Gardens: A Review of Chinese Literature in Relation to the Studies in Western Countries. Frontiers of Architectural Research: Special Issue on Healthcare

http://www.arch.cycu.edu.tw/download/99term2/99204121.pdf http://www.sss8.cl/media/upload/paginas/seccion/K016_1.pdf http://www.amazon.ca/Corbusiers-Venice-Hospital-Project-Investigation/dp/1409442772 Shah, Mahnaz. Le Corbusier’s Venice Hospital Project: An Investigation Into Its Structural Formulation. Ashgate: Oct 16, 2013.

Readings on the Architecture of Health

http://site.ebrary.com.ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/lib/oculryerson/docDetail.action?docID=10740218&p00=LE+CORBUSIER%27S+VENICE+HOSPITAL+PROJECT%3A

http://www.clemson.edu/caah/architecture/architecture-plus-health/ research.html

http://www.archfoundation.org/2013/02/evolution-in-senior-housing-2/

Allison, D. (2007) Hospital as City, Health Facilities Management http://sma.sciarc.edu/theme/venice-hospital-project/ http://books.google.ca/books/about/The_Venice_hospital_project_of_Le_Corbus.html?id=IJVHAQAAIAAJ&redir_esc=y Readings on John Hejduk http://aathirdyearhts.files.wordpress.com/2011/09/hts3_t2_w6_hejduk-diller-scofidio-lecture.pdf http://www.studiohillier.com/pdfs/Hejduk_MAY27.pdf (Barbara Hillier, Princeton University School of Architecture, ARC 552 May 28, 2010) http://www.cooper.edu/architecture/publications/john-hejduk-works http://apps.acsa-arch.org/resources/proceedings/.../streamfile. aspx?...3.pdf Hejduk, John. Mask of Medusa, Works 1947-1983. New York: Rizzoli, 1985

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Allison, D., Battisto, D., Ramsey R. (2011). Healthcare Design Conference 2010 - Clemson Architecture + Health Footprint. Allison, D. (2012) Designing Hospitals and Medical Centers as Healthy Livable Urban Districts, Proceedings of the 49th International Making Cities Livable Conference, Portland Oregon, May 2012 Allison, D. (2009) Graduate Studies in Architecture + Health at Clemson University. Urbanism and Architecture [China], 7.2009 No58 pp 31-34 Allison, D (2009). Single Bed Hospital Rooms in the US: Design Issues and Trends. Journal of Japan Institute of Healthcare Architecture [Japan] pp 4-7, 1/2009

Verderber, Stephen and Fine, David. Healthcare Architecture in an Era of Radical Transformation Verderber, S., Fauerbach, J. and Walter, B. “On the Value of Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability in Health Administration Education,” The Journal of Health Administration Education, 26:3, 2008, pp. 248-68 Verderber, S. “A Hospice for the 21st Century.” Urbanism and Architecture (China), 46:7, 2008, pp. 28-30 Allison, D. (2009) “Single Bed Hospital Rooms in the US: Design Issues and Trends,” Journal of the Japan Institute of Healthcare Architecture, [Japan] pp 4-7, 1/2009 Verderber, S. “Preventing Chronic Disease Among the Aged: A Call for Evidence-based Design Research,” Health Environments Research & Design Journal, 2:3, Spring 2009, pp. 71-83 Verderber, S., Presier, W. and Battisto, D. “Assessment of Health Center Performance: Toward the Development of Design Guidelines,” International Journal of Architectural Research, 3:3, 2009, pp. 21-44 Verderber, S. Innovations in Hospital Architecture. London: Taylor & Francis/Spon Press, 2010.

Battisto, D. and Allison, D. (2008). A Hospital Patient Room Prototype: Bridging Design and Research. AIA Academy of Architecture for Health Journal. 11th edition

Verderber, S. “Private Inpatient Rooms and the 21st Century Hospital,” Urbanism and Architecture

Fink, N., Pak, R. and Battisto, D. (2009) Developing a Usability Evaluation Tool to Assess the Patient Room Bathroom, Health

Verderber, S., Presier, W. and Battisto, D. “Assessment of Health Center Performance: Toward the Development of Design


Guidelines,” International Journal of Architectural Research, 3:3, 2009, pp. 21-44

Morris, Jan. The World of Venice, revised edition. New York: Harvest, 1995

Vincent, E. Battisto, D. and Grimes, L. (2009) The Effects of Presence and Influence in Nature Images in a Simulated Hospital Patient Room, Health Environments Research & Design Journal Special Issue

Plant, Margaret. Venice: Fragile City, 1797-1997. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003*

Readings on Hospice Design http://www.hospicedesign.com/hd-aboutauth.shtml http://architecturaldesigner.dk/hospice-kolding-%E2%80%93-aplace-where-life-is-lived-2/ http://www.chpca.net/family-caregivers/faqs.aspx Verderber, Stephen and Refuerzo, Ben J. Innovations in Hospice Architecture Readings on Aging http://www.4fate.org/history.html Readings on Venice: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/394 Ackroyd, Peter. Venice: Pure City. New York: Anchor, 2011 Calvino, Italo. Invisible Cities. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1978; http://monoskop.org/images/0/0e/Calvino_Italo_Invisible_ Cities.pdf

*To the delight of visitors—and sometimes the dismay of residents—Venice is a city that appears to have resisted modernization. Its canals, gondolas, and picturesque buildings seem little changed since the Renaissance. This engrossing and strikingly illustrated book presents a wide-ranging cultural history of the city from 1797 until 1997, and shows how it has in fact changed and adapted and how perceptions of it have shaped its reality. The book charts Venice’s architectural and urban changes, the conservation efforts to protect the city and lagoon against the sea, and the social restructuring of the city, from Napoleon’s conquest through the upheavals of the World Wars to the battles against depopulation and the threats posed by the sea, industrial pollution, and mass tourism. Above all, it explores the myths that surround the city—created by writers, artists, architects, musicians, and filmmakers who have come to visit, and by the Venetians themselves—alongside the realities of living and working in a fragile city. Other readings, film set in Venice: Ruskin, John. Stones of Venice (c 1851) William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice

Larner, John. Marco Polo and the Discovery of the World. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999 Mann, Thomas. Death in Venice (Translated by HT Lowe-Porter). New York: Penguin, 1980

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source: http://historic-cities.huji.ac.il/italy/venice/maps/merian_1650_venice_b.jpg


“But of course! When one wanted to arrive overnight at the incomparable, the fabulous, the like-nothingelse-in-the-world, where was it one went? Why, obviously; he had intended to go there, what ever was he doing here? A blunder. He made all haste to correct it, announcing his departure at once. Ten days after his arrival on the island a swift motor-boat bore him and his luggage in the misty dawning back across the water to the naval station, where he landed only to pass over the landing-stage and on to the wet decks of a ship lying there with steam up for the passage to Venice…” “He saw it once more, that landing-place that takes the breath away, that amazing group of incredible structures the Republic set up to meet the awe-struck eye of the approaching seafarer: the airy splendour of the palace and Bridge of Sighs, the columns of lion and saint on the shore, the glory of the projecting flank of the fairy temple, the vista of gateway and clock. Looking, he thought that to come to Venice by the station is like entering a palace by the back door. No one should approach, save by the high seas as he was doing now, this most improbable of cities…” Thomas Mann, Death in Venice


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MASK

An Introduction

In light of its use since antiquity, a use both occupational (doctors treating patients with bubonic plague) and ceremonial (the Venetian carnival), cognizant of its place in architectural discourse (notably in the art of Le Corbusier and writing of John Hejduk), and, in reference to the subject at hand (architecture and health), students are to create a “mask� out of plaster. An introduction to the many meanings of a mask... of Venice...

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RESEARCH PROJECT An Understanding

Design Theory Design Projects Architecture of Health Architecture & Urbanism of Venice A short but intensive design-oriented investigation...

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Le Corbusier’s Unbuilt Hospital Project in Cannaregio, 1964 http://archinect.com/people/project/22042524/a-public-archives-for-venice-anaddition-to-le-corbusier-s-unbuilt-venice-hospital/22542830

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Design Theory: Typology duplex

Victor Huynh The classification of buildings began to form during the age of enlightenment within the 18th century. Within this era, there was a shift from the traditional classical design towards a more scientific and rational design approach. Quatemere de Quincy who first introduced type into architectural theory was a French armchair archaeologist, a writer, an artist and architectural theorist. He began his research with primitive buildings, allowing him to understand the basic functions and components within buildings. This led him to believe that architecture had a coherent system allowing buildings to be categorized by their physical structure, appearance and function.

detached house

semi-detached house

row house

Fabric Hybrid - The building’s programmatic spaces alter from one another; which may be reflected on the exterior, through material and window sizing.

low-rise building

mid-rise building

high-rise building

Typology is the doctrine or study of types of prefigurative symbols. typlogy

Graft Hybrid - Composition of various building function blended into one. High Rise Podium

Perimeter Block West 57th Street BIG Architects source: http://buildipedia.com/aec-pros/ featured-architecture/bigs-west-57th-residential-building

House

Quatremère de Quincy (1755-1849) source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quatrem%C3%A8re_de_Quincy

Bridge

Ponte Vecchio source: https://anotherbagmoretravel. wordpress.com/2011/11/26/love-locksand-the-ponte-vecchio-florence/

Anti-typlogy defy and lack any pure, nameable typology, they challenge our notions and understanding of building identity and architectural typology. anti-typlogy

Monolith Hybrid - Complex building function which appears as a monumental scale to the city and the visibility of programmatic function homogeneous within the form. hybrid building

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Design Theory: Mat Building Mat Urbanism

Adrian Bica & Shiloh Lazar Responding to the pressures of rebuilding society upon the conclusion of the second world war, Team 10 embraced the challenge of formulating a new model society. Inspired by Casbah, Team 10 developed the narrative establishing parameters formulating the mat building typology. Coined in 1976 by Alison Smithson the term mat building was recognized worldwide. Defined by its systematic modulation of building elements, low rise/high and homogeneous layout, mat building looks to provide an architecture solution at the urban scale. Amongst the first of its kind, the Free University in Berlin is regarded as one of the first mat buildings created setting precedent through the implementation of the mat building typology.

Team 10 and the Development of Mat

http://en.nai.nl/

Free University of Berlin

http://www.fu-berlin.de/

Free University of Berlin - Modular Spaces http://loveyousomat.tumblr.com/

Casbah - The Islamic City 20

http://design.epfl.ch/

Free University of Berlin - Open Spaces

http://loveyousomat.tumblr.com/


Infrastructure/Framework: a systematic modulation of building elements which provide an infrastructure/ framework to connect and service programmed space. Program & Spatial Flexibility: versatile spaces designed to evolve and grow over time in order to adapt to changes in size or program requirements. Context: a low rise high density structure that adapts to the surrounding built fabric with a local contextual response.

Photo by James Leng 2008

Design Theory Mat Building & Mat Urbanism

The program and form of the two case studies presented here are very different in form, program and building scale. The first, the VPRO office building by MVRDV completed in 1997, is a 10,500m2 4 storey building and the second is the Zürich Children’s hospital by Herzog and De Meuron scheduled for completion in 2018, is an 84,579m2 3 storey building. These differences are also seen in the mat building strategies employed in each building which categorize it as a mat building. There are 3 defining elements of mat building: Photo by James Leng 2008

Infrastructure/Framework

In both projects, share or public space which penetrates to the exterior function as infrastructure. The openings allow daylight penetration and provide a visual connection to the exterior which would otherwise be impossible with such large floor plates. In VPRO the structural grid becomes the framework around which the offices are laid out. The regular grid becomes a standard design module. In the Children’s Hospital it is the interior circulation between departments which define the modular spaces.

Photo by Rory Hyde 2009

VPRO Office Building, MVRDV, 1997

GROUND FLOOR ground floor plan

THIRD FLOOR second floor plan

GROUND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

-REGULAR COLUMN GRID -REGULAR COLUMN -CORE OPENINGS TOGRID EXTERIOR -CORE OPENINGS TO EXTERIOR 2. FLEXIBLE SPACES GROUND FLOOR 2. FLEXIBLE SPACES ground floor plan GROUND FLOOR

-OPEN & PRIVATE WORK AREAS -OPEN & PRIVATE AREAS -VARYING OFFICE WORK CONDITIONS -VARYING OFFICE CONDITIONS 3. CONTEXT 3. CONTEXT

Context

The projects respond to their context in different ways. VPRO, positioned on its lot with considerable distance away from adjacent buildings uses its glass facade as a means of reflecting its surroundings onto its exterior while the interior ground circulation of the Children’s Hospital connects with the pedestrian circulation existing on the site.

MVRDV (1997)

1. INFRASTRUCTURE 1. INFRASTRUCTURE

Program & Spatial Flexibility

The building program in both examples are designed within the established frame work. As the scale differs in the projects the framework is scaled to suit. The structural grid in VPRO although rigid and regular allows for movement and reconfiguration of open or defined offices throughout. The hospital with it’s larger defined spatial zones allows for departments to be updated, reorganized or shifted as necessary.

VPRO OFFICE BUILDING MVRDV VPRO(1997) OFFICE BUILDING Zürich Children’s Hospital, Herzog & De Meuron, 2012

SECOND FLOOR

FOURTH FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR third floor plan

FOURTH FLOOR fourth floor plan

VPRO Office Building, MVRDV, 1997

-OPEN LANDSCAPE AROUND second floor plan -OPEN LANDSCAPE AROUND Zürich Children’s Hospital, Herzog TO & De Meuron, 2012 -GLAZED WALLS EXTERIOR SECOND FLOOR -GLAZED WALLS TO EXTERIOR 21


Design Theory: Eisenman Hedjuk

Aviv Sarner & Nwamaka Onyenokwe Peter Eisenman In his writings, Eisenman divides his explanation into three texts Corbusier’s Venice Hospital

Text One: the emptiness of the future Eisenman describes his intention in the imposition of Corb’s grid the Cannaregio area. This grid is articulated as a series of voids, holes in the ground which can be seen as potential sites for future houses, or future graves. They embody the emptiness of rationality. Text Two: the emptiness of the present. Solid objects, lifeless blocks with no program inside. Same form of one of his previous house schemes at three different scales.The objects do not actually fit in the voids, they create emptiness around them symbolizing displacement, as if not meant to be there. Trace on the ground - of their movement, their detachment from life. A trace is a mark of absence of their former presence pointing to their true meaning - symbolizing absence.

