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KIDS, PARENTS, TEACHERS!

Bear’s Summer Camp Guide Pages 26–43

ESSENTIAL NEWS May 2013 • Tucson Edition • www.bearessentialnews.com

®

In this Picture: Find the US flag, a May flower, a heart, the word MOM, the word CAMPS!, a safari hat, a banana, a tiger paw print, the word ZOO and a pair of binoculars.

FEATURE

NEWS

A nimals In Arizona! Helping S ea Lions A native and exotic safari Pages 22 thru 23

Spotlight on cicada invasion News Highlights page 5

NEWS

CONTESTS

N EW! Bully Breakers W in Tickets & M ore! Substance Abuse & Bullying page 9

Great Contests Abound. pages 4, 7, 9 & 25

S— FAMILIE for ide Look ins pons, u o c great ts. e n u ven tips & f


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May 2013

Calling All

He’s wise, he’s cool and he’s ready to respond — write to Boomer Bear at

Teachers!

Bear Essential News for Kids 1037 S. Alvernon Way, #150 Tucson, AZ 85711 or e-mail your letters to boomer@bearessentialnews.com

Sponsored by: Dear Boomer, Why do you like to swim so much? I like being a reporter—it’s really fun. Sincerely, K.B.

BOOK IT! Reading Program Muscles Up with Diary of a Wimpy Kid. ®

BOOK IT!® and Author Jeff Kinney Encourage Kids to “Read Your Heart OutTM” Registration Now Open for 2013–14 BOOK IT Program.

Hey, K.B.! You might say that polar bears like me are made to swim. This issue of Bear Essential News is all about animals, so I may as well talk about polar bears. With two layers of fur and a thick layer of fat, polar bears can swim for hours in frigid waters. We also can stay underwater for up to two minutes. It’s been a long time since a Young Reporter has done a story on polar bears, so this would be a good assignment for you to cover this summer! You also could do a story on pool safety and drowning prevention. Have a great summer, Boomer Bear Dear Boomer, I’m having trouble at my school because someone is making fun of me in really hurtfull ways. I’ve tried to tell an adult, but I don’t want them to freak out about it. He calls me very mean and inappropriate names, and it makes me lose confidence. I fail my tests, and I can’t seem to focus. I don’t want to tell an adult because I don’t want to tell them what’s going on. What should I do? Your confused and shy friend, B.G.

Dear B.G., Am I ever glad that you had the courage to write me about these very tough and serious times of yours. First off, you are not alone— unfortunately, lots of great kids like you end up being bullied or cyberbullied. The good news is that Bear Essential News is teaming up with the Attorney General’s Office to bring you “Bully Breakers,” a bullying prevention column (see page 9). Each month, kids, teens and parents can learn what it takes to break this bullying cycle and find helpful resources, too! Bully Breakers is also online at BearEssentialNews.com. All my best, Boomer Bear

Hey Boomer, I had a friend, and then she started to treat me meanly. I don’t like how she looks at me, and I want it to stop. Thank you, B.T. Dear B.T., I’m sorry that your friend seems to have turned on you. Last month’s Bully Breakers talks about who is a bully and what kids need to do if they are being bullied. There are also great online resources given that might help. Ignoring the problem generally is NOT a good solution. Go to BearEssentialNews.com and go to April’s Front Cover Seek-nFind under Bear Fun Activities. Then click on Bully Breakers on the right. Hope this helps, Boomer Bear

I love your blog, Boomer! from H.B. Thank you very much, H.B.! I’d love for you, your friends and any other young person to write me on “Boomer’s Blog.” There are several topics you can write on or you can share what’s on your mind in “Other Thoughts of Mine.” Go to BearEssentialNews.com/blog.php and pick a topic! Some of my answers appear here in “Letters to Boomer.” Get writing, Boomer Bear

Dear Boomer, It’s sad that Neil Armstrong died (in August). I wonder how it feels to step on the moon. Don’t you wonder sometimes? From someone new, G.T. Hi, G.T.! In July of 1969, Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon. What a thrill that must be—hopping around on a celestial body that’s about 239,000 miles from Earth! I wonder if NASA has a helmet that will fit my big head?

Read LETTERS TO BOOMER to younger readers to enhance their Common Core experience. Bear readers also can practice their letter writing!

Your buddy, Boomer Bear

Take the 5 Cheese Challenge! Make your way through the maze and collect all 5 cheeses for your pizza.

START DONE!

PIZZA HUT


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

Bear essential news for kids!

In this issue! Contests Galore in Bear’s May Edition Page 2…Letters to Boomer. Why do you like to swim so much? Page 5…News Highlights. Record numbers of California sea lion pups stranded. 14-year-old plays Masters. Spotlight on the invasion of the 17-year cicada!

Pages 7, 12, 15, 18 & 43…Get the Scoop! Rescuing greyhounds, interview with Sweetwater Rain and more news by Young Reporters

Page 9…Bully Breakers by the Arizona Attorney General. Substance abuse, bullying & peer pressure

Martial Arts for Children Character, Fitness and Self-defense.

Page 11…Have a New Kid by Friday. Dr. Kevin Leman talks about college kids coming home for the summer.

Pages 17…Water Wise with CAP. Cutting your family’s outdoor water use. Pages 22–23…Animals in Arizona. Learn about the amazing creatures in our state. Page 25…Animals in Arizona Family Ticket Contest. Enter to win 4 tickets! Pages 27– 43…Bear’s Summer Camp Guide. Find the right camp for your child in Bear’s Summer Camp listings.

