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RYAN CERONE PORTFOLIO OF WORKS


RYAN CERONE ryan.cerone@gmail.com 757.285.1248

EDUCATION 2016

CITY COLLEGE OF NEW YORK Master of Architecture | New York, New York

2011

THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM & MARY Bachelor of Arts, Sociology | Williamsburg, Virginia

2009

HARVARD UNIVERSITY GSD Architecture Career Discovery Program

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2014 - 2016 ADJUNCT LECTURER City College of New York | New York, New York Survey of World Architecture 2, 3, 4

2015

INTERN ARCHITECT OCV Architects | New York, New York 300 Unit Housing + Community Center, Passive House Apartments

2014

Design Development, Construction Documents, Code + Zoning

DESIGN ASSISTANT FERRER LLC | New York, New York West Palm Beach Residence, Jupiter Island Renovation

2014

Team Management, Leadership, Presentations

Schematic Design + Development, Product Research

DESIGN + PRODUCTION MANAGER Billy Cotton | New York, New York Hamptons Pool Houses, Boston Restaurants, Furniture

Schematic Design + Development, Cost Estimation, Renderings

2009 - 2010 INTERN ARCHITECT Edwin Pease, AIA | Williamsburg, Virginia Residential Addition

Schematic Design, Renderings

2009 - 2010 INTERN ARCHITECT Q Design | Hampton, Virginia Residential Addition, Housing Complex

Graphic Design, Computer Drafting, Office Management


RESEARCH 2015 - 2016 RESEARCH ASSISTANT City College of New York | New York, New York Plant-Based Dynamic Filtration System

Optimization, Prototyping, + Building Integration

HONORS 2015

MoMA LECTURE & PANEL Museum of Modern Art | New York, New York “Is this for Everyone? Design and the Common Good”

Image Collection, Presentation Preparation, Model Photos

2013 - 2016 “CITY WORKS” UNIVERSITY PUBLICATION City College of New York | New York, New York Selections of top student projects during each semester COMPETITIONS 2016

FREE FORM HOME DESIGN CHALLENGE Branch Technology | Chattanooga, Tennessee 3D-printed Single Family Home Design | FINALIST

2015

WORLD WAR I MEMORIAL World War One Centennial Competition | Washington DC Monument & Memorial Design

2015

PERFORM 2015 BUILDING COMPETITION Hammer & Hand | Portland, Oregon Net-zero Apartment Complex Design

SKILLS AUTODESK Revit, AutoCAD, CFD, 3DS Max

MICROSOFT OFFICE SUITE ADOBE CREATIVE SUITE 3D VISUALIZATION SketchUp, Rhino, V-Ray, Grasshopper, Ladybug, Honeybee

