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RYAN CRAFT

PORTFOLIO selected work

2013-2018


RYAN CRAFT 602 N PEARL ST. COVINGTON, OH 45318 P: (937)570-6235 E: RYANCRAFT3672@GMAIL.COM


CONTENTS ARCHITECTURE SELECTED WORK 2013-PRESENT CUBE STUDIES CINCINNATI, OHIO FIRST YEAR FOUNDATION, FALL 2013 UNIT WALL CINCINNATI, OHIO FIRST YEAR FOUNDATION, SPRING 2014 BUILDING FROM WITHOUT CINCINNATI, OHIO HUMAN DIMENSION AND FORM STUDIO, FALL 2014 FORRESTPERKINS WASHINGTON, D.C. ARCHITECTURAL CO-OP, SPRING 2015 STUDIO IN THE WOODS CINCINNATI, OHIO TECTONIC FORMS STUDIO, SUMMER 2015

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CHOEFF LEVY FISCHMAN ARCHITECTS MIAMI, FLORIDA ARCHITECTURAL CO-OP, FALL 2015

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721 MAIN ST. CINCINNATI, OHIO SPACE EFFICIENT HOUSING STUDIO, SPRING 2016

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DLR GROUP PHOENIX, ARIZONA ARCHITECTURAL CO-OP, SUMMER 2016 WOVEN MOBILITY SAO PAULO, BRAZIL SCHINDLER GLOBAL DESIGN COMPETITION, FALL 2016

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THE FLOATING BOX ONE NEW YORK, NEW YORK LYCEUM DESIGN COMPETITION, SPRING 2017

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THE VOYAGER PROJECT CINCINNATI, OHIO HERE + NOW DESIGN COMPETITION, SPRING 2017

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THE VOYAGER PROJECT: ROAD TRIP UNITED STATES + CANADA POST-GRADUATION ROAD TRIP, FALL 2017

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OTHER

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STUDIO IN THE WOODS typology: masterclass studio location: cincinnati, ohio studio: tectonic forms, summer 2015

The Studio in the Woods is a parallel cable tensile membrane structure designed to hold architectural workshops, as well as various other workshops in other creative fields, throughout the summer. The open-air studio design is elevated to give a treetop view of the surrounding Mt Airy Forest, located in Cincinnati, Ohio. The lower level is designed to house both the guests and the instructor, to accommodate for multi-day events. The stepped slabs of the first level create a strong connection with the topography and nestles this level softly into the ridge. Though the open-air studio is a very seasonal design. The first level can still be used as a shelter in the winter months, to allow the park users to escape from the winter weather. In the early design stages, the tectonic form of this parallel cable tensile membrane was studied using different mediums, such as laser-cut chipboard and 3D printed casts. This study of form, limited by the constraints of the varying materials, created a greater understanding of how the parallel cable tensile membrane can be manipulated to create a new form of its own.


LASER CUT

CNC ROUTE

3D PRINT TECTONIC CONCEPT STUDIES

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EXTERIOR STUDIO OVERLOOK


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EXPLODED AXON Exploded Axon_3/32” = 1’-0”


80’

PHYSICAL MODEL COLLAGE + SECTION

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SECTION


16’

48’

80’

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16’

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FLOOR PLAN Floor Plan_1/16” = 1’-0”

48’

80’


WINTER-TIME FRONT ENTRANCE

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721 MAIN ST typology: multi-family residential location: cincinnati, ohio studio: tectonic forms, spring 2016

Located in Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati, the site for this apartment complex is in a prime location with great connection to the city. The footprint of the first level is shaped to create an inviting exterior public space on the street corner, while allowing space for a commercial program. The private living space is separated from the street level with an open-air second level that acts as a balcony, overlooking the street below. This elevation creates a clear divide between private and public space. Taking precedence from Le Corbusier’s “Unité d’Habitation”, the units are designed to be multi-level and interlock with the mirrored unit beside it. This creates a more efficient corridor scheme, as corridors are no longer necessary on all floor levels. The mass of the private apartments has also been skewed to create more space between the southern facing balconies and the neighboring building. This allows more light to reach the balconies.