“The Building is the City: Le Corbusier’s Unbuilt Hospital in....” SOCKS. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Sept. 2014. <http://socks-studio.com/2014/05/18/the-building-is-the-city-le-corbusiers-unbuilt-hospital-in-venice/>.

Corbusier and Eisenman’s scheme’s combined

“Eisenman’s Evolution: Architecture, Syntax, and New Subjectivity.” ArchDaily. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2014. <http:// www.archdaily.com/429925/eisenman-s-evolution-architecture-syntax-and-new-subjectivity/>.

Eisenman’s 11a house scheme http://www.eisenmanarchitects.com/

Text Three: the emptiness of the past. Eisenman constructs a diagonal line on the ground. This line marks the topological axis of symmetry for the objects and a ‘cut’ in the physical surface of the earth. It can also be seen as a never healing wound. This suggests there is another level, an inside, which cannot be forever submerged, it will erupt. Is this unconsciousness or the shadow of memory? Eisenman, Peter, Jean Bédard, and Alan Balfour. Cities of artificial excavation: the work of Peter Eisenman, 1978-1988. Montréal: Canadian Centre for Architecture ;, 1994. Print.

Corbusier and Eisenman’s scheme’s combined

http://www.meipi.org/mediterranean.meipi.php?open_entry=556

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Eisenman’s Cannaregio model

“Eisenman’s Evolution: Architecture, Syntax, and New Subjectivity.” ArchDaily. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Sept. 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/429925/eisenman-s-evolution-architecture-syntax-and-new-subjectivity/>.


Design Theory Peter Eisenman & John Hedjuk

John Hedjuk “The fundamental issue of architecture is that; does it affect the spirit or doesn’t it?” Described as something of a CULT HERO and also a GENIUS, Hejduk an Architect, Poet, Illustrator and Educator, was born and lived in New York and was a member of THE NEW YORK 5. Hejduk graduated from Harvard Graduate School of Design (1952-1953), taught between 1964 and 2000, and assumed the role as the first dean of the S.Chanin School of Architecture (1975-2000). With a few built work, this creative preferred publishing his drawings and illustrations. One of his most important works was his book; MASK OF MEDUSA, which is a collection of works from 19471983. This oeuvre is framed as a timeline of his body of work; beginning with work from his school years, through to his teaching years, carefully documented in various forms and mediums of illustration.

FRAME 7: MASQUE, Mask of Medusa

FRAME 7: MASQUE, Mask of Medusa

FRAME 1: Italian Sketches, Mask of Medusa

FRAME 1: Italian Sketches, Mask of Medusa

Mask of Medusa Hejduks book is broken down into frames, categorized in a timeline manner. 1947-1954 1954-1963 1963-1967 1968-1974 1974-1979 1900-1900 1979-1983

FRAME 1: SCHOOL YEARS FRAME 2: TEXAS|NY|NEW HAVEN|ITHACA FRAME 3: COOPER UNION & NY FRAME 4: THE BRONX FRAME 5: VENICE FRAME 6: POEMS FRAME 7: MASQUES NY|BERLIN

All images: Hejduk, John. Mask of Medusa: Works, 1947-1983. New York: Rizzoli, 1985. Print.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

FRAME 2: Texas House 1, Mask of Medusa

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Design Projects: Scales Madison Dozzi-Perry Andrew Chiu Anna Pavia Alykhan Neky Sandra Wojtecki

Interpreting the Mat Strategy through Scale Mat building/urbanism with its open-ended and non-hierarchical organizational strategy can achieve a large variation of interchangeable functions. As a result, creating many social interactions. Therefore, the more complex the programs, the stronger the social dynamic. Mat urbanism takes a city planning approach that embodies the qualities of a mat building strategy. Particularly, the concepts of the long, repetitive and flexible nature of mat building applied to sprawling city plans. The rather large area affected by the scale of Le Corbusier’s hospital and Zurich Children’s Hospital illustrates that through context, function, circulation and materiality, components that attribute to the Mat typology. The expansive nature of Le Corbusier’s hospital goes beyond the suggestion of the Mat typology through its poetic intervention and representation of its surrounding Venetian landscape and culture. Buildings at a smaller scale exemplify the qualities of a “mat building strategy” often through a singular extrapolation of one of the various definitions. However, the fact that a mat building cannot be isolated from its outdoor space and maintain its functionality is present in all. 24


The projects proposed by Ludwig Hilberseimer, Archizoom and Andrea Branzi are all radical repsonses to the societal conditions of their times. However, though decades apart, each proposal carries out four common ideas; cities in the new age of technology and globilization; the decentralization of cities; concepts of weak and agrarian urbanism and the dissolution of architecture.

Master Plan for Eindhoven, Andrea Branzi, 1999 -2000

No-Stop City, Archizoom, 1969

Design Projects Urban, Extra Large, Large, Medium, Small

Urban Scale

Scale No-Stop City, Archizoom, 1969

No-Stop City, Archizoom, 1969

No-Stop City, Archizoom, 1969

Ludwig Hilberseimer, The New City, 1944

25


Extra Large Scale The Free University of Berlin, designed by the architectural firm Candilis Josic Woods in 1963, explored the linkage of social sciences, architecture and urbanism. A “stem” and “web” structure was conceived by using an open-ended and nonhierarchical organizational strategy. In 1968, Alison and Peter Smithson applied similar ordering strategy to the Kuwait university, part of their Kuwait urban study proposal.

Free University of Berlin Smithson, A., “How toRecognize and Read Mat-Building” Architectural Design 1974, September. p.573-590

Mat Building response to the Free University of Berlin • • • • • • •

Interchangeability Maximizing interfaces and contact between programs Universal access: ramps, double height void Flexible structure for enlarging and expanding Important of cultural identity Important of old buildings Important of landscape

Mat Building response to Kuwait University • • • •

Existing building (old identity) strengthen the identity of the new plan 22.5 degree grid - the line of the Gulf coast Cooling towers in response to the local climate Kuwait University Masterplan Smithson, A.and P. Smithson, “Proposals for Restructuring Kuwait: The Smithsons Scheme” The Architectural Review1974,September.p.183-190

26

Kuwait University

“... the 1960s, when the Free University of Berlin was designed, it was a real mat building ...” - Peter Smithson


The expansive nature of Le Corbusier’s Venice Hospital goes beyond the components of Mat typology through its poetic intervention and representation of the Venetian landscape and culture. Governed by the external mechanisms of its context, it is designed contraire to the Children’s Hospital’s clear articulation of internal mechanisms. Both the Venetian Hospital and Herzog and de Meuron’s Children’s Hospital, can otherwise be identified as Mat Projects through the dissection of their context, function, circulation and materiality. 1911 Le Corbusier visists Venice Cholera outbreak

1928-1959 Congrès internationaux d’architecture modern Recreation, Industry, Residential, Infrastructure 1943 The Athens Charter is published

Level 02A Professional offices, outpatient services. Connection of Level 2a to Level 3.

Level 02B Connection of Level 2a to Level 3.

Level 03 Level of “Les infirmieres” with the pinwheel shape units that rotate and connect to one another.

Le Corbusier : Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965)

Scale

1912 Death in Venice Published, Thomas Mann

Level 01 Level of liason with the city. Additional Venues and linkes were provided create an extended networks with the city.

Origins Swiss-French Professional work Architect, Designer, painter, urban planner, writer, pioneers modern architecture. Project Locations Europe, India, America

Children’s Hospital Zürich, Herzog & de Meuron Zürich, Switzerland Icon amoung Mat Buildings Venice Hospital, Le Corbusier Venice, Italy

Design Projects Urban, Extra Large, Large, Medium, Small

Large Scale

Winning Entry for Kinderspital Zürich Competition First Phase of Design, May 2011

First Phase of Design, 1964-1965

Children’s Hospital

Scientific Research Building

1953 Team 10 Alison Smithson’s + Mat building typology 1972 Pruitt Igoe is demolished

Level 01

Level 02

Level 01

Level 02

1978 Herzog & de Meuron Basel Ltd established 2001 HdM Pritzker Prize Winner

North Section

South Section

0

30 10

120 m 60

27


Medium Scale Santa Caterina Market, Yokohama Terminal, and Villa VPRO exhibit a diverse range of mat strategies. Conceived as an ‘enabling surface’, Yokohama Terminal’s complex circulation design takes the foreground of the design process while the built form was deployed after. The Terminal then is different compared to other transportation buildings in that it does not clearly orient its users in a single direction. This notion of flexibility is also present in MVRDV’s Villa VPRO where an open concept office is grounded on a folded plane, allowing for a highly flexible collaborative office culture. Lastly Santa Caterina Market’s canopy serves to demarcate its program, unifying the many functions in a single design strategy.

Figure 3- Villa VPRO 1914 WWI Start

1918 WWI End

Figure 1 - Yokohama Circulation Diagram

Figure 2 - Santa Caterina Market Aerial

Figure 4 - Yokohama Terminal

Figure 5 - Santa Caterina Market

1928 CIAM Founded

1939 WWII Start

1945 WWII End

1953 Team 10 Formalized

1959 CIAM Disbanded

Figure 1. Circulation Diagram of Yokohama Terminal. Image taken from http://openbuildings.com/buildings/yokohama-internationalport-terminal-profile-1231/media

1943 Athens Charter

1900

1905

1910

1915

1920

1925

1930

1935

1945

1940

1950

1955

1960

Brutalism

Structuralism 1997 Barcelona’s Santa Caterina Market

1963 Candilis, Josic and Wood’s Berlin Free University

2002 FOA’s Yokohama Terminal

1974 Alison Smithson’s Mat Building 1972 Hertzberger’s Central Beheer Completed

1960

28

1965

1970

1975

2014 Present Day

1997 MVRDV’s Villa VPRO 2002 Stan Allen’s The Thick 2D

1980

1985

1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

Figure 2. Santa Caterina Market Aerial. Image taken from http:// mireiamartinarq.wordpress.com/ Figure 3. Villa VPRO. http://www.mvrdv.nl/en/projects/Villa_VPRO/ villa_vpro/ Figure 4. Yokohama International Port Terminal. Image taken from http://www.idesignarch.com/architecture-without-exteriors-inyokohama/ Figure 5. Santa Caterina Market Image taken from http://cdn-tours. architectureweekend.com/building-structures-in-la-ribera-quarter/ barcelona_santa_caterina_market_base.jpg


Design Projects Urban, Extra Large, Large, Medium, Small

Small Scale

STATISTICS 24 INDIVIDUAL HOUSES 3 STOREYS HIGH GROUND: PUBLIC SHOPS, CONCOURSE LEVEL, INDIVIDUAL ENTRANCES WITH PEBBLED COURTYARDS

Scale

The Amsterdam Orphanage, designed by Aldo Van Eyck in 1960, exemplifies the strategy of “matt building” through its compositional metrics. Designed to achieve the greatest amount of private views for each organized living unit, the one storey intervention took on an easily adaptable form of square segments. This module gave the design its unique proportional system, with large square units dedicated to public space, and conglomerations of small scale units for living spaces.

SECOND: BEDROOMS THIRD: LIVING ROOM, DINING ROOM, OPEN AIR “JAPANESE ROOMS”, OUTDOOR PATIO METRICS Amsterdam Orphange, Aldo Van Eyck, 1960 PROGRAM OMA’s Nexus World Housing was designed in 1991 and evolves around a strategy that internalizes PLACE MATT BUILDING private outdoor space. The organization of the design is the product of the outdoor void, vertically piercing AMBIGUITY BETWEEN THE BORDERS OF THE PROJECT the form and creating the sources of light and outdoor ORGANIZATION STRATEGY GENERATES FORM space for each unit. The height restricted building SITE STRATEGY LETTING THE CITY FLOW THROUGH THE PROJECT mass was most likely the source of the need for POROUS this design, having to accomodate as many unitsNON-ARTICULATED as FUNCTIONS SO THAT THE FULLEST RANGE OF EVENTS MAY TAKE PLACE possible with limited space for horizontal views.

INTEGRATED TRANSITIONAL SPACES ARE AS IMPORTANT AS THE NODES THEY CONNECT

Amsterdam Orphange, Aldo Van Eyck, 1960

METRICS PROGRAM PLACE

UNIT 1

WHAT IS A SMALL SCALE

UNIT 2

OUTDOOR SPACE Space Outdoor

Circulation CIRCULATION

Circulation CIRCULATION

Circulation

UNIT 1

BUILDING CANNOT BE ISOLATED AS OBJECT FROM THE OUTDOOR SPACE OR VOID AND

LIVING SPACE

LIVING SPACE

Living Space

MAINTAIN ITS FUNCTIONALITY

The Multi-Media Studio, designed by Kazuyo MATT BUILDING? Sejima in 1995 exemplifies the “matt strategy” in its MATT URBANISM: THE THICK 2D. STAN ALLEN. massing and articulation within the site. Carved into the earth to minimize the buildings impact on the surroundings, the form becomes an extension of the landscape with an accessible rooftop terrace. Its deep relationship with its surroundings creates an ambiguity between where the building starts and ends, creating a sense of porosity and ambiguity between project borders.

