Issuu on Google+

r


Encode_Engage Thesis Studio_Spring 2012


// This constant won’t change. It’s the pin number // of the sensor’s output: const int pingPin = 7; // the pin that the sensor is attached to int motorPin = 9; // the pin that the fan is attached to int speed = 0 ; int led = 11; // the pin that the LED is attached to int brightness = 0; // how bright the LED is int fadeAmount = 5; // how many points to fade the LED by void setup() { // initialize serial communication: Serial.begin(9600); pinMode(motorPin, OUTPUT); pinMode(led, OUTPUT); } void loop() { analogWrite(led, brightness);

}

// change the brightness for next time through the loop: brightness = brightness + fadeAmount; // reverse the direction of the fading at the ends of the fade: if (brightness == 0 || brightness == 120) { fadeAmount = -fadeAmount ; } // wait for 30 milliseconds to see the dimming effect delay(100); // establish variables for duration of the ping, // and the distance result in inches and centimeters: long duration, inches, cm; // The PING))) is triggered by a HIGH pulse of 2 or more microseconds. // Give a short LOW pulse beforehand to ensure a clean HIGH pulse: pinMode(pingPin, OUTPUT); digitalWrite(pingPin, LOW); delayMicroseconds(2); digitalWrite(pingPin, HIGH); delayMicroseconds(5); digitalWrite(pingPin, LOW); // The same pin is used to read the signal from the PING))): a HIGH // pulse whose duration is the time (in microseconds) from the sending // of the ping to the reception of its echo off of an object. pinMode(pingPin, INPUT); duration = pulseIn(pingPin, HIGH); // convert the time into a distance inches = microsecondsToInches(duration); cm = microsecondsToCentimeters(duration); Serial.print(inches); Serial.print(“in, “); Serial.print(cm); Serial.print(“cm”); Serial.println(); delay(100); { if (inches <=36) { analogWrite(motorPin, 255); } else { analogWrite(motorPin,0); } }

long microsecondsToInches(long microseconds) { // According to Parallax’s datasheet for the PING))), there are // 73.746 microseconds per inch (i.e. sound travels at 1130 feet per // second). This gives the distance travelled by the ping, outbound // and return, so we divide by 2 to get the distance of the obstacle. // See: http://www.parallax.com/dl/docs/prod/acc/28015-PING-v1.3.pdf return microseconds / 74 / 2; } long microsecondsToCentimeters(long microseconds) { // The speed of sound is 340 m/s or 29 microseconds per centimeter. // The ping travels out and back, so to find the distance of the // object we take half of the distance travelled.

Our current digital age has considerably affected the ways in which we operate as humans. Information technologies have increased the speed of our cities through the ways we access, share, and communicate data. The use of mobile technology, specifically the smart phone, has been a key component in this progression into this digital age. These technologies have become situated within our daily lives, causing a shift in the way we engage with both our space and one another. Through the study and experimentation of sensorial technologies, this thesis looks to bridge the gap between the virtual and the physical. Our cities are embedded with sensing technologies, collecting environmental, social, and infrastructural data used as a way to monitor our cities, ensuring safety and efficiency. While these technologies are already situated within out urban fabric, we as the users of the city do not have a direct relationship with them. We become the observed rather than becoming a participant in our city. Rather then having our embedded technologies simply collect data, they can be used to create an environment that both recognizes and responds to us as the users. Through a dialogue initiated by an input/output system we can create a new relationship between people, technology, and architecture. Through the medium of installation, a new artificial atmosphere is created encouraging curiosity, active participation, and exploration within the fabricated environment.


Mother Component

Connection Wires

Daughter Component

5V DC Brushless Fan Actuator

Connection Wire

Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

Arduino Microcontroller

Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

0.25 in. Plexi Glass Structure Rings

0.25 in. Plexi Glass Structure Ribs

Lightweight Inflatable Fabric Skin

0.25 in. Plexi Glass Structure Rings

0.25 in. Plexi Glass Structure Ribs

Lightweight Inflatable Fabric Skin

Passive Infrared (PIR) Motion Detection Sensor

Connection Wires

Electret Microphone Sensor


A study in Processing to test the variable pulses that ca occur when paied with a microphone.

Translating Communication Using the electret microphone, the microcontroller can process the frequency of talking into a light pulse. Through this response, the installation creates a dialogue through the remapping of communication that occurs in physical space

PIR Sensor

Detection Range

Intimate Space

From Touching - 18”

Personal Space From 18” - 4’

Social Space From 4’ - 8’

Public Space Greater than 8’

Personal Space of the Object Using ranges based on the levels of human personal space, the object takes on a personal space of its own. Using the dimensions given, it can detect presence as one enters its personal space

1:4 Three States Diagram A mapping of the various states that occur with engaging the object.