MODEL MAKING + HAND DRAFTING


CONTENTS

01 DYNAMIC FILTRATION SYSTEM Research | p. 7 Phytoremediation Green Wall System

02 HOME[LESS]+ HOUSING Academic | p. 15 3D Printed Housing Prototype

03 AMAZON NOW

Academic | p. 25 Fulfillment Center | East Garden City, NY

04 TOWERSCAPE HOUSING

Academic | p. 37 Campus Extension Housing | Greenpoint, Brooklyn

05 THE GEMINI

Academic | p. 51 TriBeCa Hotel | New York, NY

06 BLACK BOX THEATRE Academic | p. 63 Harlem School of the Arts | New York, NY

07 MUSEUM EXTENSION

Academic | p. 71 Harlem Studio Museum | New York, NY

08 FORMWORK Academic | p. 79 Library Connection | Boston, MA

09 THE TRENCH OF LIGHT

Competition | p. 87 WWI Monument Competition | Washington, DC

10 PERFORM HOUSING COMPLEX

Competition | p. 93 Net Zero Housing Competition | Portland, OR


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01 DYNAMIC FILTRATION SYSTEM PHYTOREMEDIATION GREEN WALL SYSTEM Fall 2015 - Spring 2016 Research Advisor: Ahu Aydogan Akseli, Ph.D. The use of contemporary construction materials and building components are complicit in the degradation of indoor air quality, which is a vital concern due to the high percentage of time people spend inside. Such challenges are further complicated with the growing cost of energy and resources to regulate and maintain healthy levels of IAQ in these buildings. Addressing these issues will require not only innovative technologies and approaches, but also cross collaborations between several disciplines. The building-integrated plant-based filtration system is a self-supported and recyclable system with the intention to maximize the surface area of filtration with minimal materials and structural implications. Despite other phytoremediation systems which have limited architectural applicability, this intervention proposes an architectural and systemic integration through modularity, scalability, flexibility, assembly and extended life cycle. It will also introduce moisture in winter conditions without introducing the pathogens associated with existing mechanical humidification technologies. In addition, this system will reduce the fresh air intake requirements of buildings and realize the potential considerable energy savings in climate types with significant heating and/or cooling loads. Moreover, the proposed system would hypothetically reduce the need to treat and circulate poor quality exterior air often found in heavily polluted urban areas, which constitutes a serious health threat that is not currently addressed in the majority of HVAC systems.

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TYPES OF PHYTOREMEDIATION

Growing media is a mixture of Growstone to host plant roots and Activated Carbon to filter air

MODULAR FLEXIBILITY OF LIDS

DYNAMIC CAP 1” FRAME WITH OPENING ROTATIONS CORNER CONNECTIONS LIGHTING

BASE TRAY GROWING MEDIA DRAINAGE IRRIGATION

MODULAR FLEXIBILITY OF DYNAMIC LIDS

8


EXPLODED SYSTEM AXON

Plenum Module

System Module

Drip Irrigation System

Hydroponic Plants

9


SYSTEM SECTION

Extendable LED Pin Light

Irrigation Tube

Growing Media

3D Mesh

3D Mesh

Drainage Tube

Slots for LED Strips [If Required]

LID 10

CASSETTE


FRAME

AIR SHAFT 11


LIGHTING OPTIONS

LED STRIP LIGHTING

Locating the lights along the interior of the lid allows for more focused lighting to the plant roots but may cause burning of the plant.

PIN LIGHTING

12

Lights on the exterior at the frame corners provides more distruibuted lighting to the plant leaves but may cause glare in adjacent spaces.


13


14


02 HOME[LESS]+ HOUSING 3D PRINTED HOUSING PROTYPE Spring 2016 Studio Critic: Fabian Llonch, AIA The advent of 3D printing technologies have radically changed the industry of architecture through the elimination of traditional construction constraints and an increase in efficiencies. High levels of complexity, both in form and in structure, have been proliferated to the benefit of lighter and stronger designs. Without the added need of tool assemblies, 3D printing will also reduce the cost, lead times and labor required for building manufacturing through designs specific to compound geometries and intricate features. This technology can provide additional energy efficiency and a reduced carbon footprint compared with raditionally manufactured homes. Home[less]+ Housing is an adaptable module-based system that profits from 3D printing innovations. The core program is encased by a flexible skin that minimizes the required material for thermal control, structure, and ergonomic living. The design of the system rests on the variable relationship between the kitchen, living room, bathroom and bedroom spaces. Different iterations stem from a separation of public and private areas, an open layout, or even a dichotomy between wet and dry program. Each combination can result in a new formal arrangement and, subsequently, an innovative 3D printed skin. The addition of a blanket-like skin unifies the home under one identity that encourages flexibility and free form without the constraints of site specificity.

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DESIGN CONCEPT

Begin with given program(s)

Arrange formally for privacy and function

Center rooms on wet and dry wall cores

ADDITIONAL ITERATIONS

Linear Form Accounts for extremes in privacy needs

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Square Form Allows for open floor plan


Cover program in 3D printed skin for thermal control

Z-Shape Form Emphasis on exterior exposures

Adjust space within for required dimensions and secondary program

Apply fenestrations based on solar exposure needs

T-Shape Form Placed around central program and function

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SITE PLAN

N

18


FLOOR PLAN 650 SQ FT

7

6

9

8

4

5

10

3

1 2

0

5

10

15

25

1 ENTRY 2 COAT CLOSET 3 KITCHEN + DINING 4 LIVING ROOM 5 BATHROOM 6 BEDROOM 7 DESK + SHELVING 8 MECHANICAL SPACE 9 DRY WALL VOID 10 WET WALL VOID 19