Outdoor Space OUTDOOR SPACE

2

2

Nexus World Housing, OMA, 1991

1 GROUND FLOOR

1.8 M

Living Space

Nexus World Housing, OMA, 1991 1 SECOND FLOOR

METRICS PROGRAM PLACE

METRICS PROGRAM

MULTI-MEDIA STUDIO

PLACE

KAZUYO SEJIMA

Multi-Media Studio, Kazuyo Sejima, 1995

METRICS PROGRAM

Multi-Media Studio, Kazuyo Sejima, 1995

29


Architecture of Health:

Assisted Living

Rebecca Tsang Seyedehsara Ghorashi Calvin Fung Tim Melnichuk Babak Teimoori Lisa Marshall Chowdhury Tasneem Rahman

“a long-term care alternative that involves the delivery of personal and health care services in a group setting that is residential in character and appearance, while optimizing residents’ physical and psychological independence” - Kane and Brown (1994) and Regnier (1994) Assisted Living is the bridge between independent living and Long Term Care or nursing homes. Majority of residents in Assisted Living are seniors over 65. However, it is not exclusive to the elderly; Assisted Living is for anyone who requires assistance in activities of daily living because of physical/cognitive disability or chronic conditions. It provides personal and health assistance in one or a few activities of daily living (ADLs) including: minor mobility issues, bathing, dressing, toileting, grooming, meal preparation, laundry, or housekeeping. If the facility cannot safely provide the required level of care to a resident, they can move on to Long Term Care, where trained nurses and medical equipment are available. Assisted Living is based on a couple of fundamental goals: enhance independence and autonomy, create a sense of community, residential in character, and reinforces the idea of “aging in place”. In the context of Venice, an increasingly popular form of assisted living is to hire a Badante, a livein caregiver, who is not professionally trained, but can provide a level of personal care and companionship to those who need it, including: running errands, helping them get around the city, basic activities of daily living, and on a more personal level, companionship.

30

In Venice, “Aging-in-place” in familiar and comfortable settings is not just the residence, but the streets, where community and cultural interactions occur. Not in buildings, but in the residual space between buildings.

Long Term Care

Long-term care is a facility that offers a range of services and supports supplied to resident’s personal care needs who require on-site delivery of supervised care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including professional health services and high levels of personal care and services and assistance with the basic personal tasks of everyday life (ADLs), such as: Bathing, Dressing, Using the toilet, transferring (to or from bed or chair), caring for incontinence, and eating, housework, taking medication, preparing and cleaning up after meals, shopping for groceries or clothes, using the telephone or other communication devices, responding to emergency alerts such as fire alarms. Other services provided: physiotherapy, restorative care and occupational therapy, behavioral management, Alzheimer and dementia care, pain and symptom management, skin and wound care, enhanced physical care (dependent on resident needs). The level or type of care offered under Longterm care can be varied from resident needs to overall facility type. Criteria for long term care admission: have severe behavioral problems on a continuous basis; are cognitively impaired ranging from moderate to severe; are physically dependent with medical needs that require professional nursing care and a planned program to retain or improve functional ability; or are clinically complex with multiple disabilities and/or complex medical conditions that require professional nursing care, monitoring and/or specialized skilled care. Long term centers are similar in program to dorms however very different in atmosphere. Each resident has their own room however they share rooms such as bathing/spa rooms, kitchen/dining rooms, laundry, cafes, and lounges. The difference is the 24 hr care for the residents living at the facility.


Terminal Care

“Hospice can be a busy place where more of life is lived at death’s door than has ever been lived in life’s playground” Hospice care/Terminal care supports terminally ill persons through the dying process with a focus on maintaining dignity and quality of life while providing palliation or controlling unpleasant symptoms to the extent possible in a time of great emotional and physical stress in a home-like environment especially for people who don’t have family members or anyone else to act as primary care givers. Growing old is not an illness, but it can involve some handicaps. Of course, elderly people with physical or mental complaints are eligible for treatment in hospital or psychiatric organization. The original issue of what has come to be called for the elderly people lies therefore not in the building of care institution, but in creation in housing specially intended for that targeted group. According to Ministry of Health and longterm care in Ontario the term “complex care” is used interchangeably with “complex continuing care and chronic care”. Complex continuing care provides continuing, medically complex and specialized services to patients over extended periods of time. Complex Care is provided for people who have long-term illnesses or disabilities typically requiring skilled, technology-based care not available at home or in long-term care facilities. Complex Care provides patients with room, board and other necessities in addition to medical care.

History:

Architecture of Health Assisted Living, Long Term Care, Complex Care, Terminal Care

Complex Care

Cicely Saunders brought the concept of a hospice to the modern medical community. Saunders and Kubler-Ross spread the ideas of the hospice all across that lead people talking about hospice care as a viable alternative to dying in a Hospital. Architecture: “The Quality of the dying process is affected to a large extent by the physical surrounding in which the process occurs.” Art and architecture are increasingly being seen as therapeutic modalities in healthcare settings, architects are being challenged to delve deeper into finding ways to synthesize functional, aesthetic, symbolic, and spiritual dimensions of designing for the terminally ill in alternative health care facilities. 31


Architecture of Health: Formal Expression - Sense of Home - Natural Light - Inviting - Views - Community - Warmth

Assisted Living - independent with minor assistance - autonomy - like a hotel or condo

Amica Windsor Assisted Living and Retirement Community

Long Term Care - 24 hour assistance - functional disabilities - like a dorm

Aaltoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paimio Sanatorium

Josef Weichenberger Architects - Nursing Home Simmering

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Amica Windsor Assisted Living and Retirement Community

Sergison Bates - Huise-Zingem Elderly Care Home


- 24 hour medical care - chronic illness - like a hospital

Terminal Care - pain and emotional support - non-curative, comfort, dignity - like home

Rehab Center for Spinal cord and brain injuries basel switzerland

Robin House: Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospice

Architecture of Health Assisted Living, Long Term Care, Complex Care, Terminal Care

Complex Care

Main Entrance: Playful Form

Images from: Robin House, Gareth Hoskins Architects, Glasgow, 2005 http://www.glasgowarchitecture.co.uk/childrens-hospice

CAMH, Toronto, Canada

Bedroom Wing: Connection to Nature

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Architecture of Health: Typologies & Rooms

Assisted Living - independent with minor assistance - autonomy - like a hotel or condo

Long Term Care - 24 hour assistance - functional disabilities - like a dorm

bergzicht assisted living plan

ltc plan perspective

racetrack typology

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amica windsor floor plans

neighbourhood cluster typology


- 24 hour medical care - chronic illness - like a hospital

Terminal Care - pain and emotional support - non-curative, comfort, dignity - like home

Architecture of Health Assisted Living, Long Term Care, Complex Care, Terminal Care

Complex Care

robin house, gareth hoskins architects, ground floor plan rehab center for spinal cord and brain injuries basel, switzerland

standard complex care room

robin house, gareth hoskins architects, standard hospice room

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Architecture & Urban History Building Types Urban Morphology

abstract timeline a. marshes - land of refuge

https://www.mosevenezia.eu/?page_id=253&lang=en

b. merchants - trade is necessary

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Venice_arsenale_2_1724.JPG

c. marches - venice on parade

http://uploads8.wikiart.org/images/canaletto/a-regatta-on-the-grand-canal.jpg

d. marshals - foreign invasion

a

http://www.napoleon-series.org/research/government/diplomatic/c_venice.html

e. merchandise - venice as commodity

http://cruiseline.com/advice/before-you-cruise/what-to-know/7-popular-tourist-trapsand-where-to-go-instead

Adryanne Quenneville Shannon Clayton Nazanin Sepehry-Rad The architectural and urban history of Venice, researched by Adryanne Quenneville, can be summarized into five M’s: marshes, merchants, marches, marshals and merchandise. An overlying theme in Venetian history is the continual process of expansion and contraction of land, power and people. This, in turn, informed the architecture of the city. Further research on Venetian architecture, analyzed by Nazanin Sepehry-Rad, explored the main typologies in Venice; including palaces and common housing. Common housing is categorized into two main groups: single family housing and larger scale residential developments. Palaces in Venice serve two functions simultaneously. They are both residences and trade centres for the merchants. Considering this duality, the main floor and the mezzanine in the palaces are dedicated to trade activities while the first and the second floors house the family members and servants. Finally, Shannon Clayton’s research on urban morphology outlined the numerous layers of Venice through the framework of Kevin Lynch’s five elements of imageability: Paths, Edges, Nodes, Landmarks, and Districts. The urban elements in Venice are the Calli, Canals, Rio, Campi, Churches, Campaniles, and ‘Island Districts’. The focus of her presentation was on the growth pattern of Venice through the gradual expansion and coalescence of separate island parishes.

b

5

history of expansion/contraction

c

d

e

Cannaregio

Santa Croce San Polo

Castello

San Marco Dorsoduro

San Marco Dorsoduro

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original six districts

architect jacopo sansovino

architect carlo scarpa


Architecture and Urbanism of Venice Urban Histories, Building Types, Urban Morphologies

canals and rii campi churches campaniles calli

venice layers

campo san polo case study

morphological growth diagram

37


1

T-shaped

Common Housing- Single Family

http://www.oqueeisso.blog.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/1.jpg

2

5

L-shaped Ca Loredan - T shaped `

Common Housing- Single Family

http://ytaba.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/201403241.jpg?w=497

C-shaped

Ca dell’Angelo - L shaped

U-shaped

by Antonio Salvadori in Architect’s guide to Venice, 1990

Second level

Common Housing- Terraces

Common Housing- Complex

http://tabikabe.jp/comdigi/wp-content/uploads/526_s.jpg

http://maps.google.ca

Piano Nobile Mezzanine Ground Hall

Courtyard

4

Portico

Canal

Palaces- Ca d’Or

38

http://www.wga.hu/art/b/bon/bartolom/ca_doro2.jpg

Palaces- Ca Contarini dal Zqffo

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/26959160.jpg

Palace Building Typology

by Antonio Salvadori in Architect’s guide to Venice, 1990


http://maps.google.ca

39


40 source: http://clipart-finder.com/clipart/world-map-simple.html


A TRIP TO VENICE An Experience

Organized by Professor Marco Polo and accompanied by Professors Wrigglesworth, Cirka, and Ripley, the studio embarked on a 10-day excursion to Venice (and its surrounding cities), immersing ourselves into the architecture and culture the city is most famous for. As informed tourists, the layers of Venice began to unfold through experience. From Marco Polo Airport to the Ali Laguna, finally setting foot onto the island, meandering through calli and bridges with heavy suitcases, arriving at Ca Venezia Hostel was a mission in itself. The next couple of days of exploring, wandering, observing, navigating, seeing and doing kept us all busy and content in an endless exploration of learning and experience, also becoming a critical analysis of our research projects and interim presentations. The reality of the city’s tides, the nooks and crannys of hope and worship, crumbling brick, fading plaster, the floating vaporetto docks, algaecovered steps, gondolas, tourists, altanas, bridges, uneven paving, and a lot of walking made us all very aware of the context and the opportunities it brings. Two day-trips brought us out of the island and lagoon, into the cities of Possagno, Treviso, Vicenza, and Verona to study the architecture of Carlo Scarpa and Palladio.

Curated by Rem Koolhaus, the 13th Architecture Biennale showcased the Fundamentals in Architecture through various elements. A combination of discrete yet interconnected elements, architecture through the lenses of each element was explored. The National Pavilions then had a single theme to respond to: Absorbing Modernity 1914 – 2014, highlighting key moments of modernization in the past century. Italian Pavilion’s theme is exactly the problem we had: the task of grafting new into old. How does one design a hundred-thousand square meters of new program into such a delicate, historical corner of the city? How do we determine what to keep? What to demolish? Immersing in the culture raises more questions and inquiries than it answers. Yet, at the end of the day, a bottle of Prosecco, pizza, pasta, and wine & cheese on an altana was all we needed. The following section documents this experience in a series of photographs: new and old, architecture and details, urban fabric and public life, friendships and bonding moments, learning about the context of Venice together, but also learning about each other in the process.

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ITINERARY Ostello Ca Venezia Piazza San Marco Cannaregio Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Carlo Scarpa Olivetti Showroom, Carlo Scarpa Museo Corrrer, Palladio Exhibit Punta della Dogana Museum, Tadao Ando Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari IUAV, Carlo Scarpa gate & garden

possagno

treviso

Museo Canova & Plaster Cast Gallery, Possagno, Carlo Scarpa Brion Cemetary , Treviso, Carlo Scarpa

vicenza

verona

venice

Villa Rotunda, Vicenza, Palladio Villa Valmarana ai Nani, Vicenza, Tiepolo frescoes Teatro Olimpio, Vicenza, Palladio Palladian Museum, Vicenza Castelvecchio Museum, Verona, Carlo Scarpa Banco Popolare, Carlo Scarpa Biennale Architecttura, Fundamentals, Giardini & Arsenale

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adriatic sea

source: http://maps.google.ca


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floor wall ceiling roof door window facade balcony corridor fireplace toilet stair escalator elevator ramp


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DESIGN PROJECT Introduction

Students are to design a “continuum of care” complex accommodating Assisted Living, Long-Term Care, Complex Care, and Terminal Care components. Students will employ mat building / mat urbanism as an ordering strategy as they conceive the design on the site of Le Corbusier’s unbuilt hospital project located in the Cannaregio district of Venice.

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56


57


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Cannaregio

Venice is divided into six sestieri (districts) each with its own history and characteristics. The Cannaregio Canal was historically the gateway to the island from the mainland, until the construction of the railway in the 60s. The name Cannaregio translates to Royal Canal, and is still one of the major arteries of the city, feeding directly into the Grand Canal. The development of Cannaregio began in the 11th Century and was primarily an area for working class housing and manufacturing. In the 16th Century, Jews were restricted to living in the Venetian Ghetto, which was a heavily guarded area, divided into the Ghetto Nuovo and Ghetto Vecchio. The area is still a centre for Jewish life in Venice with a number of synagogues in the vicinity.

maps generated using: mapbox studio (https://www.mapbox.com/)

The Cannaregio Sestiere is relatively free from tourists, with only a few boutique hotels along the Cannaregio Canal. It is mostly residential and peaceful, a place to find authentic Venetian culture: locals enjoying their time in a campo, kids playing on the streets, and numerous cafes, bars, and restaurants along the canals. 59


Site - Context


Source: https://www.studyblue.com/notes/note/n/final/deck/1569303


3.66m

3

2.26m

2b

2.26m

Le Corbusier’s Venice Hospital

2a

2

46 500m -hospitalization

2

12 650m -services/circulation

2

29 500m -medical services -prevention care -specialized care -rehabilitation

5.00m

L’area dell’ex Macello di S. Giobbe vista dalla laguna, arrivando a Venezia: più chiare le parti restaurate; a destra, i nuovi edifici sedi dei Dipartimenti della Facoltà di Economia, Università Cà Foscari (foto: M. Condotta).

