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Sub-Division 2 Site analysis Marcus,Ryan,Ally,Nicole,Hana,Farah,Yong Sheng

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Introduction In this project, our group was tasked with a study on Sub-division 2 of the Chinatown-Bukit Pasoh area. This location encompasses the district of New Bridge, Neil, Cantonment, Everton and Keong Saik Road. This Report aims to present our findings and research on this district such as climate, physical site features, site observation and urban analysis.

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1.0 Site Information

3.0 Immediate Site

1.1 Location

3.1 Location

5.1 Zoning

6.1 Street Activity

7.1 Aim

1.2 Overview

3.2 Site Drawings

5.2 Solid Void

6.2 Connectivity

7.2 Approach

1.3 Demographics

3.3 Basic Info

5.3 Mono Hybrid

6.3 Traffic Flow

7.3 Interview

1.4 History

3.4 Sun Shading

5.4 Building Height

6.4 Human Circulation

1.5 Future Developments

3.5 Views

5.5 Open Spaces

6.5 Conservation Areas

1.6 Insights

3.6 Olfactory

5.6 Recreational Space

6.6 Conservation Guidelines

3.7 Utilities

5.7 Soft Landscape

6.7 Heritage Trees

3.8 Guidelines

5.8 Hard Landscape

6.8 Formal Activities

3.9 Site Sections

5.9 Views

6.9 Informal Activities

3.10 Insight

5.10 Auditory

6.10 Ethnic Associations

5.11 Roads

6.11 Nodes

5.0 Site Observations

6.0 Urban Analysis

7.0 Participatory Design

8.0 Synthesis & Analysis 7.1 Observations 7.2 Insights

2.0 Climate Analysis 2.1 Sun Path 2.2 Wind 2.3 Rainfall

7.3 SWOT 7.4 Key Users & Need 7.5 Design Vision 7.6 How Might We?

2.4 Temperature 2.5 Insights

4.0 Building Types

7.7 Design Pointers 6.12 Commerce

4.1 Residential

6.13 Other Issues

4.2 Shophouse Style

6.14 Insights

9.0 Conclusion 8.1 Members & Roles 8.2 Reflections

4.3 Place of Worship 8.3 Reference 4.4 Roof Profile & Corner Conditions 4.5 Insights

Table of Contents

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01 Site Information Physical

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1.1 LOCATION SUB-DIVISION 2

SUB DIVISION 2 Sub-division 2 is located in the Chinatown-Bukit Pasoh district in Singapore’s central region. It is bounded by New Bridge Road, Keong Saik Road, Kreta Ayer Road, Neil Road and Cantonment Road.

Data source from: Google Maps

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1.1 LOCATION SUB-DIVISION 2

AUTOCAD Map of Sub-division 2

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1.2 OVERVIEW SUB-DIVISION 2

2

3

1

1.

ShopHouses

2.

Residential Area

3.

Singapore General Hospital

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1.2 OVERVIEW SHOPHOUSES Outram is known for its numerous number of shophouses that stretches throughout the streets. These shophouses are conserved as a historical source of delight and nostalgia that shows Singapore’s architectural heritage from 1840s to 1960s.

RESIDENTIAL AREA The main residential areas in Sub-division 2 are The Pinnacle @ duxton and Everton Park. Everton Park is slowly evolving to become home to a number of new cafes.

SINGAPORE GENERAL HOSPITAL (SGH) SGH is the largest and oldest hospital in Singapore, of which the foundation of its first building was laid in 1821. The hospital is operated by SingHealth and shares space with 4 specialist medical centres, Singapore National Eye Centre (SNEC), National Heart Centre (NHC), National Cancer Centre (NCC) and National Dental Centre (NDC).

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1.3 DEMOGRAPHICS Outram has approx 136.2ha of land coverage and an estimated population of 20,840. Outram comprises 4 subzones

A

D

B C

A.

Pearl’s Hill

B.

People’s Park

C.

China Square

D.

Chinatown

There is almost an equal amount of males to female in Outram. Outram is facing an aging population as there are more elderly compared to the number of youths.

Data source from: https://www.citypopulation.de/php/singapore-admin.php?adm1id=114

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1.4 HISTORY

It was then renamed Outram Road in honour of Outram for his heroic role in the 1857 Indian mutiny

Outram was known as Cantonment Road

1853

HDB’s Urban Renewal Department built the first public flats along the road with the typical “shops below-flats above” slab-blocks concept

1858 Soon, known as River Valley Road when it was separated from Cantonment Road

1857

1966

1969

Housing and Development Board (HDB) purchased the site of the former Outram Road prison for $4.5 million

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

BUKIT PASOH ROAD The road’s name was inspired by Ali Baba jars known as “Pasoh” meaning earthenware pots in malay. The road was famous for producing pottery used to store rice or water in homes. Bukit Pasoh Road is an area where there is a significant concentration of clan associations, many of which are still present till today. Ownership of the land has passed through the hands of several Caucasian landowners, with accompanying name changes, until it was auctioned off and divided into building lots in 1856. Its current name was given to it by Tan Keng Hoon, an opium farmer.

Data source: https://stateofbuildings.sg/places/bukit-pasoh-road

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

NEIL ROAD Neil Road was formerly known as Salat Road which translates to straits as it led to the Keppel Harbour. The former Salat Road was part of a nutmeg plantation that flourished on Duston Hill till the late 1850s. However, it was shortly renamed to Neil in honour of Colonel Neil who served with madras fusilier in india, and was one of the heroes of the 1857 Indian Mutiny. On 147 neil road stands a house owned by Lee Kwan Yew’s grandfather where he lived with his parents and grandparents for a few years.

Data source from: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_309_2004-12-16.html

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

CANTONMENT ROAD Cantonment Road was assigned by Stamford Raffles in 1819 to Major William Farquhar for barracks for the East India Company's Sepoy troops. The troops were to be “cantoned� in this area. The word Cantonment refers to a group of lodgings assigned to troops and thus was how the road got its name. Raffles intended this area to be for hospitals, barracks for the army and houses for civil and military offices back in the days. Now Cantonment serves as a mainly office district with a police complex nearby.

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

Before Reconstruction

After Reconstruction

KEONG SAIK ROAD Keong Saik Road was best known for as red light district back in the 1960s. The area had more than 25 brothels and rich merchants were said to have kept mistresses in residences alongside charcoal, incense and clan association. It was a one stop convenience for them. The red light district was put to an end in 2000s when the shophouses were put to sale. Keong Saik Rd was named in 1926 after a malacca-born chinese businessman, Tan Keong Saik, to remember his contribution to the chinese community.

Keong Saik Road today Before reconstruction source: http://www.sgexposed.com/2013/01/singapore-red-light-district-keong-saik.html

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

KRETA AYER ROAD In the early 19th and 20th centuries, bullock and ox carts once filled these streets carrying water. The words Kreta Ayer translates to “water cart” and thus the name of the street came about. The street is under the Chinatown Kreta Ayer Conservation Area and is home to many conserved shophouses. HDB blocks, shops and eateries line this street. The Kreta Ayer Complex, community centre and the People’s Theatre, make up the the Kreta Ayer Centre. Due to the disappearance of many private theatres in the mid-20th century, the Kreta Ayer People's Theatre was created as a permanent stage in 1969 for artists to showcase their talents. Kreta Ayer Complex, a shopping and residential development was then built in 1980.

http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_325_2004-12-17.html

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

DUXTON ROAD Duxton road was notoriously known for its opium and gambling dens and cheap brothels throughout the early 19th and 20th centuries. It was also popularly known by the Cantonese as “jinricksha place� (and sometimes Kampong Ah Lai) because of the many rickshaws (also known as jinricksha or jinrikisha) that were parked there with the rickshaw station located nearby. It was also notorious for the strong clan ties within the area as many rickshaw pullers created their own territorial domains. When rickshaws clashed , everyone gets involved. This meant that fights among rickshaw drivers within this area were more common and frequent.

Data source: NLB e-resources

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

DUXTON HILL Duxton hill is a small hill located at Duxton henceforth its name. The area used to be a 13 hectares nutmeg plantation with 1800 trees. The plantation was surrounded by Craig Hill and Duxton.