MASSING

ELEVATE

CARVE

SHEAR

DIVIDE

FORMATION DIAGRAMS

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EXTERIOR STREET VIEW


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UNIT A: 3/32” = 1’-0”

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UNIT FLOOR PLANS

UNIT B: 3/32” = 1’-0”


UNIT C (STUDIO): 3/32” = 1’-0”

UNIT D (PENTHOUSE): 3/32” = 1’-0”

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8TH STREET

//

PROPERTY LINE = 100’-0”

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SITE PLAN


EXTERIOR VIEW OF BALCONIES

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//

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7TH FLOOR PLAN - TYPICAL CORRIDOR


11 21 31 41 51

6 7 8 9 01

1 2 3 4 5

11 21 31 41 51

6 7 8 9 01

1 2 3 4 5

11 21 31 41 51

6 7 8 9 01

1 2 3 4 5

11 21 31 41 51

6 7 8 9 01

1 2 3 4 5

8’

16’

32’

SECTION

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WOVEN MOBILITY typology: urban planning location: sao paulo, brazil studio: schindler global award competition, fall 2016 team: ryan craft, joe gruzinsky, robert kish

Sao Paulo is a municipality located in the southeast region of Brazil. It is the most populous city in Brazil, the America’s and the southern hemisphere. The city’s metropolitan area of Greater São Paulo ranks as the 11th most populous on Earth, and largest Portuguese-speaking city in the world. Sao Paulo was once a city with a heavy focus on industry, the demand has now shifted to an economy centered around services. The city of São Paulo is home to research and development facilities and attracts companies due to the presence of regionally renowned universities. With a focus on mobility, Woven Mobility creates a reduction of vehicle traffic through implementation of a diverse selection of public transit, pedestrian-friendly roads/walkways, increased bike usage due to increase in safety, and utility corridors cutting down need for trucks. Implementation of autonomous cars remove the human error in driving, allowing for a smoother flow on traffic. They also can take up to half the space as a traditional car, allowing for more densely packed parking garages thus reducing total structural need. A hierarchy of public transit offers citizens multiple ways to travel various distances without need of a car. The light rail train connects Green and Silver Metro lines as well as connecting various areas of our site. Also, the existing bus network is integrated into our street network. The burying of the existing highway cuts back on noise pollution as well as opens up opportunities to develop the waterfront as the river becomes less polluted, becoming valuable real-estate. Green Space is implemented throughout the site to combat heat islands and the concrete jungle. Noise pollution and air quality will also be positively affected as well as creating space for leisure and other family activities.


CONCEPT ANIMATION QR CODE

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1_ANALYZE EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS

2_CONNECT TO EXISTING PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

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3_DEVELOP STREET NETWORK AND UTILITIES, CENTERED AROUND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

4_CREATE URBAN CORE, SURROUNDING TRAIN LINE

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5_ALLOW NATURAL GROWTH OF ZONED AREA


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LIGHT RAIL STATION VIEW


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ROOFTOP GARDEN

LI

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE


IGHT

ELEVATED STREETSCAPE

DRONE DELIVERY RAIL PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY

UNDERGROUND PARKING

Utility Corridor

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VIRTUAL REALITY QR CODE


TRAIN LINE / PEDESTRIAN PATH VIEW

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TAITZ RESIDENCE firm: choeff levy fischman, fall 2015 typology: single family residential location: miami, florida

Located in Miami, Florida, the Taitz Residence was designed to be elevated off the ground to both give protection from the rising sea levels, caused by climate change, as well as give the homeowner spectacular views over the trees and out to the Biscayne Bay. The simplicity of the modern design does not compete with the surrounding nature, and the home fits in nicely to its secluded site. The interior space is separated into two halves with a corridor joining in the middle. This separation creates a great amount of privacy within the home itself.