1

Approximate Height: Area ex Macello ed ex Mulini Passuello: progetto generale - piani terra, stesura 2001 (archivio Studio Spigai). 13.66m

Source: http://www.lateriziofacciavista.it/FAV/default.aspx

2

21 850m -public access -administration -general services

Approximate Area: 2 110 500m

Site - Slaughterhouse, Hospital, School This was Le Corbusier’s final commission (1964), a preliminary design having been made known just prior to his death by drowning in 1965, some 50 years ago. For its part, Cannaregio is one of the most potent districts of Venice – culturally, socially, and politically. Until mid-century, it was the Jewish Ghetto. Located next to the railway station, serving as the defacto gateway to the city for those arriving by land, the Cannaregio district has been interrogated ever since Le Corbusier’s project attained a near-mythic status, most notably in 1978, when a coterie of avant-garde architects were invited to help imagine the area’s future. Provocative visions by the likes of Raphael Moneo, who mined its historical typologies and morphology as a kind of energy for the future, Peter Eisenman, who championed memory and fantasy over history while drawing (con)text from the unbuilt hospital project, and John Hejduk, whose “Thirteen Watchtowers for Cannaregio” pen and watercolour image refreshed the area’s peculiar allure. Dirty, gritty, far from pretty, the Cannaregio district was experienced by these individuals and others not so much as the space of a distant past, but as the condition of a global present, the condition of (post)modernity. 63


INDIVIDUAL DESIGN PROJECTS

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Inceptions of Venice Anna Pavia The capillary action of seawater, seeping into the Venetian built fabric is responsible for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s steady deterioration. Water is the catalyst in the steady emigration of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inhabitants. This environmental condition can be poetically interpreted to restore the vibrancy of the Cannaregio region of Venice; by piercing and repurposing the existing residential and commercial components with flexible, social program, the proposed healthcare facility can be seamlessly integrated into the existing fabric. The inertia of city is based on additions to the peripherals, regenerative programs for the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sustainment. A healthcare facility and waterfront expansion is proposed to offer a flexible area of social interaction, an architecture of healing that bleeds into the existing fabric serving as a catalyst for the continuous urban development of the Venice. proposed site plan

68


+

=

=

_dictated by the social culture of the city; using the “in-betweens” of the Venetian fabric to base the program and form of medical facilities _shaping the thresholds to initiate healing

voids in the landscape

_Cannaregio canal as linkage between the peripheral and the city center _ views and vistas along the canal

voids as natural landscape

_are these landscapes natural? _what is the value of link between green and health in the

patterns in the social landscape

cultural context of Venice, a city of stone?

_linear hierarchy

hospice care

_reestablishing connectivity between peripherals and neighbourhood

_dense, under-utilized facades

_integration of medical cares within existing neighbourhood; promotes healing, sensation of “home”

_new program interprets old forms (Le Corbusier’s strategy) _emphasis of the thresholds between neighbourhood and peripherals

_limited connections to existing neighbourhood

_future development: expansion of recreation + sustainable landscape onto waterfront

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Inceptions of Venice Anna Pavia

street condition

assisted living

4

3

2

1

1 2 3 4 0

70

8

m

public dining hall mezzanine private roof garden private residences

south section detail


0

16 6

m

north elevation

north elevation detail

level 04

level 03

medical care unit

exterior green space level 02 circulation/ congregation

services

leasable space/ support spaces

level 01

program overview

community hall

71


Inceptions of Venice Anna Pavia

complex + long- term care

south section detail

72


medical care unit

CB

communal bathing

nursing station

leasable/ support spaces

exterior green space

services

circulation/ congregation

research/ classrooms

level 04

level 03

level 02

level 01

pharmacy entrance

program overview

0

16 6

m

south section

73


The Healing Village Adrian Bica The Healing Village looks to analyze the social dynamic of Venice to integrate aspects of this dynamic into the architecture, creating a health center that provides a meaningful end of life experience for its inhabitants. Built form manifests into a series of social spaces with a variety of scales, organized as the home group, the sister group, and the community group, each promoting varying intimacies of social healing behavior. The community group is defined through the large scale community spaces consisting of two major campos and a series of smaller campos overlooking the water. The sister group consisting of the community gardens on the second and third floor on each of the structures invites the public into the building to promote an active, energetic and lively atmosphere. The home, sister, and community groups together form a village in which healing happens through varying intimacies of social interactions, a reference to Veniceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dynamic social scales together forming an intimate community. master plan proposal

structural plane

74

ground floor - commercial

first floor - long term & complex care

second and third floor - assisted living


HOME GROUP UP TO 10 PEOPLE

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel

SISTER GROUP

UP TO FIVE HOME GROUPS

COMMUNITY GROUP

UP TO THREE SISTER GROUPS

EATING IN SMALL GROUPS

EATING IN LARGE GROUPS

VISITING COMMUNITY CAMPO

INTIMATE FRIENDSHIPS

ASSISTED BATHING

PEOPLE WATCHING

PERSONAL MEDICINE

ASSISTED MEDICINE

FAMILY OUTINGS

PERSONAL HYGIENE

AIDED MEDICINE

NEW FRIENDSHIPS

CAFE PERSONAL HYGIENE

TRAVELING WITH FAMILY

SHARED LAUNDRY FAMILY VISITS

PERSONAL BUSINESS

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel the intimate moment

BABY SITTING

COMMUNITY GARDEN WALKS

SPEND TIME WITH CLOSE FRIENDS

Source: http://tripwow.tripadvisor.com/Venice The Busy Moment

Source: http://tripwow.tripadvisor.com/Venice the busy moment

sister group 1

75


The Healing Village Adrian Bica

1

2

3 approaching sister group 1

1

2

4

3

5

7

6

9

8

A

8.

7.

6.

2.

5.

3.

4.

B

1. C

9.

community gardens

D

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

E

Legend

76

public campo

1 - Shared Amenity Space 2 - Administration 3 - Administration 4 - Storage 5 - Lobby 6 - Storage and Disposal 7 - Administration 8 - Commercial 9 - Secondary Circulation 10 - Shared Amenity Space 11 - Lobby 12 - Administration 13 - Storage 14 - Janitors Closet 15 - Office 16 - Office 17 - Office 18 - Office

10.

18. F

11.

12.

13.

15.

16.

17..

14. G

10

11

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13

14

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1

5

2

home group intimate space 1

2

4

3

5

A

7

6

9

8

8. 3.

3.

3.

3.

3.

5.

3.

6.

1.

6.

6.

7.

6.

B

11.

4. C

2. 3.

3.

3.

3.

3.

5.

3.

9.

D

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

10. 11.

Legend

1 - Lobby 2 - Administration 3 - Complex Care Units 4 - Nurse Stations 5 - Home Group Intimate Spaces 6 - Long Term Care Units 7 - Nurse Area 8 - Storage and Disposal 9 - Community Gardens 10 - Home Group Balconies 11 - Home Group Intimate Spaces

11.

11.

11.

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7.

6.

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G

10

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home group intimate space from exterior

77


The Healing Village Adrian Bica

1 view from residential area to community gardens 1

2

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7

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8

E

A

7. B

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3. C

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3.

9.

6.

sister group - perspective looking north west

2.

3.

3.

D

3.

I

3.

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1 - Lobby 2 - Administration 3 - Assisted Living and Long Term Care 4 - Home Group Intimate Spaces 5 - Amenity Space 6 - Communal Dining 7 - Nurse Area 8 - Balcony 9 - Community Gardens

sister group - perspective looking east

4.

8.

4.

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6.

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3.

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8. 10

78

8.

4.

Legend

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12

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20


1 master plan proposal perspective looking north

master plan proposal perspective looking west

master plan proposal perspective looking north west 4

3

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4. 4.

4. 3.

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4.

4. 9.

8.

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13

12

THIRD FLOOR PLAN Legend

8.

1 - Lobby 2 - Administration 3 - Assisted Living 4 - Home Group Intimate Spaces 5 - Amenity Space 6 - Communal Kitchen 7 - Nurse Area 8 - Balcony 9 - Community Gardens 10 - Classroom

8.

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79


Architecture of Hope Babak Teimoori Perhaps no other city on earth wears as cosmopolitan a face as Venice. It is a city made on physical, social and cultural layers. Magnificently varied, it is the product of fusion of three great and contrasting cultures across the span of the centuries. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique urban scale, its nodes, edges, pathways, landmarks, and focal points which serve as community gathering space that can be concept for healing environment for elderly people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be separated at the final stage of their life span. So these focal points and layers initially shaped my deconstructed and decentralized program inside the site.

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

80

a critical venice


Street Net work

Carport 0

30

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori 10

120

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

m

60

Circulation

Service Regulating Liness

Assisted Living Long term Complex Hospice

Assisted Living Care

assisted living

Long Term Care Hospice Care Complex

long term care complex care

Main Service 30

0 10

University

120 m 60

proposed site plan

Community Center Cafe

hospice care

hospice

Corbeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospitalentrance Area 30

0 10

120 m

calle

Existing buildings 60

university Ryerson University Host Babak Teimoori serviceBuilding

Demolish

green space

site plan

Existing buildings

81


Nurs Station

Complex

Nurs Station

The Architecture of Hope Bsbsk Teimoori

Complex

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

Therapy, Admin

-

form finding

Court Yard

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

---

---

Level 6 18.00

A

Admin

Presentation scheme

Outpatient clinic 4

Admin

B

Level 5

3 Main Ent Long Term and Assisted Living

Rec and Waiting

1

2

14.40

Circulation Common Space C

Common Spaces Coutyard Main Ent Long Term and Assisted Living Outpatient clinic

10.80

5

Rec and Waiting Secondery Entr Nurs and rec

Level 4

Secondery Entr Nurs and rec

-

-

15

Common Space 9

Transitional space

Transitional space

-

11

-

Coutyard

Level 3

89

16

7.20

Secondery Entr Nurs 13.80 and rec 49

---

E

Level 2

Circulation

3.60

90

Common Space 14

F Common Spaces 13

Circulation

Level 1

-

G

0.00

-

1st floor plan

Communal

---

-

---

Presentation scheme

Long Term Bedroom Long Term Bedroom

Circulation

76

Long Term Bedroom Nurs and Support

75

Long Term Bedroom

Complex Care

50

77

Court Yard Day Room

---

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

52

53

54

55

51

Circulation

Long Term Bedroom

56 Court Yard

A

Long Term Bedroom Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

76

75

Nurs and Support

Nurs and Support

50

77

57

Day Room

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Nurs and Support

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Presentation scheme

Nurs and Support

Nurs and Support

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78

Assisted living

Assisted living

Assisted living

Assisted living

16

17

18

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20

View Lounge 21

Courtyard

Nurs and Support Nurs

B

Circulation

Nurs

C

Assisted living

Assisted living

B

Long Term Bedroom

B

Nurs

Nurs and Support

A

Presentation scheme

A

Lib Way finding

C Nurs and Support

Nurs

Nurs and Support

81

78

C

Support

Lib Way finding

Vertical Circulation

74

29

View Lounge

74

Nurs and Support Nurs and Support

58

15

58

15

Court Yard

73

83

Court Yard

73

83

30

87

Support

Courtyard

31

85

-

Nurs and Support

Assisted living -

72

-

2.50

-

Nurs

Nurs and Support

Nurs and Support

82

Nurs and Support

Long Term Bedroom

67

66

Long Term Bedroom Long Term Bedroom 65

64

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

63

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61

F

37.15

Long Term Bedroom 69

Long Term Bedroom 68

Day Room

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

70

67

66

Long Term Bedroom Long Term Bedroom 65

64

5.18

23

F

Assisted living

Assisted living

24

25

Assisted living Assisted living

View Lounge 28

27

26

84 Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

Long Term Bedroom

63

62

61

4.80

Long Term Bedroom

70

7.05

68

Day Room

7.05

Long Term Bedroom

Day Room

71

4.80

7.05

69

Assisted living

Nurs and Support 60

60

5.08

Circulation

Nurs and Support

Day Room 84

E

79

E

80

80

3.20

79 Circulation

3.05

82

6.35

Nurs

2.05

-

71 Long Term Bedroom

---

22

---

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Nurs and Support

F

-

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Nurs and Support 72

Circulation

15

Vertical Circulation

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59

-

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Nurs and Support Nurs and Support

16

E

G

G

G

2nd floor plan, complex care

82

-

Nurs and Support

7.05

Assisted Living

Nurs and Support

3rd floor plan, complex care

4th and 5th floor plan, assisted living

-


1 2 3

4 5 6

7

8 9,a

J 14 13 Rec

Mech

31

27

A

12 Storage

K

10 11

Staff

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5

Workshop

Workshop

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3

Assited Living

9

Bank and PB

B

2 Administration 19

Administration Art and crafts

20

Arts and Crafts 28 29 Community

Main Kitchen

L

168

25

Reception

Circulation

Room Legend

Administration

24

170

Cafe and Beauty Shop

service

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30

21

Administration

c

Art and crafts Arts and Crafts Bank and PB Cafe and Beauty Shop Change UP

Common Spaces

Circulation

D E

171

Club Activity Common Spaces Community Gym F

Lavatory

Multi-Purpose Room

Y

Main Kitchen

40

Mech

Long Term Care

Multi-Purpose Room Music Gym

N

G

22

Lavatory

Tv Room

Club Activity

Club Activity

37

36

35

Rec Reception

Change 51

Music

172

service

43

Staff Storage M Tv Room Workshop

R

Q

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AA

BB

CC

Long Term Care

1

long term and assisted living care, first floor, repurposed building 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9,a J 14 Common Area

13

181

A

12

Therapy 182

10 11

Therapy

K

183 Therapy

Therapy

184

185

9 Therapy

B

186

Circulation

L c

Service 180

Medical Aid

Room Legend Circulation Common Area Service D E

Therapy DN

Therapy 244

F Y Therapy 179

N

G Therapy 178

Therapy

Therapy

Therapy

Therapy

177

176

175

187

Therapy 174

M CC

R

Q

P

S

Z

AA

BB

Social interaction

CC

1 2 3

courtyard render

long term and assisted living, 2nd floor, medical aid 4

5

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7

8

9,a

J 14 13

A

12

One-Bed Long Term Care

K

One-Bed Long Term Care

251

250

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10

One-Bed Long Term Care

One-Bed Long Term Care

One-Bed Long Term Care

89

102

101

9 One-Bed Long Term Care

B

100 One-Bed Long Term Care

Day Room

One-Bed Long TermOne-Bed Long Term Care Care

242 One-Bed Long Term Care

97

99 One-Bed Long Term Care

98

96

72

L Interactive Space 91

Nurs station

c

Balcony

85

One-Bed Long Term Care

86

Room Legend

Nurse suport

Nurs Station

243

80

71 Nurse station

2 Bed Long Term Care

65

2-Bed Long Term Care

2 Bed Long Term Care

One-Bed Long Term Care

95

70

Nurse station

Balcony Nurse station

00

UP

105

R

Nurse station 106

Lab

Family Room

D

104

1.