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1.4 HISTORY ROADS

CRAIG ROAD The road, commonly known as gu chia chui kia in Hokkien, means "side of Kreta Ayer". Craig Road was named after Captain James Craig, a member of the Merchant Service Guild and an officer of the Freemason's Zetland Lodge Club. The road was the living quarters of Chinatown's poor in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was where rickshaw pullers, prostitutes, dock workers and triad gangsters set up their homes. After Singapore’s independence in 1965, following rapid urbanisation, Craig Road’s reputation increased.

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1.4 HISTORY HISTORICAL LANDMARK

EE HOE HEAN CLUB Location: Bukit Pasoh Road The Ee Hoe Hean Club is a notable landmark as it was a millionaires’ dating club back in 1895. It was associated with many luminaries like Tan Kah Kee. Founded in 1895, it is one of the oldest millionaires club in Singapore. From 1937-1942, the club was the headquarters of the anti-japanese china salvation movement. After World War II, the club continues to be involved in community services and charity work.

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1.4 HISTORY HISTORICAL LANDMARK

JINRIKISHA STATION Location: Neil Road The Jinrikisha Station was built in 1903 and opened in 1905, it served as a the main depot for rickshaws. It served as a depot till 1947, where rickshaws were banned and then used for other purposes in the following years. In 1987, it became part of the Tanjong Pagar conservation area to serve as a reminder to singaporeans of the sacrifices of rickshaw pullers. The historical landmark was bought over by L&B holdings in 1989 and was subsequently sold to Hong Kong movie star Jackie Chan in 2007.

Jinrikisha Station in 1900s 1900s picture: http://www.oldstratforduponavon.com/singapore.html

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1.4 HISTORY HISTORICAL LANDMARK

NO. 9 NEIL ROAD Location: Neil Road No. 9 Neil Road was the first shophouse to be part of URA’s shophouse restoration project from 1987 to 1988. No. 9 was also the demonstrated shophouse unit where guests such as Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Phillip had tea during a visit in 1989. No.9 managed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability of shophouse conservation.

Before restoration

After restoration

No.9 picture: https://www.marina-bay.sg/sitecore/content/Corporate/Get-Involved/ConserveBuilt-Heritage/Explore-Our-Built-Heritage/brief-history

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1.4 HISTORY HISTORICAL LANDMARK

ENG AUN TONG FACTORY AT 89 NEIL RD Location: Neil Road Eng Aun Tong was a name used by the Haw Par brothers and the factory was where the famous “Tiger Balm” was first produced in 1924 and stopped in 1971. The building was built in 1924 in the Neoclassical Style.

source: National Archives of Singapore

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1.4 HISTORY HISTORICAL LANDMARK

BABA HOUSE Location: Neil Road The baba house was built in the 1860s and was owned by Wee Bin and his descendants ; a family of shipping tycoons in the 19th-century. Weebin was from the southern Chinese province of Fujian, who settled in Singapore and founded Wee Bin & Co, the largest Chinese shipping firm at that time. The Baba house was then passed on to the National University of Singapore (NUS) as a part of conservational efforts. The Baba House still retains some of its original furniture and flooring. NUS holds occasional visits and heritage tours for the public to the Baba House to spread the knowledge of conservation.

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1.4 HISTORY HISTORICAL LANDMARK

DUXTON PLAIN PARK TOMB Location: Duxton Plain Park The tomb was believed to be the tomb of Sharifah Rogayah, the granddaughter of Habib Noh, a famous 19th century saint. The area used to be a cemetery, where this particular tomb was the only one which workers were unable to unearth due to a landslide. It was believed that this was due to divine powers and hence was left untouched. The tomb is currently maintained by Mohamed Ridhwan.

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1.5 FUTURE DEVELOPMENT VIEW 1

UPCOMING THOMSON EAST COAST LINE

VIEW 1 VIEW 2

VIEW 2 Thomson East Coast Line was announced on 25 Jan 2008 and will be completed in 2019. The current construction is located along Neil and Kreta Ayer Road. In the coming year, Outram Park would have 3 lines: ➔ The North East line ➔ West East line ➔ Thomson East Coast Line

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1.5 FUTURE DEVELOPMENT UPCOMING SGH CAMPUS In the upcoming years, there will be a high demand in healthcare as the population grows alongside new medical research and educational professionals. There will be demand for hospitals, medical facilities and more professionals. Hence, Outram is aiming to become a healthcare district as Singapore General Hospital is located there. The upcoming projects would be located near Jalan Bukit Merah. New Projects: 1.

New Emergency Medicine Building

2.

SGH Campus Master Plan

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1.5 FUTURE DEVELOPMENT UPCOMING SGH CAMPUS MASTER PLAN The SGH master plan was launched on 5 Feb 2016 by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and is hoping to open 2020 onwards. The master plan would include: Upgrades ➔ SGH Accident & Emergency Block ➔ National Dental Centre Singapore New Buildings ➔ Outram Community Hospital ➔ National Cancer Centre Singapore ➔ SGH Complex

source: https://www.singhealth.com.sg/TomorrowsMed/Article/Pages/20yearmasterplanforSGH.aspx

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1.6 INSIGHTS

INSIGHTS Outram is slowly redeveloping into a healthcare district with Singapore General Hospital round the corner. Being made into a healthcare district, it aims to be easily accessible throughout Singapore with the existing North East (Green), East West (Purple) and the upcoming Thomson East Coast Line (Brown). Despite going through modernisation, it aims to continue preserving its long history by conserving the existing shophouses along Outram and Chinatown, as well as other historical landmarks.

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02 Climate Analysis Physical

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2.1 C L I M A T E - S U N P A T H (9am)

9AM

12PM

6PM

In Sub-Division 2 there are several tall buildings such as The Pinnacle @ Duxton, Everton Park housing and the Beacon condo. Tall Buildings help provide shade to the area in general in the mornings and evenings. However, at noon shophouses located at Bukit Pasoh, Neil, Kreta Ayer and Duxton road are completely exposed to the afternoon sun as they are mostly two to three stories high making it very hot.

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2.2 CLIMATE-WIND

The wind rose in Singapore tells us that wind directions comes mostly from the North and South East. Monsoon periods where steady strong winds are created are in between December to April whereas calm winds are in between June to October. Winds mostly ranges from >1km/h to >28km/h. However, Sub-division 2 experiences little or no wind as winds are mostly blocked by tall buildings. Roads of shophouses are also laid out longitudinal hence there is no cross ventilation.

Sources cited from: https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/singapore_singapore_ 1880252

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2.3 CLIMATE-RAINFALL

Dry season occurs mostly in between January to March as it indicates yellow bar the highest. It then starts to rain on a consistent rate with at least 5 days of rain or more per month from April to September. We can conclude that November and December has the highest rainfall and rain days. This might be due to the inter-monsoon period that causes heavy showers and thunderstorms.

Sources cited from: https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/singapore_singapore_1880252

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2.4 CLIMATE-TEMPERATURE

Temperatures in Singapore ranges from >25°C to >30° C with mean maximum temperature of 30.2 to 32.3. The hottest period is between February to May. In general, Outram experiences very hot weather as only tall buildings are sheltered. Shophouses are directly exposed and there are little shadings such as trees that are within shophouses .

Sources cited from: https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/singapore_singapore_1880252

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2.5 INSIGHTS

INSIGHTS The temperatures in the area is relatively consistent throughout the day, providing an opportunity to cater to all kinds of activities and usage of facilities. Areas such as shophouses will be relatively hot throughout the day with noon being the hottest as there is no shading , only places such as Duxton Plain Park would be cooler as there’s more shadings. Wind is blocked throughout the area as rows of shophouses back to back prevents cross ventilation making it humid.

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03 The Site Immediate Site at New Bridge Rd

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3.1 LOCATION

Plan View of actual site

THE SITE The chosen site is located along New Bridge Road within the Bukit Pasoh area. It is rich in 19th century urban heritage, with a number of landmarks such as the Neo-Classical styled Kong Chow Wui Koon built in 1924, Sri Layan Sithi Vinayagar Temple, People's Park Complex, The New Majestic, and shop-houses located opposite the green belt. The selected site is flanked by Kong Chow Wui Hoon, Jean Yip loft and Duxton Park/green corridor.

