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BAC.S1_M.Arch_7.28.2008_RWM


Part 1: Modern House Ana

The name of the studio: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

Foundation Design B-1 Master’s Studio Fall term of 2007 Mr. Karl Munkelwitz Boston Architectural College

PART ONE The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Analysis of a modern house precedent 6 weeks (from September 10, 2007 to October 22, 2007)

This first portion of the studio is displayed on pages: 2 through 7

PART TWO The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Design of a boathouse 8 weeks (from October 22, 2007 to December 17, 2007)

This second portion of the studio is displayed on pages: 8 through 17


B1STUDIO Part 1


Studio name:

B-1 Master’s Studio

Term:

Fall 2007

Instructor’s name:

Karl Munkelwitz

Project name:

Modern House Analysis

Project number:

1 of 2

Project duration:

6 weeks

Project dates from: September 10, 2007 Projects dates to:

October 22, 2007

Project summary: In this first part of the semester, our studio was asked to analyze a chosen house through drawing, diagraming, and modeling. The final step was to convert a single aspect of our house based on the conclusions reached in our analysis and, in turn, introspectively analyze our own outcome.

Left: Plan of Rudolf M. Schindler’s Residence on Kings Road in Hollywood California -Completed in 1922 2


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 1 of 2: Modern House Analysis █ 6 weeks


ern House Analysis █ 6 weeks Schindler and his modern house When given a handful of houses to choose from to start the studio, I chose the infamous Rudolf M. Schindler Residence on Kings Road in Hollywood California. In doing research about both Schindler and this house, I found many aspects about each that defied the convention of their day and age. The modernist duplex that Schindler designed and build, was the first of its kind introduced to the western part of the United States. Upon his moving to Hollywood, California, Schindler constructed his residence to compliment a Southern California way of life. The temperate and pleasant climate informed Schindler’s design. He virtually used the California sun as a building material. In addition, the built construct merely assisted in the larger scaled site context. In fact, the “Schindler House” can be more identifiable as a site than a building. Although the tilted concrete and wood-frame were fundamental partitioning, they were not the only boundaries on the site. The site was also navigated between the weaving hedges, the generously sized gardens, and the implied courtyard areas. Schindler himself was a gregarious personality from what many sources have said. His accelerated lifestyle of partying and staying up late dictated the design of this, his own residence and eventually lead to his solitary inhabitancy of the duplex. The design was meant to be a collection of four studio-spaces linked into a hose with shared kitchen space, garage, sleeping lofts, gardens and bathrooms. To this effect, the shared spaces were conducive to parties and the private studios were conducive to private living and uninterrupted workspace. Collage of the Schindler House The collage to left is meant to be an exercise in both increasing Photoshop proficiency and arranging compositions to read coherently. The images come from a variety of sources found in the Library of the BAC pertaining to the Schindler House. 3


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 1 of 2: Modern House Analysis █ 6 weeks

Base Drawing 1

Base Drawing 2

This drawing is one of two large scale pencil drawings documenting the layout of the Schindler House. The first two weeks of our studio were meant to simply research, document and draw the existing conditions of our respective modern house. As you will notice, the drawing above has a site plan, a floor plan, a section and an elevation.

This, the second of two base drawings, page). Even though these two drawing us as students to evaluate the design th roof plan, two elevations and one sectio


ern House Analysis â–ˆ 6 weeks

of the Schindler House. The first two isting conditions of our respective an, a section and an elevation.

Base Drawing 2 This, the second of two base drawings, was a continuation of the previous weeks drawing (found on the opposing page). Even though these two drawings were simply a pragmatic recreation of an existing work, it was important for us as students to evaluate the design through our process of hard-lined drawing. The pencil drawing above shows a roof plan, two elevations and one section of the Schindler House. 4


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 1 of 2: Modern House Analysis █ 6 weeks

Analysis Once we were familiar with the nuances of the our modern houses, the next step was to analyze the house though a variety of mediums. Each of the images from these two pages represent a different cross-section of evaluation for the Schindler house. • Top Left- The layout of the Schindler House consists of equally shaped wings that mimic one another. • Top Right- Similar to the left image there is parts of the house layout that reflect on major axes. • Opposite Page- An abstracted 3-dimensional collage showing extrusions of the Schindler house site. • Bottom Left- A more literal collage representing the utilization of space. • Bottom Right- Knowing the partitions, entrances and the nature of the dual inhabitants this drawing represents a circulation diagram of the Schindler House.


ern House Analysis â–ˆ 6 weeks

as to analyze the house though a t cross-section of evaluation for the

at mimic one another. on major axes. Schindler house site.

bitants this drawing represents a

5


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 1 of 2: Modern House Analysis █ 6 weeks

Diagramming Each of these represents an isolated aspect of the Schindler Residence: Structural System - The beams and load-bearing tilt slab concrete walls are displayed Environment - The shrubs, trees and sun patterns are evident in this ink on Mylar diagram Tectonics – Joints, corners, seams and intersections are shown in this axonometric drawing of the south wing. Model - A continuation of the tectonic study only more detailed and more successful in representing the dynamic between the heavy concrete massing and the light mullion striped glazing.


ern House Analysis â–ˆ 6 weeks

6


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 1 of 2: Modern House Analysis █ 6 weeks

Initial Transformation Iteration For this last part of the House Analysis Project, we were asked to consider strategies of subvertsubvert ing, obscuring, amplifying, or otherwise altering the logical systems that govern the design of our house. In my previous analysis of the house I noticed that the house was polarized between the two groups of residents. Because the duplex was designed as equal households dissected into equally shared spaces and equally assigned private spaces, I wanted to preserve that sancsanc tity. The “alteration” that I proposed was to keep the purity of the bisection and arrange the space to make the polarization more decipherable. As you can see in the drawing, the middle partition between the two residences severs the two residences into a less ambiguous more private space for each.


ern House Analysis █ 6 weeks

Final Transformation Iteration Because the initial proposal lacked a clear goal and seemed a bit forced, I wanted to give it one more try before presenting to a final jury. In this Final Transformation study I wanted to keep the reordering of space a paramount, but give the design a distinct set of rules that built upon my previous studies of the house. The drawing below shows the contrast of my design with the current Schindler House in plan view. The diagrams show how the axis of separation could be fractured and shifted to create a new axis, while maintaining the purity of Schindler’s organization pattern. In retrospect, I wished that part one of this studio granted more than a week to this transformation study, but I felt the analysis study was quite successful.

sformation Iteration

part of the House Analysis Project, ked to consider strategies of subvertng, amplifying, or otherwise altering ystems that govern the design of our

ous analysis of the house I noticed se was polarized between the two sidents. Because the duplex was equal households dissected into ed spaces and equally assigned es, I wanted to preserve that sanceration” that I proposed was to keep the bisection and arrange the space polarization more decipherable. As in the drawing, the middle partition e two residences severs the two nto a less ambiguous more private ach. 7


B1STUDIO Part 2


Studio name:

B-1 Master’s Studio

Term:

Fall 2007

Instructor’s name:

Karl Munkelwitz

Project name:

Boathouse Design

Project number:

2 of 2

Project duration:

10 weeks

Project dates from: October 22, 2007 Projects dates to:

December 17, 2007

Project summary: In this second part of the semester, the studio class was asked to analyze the site of the Charles River Esplanade from the eastern end of Storrow Lagoon to Massachusetts Avenue. From our analysis we were then asked to locate and design a boathouse on the site that evolved from our conclusions about the site.

Left: Diagrammatic sketch of the diverting pathways found on on the Esplanade 8


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks Preliminary Site Analysis

When asked to visit the site, our assignm its use, sun pattern, ground materials, s connection to the city, noise patterns, av traffic patterns, variations of use through whatever else might have significance.

1 4 2

3

To the left are the 3 sketches showing v our observations.

The top sketch shows the nature of the thoroughfare. Bicyclists use the site prim transport, whereas runners and walkers leisure and recreation.

The middle sketch looks at the Charles larly, from the first dock before the lagoo view, I wanted to display the dock’s impl structed view toward scenic Cambridge

The bottom sketch contrasts the middle prominent foregrounding of the Back Ba apartments.

1

Drawings are drawn with pen on Strathm

Site: The Charles River Esplanade (from Storrow Lagoon to Massachusetts Aven


oathouse Design █ 10 weeks Preliminary Site Analysis When asked to visit the site, our assignment was to observe its use, sun pattern, ground materials, significant views, connection to the city, noise patterns, available seating, traffic patterns, variations of use throughout the day, and whatever else might have significance. To the left are the 3 sketches showing views that pertain to our observations. The top sketch shows the nature of the site as a multi-use thoroughfare. Bicyclists use the site primarily for utilitarian transport, whereas runners and walkers use the site for leisure and recreation.

2

The middle sketch looks at the Charles River perpendicularly, from the first dock before the lagoon. By drawing this view, I wanted to display the dock’s implication of an unobstructed view toward scenic Cambridge & MIT. The bottom sketch contrasts the middle sketch with its prominent foregrounding of the Back Bay’s semi-high rise apartments.

3

Drawings are drawn with pen on Strathmore paper. Site: The Charles River Esplanade (from the eastern end of Storrow Lagoon to Massachusetts Avenue).

4 9


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks

Mapping the site Modeling the site

Once we had delineated patterns of the site and an analytical model. By readin mapping is conventionalized was reinte documenting benalities entrensic to the

Within the group of possible headings t synthesizes the circulation patterns wit trees from the left sketches, a split-path

A more in-depth study of this fractured wanted to show the variation in usage floating red lines as vehicular traffic, the notice, the bicycle and foot traffic unite making the volume of traffic greater at

From the models perspective on the op you pan across the model. The conclu


oathouse Design â–ˆ 10 weeks

Mapping the site Modeling the site Once we had delineated patterns of the site, the next step for our studio was to produce both an abstract mapping of the site and an analytical model. By reading the article “The Agency of Mapping� by James Corner, the process by which mapping is conventionalized was reinterpreted for me as a means to extract information from the site rather than simply documenting banalities intrinsic to the common observer. Within the group of possible headings to consider as mapping facilitators, I chose to construct a perspective drawing that synthesizes the circulation patterns with the edge conditions for our given site. As you can see in the abstracted wedge of trees from the left sketches, a split-path is created. A more in-depth study of this fractured pathway is studied in the subsequent analytical model. For the model found below, I wanted to show the variation in usage between two cross-sections of the site. The birds-eye perspective below shows the floating red lines as vehicular traffic, the yellow line as bicycle traffic, and lastly the blue line as foot traffic. As you will notice, the bicycle and foot traffic unite (or diverge if approaching from the left orientation of the model) at a single node making the volume of traffic greater at that area of the path. From the models perspective on the opposite page, you can see that both the type and the amount of traffic undulate as you pan across the model. The conclusions found in this exercise are precursors to my future designs of the Boathouse.

