Page 1

RYAN CRANEY Architecture Portfolio 916.531.4473 rcraney92@gmail.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS 01 INTRODUCTION 02 RESTRICTING OPTIMIZATION Fall/Spring/Winter 2014-2015 03 JONES MIDDLE SCHOOL Spring 2013 04 vWALL Spring 2013 05 SHIFT Fall 2013 06 INSTITUTE OF MOLECULAR GASTRONOMY Winter 2012 07 ULTERIOR MOTIVE Fall 2014


INTRODUCTION Architecture Portfolio 916.531.4473 rcraney92@gmail.com

I am currently studying as a fifth year architecture student at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. As a student, I have been fascinated with the world of parametric design and digital fabrication. I also enjoy photography and the hands-on aspect of making beautiful things (at any scale, from houses to plates). I’m currently looking for a full-time position at an architecture firm. From such an opportunity, I hope to gain valuable real-world experience and work towards earning licensure. As part of this experience, I hope to be challenged to learn and develop new skills, while also contributing my own extensive knowledge of fabrication and parametric systems to the firm.


RESTRICTING OPTIMIZATION Thesis In Progress Location Hyperoptimized Future Program Public Spaces This thesis explores the current trend of efficiency-centric urban construction and its potential to result in hyper-optimized cities where architecture loses its responsiveness to cultural and social conditions. In order to explore the possibility of architecture to recover from such a situation, this project exists in a fictionalized future city which has evolved into a hyper-optimized urban condition, lacking even public spaces and cultural hubs. The primary enablers of the future city are the evolutionary modelers—programs which utilize the iterative design process and input parameters to develop a complete architectural design—and they will provide the opportunity for the developer and client to bypass the architect completely. As the architecture discipline declines, the few remaining architects will survive through adopting new skills into the architectural profession.


These guerrilla architects will design new public space through architectural insertions into the main components of the optimized tower (the entry, the circulation core, and the tenant spaces). This new type of architectural typology will utilize engage the user through new strategies, including augmented reality spaces and the virtual realm of digital overlays. Through this guerrilla architecture, the architects have the opportunity to reintroduce responsiveness into design and bring awareness to the monotonous conditions of the future cities.

FUTURE CITY DESIGN WITH EVOLUTIONARY MODELERS PROGRAMMATIC ATTRIBUTES OFFICE LARGE FLOOR AREA

RETAIL GROUND LEVEL

SERVICE UNDERGROUND/CORE

LARGE WINDOW AREA

MAXIMIZE DAYLIGHTING

MINIMIZE WINDOW AREA

SMALL FOOTPRINT

NARROW PROFILE

LARGE FLOOR AREA

MINIMIZE WINDOWS MAXIMIZE VENTILATION

FUTURE CITY DESIGN WITH EVOLUTIONARY MODELERS PROGRAMMATIC ATTRIBUTES RETAIL GROUND LEVEL MINIMIZE WINDOW AREA LARGE FLOOR AREA

SERVICE UNDERGROUND/CORE MINIMIZE WINDOWS MAXIMIZE VENTILATION

HYPER-OPTIMIZED MIXED USE TOWER

BUILDING ENTRY

CIRCULATION CORE

TENANT SPACE

COMMON INTERESTS SHARED BETWEEN TENANTS

CORPORATE OFFICES

HYPER-OPTIMIZED MIXED USE TOWER

CORE

OFFICE LARGE FLOOR AREA MAXIMIZE DAYLIGHTING NARROW PROFILE

ENTRY

HOUSING MAXIMIZE VIEWS LARGE WINDOW AREA SMALL FOOTPRINT

TENANT

HOUSING MAXIMIZE VIEWS

COMMON HOUSING INTERESTS SHARED BETWEEN TENANTS

CORPORATE OFFICES HOUSING

DESI SPAC CAN FROM IMPR

DESIGNATE SPACES THAT CAN BENEFIT FROM TENANT IMPROVEMENT


What a wonderful park... we should start working here sometime. I don’t know what reality you’re in, but all I see is disgusting benches.


Plans 1” = 50’ Section 1/16” = 1’ 0”

Plan 1/16” = 1’ 0” AR Diagram Ooh, maybe we should check out that public plaza… I haven’t seen one of those in forever!

I was wrapped up in my own little virtual cocoon before coming here. I wonder how much different this world is without my personal info overlay.

Ok glass, take a picture.


Atrium Section 1/64” = 1’ 0”

Planter Detail 1/2” = 1’ 0”

Wall Section 1/8” = 1’ 0” Light Gauge Steel Framing

Existing Concrete Core

Existing Steel Structure Fireproofed

Various Small Plants

Suspended Perforated Metal Panels

Irrigation Pipe System

Typ. Glass Curtain Wall Facade System

1/2” Threaded Steel Rod 1/4” Neophrene Pad U-Channel w/ Stiffeners 2’ O.C.