Circulation Day Room

2-Bed Long Term Care

Circulation

94

166

79

One-Bed Long Term Care 69

E

Interactive Space Lab

Lab

78

One-Bed Long Term Care

Lab

Massage

F

93

Y

Massage room

68

2-Bed Long Term Care

77

Nurs station

One-Bed Long Term Care

73

Nurs Station

67

Circulation 167

Nurs station Nurse station Nurse suport

N

Day Room

One-Bed Long Term Care Staff Accomedation

Staff Accomedation

76

74

57

One-Bed Long Term Care

One-Bed Long Term Care

58

59

One-Bed Long Term One-Bed Long Term Care Care 60

61

One-Bed Long Term Care

Massage

55

56

One-Bed Long Term Care

62

G

103

Massage room

Family Room Staff Accomedation

One-Bed Long Term Care

63

1

One-Bed Long Term One-Bed Long Term Care Care 64 66

M

R

Q

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S

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Z

AA

BB

CC

long term care, 3rd and 4th floor diagram

1 4

section perspective

5 6

7

8 9,a

J 14 13 12

A

10 11

K 9

B

L

Interactive spaces 253

c

D E

F Y

N

G

Interactive spaces 252

M

assisted living, 5th floor diagram R

Q

P

S

Z

AA

BB

CC

83


Section Perspective

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

The Architecture of Hope Babak Teimoori

assisted living section

Cafe

MS

AL,LT

Circulation

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

assisted living floor plan

Ryerson University assisted living Babak Teimoori Circulation Therapy Admin Cafe Community Center 84


Walk Way To Main Hub

Slop To Calle Magazzen

hospice floor plan

Program Community Center Cafe Courtyard Shared area

Ryerson University Babak Teimoori

Program

interior render - home like environment

hospice care section

85


Building Dialogue Andrew Chiu Drawing inspiration from the site visit to Venice, as well as research on mat building/urbanism. This design proposal is to create an open network for spatial dialogue between buildings and the surrounding context. The introduction of the new canal into the site not only provides needed infrastructure for services, it reflects Veniceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity as a water city. Combining new buildings with the integration of existing buildings on site, the planning strategy gives the impression that the buildings are growing out of the site. The project is informed by the preliminary design of Le Corbusierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1964 unbuilt hospital on the same site. It has a capacity of 50,000 square meters of space. A flexible structure is proposed to accommodate new buildings on land and beyond the shoreline, as well as integrating existing buildings into the urban fabric. 0

30 10

120 m

site plan

60

assisted living long term care complex care hospice care primary care

0

86

30 10

120 60

m

site plan

a critical Venice


87


Building Dialogue Andrew Chiu 88

diagram - existing condition

diagram - existing public access

diagram - new canal proposal

diagram - demolation

diagram - improved public access with new canal

proposal


study model

study model

5 study model

study model

study model

study model

study model

89


Building Dialogue Andrew Chiu design sketches

design sketches design sketches

design sketches

90

design sketches

design sketches


Venice photo

Venice photo

design model

Venice photo

Venice photo

design model

91


Reshaping Solid & Void

8 4

1

Aviv Sarner 1

8

Venice’s solid and void relationship, unexpected layers of meaning, programs, and façades is diverse and rich in ways that are hard to emulate. The importance of the in between spaces in Venice, of the coincident interactions to the social and economic fabric are inseparable from the city. Aside from these existing conditions in Venice, the project attempted to develop guiding principles for this care facility - a concern for the future, shared community and holistic and spiritual approach were some of the guiding principles in the design The starting point was an analysis of Peter Eisenman’s reinterpretation of Corbusier’s Venice Hospital. Building upon both Eisenman and Corbusier’s grids, in developing further interpretation of my own grid in response to site conditions in a way of creation a demarcation of space. The project attempted to relate and remark on ideas discussing memory of place, void and solid relationships, the collective space and memory and in between spaces through the notion of past present and future.

4 3 5 2

8 6

5

6

7

1 new walk way 2 communal amenities 3 retail 4 assisted living 5 complex care 6 long term 7 hospice 8 vaporetto stop

8

future

medical aid

accessibility

growth

0

30 10

community

hollistic/spiritual

social interaction

sense of place

chance meetings

new home

120 m 60

site plan

open space

reflection

circulation

open social space

Complex Care

Assisted Living

Hospice hope

re-purpose

92

common amenities

Long Term Care

proposed program


calle and campo solid void relationship

rich facade solid void relationship

solid and void in place creation

solid and void in place creation

massing diagram

93


Reshaping Solid & Void Aviv Sarner 94

Le Corbusier Venice Hospital grid

Personal interpretation

Eisenman grid interpretation

Layers overlay


complex care: floor 4 typical plan

Complex care section

95


Reshaping Solid & Void Aviv Sarner complex care south elevation

typical long term care plan

96

long term east elevation


experiential section

site elevation

97


LIFE IS BACK TO VENICE Sarah Ghorashi

The continuum of care design in Venice is a project considering the culture, context of the city. As Venice is the city on water, I was inspired by water taxies and tried to read the map of vaporetto. My approach was to apply the least intervention on site and keep the valuable context. I looked for green spots and located most parts of required components on them. A linear zone for assisted living to provide the view and light near Canal which is more connected and integrated to the city context. Considering the public path and water access, I locate the Long-term care close to assisted living. The Complex care is located near train station to provide quick access to other hospitals. Hospice is the spot above university for research issues. Reflective and transparent material choice helps to expose the idea of mirror for old Venice facades.

Map of vaporetto stations. Image taken from: http://turotvet.com/files/venice-vaporetto-map.jpg

Map of Venice

Inspiration diagram. Image taken from: https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=_WPaur6XF0U

court yard

Random journeys Of the City Vaporetto stations.

Vaporetto grid.

assisted living long term care complex care hospice care green area circulation

98

proposed site plan

0

30 10

120 60

m

Program distribution


Forms of the Vaporetto grid are applied to the site and reshaped considering the existing buildings.

Reshaped components of proposal considering the existing buildings

proposed site plan and the existing buildings

99


LIFE IS BACK TO VENICE Sarah Ghorashi

Assisted living existing-proposed situation

Assisted living layout- common and private areas

100

Assisted living common area-courtyard

Assisted living inside - outside relation

ASSISTED LIVING

Assisted living unit

Assisted living relation to existing context


Long term care layout- common and private areas

Long term care existing calle situation

Long term care unit

Long term care proposed buildings relation to existing context

Long term care proposed building and calle situation

101


Life is Back to Venice Sarah Ghorashi

Figure 22. Relation to context

Complex care layout- common and private areas

102

Assisted living- Long term care and Complex care relation to context

Section key plan

Complex care unit


Hospice layout- common and private areas

Mask

Hospice relation to university and context

Reflective material inspiration. Image taken from: http://www. archdaily.com/311623/happy-holidays-from-the-architects/azpa-alejandro-zaera-polo/

Hospice unit

Overall perspective

Reflective material enforces the value of old Venice facades like a mask for the old city.

103


Metamorphosis Shiloh Lazar The nature of Venice and its people is quite conservative. The rich architecture, history and traditions unique to the city, are a wealth of pride which the venetians do boast and exude from their very beings. This is to be even more so expected in the senior population whose notion of home has been the same, in many cases from their youth. An appropriate intervention must be current and be sensitive to both the context and the idea of home for its occupants. The scheme acknowledges the changes that are taking place in the in the golden years of its community members. Considering the changes they will undergo from living with minimal assistance to the time of laying on their death bead as their final metamorphosis in life, the architecture and the program proposed in the community adopt a similar transition within the existing urban boundary. The intent is to limit anxiety along their journey by allowing them to gradually experience the change from old to new and the familiar to the unknown. In life things must change and the built environment which also must change for the better will become an ever present reminder that change can be good.

104


Garden Block The lagoon block is a quiet place for reflection and contemplation on the waters edge. All health care types are provided here which gives the resident the option to live in a more active environment on land or in a quieter setting in the lagoon regardless of the type of care required. All that remains of the stone shell here is a structural support which keeps it up. Additionally at the lagoon, the masses are suspended above ground and off the stone suggesting they will depart even further away from the stone material

Entertainment Block

Land Mat Strategy

This area of the community will house assisted living units. Located off the main canal, the most active area in the community will have a variety of restaurants, cafes, bars and a market.

The mat strategy on the land is based on the existing ground circulation and buildings. The mat building on land is not perceived as one homogenous mass but rather as a series of smaller blocks which are connected by upper level circulation paths perpendicular to ground ciruculation. On the upper level circulation will provide access to the health care floors through which services and supplies can be transported, and when weather does not permit or mobility becomes to big an obstacle, residents can share common spaces and visit. This strategy can be expanded to accommodate more blocks as required.

As this area is along the canal the architecture here will attempt to match and tie into the existing using stone as the primary facade material. The seams between the stone of the buildings begin to open up and expose the new glazed and metal paneling which continues to change across the site.

Retail Block Long term care units will belocated in this area of the community. The elongated block in the interior of the site and is quieter but will still remain active because of the circulation paths running across it allowing the residents maintain their connection with the public below as they travel between the shops and services resident in this area of the community. Here the interior courtyards begin to open up to the pedestrian circulation going through the site allowing the interior materials of the courtard to be brought further into the public domain. Health Care Block

Lagoon Mat Strategy

The health care block will have special health care facilities, clinic and health oriented retail. Also available for community use will be a community gym an pool. The health care components for senior care will be concentrated in this block and make it the ideal location for hospice and complex care units.

The lagoon strategy is composed of a series of blocks connected by perpendicular circulation, one band at grade and one on the third/fourth floor. The circulation bands are equivalent to the connections on land. The third/fourth floor bands provide much more generous spaces for socializing and program and supplement the program space within the blocks. This strategy can be expanded in both directions. As they expand the care types will be divided by the circulation band ensuring all care facilities will remain at a manageable size.

The existing stone here is further broken up and the overall expression begins to become distincltly separate from a traditional Venetian aesthetic.

105


METAMORPHOSIS Shiloh Lazar

Health Care Floors (3-4)

Assisted Living Block Complex Care Block Hospice Care Block

Long Term Care Block

Long Term Care Block

Assisted Living Block

The layouts of the individual units can be grouped as follows: the assisted living, which contain larger living spaces and full washrooms; and the long term care, complex care and hospice care units, which consist of a small bedroom space, wash and storage. The latter three are differentiated by their adjoining corridors and public space. The more intensive the health care required the larger the corridor space will be to accommodate the support spaces. This is seen best in the garden block as the regular block grid uses different unit arrangements to provide more or less space in the to allow for the necessary support program.

Assisted Living Block

Complex Care Block

Assisted Living Block

Hospice Care Block Long Term Care Block

Long Term Care Block

Complex Care Layout Complex Care Block

Green Space Circulation Circulation/Support Space Support Space Units Common Space

0

10 5

106

40 20

Third Floor Plan


Corridors and Support Spaces The corridors in the long term care, complex care and hospice components are defined by their corridor spaces. The complex care and hospices components are designed with the largest corridor spaces to accommodate shared nurses stations and indivicual monitoring stations at every pair of rooms. While the corridors even in the most intensive level of care are fitted to accommodate various care spaces, they are open and provide spaces where residents can site and interact. Additionally Entrances to rooms will be costomized to allow for personalization while the programmed rooms will be painted colours which will act as familiar reference points.

Common Spaces As a standard, within each grouping of residential units there will be common spaces share privately among the seniors on each floor. These spaces will function as dining or social/ activity spaces where the residents can spend time socializing outside of their rooms. These spaces are all off the private corridors and all look out to either an exterior view providing visual access into the public realm below, vistas across the lagoon or into interior landscaped courtyards.

107


METAMORPHOSIS Shiloh Lazar

The Public Realm (G) In order to facilitate connections with the outside world the design strategy incorporates programming that would be utilized by the general public as well as the care facility. While the program covers most of the ground plan, circulation is organized around the existing street system. The primary corridor within this circulation provides access to courtyards within which the primary entrances to each block can be round. This allows ease of access and an easy way of identifying the entrance to the seniorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; residences throughout the community.

Green Space Circulation Main Lobby To Senior Care Residences Ground Program/Amenity Space Rental Units (General Public) Services

0

10 5

108

40 20

Ground Floor Plan


Common Spaces Circulation becomes a problem during flooding. What is being proposed is to install walkways within the main circulation paths which will rise with the water level. The entrances to new buildings would be designed above grade to suit and in the case of an extremely high flooding can be designed with a damming system that could raise the threshold accordingly. The void beneath the platform can store water similar to the way wells currently do in venice further reducing the height of the water. By damming the accesses to the lagoons the trapped water within the campi would be isolated rain run off suitable for irrigation or use in water closets.