10


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks

SITE’ AND ‘SITING’

After visiting and becoming familiar with th sites within the overall site, then develop a massing, the program was limited to only t eral connected volumes).

Obviously, this part of our studio was an ac of this, the designs of each were less cons

As directed, I put equal effort put into each design to the left used the water inset to se principals from earlier exploration to relate right-most design is indicative of the split p


oathouse Design █ 10 weeks

SITE’ AND ‘SITING’ After visiting and becoming familiar with the site, we were asked to use our observations to focus on three different localized sites within the overall site, then develop a distinct scheme for each site. Since this was the first attempt to create boathouse massing, the program was limited to only two elements: a dock and the boathouse itself (which was to consist of one or several connected volumes). Obviously, this part of our studio was an accelerated step toward a boathouse design because of its depth of study. Because of this, the designs of each were less consequential than the principals that informed them. As directed, I put equal effort put into each of the three designs. Each having the whimsical nature of preliminary design. The design to the left used the water inset to separate the public pathway from the private boat-doc. The middle design used the principals from earlier exploration to relate the boathouse back to the city. Lastly, the wedge shaped roof awning found on the right-most design is indicative of the split pathways found throughout the Esplanade trail.

11


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks

Reconnecting to the Site After the “Site & Siting” exercise, I took it upon myself to do an intermittent step between assignments. The sketches that are shown on this spread are showing principals that were pivotal to my later boathouse design. Since the primary goal of this studio was to evolve a construct out of site qualities, I wanted to keep the site the primary object of my focus while designing. As these diagrams show, there is a great panoramic view of Boston from certain areas of the site. One of them happens to be at the node found on the left-most design of my previous assignment. I waned to extrapolate lines of view found at this node. Once I sketched lines of site to the iconic skyscrapers and the lagoon bridge I noticed that the resulting areal perspective created a 90 degree span from one to the other. The node that I am speaking of, is located about 20 feet out to the Charles River as you will see in the upper left drawing. From this node I designed a construct that pointed its contour lines in significant directions within this 90 degree span. Even though it is a rough sketch and rough model, the two images in the upper right dictate a formidable aspect of future designs.


oathouse Design â–ˆ 10 weeks

tween assignments. The sketches that house design.

I wanted to keep the site the primary

reas of the site. One of them happens ed to extrapolate lines of view found at ridge I noticed that the resulting areal

s you will see in the upper left drawing. rections within this 90 degree span. ht dictate a formidable aspect of future

12


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks


oathouse Design █ 10 weeks 3 ABSTRACT CONCEPTUAL MODELS The assignment that followed the previous one, challenged our studio to produce three abstract conceptual models in response to one of our site designs. Of course, I chose the left-most design for reasons explained on the previous page. Juxtaposing the “small scale” design of the previous assignment, this assignment called for 3 fragmented parts of a possible boathouse design. The previous scale limited our level of detail, but this assignment gave us the freedom to inhabit a “large scale” massing. These fragmented parts of the overall boathouse design were meant to show the thresholds between public/private and interior/exterior spaces, as well as entry and exit locations. The designs you can see below show parts of the right triangle shaped model to the left. The entrance is a diverted path found on the right-most images. The middle images show the inset of the river found in the chosen siting model. The last conceptual model is the confluence of two pathways. One line is the linear pathway cutting an underpass into the side of the massing. The other line shows the the directional connectivity back to the city.

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B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks

View 1

View 3

View 2 View 4

View 1


oathouse Design █ 10 weeks

COMBINING ELEMENTS / DESIGNING THE WHOLE As the heading suggests, this next step is a refining of previously explored ideas into a model. Even though the fragmented construct from before was refined and reinterpreted, for the most part the integrity of the principals were kept in tact and simply woven together.

View 2

Of course the major difference from the previous designs and this design was the input of major program elements. We were told that the design of our boathouses were to include: boat storage, workshop area, athletic areas, public areas, circulation and boat docks. The detailed list of spaces were catalogued for us upon starting our design but at this stage of the design it would have been ineffective to include detailed designs for each.

View 3

BOATHOUSE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Boat Storage: (2) 8-person shells (60’ long) (4) 4-person shells (40’ long) (2) 2-person shells (25’ long) (10) singles (15’ long) oars for all of above

View 3 View 4

Shop / Storage: 400sq.ft. shop space (not for storing shells under repair) storage area for min. (2) 8-person shells storage for additional oars and equipment mechanical room Dock(s): launching dock for shells ‘slip’ for 2 coaching launches ramp up/down from boathouse to dock (big enough to turn boats) Athlete Areas: weight / ergometer room (800 sq.ft.) showers / toilets / lockers for men & women 2 small offices for coaches / administration ‘club room’ or small meeting space

View 1

‘Public’ Areas: large event room viewing platform kitchen / prep area

View 4

Circulation

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B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks COMBINING ELEMENTS / DESIGNING THE WHOLE (Part 2) Once I realized the unorthodox arrangement of space found in the last model, I wanted to reinterpret the model into something that privileged my notion of “diverging pathways.” Because this assignment was a two week endeavor, I took it upon myself to stop after making the previous model and start fresh with a new design. The previous design was lacking drawings because this new design took precedence. As you can see, this is a much more thorough exploration of programed spaces. Our instructor asked that before the final proposal be executed, for us to give a “trial-run” at at a complete architectural proposal. That is where this semi-final design comes in. We were implored to complete the following items you can see on this page: an 1/8” = 1’-0” scale model, all major floor plans, 2 section drawings, and a site/roof plan.


oathouse Design â–ˆ 10 weeks

SIGNING THE WHOLE (Part 2)

arrangement of space found in erpret the model into something erging pathways.� Because this deavor, I took it upon myself to model and start fresh with a new as lacking drawings because e. As you can see, this is a n of programed spaces.

the final proposal be executed, complete architectural mi-final design comes in. We ollowing items you can see on model, all major floor plans, 2 f plan.

15


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks

Final Presentation


oathouse Design â–ˆ 10 weeks

16


B1 Studio █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Karl Munkelwitz █ Part 2 of 2: Boathouse Design █ 10 weeks

Club Room

Dock 1 Boat Storage

Gym Shop M

W

1 Dock 2

North Elevation

Entrance 1 Entrance 2 Entrance 3

1st Floor Viewing/ Lounge

West Section

Event 2 W M

South Elevation

2nd Floor

1

3

3

2

Public / Private Diagram

East Perspective


Final Boathouse Design

oathouse Design â–ˆ 10 weeks

Since the final presentation was meant to be a culmination of the previous work, I wanted to represent key principals from the past 10 weeks into a eclectic yet functional building. Key principals: 1 North Elevation

Shifted Grid Pattern - From the previous 3 designs it was evident that there was more than one grid orientation in play. The original justification of the shifted grid was the directional span from the iconic John Handcock skyscraper to the strait view down Exeter Street in the Back Bay. Projected Views - As a product of the eminent views projected to the surrounding context, this final design capitalized on these portraits of nature. Examples of these views are the 2nd floor viewing platform, the glazed entrance corridor and the eastern boat dock.

West Section

2

Separation of Public & Private - Much attention was paid to how one enters the building. The principals introduced in past models shows the main entrance as a branching path from the existing trail. This design is no different. A secondary entrance strictly admits athletes into the bottom floor. And lastly the tertiary entrance admits boat-watching enthusiasts ascend the steps to the public third floor.

South Elevation

3

East Perspective

Sun Pattern - From experience, I have noticed that as the sun works its way across the sky during the day, any windows facing south produce a large amount of heat-gain and glare. By designing the boathouse with minimal indoor exposure to direct rays there is a reduction of unwanted heat-gain.

The Involved Observer - The last design element of my proposed boathouse is the folded roof (pictured to the left). Extending as a view portal into the docking area of the athletes, this area provides curious spectators and fans a chance to see the inner workings of a boathouse and its rowing teams.

17


The name of the studio: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 2110 - Architecture Studio 1 Fall term of 2001 Mr. Philip Barman University of Colorado

PART ONE The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Shelter project 3 weeks (from October 9, 2001 to October 30, 2001)

This first portion of the studio is displayed on page: 19

PART TWO The name of the project: The duration of the project:

The University of Colorado Music Conservatory 8 weeks (from November 1, 2001 to December 20, 2001)

This second portion of the studio is displayed on page: 20


30, 2001)

tory ber 20, 2001)


ENVD 2110 █ Fall 2001 █ Instructor Philip Barman █ Shelter Project █ 3 weeks

Shelter Project This project was my first attempt at creating a construct that responded to site. Located on the cusp of a downhill slope in a common trail in Boulder, Colorado, this site created scenic vistas overlooking undulating farmland. The two primary components to my design are as follows: One - create a comfortable rest area that shields outside elements (sun, wind, and rain). Two - privilege the outward view to the scenery by sculpting the landscape to accommodate the sightseers. As you might notice, the depth of study is lacking as well as the complexity of the design. This project gives a fair portrayal of my architectural design starting point back in 2001.


er Project â–ˆ 3 weeks

ocated on the scenic vistas as follows:

ind, and rain). to

design. This . 19


ENVD 2110 █ Fall 2001 █ Instructor Philip Barman █ Music Conservatory Project █ 7 weeks