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3.2 SITE DRAWING

Front Elevation

Left Elevation

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3.3 BASIC INFO ABOUT THE SITE

Nearest bus stop to site

Outram Park Station

ACCESSIBILITY The site at New Bridge is within walking distance to Outram Park MRT with an estimated walking time of 2 minutes. Buses are also easily accessible as there is a bus stop right in front of the site.

HISTORY New Bridge Road, built in 1842, obtained its name from the Coleman Bridge which was constructed in 1840 over the Singapore River. Also located in New Bridge Road was a large triangular block of two-storey shophouses known as Ellenborough Buildings. These shophouses were built for Tan Tock Seng, one of Singapore’s pioneers, but unfortunately, was demolished in the late 1990s.

Past New Bridge Rd Source: Singapore memory project

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3.3 BASIC INFO

EXISTING BUILDINGS

ABOUT THE SITE

JEAN YIP LOFT

KONG CHOW WUI KOON

Jean Yip Loft, built in 2010, is an iconic building located right in the centre of the upgraded Chinatown area. It offers itself as a sanctuary for those who need to relax and unwind from the hustle and bustle of urban living. Its lush decor and contemporary architecture in complementation to the neighbouring Duxton Plain Park, offers tranquility in the midst of our concrete jungle.

Kong Chow is the old name for the Xinhui district in Guangdong. Set up in 1839 to provide temporary lodging for Xinhui’s new immigrants by Guangdong’s Pearl River Delta, it is the first clan association to open to other Chinese dialect groups; they could join in their Lion Dance Troupe, Dragon Dance Troupe, as well as their Music and Opera Section, which helped to enliven the old association. The KCWK, since its inception, has stressed the importance of culture and heritage in building a cohesive society.

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3.4 SUN SHADINGS

No Shade

9am

12pm

5pm

The site is mostly shaded throughout the day. At 9am,its shaded by the current construction of Pearl Centre. At noon its partially shaded by the Jean Yip building and Kong Chow Wui Koon. However, in the evening it is hottest as its fully exposed to the sun.

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3.5 VIEWS 3

2 1 1

3

2 Overview of site

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3.6 OLFACTORY

Olfactory refers to the sense of smell Every morning, Kong Chow Wui Koon would offer morning prayers so there will be the scent of burning incense. On Saturday afternoons, gardeners would add fertilisers to the trees along Duxton Plain Park. It might result in an unpleasant experience during such timings due to the overpowering smell of natural fertilisers. Due to the large concentration of flora at Duxton Plain Park, strong scents of plant oils, bacteria spores and ozone are released after heavy rain.

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3.7 UTILITIES

Sewage

Drain

Street Lamps

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3.8 GUIDELINES

New Bridge Road The purpose of this Streetblock Plan is to guide addition & alteration works and redevelopment proposals within the Upper Circular Road Conservation Area To ensure that developments have a strong street edge and contribute to the planned comprehensive continuous covered walkway network for comfortable pedestrian movement at street level. All new developments and major additions & alterations are required to be set back to the safeguarded line of Road Reserve at the front, side and rear. https://www.ura.gov.sg/-/media/User%20Defined/URA%20Online/circulars/2008/dec/dc08-25.pdf

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3.9 SITE SECTIONS

SIte Section B-B

Hui Guan Temple Section

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3.9 SITE SECTIONS

SIte Section A-A

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3.10 INSIGHT

INSIGHTS We can conclude from the observations above, that the site under study: ●

Consists of the Bukit Pasoh area which is rich in 19th century urban heritage;

Is easily accessible with a direct bus stop in front, and a 2 minute walk to Outram Park MRT station;

Has an issue of noise pollution - largely caused by vehicles and pedestrians - as the area is not only closely located to the main road and MRT, but is also developed around small and busy roads;

Has comfortable shade coverage from trees, yet sufficient exposure to sunlight throughout the day - this provides good opportunity to host a variety of programmes at site;

Presents good opportunities for collaborative design spaces or activities with the neighbouring Duxton Plain Park; since they boast an excellent visual connection with each other.

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04 Building Type Residential Worship Shophouses

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4.1 RESIDENTIAL

THE PINNACLE AT DUXTON The first 50-storey public housing project in Singapore, and also the first in the world with two sky bridges linking seven towers. As part of the government’s urban renewal strategy, The competition was held to design a high-density, high-rise public housing that would optimise land use while meeting the changing lifestyle needs and rising aspirations of residents, and cost effective.

TANJONG PAGAR HDB Tanjong Pagar Plaza is a government-built, self-sufficient, high-rise complex, providing inhabitants with many facilities such as a shopping complex and key public amenities including a post office, banks, a kindergarten, market, and hawker centre.

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4.1 RESIDENTIAL

EVERTON PARK HDBs

KRETA AYER HEIGHTS

Constructed in 1965, the Everton Park Housing estate comprises of seven 12-storey blocks and was initially used to house staff of the Singapore Harbour Board.

Kreta Ayer Heights was built in 1981 and it is part of the Kreta Ayer conservation Area. It is a residential with first storey commercial. Kreta Ayer heights consists of 3 blocks in total.

It was subsequently renovated in 1979 and re-allotted to the current residents in April 1980.

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4.1 RESIDENTIAL

CHINATOWN PLAZA

THE BEACON

Chinatown Place is on a prime mixed use redevelopment site, zoned for commercial and residential use. It is built in 1984.

Builts in 2008. Project developed by Cantonment Realty Pte Ltd. The Beacon is part of the redevelopment plan that consist of the pinnacle to introduce new types of building typology into the district.

It sits at the junction of Craig Road and Neil Road.

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE HISTORY

ORIGINS OF SHOPHOUSES The main idea of Shophouses was to combine a shop and a home. Singapore’s shophouses originated from China, mostly from GuangDong and FuJian Shophouses are built with symmetry and orientated to mostly the North South Axis as the ancient Chinese believed in universal balance. Shophouses are usually very narrow and deep with the main hall of the house being the primary focus.

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE STYLE

Early 1st Transitional Late 2nd Transitional Art Deco Modern

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE STYLE

(PRESENT)

(PAST)

(PRESENT)

In the 1840s-1900, shophouses were built to facilitate trade activities along the Singapore River.

(PAST)

The first transitional shophouse features are Elegant and Simple. They are a storey higher than the early shophouses and have relatively restrained ornamentation. They are more chinese originated as influenced by chinese labourers.

Early shophouses style features minimal ornamentation. They are low in height with one or two timber windows on the facades.

(1840s-1900s) (Early 1900s)

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE STYLE

(PRESENT)

The late Shophouse style began to differ from the first two as Cultural influences begun to show up in the designs. They are highly decorated due to the exposure of the Europeans. They practice designs such as : Malay, Peranakan, Chinese-Baroque, Chinoiserie, Art Deco

(1900s - 1940s)

The Second Transition Shophouse toned down on being highly decorated and returned back to being simple and more streamlined. It was a mixed between the Chinese and European styles. It was also the beginning of Art Deco influences where there were motifs and wall tiles.

Rococo,

(Late 1930s)

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE STYLE

(PRESENT)

(PRESENT)

Modern shophouses are functional and simple to reflect the post-war situation.

The Art Deco style displays geometric and pre-cast elements with streamlined motifs. It has lesser use of decorative wall tiles compared to the 2nd Transition. Art Deco features the year of the building’s construction displayed on its facade.

Industrial materials such as as steel and concrete were used as materials. . Facade features thin sunshine fins and air vents as decorations.

One trend took place during this period is the indication of the building’s built year onto the facade of the building

(1930s-1960s) (Late 1950s-1970s)

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE STYLE

SHOPHOUSES TODAY Unfortunately the era of shophouses ended by 1980s as shophouses were no longer in favour due to land scarcity as they were not efficient in space. Today, most shophouses have been conserved from the past and are converted into more functional space such as offices, cafes, coffee shops, hotels, museums and clan associations Majority of the shophouses also have strict conservation rules.