Typ. Plastic Planter Box 1/4” Steel Mount Arm Custom Steel Bracket Clip-on Composite Panel GFRC Floor Panels Steel Beam Insertion

Plans 1/128” = 1’ 0”


JONES MIDDLE SCHOOL Location Size Team

Chicago, IL, USA 96,000 sq. ft. Max Wisotsky Ryan Craney

The prospect of designing for a school of the new century is a daunting one. There are many questions to ask. What is education in the 21st century? What was education like before? And, where will the next development be made?

01. Geometry Set Out

05. Circulation

04. Micro Form

02. Site Diagram

I took this task as an opportunity to stray away from the wholly traditional educational system, one teacher with a classroom of students at desks, and decided to look at designing a school that promoted project based learning at different scales. Though the architect can’t necessarily design a curriculum for the students to follow in their space, they can plant the seeds for a new way of learning by making spaces that support a new type of education.


The spaces within the Jones Middle School are focused on providing a better learning environment through project-based learning. Large open spaces allow for programmatic flexibility and provoke interaction between different teachers and classes.


JONES SCHOOL MIDDLE

CLUSTER LAYOUT Each classroom is designed to be flexible in order to allow project based learning. For example, the first diagram shows a typical lecture, while the second one shows group activities and the final one shows a multiple class discussion.

???


With this interest in focusing on project based learning, we came upon the metaphor of weaving. This metaphor helped to define many key characteristics of our building. The idea of weaving affects several key areas: circulation, programmatic anchor points, and the overall formal development. Most drastically, we looked at the idea of weaving as a way to connect students from different grades, clusters, and social groups. This was achieved by creating a continuous ribbon of circulation through the project that takes the user through many different kinds of learning spaces. This helps to extenuate the flowing motion of student movement and learning throughout the building. The weave is further reflected on the exterior of the building. The facade consists of a terracotta tube system that acts as a rainscreen and lifts up on the corner to show the weave and draw people inside.

Ground Floor

0

5 10 15

25

45

N 1:1000

Classroom Floors

0

5 10 15

25

45

Library Floor

0

5 10 15

25

45


vWALL Location SLO, CA, USA Medium Hydrocal, Unistrut Team Nicholas Schwaller Julien Stockwell Son Phan Ryan Craney In this project we developed a feasible wall system that utilizes the capabilities of Hydrocal through careful parametric modeling and materials testing. Grasshopper was used in conjunction with Ladybug and Ecotect to develop a wall system that adapts to the solar conditions of various sites. These solar parameters output a modular pattern that allows a localized variation, while still maintaining the thermal performance required by the site. This is accomplished be having a “scoop” matched with a “plate” in order to control the solar radiation entering through the facade. This project also required significant detailing in connections. In order to minimize structural obstructions, we angled the Unistruct and bolted the Hydrocal pieces to the structure.


SLO, California 55째 Design Angle

Mexico City, Mexico 70째 Design Angle

vWall Modular Mold Assembly

Modeling System Exploded Axonometric

Connection Bracket

Connection Brace

Inner Scoop

Inner Scoop

InterchangableInterchangeable Boundary Pieces

Edge Pieces Outer Scoop

Outer Scoop


Anchorage, Alaska 110째 Design Angle

The most challenging aspect of this project was to develop a production process that allowed for both mass-production and mass-customizaton. After researching several different methods, we realized the best results would be acheived through a modular fabrication process. The locationbased pattern, developed using a grasshopper script and weather data analysis, was then divided into modules of three scoop/

shade pairs. The molds were then rearranged between each cast based on the three parts of each module. In order to reuse the modules and reduce material waste, the molds were assembled using screws and a release agent. The customizability of this process allowed for further material testing, and we were able to cast a module that was six scoops wide, making the production even more efficient.


3.1

PUBLIC SPACE/

The site for this project was located in the city of Copenhagen. The culture here is PROGRAM CIRCULATION #2 active and lively, even though the weather and lighting conditions can be challenging.

The historical harbor lines of Copenhagen intersect at Papirøen, which marks a turning PROGRAM point or shift in the harbor’s flow.

KUNSTHAL COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL PARKING

A bike path and pedestrian walkway cut through the project along one of the harbor axes. This enhances the circulation on the island, encouraging more visitors.

The city plan is layed out in a way that accentuates the kunsthal, while also sheltering the residentual spaces.

The lines from the harbor’s edge influence the dynamic, shifting form of the project at an urban scale.