University of Colorado Music Conservatory For this sophomore design studio, I attempted my first building design. As a class we were asked to design a Music Conservatory and respond to three major criteria: site, program, and concept. The site for our project is within The University of Colorado Research Park. This several acre open space is located approximately one mile east of campus, adjacent to the popular Boulder Creek Trail. The program of the assignment was to practice balancing two limitations: program and budget. Because of these limits, I discovered that the elegance of a building’s simplicity can make as bold of a statement as a building with complex geometries. Lastly, the concept of this project was to base the design on a particular music piece. The piece I chose has melodic characteristics and abrupt tempo fluctuation. It was interesting to bring an element of time and tempo into a spatial environment. After all, it is a four dimensional world where time and all three linear axis merge into a virtual orchestra of movement. The 4/5 tempo played into the design rhythm of the hallways and the experience of the concertgoer will follow the same emotional progression as the song would. Because this was an introductory architecture studio, the richness of design and the spatial layout are somewhat lacking, however, my design methods improved over this studio with my use of architectural language and craft.


ervatory Project â–ˆ 7 weeks

20


Part 1: Vertical Proj

The name of the studio: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 3210 - Architecture Studio 2 Fall term of 2002 Mr. Eric Morris University of Colorado

PART ONE The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Vertical project - Urban Shopping Mall of Downtown San Francisco 8 weeks (from August 27, 2002 to October 17, 2002)

This first portion of the studio is displayed on pages: 22 and 23

PART TWO The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Horizontal project - Communal Living Grounds for Southern California's Institute of Architecture (SCIArc) 8 weeks (from October 22, 2002 to December 19, 2002)

This second portion of the studio is displayed on page: 24


ENVD 3210 █ Fall 2002 █ Instructor Eric Morris █ Part 1 of 2: Vertical Project █ 8 weeks

0

8 2 7 3 8

2 1 5


ertical Project █ 8 weeks

2 7 3 8

Design Studio 3210 – Eric Morris Vertical Project Urban Shopping Mall of Downtown San Francisco

The final result of this project explored a thread in modern culture which might eventually be of relevance in tomorrow’s architecture. The premise for the project was to create our own program for a vertical building or construct. In my program, I wanted to take the idea of the conventional department store shopping center and elevate it. I believed it would work flawlessly but the question remains: will a shopping district be appropriate and successful for an urban setting in our present day, and if not, what problems limit us? If there were to be any limitations, one would be the convenience factor for consumers. To elaborate, there might be problems of parking, maneuvering of child strollers and disabled citizens, and the easy stocking and removal of goods. So many social and spatial factors agree with the conventional grounded shopping district, but there are also enticing benefits to a vertical mall. I believed there were opportunities for increased consumer convenience by having each shopping genre (like electronics or fashion) organized by numbered floors rather than mixed throughout. The building itself could possibly be more recognizable as an iconic vertical structure than as a series of horizontal façades, like in most malls. Consumers could be captivated by the extraordinary panoramic views of the city skyline during their shopping experience. Lastly, there are the possibility of new challenging construction innovations to look forward to such as faster, larger and more efficient elevators to navigate the masses. As for the design, the urban setting of choice for our project was to be in downtown San Francisco. I drew a figure/ground rendering to depict a unique stamp of the San Franciscan spirit. The poetry of that form transformed into the inspiration of my design through abstraction. In other words, my design evolved into extruded patterns of that city plot.

2 1 5 6 8

5

22


ENVD 3210 █ Fall 2002 █ Instructor Eric Morris █ Part 1 of 2: Virtical Project █ 3 weeks

In my presented building design I created a massing model made of delicate floating objects. The crafted basswood objects adorned the verti vertical space of my first model like interacting fishes in a fish bowl. These objects were to take the notion of the San Francisco plot pattern and extrude it along each façade such to imitate playful sculptural pieces at a large scale. The rigid framework of the vertical beams served not only as support to hold up each of the floors but also as an aesthetic. As slender lines, they privileged the elongated frame of the building, while also highlighting the internal shapes. To analogize; the building’s vertical lines were structurally what a skeleton might be to a living organism, pieces that hold its vital parts firmly in place. For most conventional 20 story office buildings the floor plan deviates very little from floor to floor. With my design the square floor plan never changes but the floors cut a horizontal section through each floating object as if it is a hollow shell. Inside the shells are the public circulation spaces that extend out into the semi-private department store exterior. This project had the strongest notion of positive/negative space. The floating objects were the positive space, and the negative space was the open area between the objects. Now in this sculptural skyscraper you can see that the exterior complexity translates to its interior ingenuity. From the shoppers perspective a unique design presents itself from floor to floor. In any given floor there is a city floorpanorama complimented by one or more solid shapes weaving from floor board to ceiling. In this day in age, shopping malls deviate very little from one to the next, but with this new way of extending consumerism vertically, we might be able to explore a thread in our culture which could open doors for new design.

0

8 2 738 .2 1568 5


irtical Project â–ˆ 3 weeks

23


ENVD 3210 █ Fall 2002 █ Instructor Eric Morris █ Part 2 of 2: Horizontal Project █ 8 weeks

Horizontal Project –Communal Living Grounds for Southern California’s Institute of Architecture With more than 50 acres of land to build on, this project was a sizable undertaking for a junior level architecture studio. In the second half of the ENVD 3210 studio, we explored a more grounded approach to design, in comparison to the vertical project. We were asked to respond to several program criteria for this project. We were asked to incorporate into this construct a residential hall, a community center, a dining facility, an administration sector, a common study space and lastly a station for underground transport. The setting for this project bordered Southern California Institute of Architecture or SCIArc for short. This institute is a narrow, quarter mile long building renovated from a cargo train station into what you see today. The old freight yard, next to which SCIArc was constructed, is the setting for our proposed design. The immensity of this site limited our depth of exploration in the building’s mechanical and functional elements. With my knowledge of architecture and limited time at hand I put forth a promising attempt to organize a massive harboring of students and faculty. I noticed that the site had a very strong linear tension by nature and felt compelled to design an opposing force to give presence to the construct. The earliest stages my partí models suggested a free formed organic shape. By weaving curvilinear elements into a design the static plot of land began to engage a sense of whimsical movement. The vertical walls of my small scale model interact like free flowing ribbons. These walls provided the interior spaces with unique design opportunities. The reasoning behind building such a free form, curvilinear design was not only to juxtapose the linear freight yard but to make each space something customized and entirely organic. For a project of this size to be blocky and rigid the final end result would be endless streams of walls and monotony. That is why for my final construct the building reads linearly but still feels more appropriately scaled. The procession takes the observer from the southern end of the building with a two-story wing of administration and staff to the sweeping community center with many areas to relax and study. From there you enter to the food court or dining hall with a pointed glass atrium that stares into the courtyard space between the building and SCIArc. The residential was slightly disconnected from the rest of the construct in order to make it more private and secluded. Obviously the scale of this project limited the complexity of space but I felt the successful elements were the axial flow and the unique organic spaces to inspire the architecture students.


rizontal Project â–ˆ 8 weeks

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24


The name of the studio: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 4310 - Architecture Studio 3 Spring term of 2003 Mr. Michael Hughes University of Colorado

PART ONE The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Diagraming - Analysis of a Le Corbusier Painting 5 weeks (from January 14, 2003 to February 4, 2003)

This first portion of the studio is displayed on page: 26

PART TWO The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Pre-visit - Mies van der Rohe Foundation Project 5 weeks (from February 6, 2003 to March 13, 2003)

This second portion of the studio is displayed on pages: 27 to 31

PART THREE The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Post-visit - Mies van der Rohe Foundation Project 6 weeks (from March 25, 2003 to May 6, 2003)

This second portion of the studio is displayed on page: 32 to 34


nting y 4, 2003)

roject 3, 2003)

Project 03)


ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 1 of 3: Diagraming █ 5 weeks

In the first exercise of this studio class we exercised the universally recognized language of diagramming. A diagram is traditionally considered a drawing which illustrates geometrical patterns within a system, using scribe only for topical uses and not for description.

We began this first analytical exercise by deriving patterns from an obscure grayscale image which was presented to us by Professor Hughes. As we later discovered, the painting was a cubist work by French architect Le Corbusier, but in this early stage of study it was only identifiable to us as a series of interacting black and white geometries. This assignment was a practice in creating our own individual categories of interplay as well as decoding each category diagrammatically. As a grayscale image it was simple for us to abstract several dualities in this painting; heavy/light massing, the fluid/static hierarchy, the grid pattern, linear tension and many other systems. At this juncture we were then introduced to the color rendering of the painting for the first time. This engaged a dialogue between the partial information and the enriched information. As a class, we interpreted the continuity of the grayscale and of the color rendering. By doing so we honed our ability to interpret and diagram any architectural landscape before designing a construct. My diagrams of Le Corbusier’s painting used conventional threshold markings, such as varied doted lines and assorted hatch patterns, in order to easily identify contrasting elements. By the conclusion of this project I felt that my diagramed portrayal of the painting would inform an outside viewer of what might be a derived aesthetic of the painting. Furthermore, given my instructional diagrams, one might even be able to replicate the Le Corbusier painting to some end.


of 3: Diagraming â–ˆ 5 weeks

st analytical exercise by deriving patterns grayscale image which was presented to us hes. As we later discovered, the painting k by French architect Le Corbusier, but in f study it was only identifiable to us as a ng black and white geometries. This assignice in creating our own individual categos well as decoding each category diagram-

age it was simple for us to abstract several ainting; heavy/light massing, the fluid/static d pattern, linear tension and many other uncture we were then introduced to the f the painting for the first time. This gue between the partial information and the tion.

erpreted the continuity of the grayscale and ering. By doing so we honed our ability to gram any architectural landscape before truct. My diagrams of Le Corbusier’s paintional threshold markings, such as varied ssorted hatch patterns, in order to easily ng elements. By the conclusion of this my diagramed portrayal of the painting outside viewer of what might be a derived ainting. Furthermore, given my instrucone might even be able to replicate the Le g to some end.

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Part 2 & 3

3

“The building art is always the spatial expression of spiritual decisions.� -Mies van der Rohe


Studio name:

ENVD 4310

Term:

Spring 2003

Instructor’s name:

Michael Hughes

Project name:

Mies Foundation

Project duration:

11 weeks total (5 + 6)

Project dates from: March 6, 2003 Projects dates to:

May 6, 2003

Project statement: In this upper division studio, Professor Hughes showed us that there was more to architecture design than being an impulsive extrusion of the designer’s psyche. Rather, when it comes to building successful structures, function and aesthetic are derived from layers of collective information. Hughes encouraged us to make every component of our design part of a system. In doing so he prescribed for us a framework for our new visual language.