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE FEATURES

Granite Bracket

Security Bar

Louvered Timber Window Tile Panel Decorative Plaster

Pintu Pagar

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4.2 SHOPHOUSE BACK ALLEYS

BACK ALLEYS Before back alleys were introduced, shophouses used to be back to back. In the past, Back alleys were used for: Space for water pipes and sewer lines to run Area for business (barber, wet market etc) Play/hangout area Easy collection of nightsoil (human waste) But after municipal ordinance in 1909, they were seen as a necessity for fire-fighting and sanitation. Hence they were made back to back with spiral staircases as secondary exits and fire escapes. The remaining back alleys now act as a circulation route to cut from one street to the other.

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4.3 PLACE OF WORSHIP

SRI LAYAN SITHI VINAYAGAR TEMPLE

THE POH TOH SI TEMPLE

CUNDHI GONG TEMPLE

The temple was built in 1925 and attracted many devotees of all races.The temple has three Vinayagar idols and Holy Spear and its worshippers are well blessed with peace and wealth. Between Thursday to Sunday every week, one can see lot of devotees making 108 Pragarams (Circle around the Sanctum)

Poo Thor Jee (pu tuo si) was founded in 1911 by Venerable Zhuan Dao. Itwas rebuilt in 1968 at the current site, and the opening ceremony was graced by the then prime minister and member of parliament for Tanjong Pagar Mr Lee Kuan Yew.

The two storey 400msq temple was built in 1928 and worshiped by two domestic helpers.

The temple celebrates Vinayagar Chathurthi and ThaiPusam Festival grandly. 73 Keong Saik Rd, Singapore 089167

In 1995, Zhuan Dao Buddhist Library and Arts Culture Centre was opened as an extension to the temple, in memory of their founder.

7 Yan Kit Road (S)088262, Singapore 088262

Its located in keong saik road, in between taller shophouses. It is affiliated to the Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple in waterloo street.

13 Keong Saik Rd, Singapore 089120

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4.4 ROOF PROFILE & CORNER CONDITIONS

Entrance

Plan

Gable End Curved Pitched Roof

Roof Ridge

Air Well

Roof Tiles Party Wall Pitched Roof

Flat Roof

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4.5 INSIGHTS

INSIGHTS There is a strong contrast between the typologies of buildings in sub-division 2. The old and the new. Tall residential buildings creates a strong contrast against the shophouses. Despite being very different in height and looks, they blend well. There is also the contrast between old and new residential buildings like Everton Park and The Pinnacle. Old residential buildings are simpler looking and shorter in height, they feature void decks and small window frames whereas the new residential building features a sky garden and large window frames.

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05 Site Observation Physical

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5.1 ZONING HealthCare ShopHouse Commercial

Open Space

Place of Worship Residential Landmark Government The sub-division consist mostly of residential, shophouses and healthcare.

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5.2 SOLID VOID

Shows a void space in between two solid buildings

In Subdivision 2, there is a clear distinction between the solid and void spaces. Solid and void spaces are more evenly spread out within residential and healthcare areas. Whereas solid and void spaces are unevenly spread out in the shophouse area. Being so dense, the void spaces are very narrow.

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5.3 MONO HYBRID

MONO

HYBRID

Mono refers to buildings that are of a single use whereas Hybrid refers to buildings that have multiple use. Some examples of Mono buildings would be The Pinnacle and Tanjong Pagar HDB.

Mono

Hybrid

Examples of Hybrid buildings would be Everton Park and Chinatown Plaza where its a mixed of residential and commercial under the block.

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5.4 BUILDING HEIGHT

> 20 Storeys

5 - 20 storeys

<5 storeys

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5.5 OPEN SPACES

There are a number of open spaces within the sub-division, some with amenities such as fitness corners and resting areas. Opens spaces are important as they encourage human interactions and activities. The most popular open space in the area would be Duxton Plains Park. Duxton Plains Park was established before the second world war by the British. It was once a railroad, reserved for the line to Pulo Saigon on the south bank of the Singapore River. It was originally called Duxton Plains Parkway. Falling defunct in 1914, this section of the railway was eventually dismantled in 1925 after the realignment of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rail network.

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5.6 RECREATIONAL SPACES

Recreational spaces help improve and enhance the quality of life for residences and the public. Some amenities include Fitness corners for the elderly and adults, swings for children and pavillions for people to gather together.

Recreational amenities

Fitness Corner and Basketball court at Duxton Plain Park

Pavilions with benches and swings at Duxton Plain Park

Fitness Corner at Everton Park

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5.8 SOFT LANDSCAPE

Trees

Green Spaces

Girth Sizes > 2.0m 1.0 - 2.0m 0.6 - 1.0m 0.1 - 0.5m

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5.8 SOFT LANDSCAPE

TREES

Soft landscape in the sub-division include trees and a variety of other plants. Green spaces help provide shade and also make the place more visually appealing.

FLOWERING PLANTS

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5.8 H A R D S C A P E ( P A T H W A Y S)

Brick

Road

Pavement

Single-Tile

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5.9 VIEWS

6 5

4

1

4

2

5

3

6

3

1

2

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5.10 AUDITORY

72db

NOISE LEVELS Noise levels on Neil Road and Tanjong Pagar road rank the highest at 73db as they are major roads with high traffic flow.

67db

Certain streets like Craig Road have lower noise levels but high traffic flow since most cars around the area are stationary.

70db 63db

60db

71db 73db

The site has a noise level of 72db as it is beside a bus stop and a major road, New Bridge Road.

73db

66db

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5.11 ROADS

Primary Roads are the main roads. They are usually 3 laned. Access to buses are located on main roads only.

Intersections are cross junctions where there are the most cars passing by.

Secondary roads are smaller and are usually one laned that goes either one way or two way. Back alleys are used to unload items from vehicles and shortcuts to cut to streets for pedestrians.

Primary Roads

Back Alleys

Secondary Roads

Intersections

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06 Urban Analysis Physical

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6.1 STREET ACTIVITIES Subdivision 2 street activity is more concentrated in the shophouse area as compared to the rest of the area as most of the commercial is concentrated there. It is the busiest at night as most shophouses cater to the nightlife. It is quieter in the day as only offices and some F&Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operate. Majority of the visitors visit areas like Keong Siak Rd, Teck Lim Rd and Duxton Hill for its good food. It has a slightly different ambience as seats of many F&B shophouses extend out to walkways allowing you to view the road and be more exposed. On some of the roads there are Clubs and Bars which would bustle with people in the night time. As of the Residential areas there are not a lot of areas for people to do recreational activities thus there is less activity there. High

Low

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6.2 CONNECTIVITY

MRT Station

Bus Stops

Taxi Stands Site

Outram is easily accessible as there are many bus stops around the vicinity and MRT closeby. However, bus stops are only located on main roads such as New Bridge, Neil and Tg Pagar Rd as buses are not allowed into the other roads which are mostly 2 lanes.

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6.2 CONNECTIVITY

Parking Areas

There are 2 kinds of parking spaces in the sub-division. Public Open Car Park There are 3 main car parks. Located at Teo Hong road, Neil road and duxton hill road. Parking lots on the side of the road Besides car parks, cars are allowed to park on the side of the road with allocated lots.

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6.3 TRAFFIC FLOW-WEEKDAY Day

Noon

In the day, traffic is heavy only on main roads as they lead to the highway. The only road that is medium in traffic is cantonment road. Roads within the shophouses are low in traffic as people don't commute inside except for those working there.

At noon, traffic conditions are slightly better, the roads that remain heavy traffic are New Bridge Rd and Eu Tong Sen St. Cantonment and Neil Rd are medium in traffic as not much cars commute by this route at noon. Roads within shophouses remain the same.

High

Medium

Low

Night

In the later part of the day, New Bridge Rd and Eu Tong Sen St is heavier as people start to commute back home as it leads to the highway. Secondary roads like Cantonment and Neil Rd are also busier as they lead to FnB within the shophouse area. The roads within shophouses still remain the same as traffic is spreaded out throughout the roads.

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6.3 TRAFFIC FLOW-WEEKEND Day

Noon

In the day, traffic is heavy only on main roads as they lead to the highway. The only road that is medium in traffic is cantonment road. Roads within the shophouses are low in traffic as people don't commute inside except for those working there.

