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The goal of this project was to design a public market on a pivotal corner in the Brady Street District. Anchoring the market to the site was very important as it served as a gateway to visitors from the west. It is made up of both indoor and outdoor market stalls as well as space outside for public events and gatherings. The second level contains a demonstration kitchen, a multi-purpose events room, and access to a roof-top garden.

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The façade along Brady Street was greatly considered when designing, as most of Brady Street is made up of small shops, restaurants, and houses. It’s an excellent stepping stone to the double level market and encloses an outdoor coffee shop with views to the sky. The west façade is a mirrored response to the edge of the site formed by a viaduct. This mirroring creates a plaza which opens up to Pearson Street below.


Ground Level

Second Level

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The Downer Woods Residence Hall is a dormitory intended for incoming freshman at UW-Milwaukee. Located on Downer Avenue, this hall is adjacent to the campus’ only ‘natural’ space – Downer Woods. A major emphasis was put on students being able to interact with each other. Visibility was vital for obtaining this goal and was stressed in each house’s common space. Connection to its neighboring wooded area was also essential in the design and was attained by the elongated form of the buildings. The west hall’s ground floor contains a lobby area and lecture hall where as the east hall’s ground floor contained a large study area, computer lab, convenience store, and a GRIND coffee shop all publicly accessible.

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The design for each house’s common space was inspired by both Le Corbusier’s “Unité d’habitation de Firminy Vert” in France and also by UW-Milwaukee’s sophomore studio space nicknamed ‘The Barn’. Le Corbusier’s design showcased a single, centrally-located corridor which formed two-level apartments. Each apartment stretched east to west across the entire building allowing natural sunlight to enter throughout the day. The Barn was a double high studio space creating an atmosphere in which students could easily interact with one another. Diagram of Le Corbusier’s design


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FIGURE GROUND

GROUND LEVEL

SECOND LEVEL

THIRD FLOOR


Both ideas combined into one, forming double high common spaces and an overall stacked effect. Encased in glass, these common space towers allow residents views across the central courtyard to other common spaces, promoting interaction with other residents.

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This waiting lounge was designed in response to its neighboring Amtrak station and Post Office located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The connection of these two buildings was very important to the overall success of the waiting lounge. The goal was to create a space in which travelers could relax upon their arrival or before their departure. Development of the entire site was vital in creating a truly relaxing atmosphere.

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The ground level was intended for short term visitors staying less than thirty minutes. It allows immediate access to the waiting lounge from the Amtrak station without having to walk outside. Two bathrooms, a computer station, and a small waiting area make up this floor.

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The second level was intended for visitors planning on staying longer than thirty minutes. A large waiting area sits adjacent to the atrium space overlooking the stairway. Also on this level there is access to the outdoor patio which overlooks the park in the rear. The front faรงade of the second level draws an imaginary line which connects the Amtrak station to the Post Office in an indirect way.

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FORM DEVELOPMENT AND ITS RESPONSE TO THE URBAN CONTEXT Facade Relationship

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Building Connection

Location on Site


Connection to Amtrak Station

Patio Shading

Pocket Park

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URBAN CONTEXT AND ACTIVITY & HUMAN RESPONSE Indoor vs. Outdoor

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Entrances

Lower Level Movement


Second Level Movement

Outdoor Movement

Long Term vs. Short Term


This studio focused on the development of compositional skills and the manipulation of space through tectonics. Spaces were designed and developed using mass, frame, plane, and hearth as building blocks. The combination of these four elements produced very intricate spaces while emphasizing the structure.

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This studio looked at creating a campus focusing on one word, starting from an overall view and gradually focusing in on different areas. The word I was given was ‘Radial’, and I used different iterations of it to design each aspect of the campus. Through the development of this project, we became familiar with new software including Rhino and AutoCAD as well as new tools including the laser cutter and the 3D printer.

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During the summer of 2013 I had the opportunity to study abroad in Paris, France. There was not one classroom, but many, as we traveled throughout France and the United Kingdom, arriving at architecturally significant sites and learning about each from within. Class typically included a short lesson of the site followed by quick sketches and an abundance of photos. The sketches and photos were combined at the end to create a final board of the experience.

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Ryan Evers Undergraduate Architectural Portfolio  

Ryan's architectural portfolio displaying his undergraduate work at UW- Milwaukee.