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ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 2 of 3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks

The first three weeks of our studio placed the Le Corbusier painting under the proverbial microscope and, in turn, implored us to critique this work from an architectural standpoint. In this moment in our studio we transitioned into a more traditional study of architecture, and in doing so, we changed latitudes, literally. Our small group of students embarked on a trip to Barcelona Spain midway though the semester to study, up-close, Mies van der Rohe’s modernist masterpiece, The Barcelona Pavilion. But long before we arrived at its footsteps we had to first study the history and conceptualization of this small but very significant construct.

History and Design of the German Pavilion in Barcelona First built in 1929, in The Pavilion was part of the Barcelona Universal Exposition which exhibited works from architects from around the world. Originally, Mies was commissioned to oversee installations of German manufacturing prior to his own design for the Barcelona fair. When the opportunity presented itself for an additional entry into the exhibition, Mies obliged despite Germany’s reluctance to allow such a timerestrained entry. The program for The Pavilion called for a non-utilitarian space to make note of Germany’s re-emergence into a democratic nation after The First World War. In comparison to other Exposition entries, The Pavilion’s design had nearly any items to showcase besides the Georg Kolbe’s bronze statue. Therefore, The Pavilion was to constitute its own display.


3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks In lieu of The Exposition’s completion and The Pavilion’s functional shortcomings, Mies’ masterpiece was dismantled and sent to Germany after its short-lived eight-month existence. It was not until 1985, more than 50 years later, a reconstruction campaign was assembled to bring The Pavilion back to life. The campaign gave way to a virtually identical pavilion which now inhabits its original Exposition plot. The new pavilion was graciously welcomed after the authenticity and accuracy of the plans and prints were argued. This rebirth of the classic Pavilion gave way to a tangible model so that Mies’ vision could be shared and appreciated in today’s realm.

Background Information The Barcelona Pavilion was arguably the definitive model of Mies van der

Rohe’s modernist age of architecture. This movement brought into fame the likes of Frank Lloyd Right and Le Corbusier, two other pioneering architects of the 20th century. As an object of study, this Pavilion of Mies’ represents ideas that can be found in many modern day design concepts. But in its day, what was erected upon the grounds of the 1928 Universal Exposition was more than just an exhibit; it was a celebration of German engineering with a daring breach of classical idealism. Mies used a style reminiscent of German Neoclassicism in his design. This is evidenced by the Pavilion’s low podium, casually open courtyard, and a-symmetrical congregating form. The Pavilion also borrows from the zeitgeist of collimated expositions. The purpose of these slender columns are not only to structure the building, but float the massive glass pains in its rigid grasp. The engineering and materiality of these cruciform, chromium-plated columns, along with other things, proved that Mies was devoted to artful craftsmanship. Perhaps the most radical element of The Pavilion is its haphazard wall placement that is evident in Mies’ design. In fact, the design of The Pavilion is so disordered that analysts cannot ascertain any modular pattern whatsoever. The placement of walls and columns are, in essence, random, yet they foster a useful design. The function of The Pavilion is unique because it is less utilitarian and more experiential. That is to say, the building itself, is the work of art instead of a casing for the art. One who visits the space likely engages their curiosity and their sense of exploration as they enter into this human-scaled sculpture. Nothing about the pavilion is intensely jarring or extreme. Rather, the beauty of Mies’ construct was in the interstitial and ambiguous language which it was presented. The partitions are the product of whimsical and organic organization techniques. Furthermore, while the partitions create a circulation that is fluid and non-linear, the observer is still compelled to mobilize and indulge in the unique perspectives. In addition to spatial ambiguity, another approach to visual deceptiveness that Mies uses is his skillful materiality palate. The dynamic of glossy and opaque materiality evidenced in the Pavilion is instrumental in either focusing or broadening the observer’s focal point. An example of a view that encapsulates Mies’ excellence would be the view down the travertine and marble veneered corridor as you face the statue adorning the reflecting pool. This view exhibits Mies’ use of reflected natural lighting. It goes without saying that this is not the only provocative perspective that happens upon the raised pedestal of The Pavilion. So much praise can be given for the ingenuity Mies owned and in his architecture, but it is not until you stand in one of his buildings that you are humbled by his excellence.

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ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 2 of 3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks

Our Program In this junior level studio, our semester project was to take our previous knowledge of Mies’ Pavilion and build what was called The Mies van der Rohe Foundation. It was up to us to decide whether the design would be within, upon, and/or adjacent to the site of the Barcelona Pavilion itself. With that in mind, our design was not to diminish Mies’ aspirations, but by being the “intellectual assertion of Mies’ work,” The Foundation was to extend his message of minimalism (superficial simplicity), a-symmetrical proportion, light refraction, material richness and spatial ambiguity. The Foundation also needed to perform several pragmatic duties: expand upon the gift shop, provide both a study space and a presentation space, and lastly, house several researchers and working staff in its temporary living grounds. Per the Board of Directors programmatic request, the Foundation needed to be rectilinear in order to clarify the experience over imagery. Likewise, the foundation was to be subtle in its integration of building into landscape as well as pay homage to Mies’ indoor/outdoor dynamic. The client envisioned an architectural solution that capitalizes on the uniqueness of site and mission. Likewise the client asked for the Foundation to be an elegant, comfortable place for contemplation, study, fellowship and inspiration. Occupants of the foundation were the Director, Curator, Archivist, Publicist, Pavilion Manager and Two Office Assistants. The public access was to be limited to academics looking to access archives, and researchers. Overall the spaces were slated to be conducive to serious academic research and study. However, the Pavilion’s bookstore/souvenir shop could benefit from being expanded through the Foundation’s public areas. The last of the pragmatic requests was to provide the Foundation with a relatively small, but complete and permanent gallery space for the display of drawings, models, furniture, photographs, and video/film projection. This space may even be used for public lecturing, academic presentations and/or invited conferences. The Foundation was to embody the creativity evidenced by Mies’ approach to Architecture and not the tectonic and form imitation. We were asked to research and uncover the literal objective reasoning behind Mies’ design and strive for our own personalized vocabulary in which to tell it.

Site

The si adjace Montj symm Pavilio likely conco the ea this en

In resp decide Pavilio Pavilio tion w tion. M Mies’ c Found


3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks

a y living

the experience over y homage to Mies’ of site and mission. ellowship and inspiration.

Assistants. The public lated to be conducive to eing expanded through

ermanent gallery space for used for public lecturing,

onic and form imitation. own personalized vocabu-

Site The site of our Foundation was specified to be within the large rectangular courtyard adjacent to the Pavilion. Encased within this courtyard was the monumental Font Màgica of Montjuïc. This “Magic Fountain,” as it is translated, is relevant to my design for two reasons: its symmetry and its concentric proximity to surrounding exhibitions, predominantly the Pavilion. In other words, the nuclear reference point, to which each Exhibition visitor is most likely oriented, is this Fountain. The focal point of the Fountain bisects the elongated concourse. At the western-most point lays Spain’s very own entry into the Exhibition and at the east, Germany’s own Barcelona Pavilion. Thus, the Pavilion acts as a climatic endpoint to this engaging procession. In response to this visually captivating journey eastward along the grassy open space, I decided to position the design of my Foundation catty-corner to the south-western tip of the Pavilion. By making the Foundation a subsidiary stop as you radiate outward toward the Pavilion, it preserves the prominent linear pathway to the Pavilion. Additionally, the Foundation would stand as a steppingstone to the grandiose Pavilion instead of being an obstruction. My final motive for this conservative Foundation placement was the glorification of Mies’ conscious positioning of the Pavilion. With all three of these rationalizations for the Foundation’s positioning, I fostered a necessary connectivity to the landscape.

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ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 2 of 3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks

The Pre-visit Mies Foundation Design


3: Pre-visit Design â–ˆ 5 weeks

30


ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 2 of 3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks

way carves aw-inspiring Foundation that playful

As for the e changes an tial. While w boxy ortho deemed it a

This Found spaces. Lik time stays o of the const

On the sam lateral rhyth tion, there

In the in co Ba T

Design One

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe had many innovative design techniques that made him an architectural icon, but what intrigued me most about his design of the Barcelona Pavilion was his spatial ambiguity and inexplicit functionality. Given that Mies’ experiential complexity needed to emerge in my design, I prescribed a congruent archetype of the Pavilion to my Foundation. Even though the Pavilion had a strong notion of placement and a pronounced connectivity to the landscape, there were many created opportunities for spatial ambiguity. Even in today’s modern architecture it is rare to find non-functional architecture and disillusioning circulation patterns, but as we contemplate Mies’ forward thinking in retrospect, the design of the Pavilion was an aggressive advancement toward the 20th Century’s new avant-garde. In light of my interest in this idea of spatial ambiguity, the experiential qualities of the Pavilion were informative to my design. Henceforth, I wanted to privilege both the connectivity to the landscape and the implication of undefined spaces in my design of the Foundation.