High

Medium

Low

Night

At noon, traffic conditions are slightly better, the roads that remain heavy traffic are New Bridge Rd and Eu Tong Sen St. Cantonment and Neil Rd are medium in traffic as not much cars commute by this route at noon. Roads same.

within

shophouses

remain

the

In the later part of the day, New Bridge Rd and Eu Tong Sen St is heavier as people start to commute back home as it leads to the highway. Secondary roads like Cantonment and Neil Rd are also busier as they lead to FnB within the shophouse area. The roads within shophouses still remain the same as traffic is spreaded out throughout the roads.

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6.4 HUMAN CIRCULATION-WEEKDAY Day

Noon

Night

Human circulation on the main roads are medium as it is peak period. Pathways to the MRT and bus stops are also along the main road.

Human circulation remain the same along New Bridge Rd and Eu Tong Sen St as people commute to and fro via buses on the main road.

Places such as duxton parks and other linkways are medium in circulation as residents are on their way to work or exercise. There is barely any circulation around the shophouses as they are mostly closed except for offices

At night, majority of the roads are heavy in human circulation as it is more common to commute via walking than vehicles. It is easier to walk street to street within the shophouse area.

However other streets reduce in human circulation and is quieter as people are indoors, working and staying away from the heat.

High

Medium

Low

Main roads also increase in circulation due to the people commuting to bus stops and MRT to get home. Green spaces like Duxton Plain Park also increases in people as they come down to participate in sports and activities.

82


6.4 HUMAN CIRCULATION-WEEKEND Day

The main roads have medium traffic as the public are mostly travelling and gathering. Along the road are MRT stations, bus terminals and bus stops. The yellow walkway has medium traffic as residences come here to exercise and do activities. The shop houses has lesser people. High

Medium

Low

Noon

The only roads that still remain the same are New Bridge Rd and Eu Tong Sen St. as they have the stations. Streets like Keong Saik Road has increased traffic as people are looking for food and shopping.

Night

In the night majority of the roads increase in numbers, as people are gathering and having dinner. The main roads increase number due to commuting. The yellow walkway starts to have more people as people can do sports and activities.

The green walkway remains the same as there are recreational activities.

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6.5 CONSERVATION AREAS

1

Blair Plain Conservation Area

2

Home Team Career Centre

3

Bukit Pasoh Conservation Area

4

Kreta Ayer Road

5

Duxton Road

4 3 5

2

1 84


6.5 CONSERVATION AREAS

BLAIR PLAIN CONSERVATION AREA The area was gazetted as a conservation area on 25 october 1991. It was named after a low-lying plain that stretched from kampong bahru to the sea. The area was substantially built up before the end of nineteenth century when detached bungalows were redeveloped and the land subdivided into urban residential terraces. The area mainly consist of Early, Transitional and Late styles, mostly located along Blair and Neil Road.

85


6.5 CONSERVATION AREAS

KRETA AYER Kreta Ayer is part of the conservation area, it received conservation status on 7 July 1989. This area is traditionally associated with the Cantonese community who settled here in the past. Shophouses in this area features are two to three-storeys and built in the Transitional, Late and Art Deco styles.

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6.5 CONSERVATION AREAS

BUKIT PASOH CONSERVATION AREA The area was restored in 1994. The Bukit Pasoh conservation area consist of ten iconic townhouses that were works of Westerhout and Oman. It was conserved as a memory of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading architectural partnership. The most distinctive feature is the fair-faced brickwork and plaster banding on the main columns .

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6.5 CONSERVATION AREAS

DUXTON ROAD Duxton Road is under the Tanjong Pagar Chinatown Conservation Area. Tanjong Pagar received conservation status on 7 July 1989 and was the site of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first urban restoration project at no. 9 Neil Road, that was carried out by the URA. It features mostly two- and three-storey shophouses of the Early, Transitional and Late Shophouse styles. The 1950s Modern-style former Jing Hwa Cinema at 1 Tanjong Pagar Road was given conservation status on 25 Nov 2005 and adds to the variety of heritage buildings in the area.

88


6.5 CONSERVATION AREAS

HOME TEAM CAREER CENTRE The three-storey Neoclassical building was formerly Fairfield Methodist Girl's School. The school moved out in 1983 as the building could no longer accommodate the number of students.. The building was vacant for nearly 30 years before becoming the Ministry of Home Affairs Home Team.

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6.6 CONSERVATION GUIDELINES

Our historic buildings and districts give us a visual and physical link to Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past in our changing urban landscape. However, Conservation is much more than just preserving a facade or the external shell of a building.The fundamental principle of conservation applicable to all conserved buildings, irrespective of scale and complexity, is maximum Retention, sensitive Restoration and careful Repair - the â&#x20AC;&#x153;3Râ&#x20AC;?s.

Retention It is also important that we retain the inherent spirit and original ambience of these historic buildings as far as possible. The original structure and architectural elements of historic buildings should be retained and restored as far as possible, without reconstructing the entire building. Parts of the building should only be replaced when it is absolutely necessary.

Restoration Conserved buildings are to be restored in accordance with the conservation guidelines. All original structural and architectural elements are to be retained and restored. Replacement is done only when absolutely necessary

Repair Before any conservation work begins, thorough research and documentation should be carried out on the conservation building to ensure that quality restoration work is carried out through careful and accurate repair. The existing structure is to be retained by strengthening and repairing the structural elements. Any alteration or strengthening to structural elements is to be done in the most sympathetic and unobtrusive way, using original methods and materials wherever possible.

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6.6 CONSERVATION GUIDELINES Key Elements of the Shophouses

Description

Party walls

These are principle load bearing walls that separate a shophouse from its neighbouring shophouse.

Timber Structural Members

This refers to the main and secondary timber beams, that span from one party wall to the other and supports each floor. .It also includes the timber floor boards, and timber rafters that support the roof.

Airwells

Airwells are courtyards that are exposed to the sky, they provide natural ventilation and lighting to the interior of the shophouse They facilitate a comfortable indoor environment in our tropical climate.

Rear Court

An open courtyard located at the back of the shophouse. It is bounded by the rear boundary wall, service block, rear elevation of the main shophouse and the party wall. This area was traditionally used for functional needs such as the kitchen and the toilet.

Timber Windows

Timber framed windows that are designed in the French or Casement style. Some have solid infill panels while others will have operable timber shutters/jalousies to allow for air and light.

Timber Staircase

This refers to the staircase inside the shophouse, which are often of timber structural construction In some houses, the timber balustrades can be of ornate design. .

Front Facade

The front ‘face’ of the house that faces the street. Facades from different architectural eras will have different aesthetic approaches.

The Upper Floor

This projects over the five-footway to form a covered pedestrian arcade.

The Columns

Located at the front of the building. They support the upper floors and form five-foot way colonnades.

The Five-Footway

This provides pedestrians with a sheltered environment for passage away from the hot sun and torrential rain. This feature was mandated by Raffles since the first Town Plan for Singapore.

The Roof

The roof is usually of a ‘pitched’ construction on a timber structural frame and laid with natural coloured, unglazed V-profile terracotta roof tiles. Shophouses from the 1900s onwards tend to use natural coloured, unglazed flat-interlocking tiles (also commonly called ‘Marseilles’ tiles).

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6.7 HERITAGE TREES

Angsana

Indian Rubber Tree

A large deciduous tree that grows up to 40m in height. A cultivated species in Singapore.

An evergreen, medium or large tree of the moist tropical forests, it is hardy and fast growing, up to 30m in height. It develops numerous descending aerial roots to form a banyan. It is able to endure low light conditions and can be kept indoors as a houseplant. It requires little attention and will grow in almost any soil, as long as it has good drainage and is kept moist.

The floral buds of the Angsana develop high up on the crown, and bloom in yellow simultaneously. This Heritage Tree had a girth of 6.05m when measured in 2003. Unique ID: HT 2003-101 Location: Found in National Cancer Center at Hospital Drive and 2nd Hospital Ave roundabout

Unique ID: 2012-203 Location: Found in Duxton Plain Park, near Block 1D, Pinnacle Food Court

Bodhi Tree

Tembusu Tree

A large, fast growing deciduous tree that can reach up to 30m in height. There are three kinds of flowers: male, female and sterile.