SYSTEM ELEMENTS

Solar Responsive Facade Treatment

Singular Print of Skin, Structure, Furniture

Wet Core: Water Collection Dry Core: Stack Ventilation

20


3 4

3

WALL SECTION

1 2 5 6 5

5 3

6

4 9 10

7 8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

5

16

10 9 3 4 14

16

11

17

12

18

13

19

1 2

SPRAYED CONCRETE MOISTURE BARRIER 3D PRINTED MATRIX w/ CLOSED CELL INSULATION 5/8” STUCCO INTERIOR FINISH 1” “LOW E” INSULATED GLASS w/ STRUCTURAL SILICONE 5/8” EFIS FINISH 2” X 4” HEADER DRIP EDGE 2” EXTRUDED ALUM. MULLION SYSTEM SILICONE SEAL BACKER ROD WINDOW SILL 2” X 4” SILL PLATE 1/2” DIA. BOLTS @ 32” O.C. “C” CHANNEL w/ 2“ RIGID FOAM INSULATION POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR 4” P.C. SLAB w/ WELDED WIRE FABRIC 10” P.C. WALL w/#5 BARS VERTICAL & HORIZONTAL 18” X 12” POURED CONCRETE FOOTING w/ #5 BARS

6 15 17 18 19 21


22


23


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03 AMAZON NOW FULFILLMENT CENTER Fall 2015 Studio Critic: Suzan Wines, AIA Current trends in consumer culture depend heavily on the vast network of consumption locales that stem from a singular production point. Such greed generates a large amount of unncessary waste and a wide gap between customers and genesis of consumption culture. The father removed one is from the impact of product creation, the less connected one is to the culture of material networks and its negative influences. Amazon Now postulates a new type of consumption that is directly connected to centers of production, closing the gap and creating a new type of consumer culture. Goods and services come directly to the public in a setting a virtual samplings and interacitve program. Consumption dispenceries anchor the design and allow for a one-stop-shop that meets all of the public’s needs, surrounded by secondary program related to each good type. This project also introduces new technologies that suggest alternative urban strategies. Electric cars that park on vertical walls also act as batteries to power small grids and public bicycles utilize mechanical energy to produce clean and free energy.

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CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

The traditional relationship between production and consumption begins from a single point with goods distributed to multiple locations.

FORMAL STRATEGY

Centers of consumption are seen as ‘big box’ stores with parking lots

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Reactivate train as input of production and consumption goods


A simplification of this process would reduce the amount of consumption locations.

Connect points of entry and shift planes for light and air

What happens when the center of production becomes the place of consumption?

Locate connections of goods, services, vertical parking and green walkway

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TECHNOLOGICAL ELEMENTS

AMAZON SPARQ An electric car-sharing service that uses smart machine-to-machine technology to mitigate traffic problems. This vehicle also has no engine and relies on solar-powered wheel wells. It is stored on vertical parking walls.

AMAZON NOW A preemptive drone service that provides immediate need fulfillment. This system would deliver goods and services beofre a consumer would even acknowledge the need. Drones would have a raidus of 60 miles from the center.

AMAZON TORQ Public bicycles that use mechanical power to generate and provide free and clean energy. The front wheel would allow for production of energy based on the amount of rotation per ride. The storage racks would act as batteries and hold any surcharge.

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SITE PLAN

Consumption Center Production Center

Green Walkway

Public Park

Vertical Parking

N

Movement of Production

Paths of Consumption

Connections of Park Space 29


Warehouse with mechanical shelving

30


LEVEL 1 PLAN

N Consumption dispenceries for good collection

Secondary program related to goods dispensed

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

31


SPARQ VERTICAL PARKING WALL

5’ TYP.