The Construct

Even though the Foundation’s location is respectful to Mies’ work, I felt compelled to design a commanding construct, one that provides the Foundation its own sense of presence. When I design, I keep in mind the idea of synergy, which essentially implies that the whole is the sum of its parts. Though there may be hierarchies in a design’s influences, there is still only one end result to make a definitive statement. It should be evident in my Foundation design that, before I put pen to sketchpad, I articulated the structural underpinnings and guidelines for which I needed to follow. As I touched on before, my design was informed by the notion of ambiguous space but the question that needed to be addressed was; how would I manifest ambiguity in a design model? To me, the word “ambiguous” means serving more than one purpose. Though there are contrasting ideas within my design, the interaction of these ideas create a unique and exciting formula for ambiguity. In this first design, I took Mies’ quality of directional and experiential space and induced the element of observatory space. This is evident in the circulation of my Foundation model. The pathway that runs along the grassy open area is sloped into the ground as it approaches the Foundation. While this entry-


3: Pre-visit Design █ 5 weeks

on, but what intrigued me most about his design of

archetype of the Pavilion to my Foundation. Even e, there were many created opportunities for spatial

circulation patterns, but as we contemplate Mies’ he 20th Century’s new avant-garde. In light of my y design. Henceforth, I wanted to privilege both the .

nding construct, one that provides the Foundation

m of its parts. Though there may be hierarchies in a nt in my Foundation design that, before I put pen to

hat needed to be addressed was; how would I maniose. Though there are contrasting ideas within my

observatory space. This is evident in the circulation as it approaches the Foundation. While this entry-

way carves downward to the courtyard space, the slight upward slope into the grassy concourse leads you to an awe-inspiring experiential pathway. This path stays flush to the grassy field as it takes you on a journey through the Foundation from an overhead perspective and lets the public observe extraordinary views of the Foundation walls that playfully weave about. As for the experiential elements of design, my Foundation has an organic circulation. With a series of elevation changes and channeled lateral movement, the built design is the quintessential embodiment of the term experiential. While weaving pathways advantage the experience, indirectly the design bends the stereotypes of rigid and boxy orthogonal form. Even though “boxy” might have its advantages, in my first model of The Foundation I deemed it appropriate to expand the boundaries of convention, while still being functional. This Foundation model portrays similar characteristics to The Pavilion with its ephemeral and semi-undefined spaces. Like The Pavilion, a courtyard-like center expands outward into the more private regions but at the same time stays open and abstract. The total aesthetic seems as though diagonal sections have carved out of the center of the construct. On the same topic of orthogonal structure, my Foundation design moves on the east/west axis with a uniform lateral rhythm analogous with the paralleled path of trees. To elaborate, for every 15 feet lengthwise of the Foundation, there is a modular threshold of structural walls in order to maintain its connection to the landscape. In the northern/southern axis, there remains a connected lineage for structural walls and partitions. However, in converse to the east/west axis, the Foundation’s graphical pattern is more arbitrary. To compliment the Barcelona Pavilion, the haphazard wall placement of the Foundation’s mimics the unintelligible rhythm of The Pavilion’s grid pattern. The dynamic of both axes, once again, leads to the defining manifestation of ambiguity fostered in The Pavilion. Even though The Pavilion had a less utilitarian spatial organization, The Foundation’s function was required to be more involved. With this complex agenda awarded to us designers, our design objective was much more focused and purposeful than that of Mies’. The diagramming practice we had at he beginning of this studio was important in our Foundation’s spatial organization and programmatic room placement. The rooms had to be ordered and placed according to a logical usage pattern. In effect, The Foundation’s function is born. Included in my program were all of the required spaces. As you move eastward along The Foundation you see first the most public spaces which are the expanded gift shop and a small restaurant/café on the lowest level, the courtyard level. The courtyard space is then superseded in height by the larger semi-public level. To get there, a stairway is oriented in the northeast corner of the courtyard. This is where its uppermost landing creates a focal point for omni-directional movement (similar to the Font Màgica’s relation to The Exhibition Grounds). Move north from this point and you are at the doors of the researcher residence, move east and you find the gallery and lecture space and continue to the eastern-most area of library, archives and research center. As you take the path upward from the courtyard’s stairway, you find yourself in the final areas of offices with a conference rooms. One last observance needed to be pointed out as to a discontinuity between The Pavilion and my Foundation Design. The Pavilion has a pedestal on which Mies built his construct but the way My Foundation Design engages the subterranean is almost opposite in theory. The Foundation makes use of the multi-tiered floor orientation so that there might be a certain hierarchy of meaning for each floor elevation.

31


ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 3 of 3: Post-visit Design █ 6 weeks

The Po


3: Post-visit Design â–ˆ 6 weeks

The Post-visit Mies Foundation Design

32


ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 3 of 3: Post-visit Design █ 6 weeks

Design 2 The visit to Barcelona Spain was pivotal to the before and after dynamic of my Foundation design. For the next and final design of this project, I began a new, contrasting approach to its previous design with my newfound perspective. I created a high profile and land engaging form in order for The Foundation to increase its sense of presence. In response to some of the previous model’s ephemeral and implied spaces, this final design enclosed more spaces. Besides making the building more functional, the individual rooms give the visitors privacy and a sense of belonging. As you can see in this final design there are some similarities to the first model. Besides having the same location, there is an elongated footprint coupled with the large internalized courtyard that also emanates throughout this Foundation design. The practice of lining up walls and boundaries with predisposed grid patterns was reincarnated in this second Foundation as well. As a result, the connection to the land was still preserved. I discovered in this studio that, like in Richard Meyer’s architecture, equidistant line patterns provide order and scale to architecture whereas all other lines distract from it. As it has been said, Mies van der Rohe was innovative in his non-modular design, but keep in mind, his underlying goal was not to organize but rather disillusion The Pavilion’s observers. Much of the design is radically different in overall aesthetic and style. The less organic design gave way to a more calculated circulation patterns and the ambiguous space was replaced with utterly segregated sectors. As I had mentioned in the first design profile, an enclosed and “boxy” space had certain advantages. Because I wanted to make a more appropriate, functional model I gave this second design some volumetric girth. I used this design to expand my visual vocabulary from uniform lines as partitions, to various wall and dwelling thicknesses. The focus transferred from the stylistic statement of abstract ambiguity to the weaving of functional space. The final design attempt was not necessarily better but it was in no way a re-creation of the first Foundation model. It touched on fresh ideas that normally would have not been next in succession to a predictable design.


3: Post-visit Design â–ˆ 6 weeks

33


ENVD 4310 █ Spring 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes= █ Part 3 of 3: Post-visit Design █ 6 weeks


3: Post-visit Design â–ˆ 6 weeks

34


The name of the studio: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 4410 - Urban Design Studio Spring term of 2004 Mr. Michael Jenson University of Colorado

DESIGN COMPETITION The name of the project: The duration of the project:

ACSA Student Design Competition 2004 16 weeks (from January 13, 2004 to May 6, 2004)

The work for this studio is displayed on pages: 35 through 54


2004)


4

“This is the Ci Whatever intere -Walt Whitm Design Studio 4410 - Michael Jenson

The appropriately named Urban Desig learned up until this point and expand student of architecture to hone my de nized a framework to champion a ridg strengths in order to help us insight o

When one contemplates Urban Desig resiliency to the conditions. There is a fast paced poetry in motion. When a the process from paper to production compelled me to formulate a constru


“This is the City and I am one of the citizens. Whatever interests the rest, interests me.� -Walt Whitman Design Studio 4410 - Michael Jenson The appropriately named Urban Design Studio was our final undergraduate effort to reflect on our knowledge learned up until this point and expand on our creative expression. This six credit studio was important for me as a student of architecture to hone my design approach for a given preexisting context. Professor Michael Jenson organized a framework to champion a ridged system for design. By that same token he also privileged our individual strengths in order to help us insight our own creative language. When one contemplates Urban Design several sentiments arise. The name itself commands structural rigidity and resiliency to the conditions. There is a sense of timelessness and permanency interlaced into the weaving of today’s fast paced poetry in motion. When a building is build within a city, there is a standard which must be met. In the city, the process from paper to production is equivalent to the relationship between influential and ICONIC. This studio compelled me to formulate a construct with, not only purpose, but invite a journey through its conception.

36


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks The premise for the Urban Design Studio was a design competition for a convention center located in the Midlands area in Columbia, South Carolina. This challenge asked us, the participants, to take the given site, city and the program and expand on it in a way that is unique, positive, and left a memorable image in the visitor’s mind. Entries were entered from 27 schools across North America. The submissions were to be primarily the product of work in upper level design studios (3rd year or higher, including graduate level). Because our entire studio was individual solo projects our small group made up 7 of the total 140 submissions. The 2003-2004 ACSA / AISC Student Design Competition was the first of the annual ACSA (Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture) competitions to have a co-sponsor. In lue of this, the AISC (American Institute of Steel Construction) introduced a construction element to the program. The main goal of the competition was to display both the properties and the benefits of structural steel. In fact, our design needed to have structural steel as the primary material. It was an excellent opportunity to integrate structure with architectural language. ACSA is a nonprofit organization founded in 1912 aimed at enhancing the quality of architectural education. This Washington DC based organization has over 120 affiliate member schools and 4000 plus faculty members nationwide. AISC is a nonprofit association founded in 1921 whose purpose is to promote the use of structural steel through research development, market development, education, codes & specifications, quality certification, and standardization.

Qualifications: There were 3 specific criteria for judging in this competition. We were to be judged on; one, the creative use of structural steel in our design, two, our successful response to the surrounding context, and three, our knowledge of basic architectural concepts such as human activity needs, structural integrity and coherence of architectural nomenclature. More specifically to these basic principals, the program asked us to follow further guidelines. The goal of this project was to create a state of the art facility which enhances downtown development and stimulates economic growth. The proposed convention center should own the characteristics of efficiency, functionality, durability, innovation and perhaps most importantly adaptability. Its image needs to be appropriate for the district and not be visually offensive. Additionally, this convention center aims to not only service Columbia but surrounding jurisdictions of Richland and Lexington County.

