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The Octagon

February 18, 2014

Play: Thespians start to rehearse ‘Almost, Maine’ (Continued from page 1) According to Frishman, this is because the students are busy during the day, so they can’t easily make time to practice. However, sophomore Aidan Galati credits Frishman for trying to make the practices convenient. “He looked at everyone’s sports, Mock Trial and any other commitments and tried to create a schedule that works for every single person,” Galati said. Sophomore Emma Belliveau agrees with Galati. “It is a new way of practicing, but I think that it will be good because we can get more individual feedback and create chemistry with our partner,” Belliveau said. “Almost, Maine” is also expected to be popular because of the number of kissing scenes because of the series of small love stories. “Since people will want to see their friends kissing other students, they will really want to come to the play,” Galati said. Like the previous spring plays, Joel Rickert, the costume designer for the winter plays, is not able to work on the costumes. Rickert is available during only the winter plays because he focuses on finishing the yearbook during the spring. However, since the play is set in modern times, cast members will provide their own costumes, Frishman said. The play, written by John Cariani, will be March 13-15, at 7 p.m. in the MP Room.

The Cast of ‘Almost, Maine’ Akilan Murugesan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pete, Man Avi Bhullar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ginette Patrick Talamantes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .East, Phil Aidan Galati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Glory, Marvalyn Grant Quattlebaum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jimmy Savannah Symister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sandrine Elinor Hilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Waitress Eric Hilton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Steve, Lendall Isabelle Leavy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gayle Austin Talamantes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Randy Daniel Hernried . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Chad Emma Belliveau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marci Grace Strumpfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hope

We thank our sponsors . . . The Bowlus Family The Williams Family The Hilton Family The Judd Family The Martin Family The Tung Family

News 3 Etiquette: Students take offense at pamphlet (Continued from page 1) In the “Guide for Guys,” under “Getting to Your Destination,” the pamphlet says “On sidewalks, guys should walk nearest the street to ‘protect’ the girl.” Bitar said that the main reason she made the pamphlet with her daughter was to spread the importance of manners to high schoolers in a way that was more relatable. “(It) focuses specifically on dating in high school, so distributing to Country Day was important to reach our target audience,” said Bitar, who is working on a middle-school etiquette pamphlet with her son, eighth grader Aaron Davis. Far from finding it helpful, many students said the pamphlet, distributed during advisory, was offensive. In fact, 37 percent of students expressed some degree of dislike for the brochure in a recent Octagon poll. Some of those polled called it “sexist” and “outdated.” One sophomore said “it had a religious connotation which I thought was inappropriate.” Sophomore Amelia Fineberg was especially upset. “I thought it was incredibly heteronormative and enforced outdated and somewhat sexist gender roles,” she said.

“It assumed that all guys would be dating girls and vice versa, and that girls needed to be protected, and that guys had to open doors for them and everything. “Chivalry is dead, and that’s how it should be. That sort of ‘courtesy’ actually stems from the idea that women are fragile, delicate creatures that must be protected by men.” Teacher Jane Batarseh felt similarly. “I respect (Christian Brothers),” she said. “However, I felt that the message of this pamphlet, which was one of compassion and courtesy towards your date, was eclipsed by a presentation that was dated and parochial. “(It) relates to an earlier time in America when there was a definite role for the sexes. The roles today have changed.” A high-school student who identifies as homosexual said that the pamphlet could be discouraging to gay students who are still closeted. “I’m okay with my sexuality, but I know some people who are still closeted and who struggle with theirs,” he said. “I can read the pamphlet and realize that it’s narrow-minded and inconsiderate. But for kids who are struggling to find their identity, it can be hard to see that.”

Orchestra: Musicians look forward to festival, amusement park switch (Continued from page 1) The only concern Michel has about the venue switch is the longer drive, but she said that the different experience of Great America will make up for the extra hour each way. Ketchum was not concerned with the drive. “I’ll just pop in my headphones and take a nap,” he said. Percussion player senior Daniel Kong was indifferent. “I don’t really care where we go because I haven’t been to either (Six Flags or Great America),” he said. “But I do think it is important to have a group bonding and fun activity after the competition in the morning.” Keys said that while the chief goal of the competition is to win awards and qualify for the state competition, the theme park excursion is about having fun. “Our kids work hard for this,” Keys said. “They work for months and months. And after all of that work, it is nice for them to blow off some steam and spend some time with their friends.”

Other students and teachers didn’t dislike the brochure. In the poll, 43 percent of students said they were neutral on the issue, and 20 percent of students expressed some degree of liking the pamphlet. Teacher Brooke Wells said he thinks the reason for the intense reaction of many students was because Country Day had never distributed something like this before. “The idea of being nice and respectful to people is important, but we don’t typically dictate how you do that,” said Wells, who said his advisory found the guide amusing. “I don’t think it represents the view of the school—I mean, we don’t have a policy on dating etiquette,” Wells said. Junior Micaela Bennett-Smith said she never took the pamphlet seriously. “When I first saw it, I just thought that these were old-fashioned ideas that we don’t typically do today as teenagers,” she said. “I just don’t think it’s as big of a deal as other people think it is.” Nonetheless, those offended by the guide insist it should not have been distributed at Country Day. “What I feel would be extremely helpful would be if we put our own brochure together and gave it to Christian Brothers,” Batarseh said with a smile.

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