In Relation_Installation Special Topics Studio_Fall 2012


This installation is a student-designed project for the fall 20120 Special Topics Studio. The work is the product of a collaboration between our studio class (Samantha Altieri, Viviana Bernal, Erblin Bucaliu, Katherine Bujalski, Brittany Carey, Kristen Giannone, Ryan Kahen, Mark Morin, Bao Nguyen, Samantha Partington, Charles Simmons, Liem Than, Robert Trumbour [instructor], Alex Cabral. The installation is in response to an intensive 10-day travel component to New York and Big Bend National Park and Marfa, Texas. Through prototyping and fabricating systems at one to one scale, we were able to encounter and problem solve issues not seen in previous studio courses. Working though the design schemes, we had the opportunity to focus specifically on certain aspects of design. I dealt with components of lighting to be integrated within the systems, focusing on new fabrication techniques with the CNC machine and cast moldings. I also used generative design programs to design algorithmic solutions for the system at both the scale of an individual component and the populated field.


STEEL CONDUIT PIPE : 0’

6” TRIANGULATED GRID : 0’

A

STEEL BANDING : 5’

TOP BRACKET : 10’

N

A SITE PLAN 2

8

4

TOP TRIANGULATED GRID : 13’


13’

1/2” x 3’ PVC Vertical Member

Metallic Two-Hole Strap

(Fastened with 5/16” Galvanized Steel Carriage Bolt)

10’

1/2” x 10’ PVC Vertical Member

Cast molded resin light housing 20 watt halogen bulb

5’

3/4” .020 Type 304 Stainless Steel Strapping

6”

7/8” x 20” Steel Thinwall Conduit Pipe

0’ -12”


Epershand Chair Digital Studies Elective_Fall 2012

Experimenting with digital modeling and fabricating techniques, this chair was designed to express the continuous motion of the loop. The chair was modeled in Rhino3D and milled in the CNC machine. Each profile was glue laminated together and supported with metal rods.


Invasive Order Ideogramming Elective_Spring 2012


Based on the book, Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments, by David Gissen, the study of natural elements is a common theme in architecture. These studies typically are of plants, trees, sunlight, etc. Subnature looks at the overlooked natural elements that tend to be on the darker side of the natural world. The elements we tend to ignore, or want to ignore such as, dankness, gas, or weeds. The subnature used in this project was weeds. Weeds are considered ‘plants out of place’. They considered to be weeds when they disrupt an inherent order. Weeds have a biological desire to invade and spread. They have no regard for their surrounding environment, as long as there is room to continue growth, they will colonize that space. This idea of weeds as an invader of space and a disrupter of order is the thought process used in utilizing this subnature in the design of a process applicable to the site.


Haus am Kleistpark_Addition

This project was an addition to an existing music school and art gallery in Berlin, Germany. This project used expressions in form to relate back to the existing school, yet also create a future for culture in the area. By maintaining proportions of the existing building, then applying gestural slices to the cubic volume, the new addition responded both to interior and exterior conditions. The new addition is wrapped with a mesh skin that becomes a bold sculptural element that is a beacon for music and the arts within the city.

Study Abroad Studio_Berlin_Fall 2011

A

C

B

5

D

2

E

6

F

6

6

25

5

.47

.2

.2

17

.47

A

1

3

1

3

C

1

.8

.8

.47

1

3

.5

2.8

2.8

.5

3

.5

.5

3.5

3

5

5

.8

KITCHEN STORAGE

CAFE

10 sqm

1

120 sqm

B

B

.5

.8

.65

2

.2

2

.2

GALLERY

28 Steps 18/28

4

.47

1.5

4

.5

2.4

.2

13

.5

2

.8

.2

2.7

.8

.8

.5

3

18

.8

1.2

200 people

C 3

A


Lattice Movement Geomatter Elective_Spring 2011


In collaboration with two other students, this full scale installation was a study in geometries based on ice ray lattices. Each panel was lasercut using museum board. The panels were connected using zip-ties.


WAr_Exhibition Wentworth Architecture Review_Volume 3


For the release party of WAr V3, the team designed and fabricated the exhibition held at the Boston Society of Architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s space in November 2012. Following the theme of V3, Build, each display component of the exhibition was built by the team. I worked on all aspects of this event including design, leading the fabrication team in the shop, and the installation for the exhibition In total 6 model stands, 3 large easels, and 6 small easels were fabricated.


RYAN A. KAHEN Architectural Designer

ryan.kahen@gmail.com kahendesign.wordpress.com 203 927 7739


Kahen Portfolio