Background Rese

The first part of this U United States: Colora laboratory for explor

For all three convent was also important t achieving its goal. Q how would its introd

As our studio was un million dollar additio tion. By taking it a st completed construct

The architecture firm but were later met w the budget was over Lightrail transportati Plaza and the histori

These large sacrifices expected to increase Denver as a home an perspective we were scale and volume to

As for the Columbia rooted in history. Ne early 1700’s this city and as a city in 1854. plot that spanned ea the proximity to the was successful in its

Today Columbia is a ideal meeting and co close in proximity to booming Adluh neig pride themselves in l

Even though the dist construction is now f historic town. One m positioned cattycorn Convention Center o


Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Midlands area in ogram and

oduct of work in dividual solo

Collegiate Steel Construcy both the rimary material.

on. This Washonwide.

hrough research zation.

use of structural basic architecature.

this project was wth. The ion and perhaps sive. Additionnd Lexington

Background Research: The first part of this Urban Design Studio explored the history, purpose and success of three selected convention centers in the United States: Colorado, San Diego, and Columbia Convention Centers. We used the locally situated Denver, Colorado as a laboratory for exploratory research. For all three convention centers we compared the likes and differences in materiality, construction details, and layout patterns. It was also important to answer questions about the political agenda behind each construct and how successful the project was in achieving its goal. Questions, for instance, like; how would the convention center interact with its respective surroundings, and how would its introduction generate revenue and bring business to the community? As our studio was underway, so too was the reconstruction efforts of Denver’s Downtown Convention Center. By having the 300 million dollar addition, our studio was privileged to see firsthand, current undertakings within the genre of large scale construction. By taking it a step further we obtained documentation of zoning laws, building codes, and blue print for this nearly completed construction effort. The architecture firm Fentress & Bradburn was honored with this opportunity to expand on the 15 year old downtown landmark but were later met with some criticism. Firstly, their bold/aggressive design, to some, was obtrusive to its surroundings. Secondly, the budget was overshot by nearly 100 million dollars. And lastly many of its surroundings were hindered by its presence: the Lightrail transportation system needed to be rerouted; one of the city streets was completely eliminated, and IM Pie’s Zeckendorf Plaza and the historic Corrigan Hall were torn down in its wake. These large sacrifices, however, were offset by huge incentives. With the new center open for business, city tax revenue was expected to increase by $9 million per year. Larger conventions, trade and consumer shows, meetings, and banquets sought Denver as a home and in effect brought business to the city and its surrounding areas. By studying this one example of a real life perspective we were, in effect, informing a similar premises for our future design endeavors. We then began to attach a sense of scale and volume to our future design by comparing the event schedules to the actual space occupied.

As for the Columbia Convention Center, we were privileged to be a part of a competition that designed within a city so deeply rooted in history. Next to Savannah, Georgia; Columbia was only the second planned city in the US. Settled by Europeans in the early 1700’s this city was chosen to be the site of South Carolina's new state capital later in 1786. It was chartered as a town in 1805 and as a city in 1854. Columbia was named for Christopher Columbus. The pioneering commissioners designed a 2 by 2 mile city plot that spanned east of the Congaree River. The streets were made a generous 100 ft wide to allow for easy transportation, and the proximity to the river provided ideal trade movement. Because the population grew to over 1000 by the year 1800, the design was successful in its growth strategy. Today Columbia is a thriving metropolis that has an array of restaurants, leisure opportunities and cultural activities making it the ideal meeting and convention destination. The site for the competition is in the heart of the historic Congaree Vista District with a close in proximity to many hot spots such as the historic State Capital Building, the prestigious University of South Carolina, the booming Adluh neighborhood and lastly the infamous Passenger Depot. Both the Adluh neighborhood and the Passenger Depot pride themselves in leading the dining, entertainment and retail industries throughout the city. Even though the district’s roots are in industry there is a warm southern demeanor to the town. The time to capitalize on new construction is now for this location because the major redevelopment of the district will seize a commanding future for this historic town. One more of the exciting benefits offered is the brand new 18,000 seat University of South Carolina Arena positioned cattycorner to the site. With the existence of both facilities, there will be a new parking structure built to the east of the Convention Center on Lincoln Street.

37


Scaled Out

Saint Petersburg

Scaled In

Columbia Saint Petersburg

Site

Columbia

Site analysis was our initial attempt to narrow the focus from a broad city context to an introscopic building plot. Because our competition specified the setting to be within Columbia, South Carolina I wanted to compare this city with a historically rich European city: Saint Petersburg, Russia. By producing diagrams I became informed on six relevant focuses: districts, edge patterns, figure/ground, monuments, green space and grid systems. This study helped in the understanding of city growth patterns for two cultures. With Saint Petersburg, there was a more organic growth pattern with a stronger central presence. It seemed that there were smaller clusters of growth that occurred over time, whereas Columbia was a planned city with design rigidity and an inherent devotion to the grid pattern.

Columbia

ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Figure Ground Diagram


Scaled Out

Saint Petersburg

Scaled In

Columbia Saint Petersburg

Site

Columbia

our initial attempt to us from a broad city roscopic building plot. mpetition specified the thin Columbia, South d to compare this city ly rich European city: , Russia. By producing ame informed on six es: districts, edge ground, monuments, d grid systems. This the understanding of erns for two cultures. ersburg, there was a rowth pattern with a presence. It seemed e smaller clusters of occurred over time, bia was a planned city dity and an inherent grid pattern.

Columbia

Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

Figure Ground Diagram

Edge Systems

Districts

Grid Systems

38


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

The basis for the systems expressed in section one of this portfolio stem from this urban studio’s introduction of 4 concepts: form, site, program and narrative. To begin our first practice in design, we made several collages that fell under each of the four mentioned headings. These 16 collages were to be “quick and dirty” explorations into our sentiment for each topic. Each rendition needed to dig deeper than the surface level and abstract itself into a message or emotion. The medium for expression was black & white photocopied media ranging from magazines to text books.


Design Studio █ 16 weeks

an studio’s introduction of made several collages that and dirty” explorations into evel and abstract itself into edia ranging from maga-

39


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

The next step for our studio was to take the successful parts of each heading (form, site, program and narrative) and incorporate the ideas into four respective boards. By using the computer program Adobe Photoshop, the ideas were better articulated: the color, the increased density and complexity, and the ability to edit made for presentation quality renditions.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

40


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks Cube 1

Cube 2

A brief exercise of historical research project was in order for the next part of our studio. In researching Eastern and Colonial culture back in the early 1800’s, I came upon several intriguing cultural attributes. One in particular was a notable deviation in cultural classes. If one were not of upper class status at this time, one would lead a harsh life of heavy labor and meek living standards. Additionally, by moving the capital of South Carolina from Charleston to Columbia it eased the struggle between the aristocratic Low country and the poorer, industrial Up country. I found it interesting to take these extreme juxtapositions and translate them into several sketches and later into a solid form as we did in our next exercise. Our first 3-dimensional model came at a very pivotal point in our studio. Many ideas needed to me manifested into one place so for this mid-semester project a form finally began to emerge. These models go back to the notion of the four themes intrinsic in our collages coupled with my research principals dealing with cultural tension. There were to be 3 total models made from basswood, Plexiglas and aluminum, with each cube representing a new idea. The assignment asked to use all of the materials at hand to articulate a solid/void language with linear, planar and volumetric complexities. At the completion of these 3 models a distinctive additive/subtractive aesthetic is evident. Cube 1- This model initiated an aesthetic of rectilinear 3-dimensional weaving. The archetype was based on tri-axial thresholds such that each of the three planes incorporated a common linear rhythm. Cube 2- From one perspective, this cube demonstrates the rigid and defined aspects of early colonial culture. The architecture of the day was very uniform and traditional in that many houses and government buildings were very symmetrical and simple (as in the famous Capital Building designed by Alfred Mullet). From the other of the cube there is a less structured chaotic form indicative of rebellious human nature and low society.

Cube 3

Cube 3- This being the last of the three designed cubes, I wanted to juxtapose the apparent style of the previous two models with controlled jagged masses representing the deviancy in colonial society. However, one similarity to Cube 2 is the dynamic of heavy mass concentration on one end and light subtractive forms on the opposing side.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

cal research project was in order for the next part ng Eastern and Colonial culture back in the early al intriguing cultural attributes. One in particular n cultural classes. If one were not of upper class would lead a harsh life of heavy labor and meek onally, by moving the capital of South Carolina umbia it eased the struggle between the aristod the poorer, industrial Up country. I found it extreme juxtapositions and translate them into r into a solid form as we did in our next exercise.

model came at a very pivotal point in our studio. to me manifested into one place so for this orm finally began to emerge. These models go e four themes intrinsic in our collages coupled pals dealing with cultural tension. There were to from basswood, Plexiglas and aluminum, with new idea. The assignment asked to use all of the culate a solid/void language with linear, planar exities. At the completion of these 3 models a ditive/subtractive aesthetic is evident.

ed an aesthetic of rectilinear 3-dimentional was based on tri-axial thresholds such that each orated a common linear rhythm.

ctive, this cube demonstrates the rigid and olonial culture. The architecture of the day was nal in that many houses and government metrical and simple (as in the famous Capital ed Mullet). From the other of the cube there is a m indicative of rebellious human nature and low

t of the three designed cubes, I wanted to yle of the previous two models with controlled ng the deviancy in colonial society. However, the dynamic of heavy mass concentration on tive forms on the opposing side.

41


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks Giving perspective to the methodology: This Urban Design Studio was based on a conscious succession of thought that borrowed from the contrast between physical form and the representation of that form. In other words, each segment was a part of the sequence that alternated from built models to abstracted drawings of those models. For the next step 6 new ink renderings were in order. Each drawing expanded on two dominant ideas or qualities of each exploratory model. Because each drawing occupied a 5 by 13 inch Strathmore canvas there was a linear quality that read on a horizontal axis.

Cub

Cub

Cub


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

Cube 1

Cube 2

Cube 3 42


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Section Overlay This was the first introduction of the actual project competition. In the program Adobe Illustrator we were to take the 6 previous drawings and overlay each of them atop the given site in order to answer questions about the organization of space. From these six renderings, the best suitable for further investigation were analyzed in color with added layers.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

43


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks


44


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Study Model # 1 In this next large step in the design process, we constructed a scaled model complete with topography and purely rough spacial representations. By assessing the scale of the individual program components in relation to the site we gained clarity to a more defined construct.


Subsequent to this first study model, there were two investigations into the vertical scale: the section drawings and the section model. 45


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

5” by 13” (Rapidograph Ink on Strathmore) Four very literal section drawings of Study Model One did two important things; one, they invited a dialogue between below and above ground construction, and two, demonstrated a more accurate vertical scale.