SITE PLAN / VIEW OF REAR BALCONY

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EXTERIOR VIEW


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RENDERED FLOOR PLAN


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THE FLOATING BOX ONE typology: community library location: new york city, new york studio: lyceum design competition, spring 2017

The Floating Box One, also known as “It Takes a Village� is driven by the idea that with a community’s support, reading and the quest for knowledge will not die. Though reading is often seen as an individual act, it takes the support of a community to keep the local library running. The mass of the community space acts as the pedestal to the reading room of the library, holding it up above the terrace and displaying the space to the community to utilize. An elevator which is accessible from the exterior of the building creates an accessible path from street level to terrace for an easy transition from the street-scape to a more private outdoor terrace area to be utilized by the library users. While the levels of the building are designed to be used as a transition from the lower street level up to the terrace level, the program is also organized for the ascend up the grand stair. Upon entry, the gallery space is used to showcase the work of community members and local artists. As the library user climbs the first flight of stairs to the second level, they start to see glimpses of books in the floor above but the attention is diverted to the large open plan community space, designed to be versatile for multiple different events and occasions. As the user climbs to the third level, they are compressed into a smaller footprint and begin to get views out onto the terrace. These views are still grounded, as the user is on the same plane as the terrace itself. When the library makes the final ascend into the main reading room, the experience of elevation is realized as the entire level overlooks the terrace below. The space is designed to be a reading sanctuary where one can go to disconnect from the world around them. This feeling of disconnect is contrasted by the grounded feeling the community space brings as they make both the climb up to the space as well as the descend as they leave. A steel construction will allow for a lighter feeling of the elevated reading room mass. A lighter feeling mass will help reinforce the idea that this mass is under the control of the community space. Materiality plays a supplemental role to create an inviting space. Warm wood materials focus around the stair and reading room and invite the user to go up the stair. While this project uses organization of space as the method of using the community to support the act of reading, the idea is to create a feeling of responsibility within the community to stress the importance of knowledge and the accessibility of knowledge in the community. With the community for support, each individual will not lose their right to knowledge and information.


CURRENT SITE CONDITIONS

GENERAL MASSING

TERRACE CONNECTION

EXTERIOR CIRCULATION

EXTERIOR BOOK EXCHANGE

CENTRAL GRAND STAIR

RECESSED ENTRY LOCATIONS

VIEWS OVER TERRACE CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

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TERRACE VIEW


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WW156TH 156THSTST

DN DN

UP UP

UP UP

//

//

//

A A

//

UP UP

//

//

//

//

UP UP

UP UP

B B

K K

CC

D D

J J

F F

L L

J J

E E

K K

DN DN

GG F F

MM H H

UP UP DN DN

N N

OO

1ST FLOOR - STREET LEVEL

2ND FLOOR

A. ENTRY B. FRONT DESK / GALLERY C. STAFF MEETING ROOM D. STAFF WORK ROOM E. STAFF LOUNGE F. CUSTODIAL STORAGE G. STAFF RESTROOM H. COMPUTER LAB J. DISPLAY BOOK SHELVES K. MEETING ROOM L. COMMUNITY ROOM / PANTRY

M. COMMUNITY AUDITORIUM N. STAGE O. STORAGE / CONTROL ROOM P. TERRACE ENTRANCE Q. TERRACE MAINTENANCE CLOSET R. ROOFTOP GARDEN S. TERRACE T. CHILDREN’S LIBRARY U. BOOK STACKS V. WORK DESK AREA W. READING / LOUNGE AREA

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FLOOR PLANS


LEVEL

UP

T

//

//

MEZZANINE LEVEL ABOVE

UP

T

DN

UP DN

U //

V

//

R

//

//

UP

W

DN

U DN

DN

P

S

J

V UP

UP

Q UP

W

DN

DN

J

3RD FLOOR - TERRACE LEVEL

R - TERRACE LEVEL

4TH FLOOR

4TH FLOOR

10’ 35’ 3RD FLOOR - TERRACE LEVEL

10’

4TH FLOOR

35’

70’

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70’