It is a memorial tree planted in honour of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Founding Prime Minister Mr Lee Kuan Yew.

The Bodhi Tree is associated with religion and is regarded as sacred to Hindus and Buddhists. The Hindu god Vishnu was born under its shade and beneath this tree, the Buddha received his enlightenment. It is often planted in temples and other places for worship.

The tree grows up to 40m in height. The bark is typically deeply fissured. Flowers are creamy white trumpet-shaped, appears in clusters and are strongly fragrant especially in the early morning and late evening. They turn yellow with age. The fruits are round berries with lots of tiny seeds. Initially green, turning orange then red, they can take more than 3 months to ripen.

This Heritage Tree had a girth of 5.8m when measured in Year 2003. Unique ID: HT 2003-69 Location: Found in Duxton Plain Park, near Neil Road

Location: Duxton Plain Park

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6.8 FORMAL ACTIVITIES

The Tanjong Pagar Community Center holds many events and activities for the community to participate in. It also celebrates different festivals to cater to the different ethnicities in the neighbourhood. The Kreta Ayer Community Club also holds many formal activities for the community. However, currently, it is unable to do so as it is under renovation.

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6.8 FORMAL ACTIVITIES Formal activities are held to allow public to sign up and learn new skills and knowledge which enhance their well being. There are formal activities such as tours, celebrations, classes and many more, that are held in a specific indoor venue.

Baba House Tour

Kong Chow Wui Koon

URA Tour

Managed by NUS Museum, Baba House is a heritage home which facilitates research and learning about the Peranakan community and its evolution.

This â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;livingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; museum, equipped with graphic exhibits and multimedia kiosks, showcases its unique cultural characteristics - featuring artifacts, dynamic display of traditional Chinese martial arts, lion and dragon dances, and Cantonese Opera, as well as interactive hands-on activities.

There are Heritage Trail which are tours by URA/FOM which cover each of the 4 Chinatown Precincts.

94


6.8 FORMAL ACTIVITIES There are various of activities planned out for the neighbourhood. Activities in the day engages the community to bond together. Most of the activities are targeted towards the residences but they also welcome the public to join. Some weekly activities includes The Pinnacle monthly Flea Market where residences are able to sell or exchange their used clothes to the other residences and the public. Other activities include interest groups where people of common interest in the neighbourhood can bond through their interest.

95


6.8 FORMAL ACTIVITIES

URBAN DESIGN ROUTE Organised by creative studio Lopelab, Singapore is holding its first ever Urban Design Festival from 15 March to 15 June. It comprises three events - the Urban Design Summit, Uban Ventures street party and Urban Design Route. Urban Design Route is located in the Tanjong Pagar district to get people to stay and play in the public spaces, which is also the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme.

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6.9 INFORMAL ACTIVITIES

People Resting on the benches

People resting and eating on the benches

A man using his phone under the pavilion

People using the fitness corner and some resting on swings

Youths playing basketball

Youths playing soccer

There are many public spaces for people to come together and do activities together, such spaces may be catered to a specific age group, if not for all ages. Various informal activities can take place at spaces such as public parks, multi-purpose court, pavilion and many more.

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6.10 ETHNIC ASSOCIATIONS

In the early 19th century, waves of Chinese immigrants arrived in Singapore, in a bid to escape extreme poverty back in their home villages. Feeling isolated and homesick in an alien environment, the immigrants banded together to help new arrivals with accommodation and employment. Eventually, their early efforts to foster unity and kinship gave rise to the formation of clan associations, based on locality or kinship. Today, the purpose of the clan is to promote the chinese culture and heritage to the younger generation and to facilitate community bonding and business networking. Other Associations: ★ ★ ★

Chao ann Association Singapore Hok San Association The Chinese Buddhist Association

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6.11 NODES

Tanjong Pagar Community Centre

Duxton Plain Park

333 Kreta Ayer Road

Vanda Miss Joaquim Pavilion

Pinnacle Sky Bridge

Duxton Plain Park Near Pinnacle

Nodes are places where people usually gather around for activities. It is usually in public area like parks, playground, fitness corner, pavillion, community centres and many more. Through the nodes, we can identify the activities that draws people together and think about what and how we can do to provide an interesting space to attract people.

99


6.12 COMMERCE SHOPHOUSE

Leisure Office Food and Beverage Education Retail Place of Worship Clinics Hotel Park Site Shophouses may look the same from the outside but on the inside, they provide a variety of different programmes for the public.

100


6.12 COMMERCE There are a huge variety of shops around the area that caters to a variety of users. Many of the shophouses are used as dining areas, but some sell antiques, many services and more. With the area being in the central of Singapore, it is important that it covers the every need of not only residences, but also tourists and passerby around the area.

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6.13 OTHER ISSUES

Singapore is facing an aging population, and Chinatown being one of the first few areas to receive its first high rise residential housing, there are many elderlies residing there. After walking around the neighbourhood, it is noted that most of the elders like to hang around void decks, parks or coffee shop just observing others. They are mostly alone and have very little friends, they find themselves too old to join activities held by the community. So what are some of the things we can do such that the elders can participate in and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t consider themselves â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;too oldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for it, is something we would like to consider.

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6.14 INSIGHTS

INSIGHTS We can conclude:

There are a variety of activities in the Bukit Pasoh area for both the public and residents to participate in.

There’s a wide range of commercial that cater to the needs of every individual in the area.

Bus stops and MRT provides an opportunity for passersby to pass by the site.

Conservation sites full of history and heritage trees are unknown to the public, giving us the opportunity to share these knowledge.

103


07 Participatory Design 104


7.1 AIM

AIM

Our Aim with Participatory Design was to sieve out the different point of view of the different groups of people in our sub-division. (e.g. elderly, teens, adults) We plan to use this as an opportunity to understand the users of this area to find out the strengths, weaknesses and needs of this area so we can provide better facilities.

We want to design with the people in mind so we can find out what they envision Chinatown-Bukit Pasoh district to be and thus create a sense of identity for the residents, at the same time preserving the culture and promoting community bonding.

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7.2 APPROACH We curated a set of interview questions based around the Chinatown-Bukit Pasoh district to further understand the people’s point of view. Our questions try to find out the strengths, weaknesses and needs of the area and how the people are emotionally connected to the area. QUESTIONS: ●

How long have you lived here?

Do you enjoy living here, why?

What are some of the activities that happen in this area?

Do you attend the activities and events that is held here? Why?

Do you think there is any culture in this area?

What are your thoughts and feelings if this place cease to exist?

Do you think this place is going through lots of changes? How are you coping with it?

Is it losing its sense of identity?

What are some of the strength and weaknesses of this place?

What do you think is lacking in this place?

Do you wish to change anything or add onto this place?

How accessible is outram to the other places that you visit in Singapore

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7.3 INTERVIEW-1&2

Interviewee 1

Interviewee 2

Resident of Everton Park

Resident of Everton Park

A middle aged lady who is a resides in Everton Park has stayed in the same neighbourhood for 40 over years. “Everything has stayed the same since last time” she said. The only thing that changed for her is the increase of elderly in the residential area. Despite having many friends in her neighbourhood, she does not participate in activities or events in the area.

A resident of Everton Park for more than 40 years ; A 80 year old retiree. He described Everton neighbourhood as a quiet and peaceful area with lots of elderly. He also mentioned that he does not do much in his spare time and so do the rest of the elderlies in the neighbourhood. He kills time by sitting at the void deck or nearby coffee shop waiting for the day to go by. Majority of them who stayed here for a long time have already retired and their kids have moved out or are working thus they are alone most of the time. He also shared a story on how the government wanted to purchase the area for redevelopment and that he was afraid because he doesn’t want to move out due to expenses. He also feels a sense of discomfort as more foreigners from china are staying in the neighbourhood

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7.3 INTERVIEW-3&4

Interviewee 3

Interviewee 4

Resident of Everton Park

Resident of Everton Park

A middle aged lady resident who has been living in the area for 30 years.

A female resident of 8 years who finds living in outram â&#x20AC;&#x153;so-soâ&#x20AC;?.