Building in the Lagoon The lagoon was historically veniceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s means of waste disposal. The other issue the lagoon faces, is the battering wave motion of the boats on the foundations. By using captured surface water, the waste can be made safe before discharging into the lagoon. By protecting space within the lagoon from wave motion, the foundations would be preserved longer and an ecosystem with native shell fish could grow and better decompose the waste being discharged. This may not clean the whole lagoon but it is a strategy for future development which can make the lagoon and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eco system healthier

109


Adaptive Inversion Nazanin Sepehry Rad In respecting the existing fabric of the Cannaregio district, the proposal seeks a creative way to intertwine the new with the old by keeping the existing buildings and reprogramming them. In order to gain more space, extra floors were added on existing buildings, and new blocks were proposed both on land and on water. Following Le Corbusierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach in his unbuilt hospital and his interpretation of calli and campi in his design, I began to investigate the urban strategy in Venice, specifically in this district. With the notion of designing the hospital as a city, the voids between the existing buildings were inverted into solid space for designing the form of the new block on the water. In this process the calli in the existing fabric were interpreted as corridors and the circulation systems of the new buildings. With three floors in each building, the ground floor is dedicated to public activities and common spaces such as restaurants, cafe, community centers, shops, etc. This was imperative in order to integrate this facility with the community and create a dynamic and livable place where elderly people would not feel segregated and forgotten. The university on the site remained untouched as an important element for the whole complex, serving as a medical school to provide opportunities for young students to gain practical experience through learning in this care facility.

110

proposed site plan north-west facade- water scape


movements within the city

proposed care facility

proposed master plan existing fabric

complex-care terminal care Service facilities assited living/ long-term care

connections in between

adding extra floors

Inversion Process

111


Adaptive Inversion Nazanin Sepehry Rad

Second floor

complex-care typical room

First floor

Pedestrian access Water access

Ground floor

Vertical access Open areas Patient rooms Staff areas

complex-care room layout

112

Common spaces

complex-care floor plans


Second floor

assisted living typical room

First floor

assisted living room layout

Ground floor

Vertical access Open areas Patient rooms Staff areas

long-term care room layout

Common spaces

assisted living/long-term care floor plans

113


Adaptive Inversion Nazanin Sepehry Rad

Second floor

terminal care typical room

First floor Water access

Water access

Ground floor

Vertical access Open areas Patient rooms Staff areas

terminal care room layout

114

Common spaces

terminal Care floor plans


complex-care section

connections between existing buildings

assisted living/ long-term care section

115


A Cultural Paradox Sandra Wojtecki Venice is a city that is torn between its cultural foundations and its environmental realities. Being dependent on the tourist industry, the city is facing a crisis in maintaining the infrastructure it relies on- careful to preserve its uniqueness, yet bound in its inevitable deterioration. The proposal for a continuing care facility faces this paradox and attempts to find a greater medium between a healthy environment and an architectural response worthy of a setting in the historic city. Through a selective integration of existing infrastructure and a proposal for a new extension, an architectural language is developed as a system responding to its context. Both in itsOF configuration and its use, an SPIRIT VENETIAN ARCHITECTURAL experience is created that reflects the quality of Venice not by how it looks, but by how it feels. As patients and residents are experiencing the effects of aging, an identity is maintained through the sensory experience of their surroundings, helping to find meaning in this important stage of their lives.

QUALITY

CHITECTURAL QUALITY

NOTABLE PRECEDENTS

116

inspiration

proposed site plan


UNIVERSITY

living spaces support spaces

development of existing infrastructure

typology 1- land, full infrastructure integration

typology 2- land, partial infrastructure integration

living spaces support spaces

typology 3- water, zero infrastructure integration

urban typology diagram

117


A Cultural Paradox Sandra Wojtecki 118

assisted and long term care typical floor plan

complex care typical floor plan

terminal care typical floor plan

assisted and long term care typical unit plan

complex care typical unit plan

terminal care typical unit plan


119


A Cultural Paradox Sandra Wojtecki complex care section

120

terminal care section


assisted and long term care section

121


Interweaving Dualities Madison Dozzi-Perry

The unraveling of community and human-tohuman interaction can be attributed to technology; however, it can also be attributed to architecture. The desire to belong is a fundamental aspect to human health and well-being, yet, there is an ignorance to the fact that these social energies have faded in our cities. The lack of adequate attention to the creation and promotion of social interaction through space design has fallen short in the industry due to the pressures of time, money, policies, technology, globalization and “flashy” architecture that take precedent. Traditional healthcare architecture is diseased by these pressures and it has led to the creation of unhealthy buildings and, in turn, unhealthy occupants. Venice, a city with a thick and layered urban fabric, robust character and history, has also come undone under the pressures of our modern, global society. Tensions between old and new, residents and tourists, public and private, traditional and modern and land and water, have left the cities and its communities fragmented and lifeless.

inspiration + characteristics

122

inspiration + characteristics

city: Venice, Italy

narrow calle

calle + canal

calle + open water

“Community is the bond that can accomodate the difference.” - Tony Fry

building to water

narrow passage

venice building-water-human relationships

campo with fountain unit/residence zoomed unit location circulation/common space support/staff spaces pallative care

assisted living

complex care

long term care

building typologies

inspiration + characteristics

inspiration + characteristics

neighbourhood: cannaregio

inspiration + characteristics

inspiration + characteristics

site: le corbusier`s unbuilt hospital


roof top community garden + altana sun path

public vs. private

pedestrian circulation

central market campo

interior common space

boat circulation

green space (private)

prevailing winds

site analysis

It is essential that we break down these tensions and begin to weave the pieces back together to create a tapestry that is strong enough to proliferate healthy existing Venetian communities and healthy healthcare facilities and healthy people. Through overlapping, blending, permeating, interlacing of spaces to facilitate social human behaviors, to facilitate interactions between different social groups and to promote human health, architecture can begin to re-stitch communities back together. 123


Interweaving Dualities Madison Dozzi-Perry

1 0

60

30

120 ft

ground floor plan

2 60

0

30

120 ft

level two floor plan

3 complex care view from nurse station

0

60 30

120 ft

ground floor plan circulation + nodes

4 124

0

60 30

120 ft

ground floor plan program

60

0

120 ft

30

level three floor plan

5 0

60 30

partial building model 1:100

120 ft

level four floor plan

partial building model 1:100


0

Typical Complex Care Unit

5 2

assisted living corridor

long term + pallative care unit

complex care unit

10 ft

0

Typical Long Term Care + Pallative Care Unit

5 2

10 ft

0

Typical Assisted Living Unit

5 2

10 ft

Each unit is designed to resemble the setting of a home. The use of warm and traditional materials, such as interior brick, dark wood, black cabinetry and iron detailing, creates a texture that is not typical of standard sterile hospital environments. Ample storage and display spaces allow for patients to personalize and feel a sense of ownership in the space. Each unit was design to enhance natural light and views to the outdoors and all units have visual access to green, blue space or both. Operable folding windows, that resemble window shutters seen throughout Venice, are layered with a steel sliding screen on the outside that can be manually operated, which controls the amount of light entering a room. All units are design to be barrier free. 125


Interweaving Dualities Madison Dozzi-Perry

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We see architecture as an act of profound optimism. Its foundation lies in believing that it is possible to make places on earth that give a sense of grace to life - and believing that matters. It is what we have to give and it is what we leave behind.â&#x20AC;? - Todd Williams + Billies Tsien

1 5

0

10 ft

2

window + overhang detail

elevation

2 126

3

overlapping wall + glazing detail

0

5 2

10 ft

section

glazing + brick detail

column + coffered ceiling detail


5 5

0

1 2 3 4 5

narrow calle

All spaces are designed to promote interaction and visual, spatial and communicative connection across demographics. The use of double height, flexible and common spaces creates the setting for potential interaction. Many ground floor spaces aim to bring in students and other residents of venice to the site by providing flexible spaces for university classes, fitness classes, arts and crafts classes, restaurants, cafes and many other public activities, all connected by a series of campos and calles. Community spaces on upper levels consist of viewing areas, activity rooms, living rooms, kitchens, dining and support spaces spread across all levels. They provide a sense of community among the floors and a sense of a home base for the residence, where they can gather together.

Chapel Viewing Area Dining Kitchen Double Height

2

10 ft

section - elevation

4

1 5

3 2

0

7.5 5

15 ft

partial detailed floor plan

127


The Urban Nuclei Chowdhury Tasneem Rahman In spite of being considered fragile in its existence, Venice is one of the most resilient cities in the world. Utilizing the strength of its rich culture and unique architectural characteristics, Venice has adapted to sustain itself. Its manifestation is evident in the use of mass tourism as an economic driver in Venice. Maintaining this unique character, new growth has to find a way to build on and around the pre-existing reality and respect the nature, scale and arrangement of the existing fabric. The project initiated with a critical analysis of Corbusier’s representation of the CampoCalli relationship in his hospital proposal and through an exploration of the character of campi, attempted to extract from this pre-existing Venetian logic of key functions developing around a square. As a generator of the new,these pockets of urban spaces and their connectors are envisioned as a neuron network of callis connecting nuclei of small campi extending from the existing onto the water creating grounds with a continuing identity for the new functions.

a critical venice

Concept Development Key Plan Locating the Campo

Access Points

Void Study of Sectional Grain

04

01 06

Analysis of Corbusier’s Hospital plan

05 03

Analyzing the Campo

Key characteristics includes irregularity in shape,variety in size,multiple access points which are not always aligned,its subtle presence of green,and its diversity in use and public amenities on the ground

1 Campo Santa Margherita

128

2 Campo De Frari

02

3 Campo S.S Filippo Giacomo

4 Campo Dei Mori

5 Campo S.Giacomo Del’Orio 6 Campo S.Maria Formosa


0

30 10

120 m 60

Testing the Concept of forms around Nuclei of Voids

Hospice Assisted Living Long Term

_ Complex Care 0

30 10

120 m 60

Programmatic Distribution on Site

Views of the Voids

129


The Urban Nuclei Chowdhury Tasneem Rahman

Extending the City: Urban Nuclei The Master Plan Proposes a myriad of campo spaces contained by built forms .The nature of built form enclosing altering sizes of Campo becomes the logic of the Mat Strategy. Intervening network of calles and ponti which provides the essence of the cityscape into the new formed nuclei of the Care Facility.

130


Building up of the Building Block The core concept behind the building block was to generate a campo space that is formed by the loosely bound buildings. The ground floor levels were designed to allow a colonnaded area which is characteristic of squares. Upper levels unite to house functions of the care facilities. Blocks that extend and connect two or more individual building house shared facilities.

Vertical Circulation Public Functions Arcaded Walkway and Sitting area 0

30 10

120 m 60

Ground Over extension of the Public Realm

Formation of the Building Block

Test Module of the Building Block

Treatment of the Building Skin

Connection and Paths

Reference lines from a region of an existing building is extracted to create a pattern of vertical and horizontal louvers that provide necessary shading to the interiors whilst creating a interesting skin for the facility.

An attempt was made to facilitate a walkable community where the streets cape extends from the existing and spans into the newly formed ground of the care facility. The water network replicates the existing canals .

Abstraction from Existing Building Elevation

ACCESS POINTS Primary Access Routes Secondary Routes Possible Service Entry Main Entrance Secondary Entrances

Tension between water and land (built form)

Framing the Campo

Circulation :Connections and Paths

131


The Urban Nuclei Chowdhury Tasneem Rahman

Incorporating City’s Character Relationship to the city’s key characteristic elements and landmarks that give it its unique identity extends from the master plan into the interior planning and layout of the built functions. Instances inside the building attempt to replicate the external mechanism of the city. The interconnecting bridges between the building blocks aim to provide the experience of the “ponti”-the connecting bridges between the landmasses in Venice. The allocation of rooms create moments of expansion after the narrow corridors with a open common living area replicating the expansion and compression experienced in a journey from a calli to a campo. Edge of building blocks with its corridors create the dead ends prevalent in the street network of Venice. Cutouts in thick buildings and light-wells for blocks spanning over the water bring the experience of walking in the fondamenta into the interiors for an inpatient walking in the corridors. Ground floors provide archaded spaces similar to those of St.Marks Square, providing shaded sitting areas adjacent to cafes and shops. The network of health nodes facilitates a walkable community and foster well being in a homelike environment rather than a facility. diagram of interior floor layout exploring character of city fabric visual and physical access to the campo section across the long term care facility (allocation of functions and ground conditions)

132


Long Term Care Patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rooms Common Areas Vertical Circulation Nursing Stations Support Node and Services Circulation

Complex Care Patient Rooms Common Areas Vertical Circulation Diagnostic Facilities Nursing Stations Support Node and Services Circulation

Hospice Care Patient Rooms Common Areas Vertical Circulation Nursing Stations Support Node and Services Circulation

Assisted Living Patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rooms Common Areas Vertical Circulation Nursing Stations Support Node and Services Circulation

programmatic distribution and layout

views of individual room types

133


Identity within Venice

Acqua Alta

Victor Huynh Venice, known as the floating city appears as a city designed that is destined for failure. Over years and years of deterioration within its architecture and population, the city continues to be functional. The historical architecture has allowed Venice to remain as a timeless city within the modern world. The preservation and restoration of its architecture has allowed Venice to retain its overall identity within the modern movement. The unique culture within the city has developed an urban fabric with high pedestrian activities. The campis within the city become the heart and the calli act as the artery, allowing the city to become alive throughout different times of the day. The overall design approach looks at revitalizing the site by allowing the public as well as the health care facility to engage with one another. The communal activities are distributed along the ground floor introducing new life within the neighborhood. The shifting of a modular structure is an approach that allows the individual unit to have an identity with the overall building. The unique spaces created from the overall form allow for unexpected encounters for occupants to engage within one another. Similar to Venice itself, the health care facility focuses on bringing people outside of their rooms and into the streets.

Veniceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth over time https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-Ev4rU27HY

http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2012/11/venice-under-water/100403/

Public Space

parti diagram

Natural Decay

134

public activity within the city

http://www.tracemedia.co.uk/luminous/flickr_map_images.php

Veniceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique characteristics

finding an identity within architecture


1000

Residential Commercial

Ca

na

ld

iC

an

na

reg

io

Canal Grande

Church Public Green Space Campo

100m 200 500 1000

cannaregio

calle activity and analysis

Complex Care

Hospice Long Term Care

Assisted Living

master plan

135


Identity within Venice Victor Huynh

Multi Purpose

Day Care

Assisted Living Kitchen Dining Kitchen

Long Term Care

Dining Multi Purpose

Hospice Multi Purpose

Complex Care

Recreational

Multi Purpose

1 0 2

5 10m

assisted living floor plan

communal floor plan

City Circulation Primary Secondary Tertiary

10 0m

50 20

circulation diagram

wood

136

stone

brick

stucco

facade texture


communal lounge

sectional perspective

room condition

street perspective

137


Order within Atrophy Shannon Clayton 24 m

The City of Venice emits a palpable quality of weathering. Plant-life climbs buildings, plaster and brick walls gradually erode; Venice appears as though it is crumbling. The intention of this project is to juxtapose the beauty and tragedy of an aging Venice, with the design of a care facility for those who are aging and weathering themselves. The proposed complex slowly descends in elevation, and becomes more porous to the water below. Concurrently, this scheme is composed in accordance with a modular, mat strategy. The resolution of these two objectives is a pixelated gradient into the water.

36 m

12 m

12 m

Both the quality of weathering and system of modularity continues into the details of the design, including the incorporation of a perforated corten steel screen. While relating to the qualities of Venice, the scheme also responds to its distinctive urban conditions; its canals, rio, calli, campi, and altana.

4m 12 m

derivation of geometry from existing site circulation

4m x 4m

early conceptual sketch legend

138

exit stairs

elevator

circulation

office

activity

dining

services

private rooms

vestibule

commercial space

ground floor plan


4m x 4m

assisted living corridor configuration

second floor plan

long-term care corridor configuration

4m x 4m

long-term care corridor configuration

third floor plan

hospice corridor configuration

139


Order within Atrophy Shannon Clayton

existing rio condition

rio view facing water

140

interior bridge sketch

rio view facing city


existing calle condition

calle view

existing campc condition

campo view

exterior stair elevator module sketch

141


Order within Atrophy Shannon Clayton

existing canal condition

elevated platform at water edge sketch

2

3 canal view

existing roof terrace â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;altanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; view

142

roof terrace programming diagram

roof terrace view


perforated corten steel panel

modular ‘wetland pods’

site model bird’s eye view

facade perspective section

143


Venice Healthcare Center Alykhan Neky Envisioned as an extension to city, the Venice Healthcare Center creates a unique environment of healing, realized through the integration of programmatically diverse civic space. This multifunctional landscape offers the city a new paradigm in civic experience, conceived as a response to the close knit city fabric and semi-private courtyard conditions. This green microenvironment, layered with commercial activity, functions as a catalyst for patient wellness. In turn, the hospitals undulating form invites this wide array of private, semi-private and public green spaces, to permeate and interact with the center, creating a malleable edge condition. The centers healthcare program, diversely spread about functional nodes, places emphasis on the healing environment for the individual, physically and programmatically reintegrating patients back into the city, while still maintaining the functionality of high quality of healthcare.

Courtyard

144

Intersection of the Modules


TERMINAL CARE ASSISTED LIVING

WATER COURTYARD VOID (OPEN TO BELOW)

Module Axonometric

INTENSIVE GREENROOF INTENSIVE GREENROOF TERMINAL CARE ASSISTED LIVING

WATER COURTYARD VOID (OPEN TO BELOW)

Module Section

145


Venice Healthcare Center Alykhan Neky

Site Design Strategy

DEVELOPMENT OF THE COURTYARD MODULE

EXTRUDE BEGIN WITH A SQUARE PRISM

CARVE

BEND BEND COURTYARD TO APPROPRIATE RAMP ANGLE, CREATING PUBLIC SPACE BELOW

CARVE OUT INTROSPECTIVE VOID TO CREATE COURTYARD TYPOLOGY

EXTEND EXTEND RAMP FOR INTIMATE SOCIAL INTERACTION SPACES

INCREASE IN IMAGE SCALE

ARRAY ARRAY MODULES TO CREATE VARIATION, RESPONDING TO SITE CONTEXTUAL VARIABLES

GLAZE INTRODUCE CIRCULATION CLERESTORY LIGHTING AT UNEVEN GEOMETRY

CARVE CARVE OUT INVERTED CLERESTORY LIGHTING. VOIDS INVITE NATURAL LIGHT INTO THE BUILDING CREATING SPECIAL MOMENTS THAT ‘CELEBRATE THE INTERSECTION OF THE MODULES’

Site Design Strategy

146


ASSISTED LIVING

ASSISTED LIVING

ASSISTED LIVING

ASSISTED LIVING

ASSISTED LIVING BATHING

DINING

MODULE COMMUNAL SPACE

LIVING

ASSISTED LIVING

ASSISTED LIVING

TERMINAL CARE

ASSISTED LIVING

VOID

TERMINAL CARE

TERMINAL CARE

ASSISTED LIVING

(OPEN TO BELOW)

LONG TERM CARE ASSISTED LIVING

COMPLEX CARE

CHARTING

SUPERVISORY STATION

NURSING UNIT

LONG TERM CARE

CHARTING MEDICINE PREPERATION

LONG TERM CARE

SUPERVISORY STATION

TERMINAL CARE

WORK SPACE

COMPLEX CARE

MEETING

COMPLEX CARE

Module Plan

Explorations of the Patient Living Space

147


Venice Healthcare Center Alykhan Neky FUNCTIONAL NODE HEALTHCARE CAMPO

SOCIAL NODE OPEN COURTYARDS FOR SOCIAL INTERACTION

Cluster Plan

148


K.

A.

L. B.

C.

A. INTENSIVE GREEN ROOF B. UPPER STEEL LATERAL BRACING

D.

C. UPPER SLAB STEEL FRAMING

E.

D. TIMBER HANDRAIL WITH STEEL BALUSTER F.

Module Axonometric

E. SLIDING TIMBER SHADING SCREEN

G.

F. TIMBER SHADING LOUVRES G. 8MM LAMINATED GLASS

H.

H. SEMII-PERMENANT RECONFIGURABLE WALLS I. LOWER STEEL LATERAL BRACING

I.

J. LOWER SLAB STEEL FRAMING ADMINISTRATIVE

K. SLOPED SLAB SYSTEM

J.

L. STEEL COLUMNS TO CONCRETE FOUNDATION

SERVICE NURSING FOCI COMPLEX CARE. TERMINAL CARE LONG TERM CARE

K.

ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNAL GROUND GREENSPACE

L.

Venice Healthcare Center CANNAREGIO Studio in Critical Practice A. INTENSIVE GREEN ROOF B. UPPER STEEL LATERAL BRACING C. UPPER SLAB STEEL FRAMING

GROUND COMMERCIAL

Alykhan Neky

Module Exploded Axonometric

D. TIMBER HANDRAIL WITH STEEL BALUSTER E.

SLIDING TIMBER SHADING SCREEN

F. TIMBER SHADING LOUVRES G. 8MM LAMINATED GLASS H. SEMII-PERMENANT RECONFIGURABLE WALLS

Master Plan

I. LOWER STEEL LATERAL BRACING J. LOWER SLAB STEEL FRAMING K. SLOPED SLAB SYSTEM L. STEEL COLUMNS TO CONCRETE FOUNDATION

Site Design Strategy Venice Healthcare Center CANNAREGIO Studio in Critical Practice

149


Metamorphosis Lisa Marshall To be healing, a place must be harmonious, brining change as an organic development so that new buildings seem not to be imposed aliens but inevitably belong where they are. High tech and rocketing costs will continue to transform hospital work, and future advances will place ever new demands on healthcare environments. With this proposed structureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicate, floating like form, it must respond to the existing surroundings and be responsible for adapting to the changing tides of this dynamic City. With this proposed light weight flexible construction of this Mat building strategy, this design will be looked upon as a versatile City within a rather permanent empire.

process model

150

concept model


calle

151


METAMORPHOSIS Lisa Marshall

process model

venice growth mapping

4

5 program distribution

152

6 master plan


1 circulation

2 section

level 1

3 level 2

complex care

long-term care

level 3

assisted living

terminal care

153


METAMORPHOSIS Lisa Marshall

light study

section

154

facade treatment


1 2

5

4 155


The Tumour of Cannaregio Adryanne Quenneville

Tourism has consumed Venice like a cancer. The masses increase on the daily and metastasize throughout the urban fabric. One by one, buildings have been converted into hotels and services dedicated to this single industry. Local inhabitants have been forced out. Surely, a cancerous city is a city in poor health. However, what if a new cancer was proposed based on the DNA of the city; one that would extend from its fabric rather than being forced onto it? Navigating Venice as a pedestrian is an experience that is characteristic of the city. Spaces expand and contract at various scales. The proposed healthcare facility pulls out this DNA of Venice and mutates it to offer a novel architectural expression of the city. How might this mutation take shape at an urban scale? As one building? Or an individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence? Growing off the existing tissue of Venice, these cancerous cells accumulate to enclose the individual unit (living cells) and form tumours (buildings) that identify the community. The individual forms and typology are distinct and unique while remaining considerate of the scale of the patient - the human scale of Venice. They also take into consideration an architecture of health, full of light and air.

tumour growth

156


ground circulation bridge sky bridge activity

masterplan

living cells

core structure

periphery structure garden courtyard vegetated mesh screen facade

building section

157


The Tumour of Cannaregio Adryanne Quenneville

ground floor

0

10 5

20 m

2nd floor

3rd floor

assisted living floor plans

building undulation

158


approach to hospice

ground floor

0

10 m 5

2nd floor

3rd floor

4th floor

hospice floor plans

159


The Tumour of Cannaregio Adryanne Quenneville

2nd & 3rd floors

long term care floor plan

4th & 5th floors

complex care floor plan

160


punched versus pinched window

hospice assisted living

long term care complex care

living cell floor plans

161


Venice 2.0 Tim Melnichuk Venice is not a healthy city, it is being split up, sold to foreigners who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reside in Venice leaving the city aging and vacant. Tourism is slowly ruining the city because of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reliance on it while the existing city fabric is becoming old and decaying. Why waste resources maintaining and preserving it. Instead, give new buildings a chance rather than focus on preserving the old. Recreating the city step by step, is needed to shift Venice from a tourist driven city to a healthy functional city by providing the framework for new industry. The gradual transformation of Venice into a new Venice (2.0) much like the human body regenerates over a 7 year cycle, will propel Venice into the future rather than it remaining stuck in the past creating an attractive destination for existing and new inhabitants at the sacrifice of the interests of the tourist.

2

3&4

1

assisted living

long term care

complex care

hospice

162

0

25

50

m

proposed site plan


A - inadequate existing

B - proposed new massing

campo perspective

1 - long term care

resident rooms

support spaces

green space 2 - hospice

3 - complex care

4 - asssisted living

163


Venice 2.0 Tim Melnichuk 4

5

3

1 6

2 screen axo

1

2

3

4

5

6 venice colour palette

164


complex/assisted section

complex/assisted elevation

green spaces - axo

green spaces perspective

165


Venice 2.0 Tim Melnichuk assisted living perspective

complex care perspective

166

sectional perspective

hallway perspective


master plan - aerial perspective

master plan - aerial perspective 2

3th floor - complex care

physical model

complex care sectional plan

5th floor - assisted living

assisted living sectional plan

167


Acqua Culture Rebecca Tsang Venice’s past, present, and future story cannot be told without reference to its relationship with water. Born from water, yet constantly battling its effects, Venice is in a critical state of constantly keeping the water out. Rising sea levels, sinking sediments, and tidal fluxes permeate its ground floor, being a temporal inconvenience yet permanent issue. My proposal envisions a future Venice which has given in to the water in support of Venice’s single industry: tourism. Economic growth takes precedence over local life in Venice and tourist significant sites are kept dry while the rest of Venice is left to food, or in other words, left to die. However, water is also the source of life and provides opportunities for revival or rebirth. Situated in Cannaregio, the new continuing care facility is organized around the historical slaughterhouse (kept dry), and a new form of living in Venice emerges from the submerged sections. New floating walkways and floating public amenities populate the new ground floor level which is a constantly changing datum, rising and falling with the tides. Anchoring these floating elements, the ground floors of the continuing care buildings are static, which act as the transition and intermingling zone for public and private life. Assisted Living and Long-Term Care is dispersed throughout the site, migrating south towards the city rather than out towards the water. Hospices are nested within the site, being protected by, yet included in daily life, while Complex Care has its own dedicated section due to its required high levels of care.

proposed flooded areas of Venice

“dry” areas of Cannaregio

historic slaughterhouse details

new ground floor +3.0m new high tide +2.5m new low tide +1.5m

0.0m

168

a street along a canal - a fondamenta

a new type of street floats with the changes in water level

a new way to move through the city


0 5 15

30

0 5 15

ground floor circulation

60m

30

0 5 15

30

60m

floating amenities

0 5 15

30

60m

static amenities

60m

complex care type

assisted living type 1

hospice care type typical floor plans for the 4 care components, based on single loaded, double loaded, and race-track configurations

assisted living type 2

LEGEND assisted living long term care

long term care type 1

complex care hospice care common public and private amenities floating public amenities 0 5 15

30

60m

upper floors masterplan

long term care type 2

169


Acqua Culture Rebecca Tsang

public & private

public public

transition from public to private

170

precedent images - floating public spaces and amenities

concept rendering - floating public spaces, community hub


precedent images a. floating public space - promenade des berges de la seine, paris

http://www.urbangardensweb.com/2013/08/12/floating-gardens-giant-chalkboards-andclimbing-walls-on-banks-of-seine-in-paris/

b. floating cafe - belgrade, serbia

http://www.belgradenet.com/belgrade_cafes.html

c. floating market barge - venice, italy

http://bitesizedtravel.ca/2014/01/24/venices-floating-fruit-and-vegetable-market/

d. floating community garden - amsterdam, netherlands http://eurobikestudy.blogspot.ca/2011/06/copenhagen-amsterdam.html

e. floating public space on left, former georges pompidou highway on right - promenade des berges de la seine, paris http://eurobikestudy.blogspot.ca/2011/06/copenhagen-amsterdam.html

e. floating theatre barge - aldo rossi, venice, italy

http://www.atelierjournal.com/2009/04/aldo-rossi-theatro-del-mondo.html

boat parking garden consolation room nursing station

shipping & receiving

common kitchen & dining

reception

staff

service staff

laundry

2

6

12

wood beams wood slat feature wall with backlit slots for ambient lighting

lounge

service

in-patient rooms

0

OTA

24m

typical hospice floor plan - upper floor

0

2

6

12

24m

entrance lounge

typical hospice floor plan - ground floor

spandrel panel moveable shading screen vision panel glass balaustrade

wood beams moveable shading screen

desk/shelf area for personal things

furniture in hallway - the â&#x20AC;&#x153;living roomâ&#x20AC;?

typical hospice room elevation

typical hospice room elevation

171


Acqua Culture Rebecca Tsang typical building elevation - dialogue between public & private, new & old

172

masterplan sectional perspective


complex care experience in the new aqua culture

173


Figure 1. cruise ship overshadowing Venice (background)

The Floating City Calvin Fung The cruise ships of Venice – these transient yet permanent structures of the economic and urban landscape – should be reconsidered in a new light. Rather than despised objects that are displacing the residents of the island, they can be reframed to provide value and support to the continuing care complex and to the larger context of Venice. The Floating City proposes a new interface for the community and the city to engage the ships and tourists. Inspired by Archigram’s Walking City, the cruise ships that sit idle in the port teminals would plug in to the city via new canals to augment the health program amenities and provide, through its visitors, an exchange of energy and cultural experience to a largely immobile population. Taking on a network of programmed sky bridges floating above the the historic city, the Floating City becomes a mediator forming a connecting link between the tourists/ ships and the residents/city, encouraging a new mutualistic relationship for Venice and the world.