4’ GLASS LENS METALLIC CONDUCTING STRIPS N-TYPE SILICON DEPLETION LAYER P-TYPE SILICON SUBSTRATE BASE CARBON ROD

Mechanical storage of Amazon Sparq cars that stores additional energy in a central battery.

5’ TYP.

PV PANEL ON ROOF

AMAZON SPARK CAR

AC/DC RECTIFIER

w12x26 STEEL I-BEAM

WHEEL PROPULSION UNIT

STEEL L-CHANNEL 8’ O.C. TYP.

INDUCTIVE PICK-UP UNIT [POLYMIDE + ELECTRODE COMBINATION EMBEDDED N SILICONE POLYMER]

CHARGING CONDUCTOR

55’

CARBON ROD

AMMONIUM CHLORIDE ELECTROLYTE CARBON ROD (POSITIVE ELECTRODE) ZINC CASE (NEGATIVE ELECTRODE ANODE) MANGANESE DIOXIDE + CARBON MIXTURE

ELECTROLYTE PASTE

SEPERATOR

WATERPROOFING MEMBRANE

PRE-CAST CONCRETE FRAME (MODULAR SECTION)

CONNECTION TO POWER GRID

CONCRETE FOUNDATION

32


SYSTEMS DISTRIBUTION

33


34


35


36


04 TOWERSCAPE HOUSING CAMPUS EXTENSION HOUSING Spring 2015 Studio Critic: Fabian Llonch, AIA The architectural composition of Towerscape Housing re-examines the relationship between the built and the unbuilt environments. As an integration of the suburban garden home and an urban high-rise, it seamlessly blends the exterior condition with the interior experience. A topographic form connects the ground parks to the green roofs through a series of public spaces and private balconies. A mix of varied units and collaborative program creates a unqie habitat for residents of all demographics. The base levels are a series of academic spaces that fulfills the requirements of a campus extension, including a lecture hall, deisgn studios, and offices. Housing at these levels are reserved for traditional dorm-style units and share common spaces. Higher levels feature larger units of a studio, one bedroom or two bedroom design. One side of the double lodaded corrider uses a series of screens as solar control while the other has connected balconies for extended space.

37


UNIT AGGREGATIONS

38


39


FORMAL STRATEGY

Original condition includes a topographic landscape with buildings in a bar typology

Condense the overall footprint to maximize available green space at the ground

Increase square footage vertically based on minimal plan dimensions

Shift topography through and below the building to create points of entry and circulation

Integrate landscape into the architecture through roof gardens and balconies

40


SITE PLAN

Public Park

Courtyard

Raised Greenway

Courtyard

Public Park

N 41


GROUND LEVEL PLAN

Cafe Lounge

Bathrooms

Housing

Private Entry

Design Studios

Pin-Up Space

Auditorium

N 42


LEVEL 6 PLAN

Fire Stair + Mechanical

Community Space

Balcony (typ.)

Circulation Core N 43


UNIT TYPES

STUDIO UNIT

3

1-BEDROOM UNIT

4

3

4

2

2

1 1

5

1 1

5

5

5 2

2 3

6 6

4

4

Balcony

44

3

Balcony


2-BEDROOM UNIT

3

4

DORM UNIT

4

4

2 6 1

6

5

5

5

6

1

5

4

3

2

6

4 4

Balcony

1 2 3

Kitchen Dining Area Living Room

4 5 6

Bathroom Bedroom Desk Area

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46


47


48


49


50


05 THE GEMINI TriBeCa Hotel Spring 2015 Studio Critic: Ali Hocek, AIA Current hotel designs center on a specific type of clientele, either economic or luxury but never both. While locations like New York City tend to host enough tourists and travelers to staisfy both economic demands, a huge economic opportunity is lost when a connection is not explored. What if one hotel sought to provide a variety of room types for different customers? The Gemini Hotel postulates the true definition of the hotel typology by questioning the accomodations people desire while away from home. A spectrum with extremes of efficiency and leisure define zones of similar character within the hotel. Public spaces border guest levels with an entry, restaurant and roof garden that generate connections and interactions between all people. An exterior ramp wrapping the upper levels and a electrodynamic daylighting system within the glazing produce an interesting relationship between public and private experiences.