She feels that the area has not changed much over the time she has been living there. In her opinion it has mostly been renovations to restore buildings more than anything. She has a sense of belonging to the area as she has been living there for a long period of time.

She does not explore the area much but feels that the sheltering in the area has to be improved. She enjoys the exercise areas that are around her vicinity as she frequents them often.

She feels that mostly elderly dominate the area and she refers to herself as part of that community as well. She does not participate in any community activities as she feels that she's too old for them.

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7.3 INTERVIEW-5&6

Interviewee 5

Interviewee 6

Resident of The Pinnacle@Duxton

Resident of The Pinnacle@Duxton A 50-60 year old man who has lived in Outram for a somewhat long period of time.

A male resident who has Pinnacle@Duxton since 2012.

been

residing

at

The

He enjoys living there due to its convenience and the eateries around the area. He likes the community of his home and the immediate surroundings a lot. However, he feels there's a lack of public swimming pools in his area. He does not participate in community activities as he prefers doing solo activities. In his opinion, the Chinatown area which is less than 1km away from his home is very bustling and happening.

His personal favourite part of Outram is the environment. He used to regularly participate in activities at the nearby Tanjong Pagar CC. He feels that Chinatown is one of the most bustling areas nearby. Within his community he feels that the elderly are becoming more scarce and that young couples are becoming more common within his area. In his opinion, shophouses arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t very significant due to modernisation. Even though he agrees that change is a must, he feels that it is happening too quickly. Culture in this area is slowly becoming unfamiliar and might eventually disappear. He hopes for more activities to be catered to the elderly within his community as in his opinion most activities at the moment cater mainly to the young. (e.g cafes/ bars)

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7.3 INTERVIEW-7&8

Interviewee 7

Interviewee 8

Resident of The Pinnacle@Duxton

Resident

A female resident who has been living in the Pinnacle for 8 years.

A female foreign resident who recently moved into a building near The Pinnacle@Duxton about two weeks ago.

Although she enjoys the environment that she lives in but feels that it lack culture. The nights are mostly quiet and peaceful around her area however a few lanes down it is more bustling due to the bars around there. She doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care for the shophouses and does not feel like Outram is lacking much. However she feels that sheltered walkways are scarce in Outram. Thus when she brings her elderly mother out for walks, it get difficult to get around especially when it rains.

She enjoys the cafes and restaurants nearby and feels that Outram is a very central area that is easy to get around and has links to everywhere. She feels that a culture is prevalent among the locals and she always see them doing exercises at park spaces. She would like to see more new information or material about Outram history or Singapore history if we were to built a cultural center.

Outram is a home to her however she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t participate in any activities at the CC due to the need to take care of her mother. She doesn't feel that there's a very prevalent culture there but she notices many aunties and uncles who practice tai chi in the park areas during the evening.

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7.3 INTERVIEW-9

Interviewee 9

Interviewee 10

Local worker

Student

He lives at Marine Parade and has been working here for 3 years.

She is 12 years old and goes to Cantonment Primary School. She visits Outram often as she studies there.

He feels that there is not much changes of spaces from the last 3 years in terms of accessibility. He often takes public transport. Peak hours only starts when he ends work. He is only interested in bars. Other than work, he only comes here mainly for food.

She is emotionally attached to the place as most of her memories are made there with her friends. Currently, she thinks that Outram is a cool place as it has a combination of the old and new things. Old things includes the conserved shophouses. One of her favourite places is the Cantonment playground area. To her, there are enough parks and playground. When asked about our project, she says that she would not mind visiting the culture center if it consists a cool spot for people of her age to hang out and activities that can involve all races and ages.

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7.3 I N T E R V I E W - 11

Interviewee 11

Interviewee 12

Local worker

Foreign worker

A worker at a hardware store owner under a residential block.

A foreign worker who works at a cafe for 2 years.

She is not emotionally attached to the place as she only goes there to work. Hence, she does not feel that she has a right to have a say about the place. However, she do not mind having advancements.

He think that the place is safe and quiet and easy to access. He also likes the ambience of the place.

To her, she views Outram as a very old state but she is not too sure about the culture sense as she does not live there. In terms of accessibility, one of the cons of walking around there is there are no proper shelter. Fortunately for her, she drives a car. Hence, it is easier for her to get around when it is raining.

To him, there is nothing much to change or lacking. However, feels that there is too much developing at the front that he is afraid Outram will lose its culture. Outram is a very special place to him as it locates his first job in Singapore and it is where he has met many people. When asked about the culture center,, he thinks that it should involve foreigners so that they are inclined to visit and know about the culture in Singapore.

-

112


08 Synthesis & Analysis 113


8.1 OBSERVATIONS

01social 1.

There are alot activities for the community and expats to participate in.

2.

There is a good balance between the old and new, new commercial buildings against the old.

3.

There are many open spaces with amenities for the people to enjoy.

4.

It is rich in culture and heritage.

5.

A wide range of commercial that cater to the needs of every individual in the area.

03 02 psychological behavioural 1.

There is a balance of old and new buildings. Thus, creating an ambience where people are able to partially experience what it feels like to be in the past.

2.

White collared workers often avoid crowds at peak hours hence they prefer to take out food.

3.

White collared workers mostly hang out in the area at night after work to dine and drink.

4.

People walking at Duxton Plain Park are more prone to visiting the site at there is visual connectivity.

1.

At night, the place turns into a bustling dining area where people can hang around the shophouses and have a good time with family and friends.

2.

Elderlies often feel bored and enjoy hanging out at void decks, parks and coffee shops. They are often alone.

3.

The public would only take part in activities if it fits their schedules.

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8.2 INSIGHTS

01social

03 02 psychological behavioural

1.

Some facilities are lacking for the community such as public swimming pool, benches and insufficient sports facilities.

2.

Food is a good way to gather crowds as majority of the people visit the shophouses for food.

1.

Community is passionate about bonding but there seems to be a lacking trigger factor that encourages bonding.

2.

3. 3.

Outsiders and residents barely interact as most residents find it uncomfortable. 4.

4.

There is a community centre but most residence do not participate in the activities as they are not interested enough.

5.

1.

There are many potential spaces that can be used for bonding activities but the public do not know how to act upon.

There is a strong segregation in social spaces like The Pinnacle and Everton Park where facilities differ completely. This creates a social barrier for bonding.

2.

People enjoy hanging in Duxton Plain Park for its greenery that provides shade and comfort.

Activities that happen there does not accommodate normal working hours which prevents participation.

3.

Many of the visitors visit the area for a sole purpose which is to dine.

The community, foreign workers and residences acknowledges the changes that is happening as change is inevitable but wish for it to be further improved. Residents and the public are fully unaware of the history and heritage of the area but they are willing to learn about it.

115


8.3 SWOT

S 1.

The place is filled with rich heritage, culture and history.

2.

The place is vibrant both day and night as there are activities for people to participate in.

3.

There is a good balance between the old and the new.

4.

The area is filled with people of different ethnicities, race, religion and age.

5.

It is easy to access the place as there are several buses and a train station along the main road.

1.

it rains or when it is too hot. 2.

There is not enough activities to cater to the range of people of different ages.

3.

Shophouses are very hot and humid in the day as they are fully exposed to the sun. Walkways are also very narrow.

4.

There are no activities catered to the elderly which makes them feel very left out.

5.

w

There are insufficient shelters which causes spaces to be under-utilized when

Community Centres do not cater enough activities for all ages to participate in. Many people are also unaware of the activities that are on going.

6.

Lots of spaces are under utilised throughout the day as there are no trigger factors for usage of space.

7.

Buildings are together but they do not promote any bonding or form of interaction.

1.

Collaborating with the community centre may ensure people are more aware about the activities.

O

1.

Design may disrupt the current living environment.

2.

Design can be a threat to the other facilities located there for example the community clubs as it may take away the attention instead of enhancing them.

t

2.

Introducing a sports facility may attract young children to visit the culture center.

3.

Having a space to incorporate the young and old may lead to knowledge of new things.

3.

Facilities should strengthens the community bond and involve expats instead of segregating them.

4.