2”-width by 20”-length by 4”-height (basswood/plexiglas/aluminum)


um)

For the next step, a section model expanded on a 1 inch swath through the scaled study model. Similar to the ink section drawings this basswood model elaborated on the interior complexity. It is obvious that the dynamic of an extreme slope presented us with a challenge to respond to. 46


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Final Presentation


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

Presentation

47


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Final Sketches Before the start of a final construct there were a few rough, pencil on velum, layouts drawn with accurate dimensions and squarefootages. These drawings were the most critical part of the design phase due to the incorporation of scale, organization, and lastly design aesthetic. Every significant principal studied up to this point was massaged into the fabric of the final design. For the final building design to be successful, it was imperative to balance FOUR independent cornerstone ideas: program, historical appreciation, use of structural steel and our own personalized architectural language. (1) ONE – Program The program forced a commanding sense of direction and challenged us, the designers, to ponder notions of functionality, durability, adaptability, versatility and organization. By setting boundaries the program, in turn, provided an opportunity for creative expression. The foremost agenda of a program is initially subjective. We were given exact square footages to follow and other guidelines and suggestions, but how we attempted to orchestrate them was the creative mission. Arguably the most important goal of a convention center is its ability to function. It should provide a successful implementation of meetings, conventions, tradeshows and other special occasions. A convention center fails if it is not convenient, accessible and efficient. Often convention centers are considered the housing for the Exhibit Hall. Proper planning of the Exhibit Space and its relationship to activities and support should, therefore, be critical in order for the facility to be successful.

For the competition, the center needed to h Space. Additionally, the Exhibit Space need maximize the potential for event scheduling

There were four critical adjacencies to keep space to the truck docks, three, the banquet called for several meeting rooms and a gene 10,000 square feet of back-of-house corrido

The last of competition requests demanded logical to assume that for farther clear span

Organization of the prescribed surface area primary agenda. To approach the difficult t manipulate grid lines and check the resultin

I like to think of my organization of space as to and experience the narrowing veins of ci destination but a journey.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

awn with accurate dimensions and squarecorporation of scale, organization, and lastly o the fabric of the final design.

endent cornerstone ideas: program, historical

s, to ponder notions of functionality, durabiln, provided an opportunity for creative

For the competition, the center needed to have an easy flow from entrances, registration areas and meeting rooms to the Exhibit Space. Additionally, the Exhibit Space needed to have a length to width ratio of 2 to 1 and, of course, be adaptable. In order to maximize the potential for event scheduling the exhibit space must include operable wall panels. There were four critical adjacencies to keep in mind for the design: one, the exhibit space to the meeting rooms, two, the exhibit space to the truck docks, three, the banquet kitchen to the ballroom and four, the entrance to the administration office. The program called for several meeting rooms and a generous amount of circulation space. These meeting rooms needed to have approximately 10,000 square feet of back-of-house corridors in order to provide access for service amenities. The last of competition requests demanded a minimum column grid dimension of 90 feet for the structure of the building. It is logical to assume that for farther clear spans, the navigation difficulties will be reduced for the facility.

ootages to follow and other guidelines and

Organization of the prescribed surface areas was important to me. If the space operates flawlessly as a machine it accomplishes its primary agenda. To approach the difficult task of forming accurate square footages I used the program AutoCAD in order to easily manipulate grid lines and check the resulting land areas.

ould provide a successful implementation of ails if it is not convenient, accessible and

I like to think of my organization of space as a more linear movement rather than radial. There are nodes to which a visitor will travel to and experience the narrowing veins of circulation as you disperse from the entrance. Architecture, in my opinion, should not be a destination but a journey.

ing of the Exhibit Space and its relationship to ful.

48


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

(2)

TWO – Historical Appreciation (or Significance)

I felt obligated to pay homage to a city rich in history by dedicating my design concept to its political journey. Although I did not want to prescribe a solution to symbolic design, I did however, want to raise the question of how does a designed space fortify a feeling or emotion. To me, there was interplay between Columbia’s past cultural hardships and its orderliness/rigidity in the former aristocratic society. In my final design, I wanted to privilege this interplay as I did in my three cube project aesthetics: one aspect of the model is rigid and uniform whereas the undulating freeform canopy permeates through the orthogonal elements.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

49


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

(3) THREE – Use of Structural Steel Some of the benefits of steel materiality in commercial design are that it has a high resiliency and performance level under harsh natural conditions such as earthquakes and hurricanes. Secondly, it spans great distances while remaining slender and agile. Steel is superior to most or all structural materials simply because it can easily be modified for changing building requirements and almost all US steel is recycled, making it a very environmentally sound choice for construction. The undulating freeform canopy mentioned above made use of steel tube system engineering. The form itself is based loosely on a 3 dimensional sine curve. For this curve it was essential to construct an exterior mold that played well off the programmatic context and yet still had structural integrity. In my research of tube system engineering, the organic forms which it traditionally creates, are simplified with triangulated meshing. The tubes themselves have an extreme compression index and the weight to span ratio is very low.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

Steel eriality in commercial design are that it mance level under harsh natural conditions nes. Secondly, it spans great distances e. Steel is superior to most or all structural asily be modified for changing building teel is recycled, making it a very environuction.

mentioned above made use of steel tube elf is based loosely on a 3 dimensional ssential to construct an exterior mold that c context and yet still had structural system engineering, the organic forms simplified with triangulated meshing. treme compression index and the weight

50


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Requirements For The Competition Final Competition Boards

The final competition boards needed to be 20 inch by 20 inch, foam board mounted, color panels. There also needed to be four total boards and each board needed to stand independent of the other.

Cultural Ryan

W.

Martin

Tensio

Conceptual Statement

The conceptual statement required deals with same attributes discussed in the topic of Personalized Language.

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Final Site Plan

The final site plan was designed in the program AutoCAD and Rendered in Photoshop.

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The site plan needed to show the convention center’s relationship to surrounding developments, landscaping and circulation patterns.

Final Section Drawings

The final section drawings were also designed in the program AutoCAD and Rendered in Photoshop.

Cultural Ryan

W.

Martin

Tensio

Program

The detail of the section drawings needed to be sufficient enough to show the site context and major program elements.

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Final Model

There was a choice of either a virtual or a material final model. My choice was obviously the latter. The shot of the final model shown behind is the required large scale perspective shot showing the essence of my design. Site

For the scale of the model, 1 inch is equal to 30 feet. The topographical lines represent 2 ft in elevation change. The 20 inch by 20 inch topographical base was built with chipboard. The wood of the model was made with both Basswood and Cherry Wood. The tube frame canopy was cut from thick Plexiglas pieces and the windowed areas of the model were represented with thin sheets of Plex.

Fo r


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

Cultural Ryan

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Tension

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Ryan

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Narative

As the fa° ade of orderly social aspirations become conventional and common the underlying jagged nature of people emerges. A deviant society balances and keeps in check the overpowering organizations and complacent groups. The two combined use each other in an attractive interplay which is sensitive to the extremes but finds peace in the interstitial.

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Site

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51


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

(4)

FOUR – Personalized Architectural Language

Since this was a competition, there needed to be an ephemeral element that set my project aside as an entry that defied convention. My own personal architectural language needed to be both meaningful & innovative. It was also essential for me to make everything a part of a system, as such; I wanted to devise a hierarchy of public and private space with the open congregation areas being part of the fluid curved design. I hypothesized that by engaging a fluid geometry the larger spaces will be the nodes of interest to a visitor. By comparison, the circulation spaces would foster a very processional movement from these larger public spaces as I discussed in my Program. A prominent attribute of the site is its descending slope where there is a strong linear threshold along this street. In response this prominent line along Lincoln Street, I designed a path running parallel to the street to be my primary circulation concourse. I designed the semi-public circulation spaces to be a bold, linear geometry that compliments this street axis. These strong rectilinear lines provide visual continuity throughout the building. From a bird’s eve view of The Center, the mahogany circulation path is the backbone of this design because it pulls all of the event spaces tight to its rigid frame. You might even say that the event spaces stem from this strong lineage. I even placed The Grand Public Entryway on the cross street of Pendleton and Lincoln because it was important to have the entrance with superior street accessibility. The five distinct pavilions that are lined up along this primary linear path are derived from two former design elements of the studio. At first glance they borrowed very deliberately from the second of the 3 designed cultural cubes. The other school of thought behind the modular pattern was obviously the grid of Columbia itself. As I had previously described Cube Two, the rigid and defined geometries were indicative of aristocratic colonial culture. The same is true for this final competition design. As you approach the grand entrance from Lincoln Street, you experience a humbling procession yielded by the presence of these heavy masses. The rest of the building, in essence, flows more organically from this threshold or core as shown in the colored site overlay.


Design Studio █ 16 weeks

N

GRAND ENTRANCE

S it e P la n S C A L E :1 '= 3 0 "

52


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

I believe that upon entering a convention center there should be an immediate sense of orientation for every patron. As one enters this proposed construct, there is gravitation leftward (south) as you peer inquiringly down the main concourse toward the Exhibition Space. Then to the right of the entrance, the Entrance Lobby serves as a home base for patrons to meet fellow convention goers as well as be free from heavy foot traffic. As you continue strait ahead from the Grand Entrance you find yourself walking down five steps into the spacious terrace I called the Pre-Function Space. The Pre-Function Space is part of the two main nodes of interest to the public patron (the other being the Exhibit Space). The undulating ceiling paired with the sunken floor entices one into this unique overhead Tube-Structured space. In effect this prepares any patron for the events taking place in the Ballroom as you continue south from the entrance. The other public space that is unique and memorable is the Glass Atrium adjacent to the Pre-Function Space. This space is a strong contradiction to the Pre-Function space with its light airy atmosphere drenched with the gently filtered sun during the day and bathed in moonlight at nighttime. The tall ceilings elongate the space and make it less confining. As you continue north from the entrance lobby, the registration window is situated nicely in the far corner yet is in convenient proximity to the entrance. I decided to cluster the administration offices and the registration areas in the north corner because they will be shielded by the direct sun during the day when most office work is done yet has a panorama of windows to provide spectacular views and indirect lighting. Because the programmed surface area of The Convention Center was extensive, it was important not to merely spread the spaces horizontally but also stack vertically certain elements of my design. Also, in response to the site having a steep downward slope, my inclination for the design was to wedge the first floor underneath the second floor with the larger surface resting above it. The only public area positioned on level one of The Center is the Ballroom space. As for the remaining first floor spaces, the back of house corridors lead to the private spaces, consisting of Back of House Staff, Storage Area, Electrical and Mechanical Rooms, Kitchen Staff and more. As you can see, the spaces farthest from the primary linear corridor tend to be more secluded and private in nature.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

Grid/Exterior

Structure

Second

Fi r s t

0

3 0

6 0

9 0

Floor

Floor

1 2 0

53


ENVD 4410 █ Spring 2004 █ Instructor Michael Jenson █ Urban Design Studio █ 16 weeks

Part of the mission of the Columbia Convention Center is to provide a successful implementation of meetings, conventions, tradeshows and other special occasions for the Columbia Riverbanks Region. In my design of these activities, there is foremost an element of adaptability and accessibility incorporated within the space. Having each space positioned along the primary axis of the main corridor made the design efficient and responsive to function. I believe that the public spaces should feel accommodating; while the private access spaces should be merely invisible. When it comes to the building as a whole, I attempted to find the equilibrium of heavy and defined verses organic and fluid. The subsidiary elements to these two main freeform spaces of Exhibit and Pre-Function permeate through the heavy framing elements. As a non-verbal architectural statement, my design of the Columbia Convention Center entices curiosity with its ingenuity and innovation. I believe that this Center could be the preferred venue for a diverse range of both public and private events for the Columbia and its surrounding jurisdictions of Richland and Lexington County.