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SPECTRUM OF PROGRAM

EFFICIENCY

PROGRAM FREQUENCY

52


LEISURE

LEISURE

EFFICIENCY

53


EXPLODED AXON

Roof Deck EDDS

Leisure Levels Exterior Ramp

Bar + Lounge

Efficiency Levels Above Grade

Below Grade

Entry

Gym + Pool

Foundation

54


LEVEL 6

Ext. Ramp

Freight Elev. Topography

Slide

Elevators Lounge Game Field Floor Lobby Storage Lounge

LEISURE ROOM

Mech Space Bath Cl. Cl. Green Wall

EDDS TV Bed

Ext. Ramp

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RAMP DETAIL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

1

P.C. CONCRETE FLOOR W/ REINFORCING BY OTHERS

2 S.S. METAL GRATING 1 1/8” x 1 3/16” x 4” O.C. 3 12” x 8” x 3/4” STEEL T BEAM PTD. W/ INTUMESCENT PAINT 4 12” x 4” x 3/8” HSS TUBE BENT PTD. W/ INTUMESCENT PAINT 5 4” x 4” x 1/2” METAL FLANGE WELDED TO HSS TUBE 6 1” DIA. STEEL BOLTS PTD. W/ INTUMESCENT PAINT 7 2” RIGID FOAM INSULATION 8 1” DIA. BRAIDED ANCHOR BOLTS 9 CUSTOM STEEL PLATE CAST IN CONC. COLUMN PTD. W/ INTUMESCENT PAINT 10 5 1/2” EXTRUDED ALUMINUM HORIZONTAL MULLION 11 S.S. METAL TRAY FOR LED STRIP LIGHTING CONT. 12 2 1/2” SQUARE POST 13 1/6” 16 GAUGE STAMPED S.S. PANEL 14 5 1/2” EXTRUDED ALUMINUM VERTICAL MULLION 15 2” EXTRUDED ALUMINUM CURTAIN WALL ANCHOR

56


57


ELECTRODYNAMIC DAYLIGHTING SYSTEM Electroactive film [1” x 1”] placed between panes of glass to make responsive membrane.

Dynamic Responsive Membrane

58


EDDS ROOM SCENARIOS

EFFICIENCY ROOM

EFFICIENCY ROOM

Day Time

Night Time

Exterior solar control + Interior views

Interior privacy + Thermal Control

LEISURE ROOM

LEISURE ROOM

Day Time Exterior solar control + Interior privacy

Night Time Interior views

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60


61


62


06 BLACK BOX THEATRE HARLEM SCHOOL OF THE ARTS Spring 2014 Studio Critic: Antonio Furgiuele As a multi-functional and experimental space, a black box theater begs to be pushed beyond its traditional six sides. Revisiting the construction of a ‘box’, this project approaches a multi-use space through mechanized walls that move and change to create an infinite arrangment of space and function. An examination of the box and how it can be constructed generates new ideas of transitional planes which can be employed spatially. In this setting, the box-in-box form reminds participants that their use of each program becomes a performance in itself. This design also creates a more static theater on the ground level for use by the adjacent Harlem School of the Arts. It is important to create a more social hub in this particular community that can connect the education aspects of theatre to the larger cultural network. A service core on the north side of the project hosts a separate zone for support program such as criculation, bathrooms, storage, and dressing rooms.