MULTIFUNCTIONAL COMMUNITY ROOM

STAFF LOUNGE AND WORKROOM

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE


EXTERIOR CIRCULATION TO TERRACE

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FRONT EXTERIOR VIEW


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LIBRARY SANCTUARY


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THE VOYAGER PROJECT typology: re-purposed school bus location: unknown studio: here + now design competition, spring 2017 team: ryan craft, andrew dunn, sam kissing

Often when one thinks of a home, being stationary is a key characteristic. It is a place to return to at the end of the day that is consistent and static. It is one of the few places on Earth that you can literally call yours; we decided to challenge this idea of the home being a static form, and centered the design around pure mobility in the most accessible way we thought possible: inside a decommissioned school bus. The idea of this “nomadic” lifestyle is quickly gaining traction within the millennial generation. Users will be openminded, as this is an alternative lifestyle that requires a willingness to question pre-conceived but unfounded cultural norms that have been decided by the majority in a capitalistic society as the “right way” to do things. The usual client for a small space designed inside a commercial vehicle would be the recent college graduate that seeks travel and adventure before settling into the next chapter of their professional lives, or a young couple who are digital commuters, able to work anywhere from a laptop. A traveling specialist, perhaps, who can move from client to client, site to site and bring their workshop with them. A comfortable mobile dwelling allows for more convenient travel to desired locations, as well as a residence when the destination is reached. With the central theme of mobility comes the provocative question: “What is site?” It is rather difficult to define, since the purpose of using a vehicle, as the home is to explore, travel, and keep moving. The site can be anywhere at anytime, if you can drive to it, it can be your home. With that in mind we designed a space that was flexible as well as robust. Everything was purposefully designed to be minimal and out of sight when not needed. This allows for a multitude of uses from sleeping, working, relaxing, showering, exercising, and cooking so as to accommodate the many needs one needs while on the road and to leave the focus on the experience; not the space.


BED - FOLD OUT WET BATH - SHOWER + TOILET KITCHEN - SINK + RANGE + FRIDGE COUCH - SLIDE OUT BED + STORAGE

SHELVES - STORAGE + FOLD OUT BED LEAF SOLAR BATTERIES - STORAGE CUBBY SPACE - LARGE ITEMS WOOD STOVE - UNDER STORAGE DESK - FOLD OUT TABLE + STORAGE

LOCATION DIAGRAMS

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INTERIOR VIEW


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4’

16’ 8’

1st iteration

REAR BED - FOLD OUT

2nd iteration

3rd iteration

COUCH - SLIDE OUT BED 4th iteration

2’

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4’

MODULAR FURNITURE + FLOOR PLAN

8’


SOLAR

PLUMBING

ELECTRICAL

SYSTEM DIAGRAMS

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LED STRIP LIGHTING EXISTING BUS SHELL

EXISTING BUS WINDOW TRANSLUCENT ACRYLIC PANEL

TRANSLUCENT PRIVACY SCREEN

COMPOSTING TOILET 2”X3” WALL STUDS WOOD SLAT SHOWER FLOOR PROPANE ON-DEMAND WATER HEATER

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DETAIL SECTION PERSPECTIVES

SHELVING WITH ROPE HOLDS


INTERIOR VIEWS

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THE VOYAGER PROJECT: ROAD TRIP 3.5 MONTHS 9,418 MILES 19 STATES 2 COUNTRIES 62


MORE TRAVEL PHOTOS ON OUR INSTAGRAM WWW.INSTAGRAM.COM/THEVOYAGERPROJECT/ 63


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YELLOWSTONE LAKE SUNSET


INTERIOR VIEW

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THANK YOU

RYAN CRAFT 602 N PEARL ST. COVINGTON, OH 45318 P: (937)570-6235 E: RYANCRAFT3672@GMAIL.COM

Ryan Craft : Architecture Portfolio 2018  

A collection of selected work from my undergraduate studies at The University of Cincinnati

Ryan Craft : Architecture Portfolio 2018  

A collection of selected work from my undergraduate studies at The University of Cincinnati

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