Figure 2. tourism in Venice

Figure 3. cruise ship in Venice

}

CRUISE SHIP

} 174

= VENICE

} Figure 4. parti diagram

AMENITIES & SUPPORT

a

ENERGY & INFORMATION

SWIMMING POOL RUNNING TRACK TENNIS COURT FITNESS CENTRE ARTIST LOFT CULINARY CENTRE COMPUTER CLASSES LECTURES / SEMINARS LIBRARY COMMUNICATIONS CENTRE BALLROOM LOUNGE DINING

LIVE SHOWS CASINO BARS SPA SALON SHUFFLEBOARD THEATRE MINI-GOLF CHILDREN’S PLAYROOM SHOPPING

c

b

Figure 5a-c. mutual relationship

CONTINUING CARE RESIDENT ROOMS ASSISTED LIVING LONG TERM CARE COMPLEX CARE TERMINAL CARE

PROGRAM / ACTIVITIES BATH AND SHOWER ROOMS DINING LOUNGE STAFF WORKSPACE & STORAGE

OUTDOOR SPACE BEAUTY PARLOUR / BARBER SHOP PLACE OF WORSHIP

AMENITIES LAUNDRY HOUSEKEEPING UTILITY SPACE MAINTENANCE SERVICE SUPPORT SPACE RESIDENTS STORAGE FACILITY STAFF SPACE RECEIVING / SERVICE

Figure 6. program


assisted living long term care complex care terminal care bridge community support circulation

Figure 7. master plan

me·di·ate verb 1. 2.

CRUISE SHIP CRUISE SHIP

intervene between people in a dispute in order to bring about an agreement or reconciliation. technical bring about (a result such as a physiological effect).

· be a means of conveying.

· form a connecting link between.

CRUISE SHIP

TOURISTS

TOURISTS TOURISTS

THE FLOATING CITY [ mediator ] CITY THE FLOATING

VENICE VENICE

[ mediator ]

THE FLOATING CITY [ mediator ]

VENICE

LOCALS

RESIDENTS

LOCALS

RESIDENTS RESIDENTS

LOCALS

= BRIDGES

Figure 8. Venice, City of Bridges

Figure 9. mediating strategies

Figure 10. Archigram’s Walking City (background)

175


The Floating City Calvin Fung

With more than 700 tourists potentially offloading a ship, it is important to disperse the crowd through different bridges at various levels of the ships. Vertical circulation is strategically placed to encourage interactions while balancing privacy and also serving as structural points. Tourists are mainly directed to the central open space and through a community of shared shops and restaurants towards the mouth of the Cannaregio Canal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the historic entrance to the city.

12

tourists

residents

locals

Figure 11. circulation plan

176

Figure 12. section through assisted living and long term care


Figure 13. view entering city from mainland

Figure 14. exterior view of typical sky bridges from complex care unit

Figure 15. progress models

177


The Floating City Calvin Fung 17

0

3 1

10 6

m

Figure 16. assisted living floor plan

Figure 17. view of assisted living within bridge

18

178

Figure 18. view of long term care

0

3 1

10 6

m

Figure 19. long term care floor plan


20

Figure 20. view of complex care from courtyard

Strategies to create thin, linear expressions permit a light form capable of mediating the height and plan between ship and city while allowing sunlight and air to permeate through the structures and site. To accommodate living out the last stages of life in a familiar, home-like setting, the existing residential building in the northern part of this district is repurposed for hospice care and connected with a newly proposed support wing. With a second cruise ship located in close proximity, it infuses life and provides many options for activities for residents and their loved ones.

Figure 22. existing residential building

22

Figure 23. terminal care context plan

0

3 1

Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 5. Figure 8. Figure 9.

10 6

m

Figure 21. complex care floor plan

Rellandini, Stefano. Cruizero Venezia. Multimedia Publico. Reuters, 08 Nov. 2013. Retrieved from <http:// www.publico.pt/multimedia/fotogaleria/cruzeiro- veneza-327231#/15>. Rellandini, Stefano. Cruizero Venezia. Multimedia Publico. Reuters, 08 Nov. 2013. Retrieved from <http:// www.publico.pt/multimedia/fotogaleria/cruzeiro- veneza-327231#/10>. Silvestri, Manuel. Cruzeiro Veneza. Multimedia Publico. Reuters, 08 Nov. 2013. Retrieved from <http:// www.publico.pt/multimedia/fotogaleria/cruzeiro- veneza-327231#/2>. a. MSC Poesia artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impression and 3D cutaway. Travel Weekly, 18 Feb. 2008. Retrieved from <http:// www.travelweekly.co.uk/Assets/GetAsset. aspx?ItemID=6515>. b. Vanderstuyf, Alex. Denali National Park, Alaska. Digital image. The Wilderness Society. NPS, n.d. Retrieved from <http://wilderness.org/sites/default/files/ styles/large/public/Denali.NPS_.AlexVanderstuyf. flickr.jpg?itok=Pa-hO5c8>. c. Lechner, Kaspar. Old Men in Olbia. Panoramio. N.p., 1 June 2007. Retrieved from <http://static. panoramio. com/photos/large/2512478.jpg>. Silvestri, Manuel. Cruizero Venezia. Multimedia Publico. Reuters, 08 Nov. 2013. Retrieved from <http://http:// www.publico.pt/multimedia/fotogaleria/cruzeiro- veneza-327231#/8>. Archigram. Walking City. Open Buildings. N.p., n.d. Retrieved from <http://c1038.r38.cf3.rackcdn.com/ group4/building39003/media/oxol_archigram.jpg>. List of Figures 179


Healing.Threshold.Tower Nwamaka Onyenokwe Giving the four streams of healthcare and Le Corbusier’s Venice Hospital as design criteria for a continuing care complex, I was faced with the challenge of originally proposing a “monumental tower” that attracted the typical tourist in Venice to get the “best view of the city”, off of these towers that were also to act as a health facility.

study model 1:plan

study model 1:perspective

My design approach changed after visiting the site and experiencing the community and residential fabric of Cannaregio. I managed to maintain the element of towering and height, by placing the appropriate program that best fit into the morphology of a tower. The Hospice and Assisted Living streams could function in a “condo-like” slender tower and Long Term and Complex care could function in a racetrack “lower leveled” building type.

venice

piazza st. marco

health tower

Highlighting that element of “community” in Cannaregio, I wanted to create a complex that allowed for interactions to occur between all streams of healthcare, and allowed for interaction between the patient residents as well as the medical staff, which includes medical students that would be housed in an additional tower. Communal and meeting spaces include the Campo on the ground level, the bridges on the third floor and the Altana on the fourth.

parti idea

180

study model 2:plan

study model 2:perspective

tower study models


ASSISTED LIVING PATIENT ROOMS LEVEL 5-15

HOSPICE PATIENT ROOMS LEVEL 5-8

LONG TERM PATIENT ROOMS (L5) ALTANA (L6)

LE

VE

ASSISTED LIVING PUBLIC + SHARES FACILITIES PATIENT ROOMS

HOSPICE PUBLIC + SHARED FACILITIES PATIENT ROOMS

L5

-2

0

COMPLEX CARE ALTANA LONG TERM MAIN FLOOR/LOBBY PATIENT ROOMS CONSULTATION LE

VE

ASSISTED LIVING LOBBY RECEPTION NURSE WARD GYM/POOL THEATER + ENTERTAINMENT MAIL ROOM

HOSPICE LOBBY RECEPTION NURSE WARD GYM/POOL COMMON FACILITIES

L4

COMPLEX CARE ADMIN DOCTORS OFFICES PATIENT ROOMS BATHS & SPA REHAB + PHYSIO CONNECTION FLOOR LE

VE

L3

ENTRANCE/RECEPTION PUBLIC SPACES CAMPO OFFICES NURSE/DOCTORS QUARTERS MEDICAL SHOPS PHARMACY LE

VE

L1

+

2

ED

OV

M

G

IN

ILD

G

IN

IST

EX

E SR

BU

master plan

181


Healing.Threshold.Tower Nwamaka Onyenokwe

17

11

9

16

11

9

9

16

6

5

O.T.B.

6

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

LEVEL 1 ELEVATOR LOBBY/RECEPTION RETAIL SHOPS SHIPPING & RECEIVING CAMPO E.R. CAFETERIA OUTDOOR CAFE COOKING CLASS TRADE & CRAFT CLASS MEDICAL SHOPS PUBLIC CLINIC

17

17

16

7

17

1

1

17

16

8

10

17

16

8

10

17

16

9

12

4

12 13 14 15 16

2

17

LEVEL 2 ELEVATOR + BRIDGE NURSE OFFICES NURSES’ QUARTERS HOUSE KEEPING/SERVICES STORAGE FOR RETAIL EXAM ROOMS MEDICAL CLASS ROOMS

4

15

13

15

13

15

15

15 15

14

15

14 14

3 14

ground floor

second floor

24

20

26

21

25

LEVEL 3 ELEVATOR SKY BRIDGES 18

19

20

21

182

LEVEL 4 ELEVATOR SKY BRIDGES

19

COMPLEX CARE ADMIN CONSULTATION ROOMS PHYSIO/REHAB CENTRE PATIENT ROOMS BATHS & SPA HOSPICE LOBBY RECEPTION NURSE WARD GYM/POOL COMMON FACILITIES

COMPLEX CARE ALTANA

23

HOSPICE PUBLIC + SHARED FACILITIES PATIENT ROOMS

18

24 O.T.B.

ASSISTED LIVING LOBBY RECEPTION NURSE WARD GYM/POOL THEATER + ENTERTAINMENT MAIL ROOM MEDICAL STUDENT RESIDENCE

22

third floor

23

ASSISTED LIVING PUBLIC + SHARES FACILITIES PATIENT ROOMS

25

LONG TERM CARE MAIN FLOOR/LOBBY PATIENT ROOMS CONSULTATION

26

MEDICAL STUDENT RESIDENCE

22

O.T.B.

fourth floor


view approaching building using vaporetto

view approaching Venice via train

28

view of sky bridge approaching hospice care

30

29

27

LEVEL 5 ELEVATOR SKY BRIDGES 26

HOSPICE PATIENT ROOMS LEVEL 5-8

27

ASSISTED LIVING PATIENT ROOMS LEVEL 5-15

28

LONG TERM CARE PATIENT ROOMS CONSULTATION

29

MEDICAL STUDENT RESIDENCE

O.T.B.

view of altana: residents participate in community activities

fifth floor

183


184


CONCLUSION

The studio concludes with twenty distinct proposals for reimagining life and the continuum of care in a city which is declining. Opportunities lie within the crumbling, aging, decaying fabric of Venice. The architecture of health is considered within this immensely rich context, highlighting history, culture, place, and identity. Venice’s context and culture provides the very ingredients for life to emerge and grafting within this context has proven to be an extremely complex and challenging task. The design provocations seek to challenge the notions of the architecture of health, of Venice itself, of constructing new within the old, of life within death, all contained within the overarching programs of assisted living, long term care, complex care, and terminal care. The project was reimagined in twenty different ways with distinct critical positions on life and death in Venice. Though distinctly different, each project is an unfolding dialogue on the mat building/mat urbanism strategy. A porous mat where the transitional spaces are just as important as the nodes it connects, the mat strategy suggests an open field where the spaces design themselves, where function and events configure space (Stan Allen, Mat Urbanism: The Thick 2-D). Continuity and urban connectivity: a direct reference to Venice’s urban and social context of “life on the streets”, the interstitial

spaces of the calli, campi, fondamenta, and sotoportego form its culture. In a city suffocated by mass tourism, Venetians can still co-exist on the same streets. A beautiful coexistence and interdependent relationship emerges among the two: a symbiotic relation which continuously feeds one another in this city of paradoxes. Not only is the city in various states of contradiction, but the project itself proved to be a continuously contradictory task: how do we design a million square feet of new program into an intimate residential neighbourhood? How does the new integrate itself into the old? How do we design a mat building when spaces emerge on its own through use and activity? Masterplan to details, what scale do we operate at? There are still so many unanswered questions. Purposefully set as an impossible task, the assignment pushed us into countless directions, exploring numerous iterations, raising more questions than ever, forcing us to explore critically. The various design exercises examined the city and the architecture of health through a critical lens. An unforgettable field trip and experiential analysis of Venice enhances design through research and experience. The studio was essentially a lesson on criticality: a way of presenting our works grounded with logic and reason, holding a critical position. In the end, a wonderfully impossible project in the fantastic, unreal setting of Venice. 185


Ryerson Master of Architecture - AR8101 Studio in Critical Practice 2014  
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