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64


DEFINITIONS OF A BOX

Reorganized Planes

Exploded Planes

Point - Line - Plane

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GROUND LEVEL PLAN

Rock

7 2

Existing

Existing

2

6

3

5

5

1

4 N 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

66

Entry Theatre Stage Seating Ticket Booth Bathroom Storage Circulation Core


BLACK BOX LEVEL PLAN

Rock

4

3

Existing

1

2

3

N 1 2 3 4

Black Box Theatre Floor Lobby Terrace Circulation Core

67


BLACK BOX VIGNETTES

Closed Condition 68

Open Condition

Varied Condition


69


70


07 MUSEUM EXTENSION HARLEM STUDIO MUSEUM Fall 2013 Studio Critic: Julio Salcedo Fernandez, AIA Designed as a separate yet related entity, this project acts as a representation of both interior and exterior conditions. The organization of spaces connect the public condition at the ground level with the art program extended from the Harlem Studio Museum. A new central gathering space that relates art and education is created through a manipulation of simple forms. Removing the fourth wall of the main gallery space creates a framed view of the Harlem streetlife, generating a performative nature beyond the wall. In this way, the neighborhood itself becomes a living installation that documents the cultural and social construction of people. The central seating area doubles as a location for live music and theatre performances, as well as education training and lecture series. The orthoganol design minimizes interference with view of the additional art, both inside and on the outdoor terrace. This space, along with the connective bridge, aims to further integrate this intervention in the site.

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CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

G

E

O

Given Program: Gallery, Education, Office

FORMAL ARRANGEMENTS

Horizontal ‘L’ Connection

Slight Vertical Skew

Horizontal Bar

Vertical ‘L’ Connection

Arrangments to generate public space 72


FORMAL STRATEGY

G

Reorganize program around a central space to generate a public gathering area. O

E

G Remove gallery’s center facing wall to create framed window for “city as art” and side wall for connection to education space. O

E

G Raise gallery and education spaces off of the ground to minimize impact on site and to allow for bridge connection to museum across the street. E O

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SITE PLAN

A.C. Powell Plaza

Public Park

Bridge Connection

W Harlem Studio Museum

125

th

Str e

et

N 74


MAIN LEVEL PLAN

4 6 5

3 3 1

2

7

1

8

1 2 3 4

Gallery Gathering Space Bathrooms Office

5 6 7 8

Archive Closet Terrace Bridge

N

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

75


76


77


78


08 FORMWORK LIBRARY EXTENSION Fall 2013 Studio Critic: Julio Salcedo Fernandez, AIA As a liminal intervention, this project focuses on the creation of a third space defined by the identity of two unrelated, adjacent libraries. An initial analysis sought to redefine each building through diagrams of space and connections. The specificity of form comes from the movement of interior space, each side projecting a different type of circulation to encourage a variation of speed and experience. The main level is a combination of stairs and ramps as means of both fast and slow movement. The presence of old and new means of knowledge allow visitors to experience the transition of libraries into the future. The roof is designed as a public space removed from the street level, though still connected to interior program.

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SPATIAL MATRIX

80


81


FORMAL STRATEGY

Formal Arrangement from Old Library

Formal Arrangement from New Library

Formal Arrangement of New Extension

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MAIN LEVEL PLAN 10

2

3

4

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

8

10 11

7

Plaza Main Entry Help Desk Light Well Balcony Landing Stepped Seating Circulation Ramps Information Kiosks Old Library New Library

5

7

6

7 8

Tablet Station (typ.)

Traditional Bookshelf (typ.)

1

9

11

1

N 83


LONGITIDUNAL SECTION

Roof Seating [for reading + events]

Old Library

Main Extension

Ground Level Cafe

84


Public Event Space

New Library

85


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09 THE TRENCH OF LIGHT WWI MEMORIAL COMPETITION Summer 2015 Through the iconic identity of trench warfare, the Trench of Light reflects on the tragedies of the Great War and creates a charged space of reflection for visitors. The trench consists of two walls as a tactile memory to the legacy of the American troops. Stainless steel panels engraved with stars, categorized by the then-existing 48 states and District of Columbia, honor those who fought during World War I. Additional panels highlight significant battles and the participation of women and minorities. The opposing wall of concrete units replicates the sandbag and undulates for places of rest and repose along the path. The flattened site improves the connection between the memorial and the surrounding urban context. With public plazas at the edges, the main memorial trench cuts through like a scar on the American conscience. The removal of existing parking extends the sidewalk to increase views to the U.S. Capitol. Plazas at the east and west edges dialogue with adjacent urban spaces and welcome visitors with the Pershing Statue and his namesake wall on one side and the Bald Eagle Memorial and the additional wall to the other. The space between the trench and site edge are treated as No Man’s Land, blocked off from entry, to enhance the experience of the trench and create a safety barrier for guests. Red poppies stand as an annual symbol of remembrance throughout. The Trench of Light is a symbol of bravery and an enduring beacon to those who fought during World War I.