Design Studio â–ˆ 16 weeks

54


ONE The name of the class: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 3115 - Intro to Building Materials & Systems Fall term of 2003 Mr. Michael Hughes University of Colorado

The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Material Cube Project 6 weeks (from October 22, 2003 to December 3, 2003)

The final project of this class is displayed on page: 56 TWO The name of the class: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 4352 - Future of CAD Spring term of 2002 Mr. Harry Koutsis University of Colorado

The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Generative Systems 6 weeks (from March 21, 2002 to May 2, 2002)

Two projects of this class is displayed on page: 57 THREE The name of the class: The respective semester: The name of the instructor: The name of the institution:

ENVD 4352 - Form Z Spring term of 2002 Cannot remember University of Colorado

The name of the project: The duration of the project:

Superimposed Fort Design 8 weeks (from March 4, 2002 to April 29, 2002)

The final project of this class is displayed on page: 58


stems

er 3, 2003)

2)

02)


Intro to Building Materials & Systems █ Fall 2003 █ Instructor Michael Hughes █ Cube Project █ 6 weeks


ghes â–ˆ Cube Project â–ˆ 6 weeks

CUBE PROJECT Whether it is scraps of paper pasted together or a scaled detail model, all model forms provide clarity for the designer and solidifies his or her process. The built environment speaks volumes about archetypes without the use of drawings or even verbal explanation. Materiality can set the tone for a room or a space. For example, exposed steel, concrete or stone generally evokes a sense of coldness, stiffness, rigidity and permanency; whereas wood or finished sheetrock could generally feel warm, light, soft and ephemeral. The challenge of this presented project was to design an 8 inch cube, displaying the innovative uses of a chosen architectural material. For my design, aluminum was my chosen medium for investigation (other student projects were samples of rammed earth, wood, concrete, steel, fiberglass, and so on). With aluminum, there is a light, graceful and sculptural character juxtaposed by its rigidity and structural dependability. As you can see on the polished ribbons of sheet aluminum, aluminum has the attractive characteristic of malleability. The inch-thick welded frame shows that, although aluminum is a soft metal, it can fulfill a structural need as well. I enjoyed working with this material because its versatility created a very dynamic final model exemplifying the opposing characteristics of strength and grace.

56


Future of CAD █ Spring 2002 █ Instructor Harry Koutsits █ Generative Systems Projects █ 6 weeks

Future of CAD – Professor Harry Koutsis

In the Computer Aided Design (CAD) project prime number which, in shape, can yield a fi nal tube-frame sweeps the outline of a basic point of the primary pentagon, reduced one f the five new pentagons are each rotated one original pentagon’s focus). Lastly, the forth s evenly, centering them at a point. Thereafte and etcetera. This final product is a multifac the method, this complex shape should be fo

The image above is a computer generated s given form. The numerical code informs a sh product you see is made with calculated adju


e Systems Projects █ 6 weeks

Future of CAD – Professor Harry Koutsis In the Computer Aided Design (CAD) project to the left, I aimed to base a three dimensional form off of a system of “Five.” Five is a prime number which, in shape, can yield a five sided polygon form. There are several references to Five in this system: the pentagonal tube-frame sweeps the outline of a basic pentagon to start off my design. In the second iteration, a new polygon is placed at each point of the primary pentagon, reduced one fifth at each point, and made perpendicular to the visualized plane. For the third iteration, the five new pentagons are each rotated one fifth of 180 degrees (36 degrees) from the previous on the central reference point (at the original pentagon’s focus). Lastly, the forth step takes five of the forms found in the previous iteration and rotates them on one axis evenly, centering them at a point. Thereafter, I reduced each of these five models by 1/5th of the original, 2/5ths of the original, 3/5ths, and etcetera. This final product is a multifaceted germinating system portraying order within a visually complex shape. By prescribing the method, this complex shape should be formulaic as a design tactic. The image above is a computer generated shape powered by a code based program called L-Breeder. The code translates into the given form. The numerical code informs a shape that is moldable by adjusting each of the codes to fit a desirable end result. The final product you see is made with calculated adjustments, both large and small, to each of the lines of code.

57


Form Z â–ˆ Spring 2002 â–ˆ Semester Project â–ˆ 8 weeks

When articulating an aesthetic in design practice, one must devise a system of representing it with images, renderings and drawings. There are various types of media, ranging from traditional hand drafting to computer aided design. Representations of a design project often need elaboration with diagrams and/or communication in order for the observer to feel connected to the project. However, by integrating a well crafted image into a project the concepts are preserved, rather than clouded.

Here you can see the CAD project built in the program Form-Z that superimposes my design for a raised fort into the median of Highway 36 in Westminster, Colorado.

sagttsth


8 weeks

sagttsth

58


ONE The name of the project: The respective semester: The name of the supervisor: The name of the firm: The duration of the project:

Muhlenberg College Student Center Model Spring term of 2008 Bob Simons Bruner/Cott & Associates 1 week (from January 29, 2008 to February 5, 2008)

Images of this model are displayed on page: 60

TWO The name of the project: The respective semester: The name of the supervisor: The name of the firm: The duration of the project:

Hamilton College Student Center Model Spring term of 2008 Norris Strawbridge Bruner/Cott & Associates 4 weeks (from April 1, 2008 to April 29, 2008)

Images of this model are displayed on page: 60

THREE The name of the project: The respective semester: The name of the supervisor: The name of the firm: The duration of the project:

Dean College Dining and Performance Center Model Spring term of 2008 Jim Bruneau Bruner/Cott & Associates 1 week (from April 29, 2008 to May 6, 2008)

Images of this model are displayed on page: 61


5, 2008)

)

er Model


Practice █ Spring 2008 █ Bruner/Cott & Associates █ Muhlenberg College Model & Hamilton College Model █ 5 Weeks

Muhlenberg College This model was built in an attempt to win the commision for a student center at Muhlenberg College in Allentown Pennsylvania. Our firm was later awarded the project for the proposed design. This was my first model building effort at Bruner/Cott. I did not build the base or the basswood construct in the center of the model, however, I did assist with making the context buildings as well as carving their footprint into the base.

Hamilton College

Our firm has been working on the stu has been agreed uppon and hard-lin model that can be used for reference museum board and print outs of the p


el & Hamilton College Model â–ˆ 5 Weeks

n attempt to win the commiat Muhlenberg College in Our firm was later awarded ed design.

uilding effort at Bruner/Cott. the basswood construct in owever, I did assist with ngs as well as carving their

Hamilton College Our firm has been working on the student center/bookstore at Hamilton College for over a year. Much of the design has been agreed upon and hard-lined in AutoCAD. My job was to take the CAD drawings and make a 3D physical model that can be used for reference and client visualization. The model is completely made by myself out of museum board and print outs of the plans, sections & elevations. 60


Practice █ Spring 2008 █ Bruner/Cott & Associates █ Dean College Model █ 1 Week

Dean College - Dining and Performance Center The design of the Dining and Performance Center at Dean College (Franklin, Massachusetts) was difficult to relay to the clients because the 2 dimensional representations had little selling power. Because of this, a model was necessary to relay key design principals and get the desired effect that associates of Bruner/Cott were hoping for. My roll in this project was to build as much as I could until the deadline swiftly approached. It wasn’t until the last minute that the placement of the proposed design had to be quickly put together. I entirely built the topographical base as well as the existing buildings. The trees and proposed design are built by Peter Zeigler and Jim Bruneau.


ollege Model â–ˆ 1 Week

sachusetts) was difficult to relay to the se of this, a model was necessary to tt were hoping for.

roached. It wasn’t until the last minute y built the topographical base as well as nd Jim Bruneau. 61


The work portrayed in this section is a collection of my 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional fine art.

3D Work with Clay & Earthenware: page 63

2D Sketches and Drawings: pages 64 through 67


and 2-dimensional fine art.


Independent Study â–ˆ Clay & Earthenware

Wheel Throwing

Sculpting

Human Form

Glazed Pottery


e

The images you see on this spread are the product of my work with clay and earthenware. It is an excellent medium for articulating complex 3-dimensional form.

Whell Throwing

Sculpting

Glazed Pottery

64 63


Independent Study █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Marilyn Paschal █ Freehand Drawing █ 3 weeks Model One

The seven images displayed on this page are sketches of 3 separate human models. During a three week period, our instructor had us sketch the human form to get a feel for texture, geometry, shadow, and lastly in color (the pastel colored drawing is pictured on the opposing page).

Model Two


eehand Drawing â–ˆ 3 weeks

Model Two

Model Three 64


Freehand Drawing █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Marilyn Paschal █ 16 weeks


chal â–ˆ 16 weeks

Charcoal Drawings

66


Independent Study █ Fall 2007 █ Instructor Marilyn Paschal █ Freehand Drawing █ 16 weeks

These are a grouping of drawings from my sketch books in 2007. Most of them use pencil but a few others experiment with pen and charcoal as well.


ehand Drawing â–ˆ 16 weeks

These are a grouping of drawings from my sketch books in 2007. Most of them use pencil but a few others experiment with pen and charcoal as well.

67


end


Ryan William Martin - Segment 1 Portfolio - Boston Architectural College  

Ryan William Martin Segment 1 Portfolio University of Colorado -and- Boston Architectural College July 28, 2008

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