ART PUBLIC/BUFFER LANDSCAPE

The kunsthal addresses a different shift; the shift between art-focused and site-focused spaces.


3.2

SHIFT Location Size Program

Copenhagen, Denmark 20000 sq m Kunsthal Residential Space Commercial Space

This proposed city- located on Paper Island on the Copenhagen Harbor is shifting the paradigm of an automobile metropolis to a bike and pedestrian-friendly city. The harbor edge is the backbone for the dynamic forms that shift along a central bike and pedestrian walkway. Along this edge, there’s a mix of residences, offices, retail and a public museum. The Kunsthall also accentuates the shift from being in the context-based spaces to the exhibits. This is done through sectional variation and even elevating the structure over the ground plane. The space underneath becomes a public recreation space on the harbor front.

3.1 Project Diagrams 3.2 Site Plan at 1:3000

N


Ridged Skylights Space Frame Fabric Diffuser

Fiberglass Rainscreen System

Copenhagen has recently made an effort to keep the harbor front open to the public. This project continues such a precedent and pushes it even further. Instead of keeping the harbor edge public, the entire building is raised on pylons. This provides ample activity space for the public. Some of the activities envisioned for this space include: soccer, ice skating, kayaking, harbor boat tours, cafes, swimming, exercising, picnicking, and cycling. The facade on the kunsthal also lifts up to open the city to the art space, and vice versa. The rest of the facade is composed of fiberglass tubes that reflect light, while restricting views out. Light is also brought down into the main gallery with a diffused glass skylight system.


3.3

3.6

3.4

3.7

3.5

3.3 Site Context 3.4 Approach from Bridge 3.5 Circulation Axis 3.6 Kunsthal 3.7 Main Gallery in Kunsthal


The kunsthal space is focused on viewing a shift from a different perspective. It explores the shift between art-based and site-based spaces and how those spaces can separated by other means than the typical load bearing wall. Instead, the spaces are differentiated by a sectional variation in the floor and ceiling planes. In the lower left, study models explore the way light can still travel between the sectional variations, which still block out site lines and distractions. This final section resulted in a large central gallery and an exterior circulation which acts as a buffer space between the art and the site. A glass ceiling is incorporated in the main gallery in order to provide more light, while also minimizing distractions from the urban environment.


Konsthal Plan

N 1:1000

DN

DN

DN

Cross Section

Wall Section


Ground

N 1”:32’

1st Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

4th Floor

DN

UP

UP

UP

DN

UP

DN

DN

UP

UP

East Elevation

DN

DN

UP

DN

DN

Longitudinal Section

South Elevation


INSTITUTE OF MOLECULAR GASTRONOMY Location San Francisco, CA, USA Size 15,000 sq ft Program Cooking School Museum By designing an Institute of Molecular Gastronomy in the heart of the Mission District, this project aims at teaching the public the entire process of cooking, from the plant all the way to the plate. The design begins to reflect this concept by forming two dense boxes, one which seems to float above the other. The grounded box contains all the parts of the program that involves teaching or learning about molecular gastronomy. The floating box represents the plant aspect of cooking, as it houses the teaching kitchens as well as a museum and roof garden. When these two boxes come together, they form a space that houses the restaurant. The restaurant is then pierced by columns that house the circulations spaces.


1.1

1.2

1.3

1.1 Abstract Study of Food Process 1.2 Material Study and Concept Models 1.3 Section Model at 1/32� 1.4 Museum Space 1.5 Circulation Space


1.4

1.5

As this project is exploring the process of plant to plate, the transitional and circulation spaces are exposed and emphasized in the design. The introduction of irregular columns pierce through the tall atrium space that hosts the staircase and circulation

hallways. These pathways are dynamic spaces that shift in location, size and purpose. Some of the stairs also act as seating areas for inhabitants to socialize or attend a lecture. The facade also reflects the dynamic nature of this space with a randomized patterning.


ULTERIOR MOTIVE Type Bench/Table Hybrid Size 20000 sq m Material Walnut Plywood At a glance, this furniture piece might appear as any typical, mundane table; however further exploration reveals an entirely new typology embedded within the table itself. The furniture has transformed with the growth of legs and shelves across all of its faces and it takes on an ambiguous and adventurous new personality. This personality engages the user through interaction with these adjustable appendages that are undefined in purpose and provide ample opportunity for exploration and play. The flexibility of this furniture piece highlights the ulterior motive of its design. The piece is physically mutated by the growth of these new appendages and a softening of some of the table’s edges. From this simple mutation arises a conflict between the mundane, stated message (the furniture piece as a table) and an alternative message (the furniture piece with no defined purpose). This conflict is not resolved, but rather accentuated in the “Ulterior Motive.�


Ryan Craney Architecture Portfolio 2015  
Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you