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SITE DIAGRAMS

MEMORIAL PATH

Public Sidewalk

MEMORIAL WALL

MEMORIAL PATH

Memorial Wall

NO MAN’S LAND

NO MAN’S LAND

No Man’s Land

TOPOGRAPHY WALL

EXISTING STATUES + BENCHES

Benches + Statues 88

Main Memorial Path

Sandbag Wall


URBAN CONTEXT White House

WWI

Vietnam

Korean

WWII

National Mall Washington Monument

US Capitol

SITE PLAN

NW

Pen n

nia

Ave

NW 14th Street

NW 15th Street

sylv a

NW Pennsylvania Ave

N 89


Famous Quotes

90

Battle Maps + War Data


UNFOLDED ELEVATION

In Memorium

Life in the Trenches

Minority Statistics

SITE SECTION

91


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10 PERFORM HOUSING COMPLEX Net Zero Housing Competition Summer 2015 perFORM seeks to answer the growing need for environmentally-responsible design. The project embraces a mixed-use, multi-family approach as a tool to manage relationship between spaces and people. A balance between public and private spaces is essential to a sustainable vision of successful urban life. The overall design features scalar identities fluctuating between the macro to micro scale. First, outward facing commercial and green spaces communicate a presence and exchange with the surrounding neighborhood, while a community park at the building’s central interior acts a participatory liminal buffer between residents and guests. The buildings offer a green roof of gardens and activity for each of the four buildings, while more autonomous identities are found within each unit. The terrace of each apartment ultimately reintroduces the resident back to the larger community. The climate requires an envelope that responds to both natural and human conditions. To maximize heat gain during winter, north and west walls are designed with little break in a thick and highly insulated walls while the south façade maximizes glazing, thermal mass and trombe wall for solar and heat gain. An open plan within each apartment enables the sun and heated air to penetrate into the building. Concrete slabs absorb and store solar radiation. Additionally, the summer calls for horizontal overhangs needed to shade and cool each space while excess heat is carried out by cross-ventilation. On-site energy creation is vital to the success of perFORM. Photovoltaics, geothermal tubing, and wind turbines are able to produce mechanical energy to suit resident needs. A bioswale on the lower western edge of the site allows for the collection and infiltration of storm water. An additional grey water system within the community park collects and reuses water on site. perFORM stands as an example of hollistic design in an emerging design field.

93


SITE PLAN

Evergreen Wind Barrier Wind Turbines

Couch Street

Green Roof

Green Roof

Community Park

Green Roof

Green Roof

Burnside Street

N Rooftop PV System 94

Bioswale + Grey Water Collection


95


TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

Minimize northern exposure

A

L2: Office L3: Mechanical

B

A

A

B

A

A

B

A

B

B

A

A

A

B

B

A

A

B

A

A A

A N

96

Maximize southern exposure


UNIT TYPES Triple-glazed, low E glass with argon

UNIT A 2 BEDROOM

All plumbing connected to grey water system

UNIT B 1 BEDROOM

Cl

Bedroom

Kitchen

Cl Kitchen Bathroom

Bathroom

Dining Area

Dining Room

Bedroom Bedroom

Living Room

Living Room

Terrace

Terrace

Central trombe wall Concrete floor slabs as thermal mass Operable Louvers to control sun + wind 97


Summer Sun

Summer Sun Shading

Winter Sun Solar Gain

Winter Sun

Utility-Connected Photovoltaics

Trombe Wall

Louvers Diffuse Light Commerical

Geothermal Tubing

98


SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS DIAGRAM

Cross Ventilation

Commerical

Grey Water Collection

99


RAC | 2016

Ryan Cerone - Graduate Architecture Portfolio  
Ryan Cerone - Graduate Architecture Portfolio  
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