Introduce a guided tour of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;old and the newâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; may promote Bukit Pasohâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich heritage and culture.

4.

Facility should respect the culture, heritage and history of Bukit Pasoh.

5.

Create activities for the elders such that they would not feel left out.

6.

Promote green spaces like Duxton Plain Park as it is connected to the site.

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8.4 KEY USERS & NEEDS

Elderly need more spaces to hang around with friends and activities they can do as a group or individually

Working adults Needs facilities that can accommodate to their working schedule

Children Need more recreational space for them to play around

Expats Needs activities that attract them to participate in

The community Needs a space for them to bond and interact with one another

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8.5 DESIGN VISIONS

To develop a deeper sense of culture,history and heritage within our area by educating the public. To preserve our areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rich culture and heritage without disrupting its current living environment. To educate and fill in the voids of Bukit Pasohâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long lost history.

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8.6 HOW MIGHT WE? 1.

How might we ensure the facilities involves everyone despite their different ethnicity backgrounds?

2.

How might we engage people of different ages to bond and interact without feeling uncomfortable?

3.

How might we ensure the facilities promotes community bonding?

4.

How might we preserve the identity of Bukit Pasoh and its history and heritage?

5.

How might we ensure the facilities attract expats enough to feel part of the community?

6.

How might we attract children to come and visit the facility?

7.

How might we ensure that the facility is the next big thing that enhances the heritage of Bukit Pasoh?

8.

How might we introduce new sports facilities into the area without disrupting the old?

9.

How might we engage the community through existing spaces and remove the segregation?

10.

How might we bring work and recreational together in the same area?

11.

How might we ensure that the facility enables people to visit more than once?

12.

How might we make the place more inviting such that people would be interested in the context of the place?

13.

How might we remove the sole purpose of visiting the area just for its food?

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8.7 DESIGN POINTERS

1.

Design should have a positive impact and enhance to the current living environment.

2.

Design should promote the rich culture and heritage around the site.

3.

Design has to be able to involve everyone of all races and religion.

4.

Design has to consider the wide variety of target audience such as tourist, children, young and the old.

5.

Design has to be able to engage the community to strengthen their bond as a community.

6.

Facilities should cater for more sport oriented more suitable for children.

7.

Considerations should be taken in order to minimize disharmony to the environment.

8.

Design should incorporate the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;old and newâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in order to make it blend into the site.

9.

Facilities should attract expats to be part of the community.

10.

Facility should be flexible to cater to the different events across the year and to ensure that people will always have different experience every time they visit.

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09 Conclusion

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9.1 MEMBERS & ROLES

THE TEAM

RYAN

MARCUS

ALLY

NICOLE

YONG SHENG

FARAH

HANA

Assistant Group Leader 2D graphics Photographer

Group Leader 2D graphics Model Maker

Photographer Video Editor Report Writer

Slides Visual Report Writer Model Maker

Site Note Taker Drafter 3D graphics

Slides Researcher Model Maker

Researcher Report Writer Note Taker

Members from left to right

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9.2 REFLECTION Kor Yong Sheng S10175660J

Farah Nurhazlinda Bte Husni S10172383B

Marcus Ng Zhen Tack S10172261G

Hana Kong Xuan Jie S10173120D

Well, it's been a challenging month going through phase 1. Quite a lot of time have been put into travel and surveying the site but one thing is for sure is that teamwork is important especially when everyone contributes into the project.

This experience has taught me about the culture and heritage that Bukit Pasoh has hold. It also helped me in understanding how Singapore was planned carefully since the start and how buildings are conserved.

It is really not easy working with the limited time that we have. It was important for us to work together as one to complete all the site visits, gathering of the information so that we don't have to go back to site so often as not all of us stay close to it.

This group project challenge me to stress coping and time management.

Other than that, i have learnt to reach out to different people for opinions as each and everyone has a different insight on things.

This project has exposed me to many things that iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never knew before, like the history of Chinatown and Singapore. Also, the lives of people in the past, compared now, and how Singapore has developed rapidly as a whole. Tanjong pagar was once the poorest area in Singapore where no one knew would blossom into a place of high living standard today.

Having knowledge about the history of our area gives a huge impact for our upcoming project.

I like that this project has helped open our minds to bigger scale projects and hopefully it will help us in the future.

This project also taught me new skills that would benefit me in the future.

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9.2 REFLECTION Yang Ning Nicole S10172298J

Ryan Tan S10175673J

Ally Tan S10166857C

I have always had an interest in site analysis especially after the Little India one i did in SCP. I find it very interesting as I get to learn many new things about SGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history that i never knew and how many other buildings/ roads came about. In my opinion i find the site visit eye opening.

From this site analysis, despite the short duration of this project, i learn the importance of preparation and plan before going down to site, experiencing the culture and daily lifestyle of the residence within our subdivision . To find out in-depth what other non-physical happenings surrounding our immediate site.

I have acquired much knowledge of Bukit Pasoh/Chinatown after this site analysis. It is indeed a hidden gem, full of culture,heritage and history, so much that no one was aware of. It was an eye opener to be able to interview people that resided there, to be able to put myself in their shoes to see things in a different manner.

Throughout this experience it has taught me to be more observant and appreciate the past. In which, these will help me better understand what to focus on, for my stage 2 project.

Through this site visit, i have learnt to be more aware of more surroundings and to appreciate whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s around me. It is important to be one of the people to design for the people.

This site visit also teaches me a lot on how to ensure that i am coming up with a design that is appropriate for my site and the people on site by taking note of every detail. Although site analysis may be tough and draining, to me it is the foundation of any good building design.

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9.3 REFERENCES Ura.gov.sg. (2018). Conservation Portal -. [online] Available at: https://www.ura.gov.sg/Conservation-Portal/Explore/History?bldgid=BLPLN [Accessed 29 May 2018] Ura.gov.sg. (2018). Conservation Portal -. [online] Available at: https://www.ura.gov.sg/Conservation-Portal/Explore/History?bldgid=BLPLN [Accessed 29 May 2018]. National Library Board, S. (2018). Jinrikisha Station | Infopedia. [online] Eresources.nlb.gov.sg. Available at: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_485_2005-01-03.html [Accessed 30 May 2018]. profile, V. (2018). WaLi AllaH. [online] Wali-allah.blogspot.sg. Available at: http://wali-allah.blogspot.sg/ [Accessed 30 May 2018]. National Library Board, S. (2018). Duxton Road | Infopedia. [online] Eresources.nlb.gov.sg. Available at: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_357_2005-01-22.html [Accessed 30 May 2018]. National Library Board, S. (2018). Neil Road | Infopedia. [online] Eresources.nlb.gov.sg. Available at: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_309_2004-12-16.html [Accessed 30 May 2018]. National Library Board, S. (2018). Craig Road | Infopedia. [online] Eresources.nlb.gov.sg. Available at: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_306_2004-12-15.html [Accessed 30 May 2018]. Beokeng.com. (2018). Poo Thor Jee 普陀寺 Pu Tuo Si. [online] Available at: http://www.beokeng.com/disptemple.php?temple=poo-thor-jee [Accessed 30 May 2018]. Beokeng.com. (2018). Cundhi Gong 準提宫 Zhun Ti Gong. [online] Available at: http://www.beokeng.com/disptemple.php?temple=cundhi-gong [Accessed 30 May 2018]. Urban Redevelopment Authority. (2018). Urban Redevelopment Authority. [online] Available at: https://www.ura.gov.sg/Corporate/Get-Involved/Conserve-Built-Heritage/Explore-Our-Built-Heritage/The-Shophouse [Accessed 30 May 2018]. Thelongnwindingroad.wordpress.com. (2018). Back Alley | The Long and Winding Road. [online] Available at: https://thelongnwindingroad.wordpress.com/tag/back-alley/ [Accessed 30 May 2018]. National Parks Board. (2018). Heritage Trees. [online] Available at: https://www.nparks.gov.sg/gardens-parks-and-nature/heritage-trees [Accessed 30 May 2018]. Sfcca.sg. (2018). 会馆的历史与发展. [online] Available at: http://www.sfcca.sg/en/node/446 [Accessed 30 May 2018].

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