Come to Bear’s Monthly Young Reporter Night!

Teen and adult classes available!

Thursday, May 16 • 4– 6 pm Win a FREE Reporter Digital Recorder & More!

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May 2013

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Bugged Back East!

San Diego’s SeaWorld Saves Sea Lions Sea lion pups have been washing up on California beaches in alarming numbers this year. About 1,110–1,300 sea lions pups have washed up on shores from San Diego to Santa Barbara—almost five times the usual number. The pups are starving and dehydrated and need help from rescue groups to survive. The newly independent pups are trying to find food on their own. It is normal for some of them to have trouble and get washed ashore at this time of year, according to David Koontz, communication director at SeaWorld San Diego. What is not normal is the high number of stranded pups. “In a normal year we would rescue about 120–150 marine animals,” he says. This year SeaWorld has rescued over 350 marine animals, and more than 300 have been sea lions, Koontz says. The pups are “very malnourished and very dehydrated,” Koontz says. “They are younger than a year old, so they are cute little pups. “These are pups that are recently weaned from mom, so they’re not experienced at all,” explains Koontz. “So they don’t have years of doing this to know necessarily where to go. And they’re not very

Record numbers of sea lion pups have been found and rescued stranded on Southern California’s coast.

Here in the desert, the loud buzz of cicadas is a sign that summer is here. But back East, the cicadas are different. They stay underground as nymphs for much longer and EMERGE in huge, messy, noisy waves ranging from Massachusetts all the way down to Georgia. As nymphs, these cicadas suck on plant roots and stay underground for 17 years, compared to our Apache cicadas that stay underground for two to five years. And now a massive insect invasion of the 17-year cicada has begun! Biologists say this wave is known as

big animals, so they don’t have the same level of strength and endurance that an adult would that 17-Year Cicada Facts could potentially go to where the fish are.” The pups normally eat smaller fish like anchoScientific name: Magicicada septendecim vies and sardines, says Koontz. The high number of stranded sea lion pups led the National Marine Billions emerge from ground Fisheries Service to declare an unusual mortality every 17 years. event in March. The service put together a task force Collective buzz is as loud as a to investigate the situation and find out why the fish rock concert or subway train. are not available. One of the longest-lived Animals that respond to rehabilitation can usually insects be returned to the ocean after several weeks, Koontz Next hatch: 2030 says. SeaWorld will release a group of rehabilitated pups in a spot “where it looks like there are already Brood II and is expected to have billions of other animals in the area, which means that there’s these bugs. The 17-year cicada nymphs live food in the area and they’re feeding. We try to set 1 to 8 feet underground. As temperatures them up with the best possible chances of success.” warm on that 17th year, they crawl out and clamp themselves onto bark, walls or other suitable surfaces to molt, shedding their nymphal skin to emerge as adult cicadas. and head into weekend play. He was the only amateur AUGUSTA, Ga.—The Masters, with traditions going The process is called a hatch. who made the Masters’ cut this year. back to 1934, is the world’s most famous and prestiThe scientific name is Magicicada You’d expect a kid to be trembling too much with gious golf tournament. Masters champions like Tiger septendecim, a much more striking cicada either fear or excitement to be able to compete with the Woods and Phil Mickelson have won the famed Green than ours here in the desert. It has a black, best of the best. But watching Tianlang Jacket multiple times, beating the darker body with two bright red, bulging eyes smack his tee shots onto the fairway or greatest golfers on the planet. and three red tiny eyes between them. The smoothly sink a 20-foot putt, you soon Unlike the other three major golf wings have dark coppery colored veins. realize that he deserves to be there. tournaments of the PGA, which It’s the male cicadas that make the noise, To keep his head on straight, his parchange golf courses from year to trying to attract females to mate with. While ents make him do an hour of homework year, the Masters is always played a mesquite tree might have a dozen Apache each day after play. Think about it, the at Augusta National Golf Club. Last cicadas, trees back East will have thousands kid isn’t even old enough to drive a car month, eighth-grader Tianlang Guan of 17-year cicadas making a terrible buzz. yet, and he’s studying to try to get into a from China became the youngest Males have vibrating noisemakers called good high school in China! ever to play in the tourney, matching tymbals on the sides of their abdomens. During weekend play, Tianlang was swing for swing some of the best in Tianlang hopes to qualify Super loud, their collective buzz can reach never a threat to those at the top of the the game! for the U.S. Open. 60 to 100 decibels—as loud as a rock leaderboard. Still, he kept his composure The LANKY 14-year-old qualified concert or a New York subway train! Some for the Masters by winning the Asia-Pacific Amateur last and played at a pro level. Playing 72 holes, he never say it sounds like an alien spaceship landing. double bogeyed (went two over par). Crowds cheered season. (At least the kid has chosen to stay an amaThese adult cicadas will only live four to him on at every hole. Thirty-two golfers failed to make teur, at least for now.) Players at the Masters play two six weeks longer. After mating, the females the cut, and he finished ahead of three pros in the end. qualifying rounds to determine if they make the cut to deposit rice-like eggs into live twigs. The For his amateur efforts, Tianlang won a silver bowl. continue playing over the weekend for the opportunity nymphs fall to the ground and instinctively to compete for the Green Jacket. Tianlang played the “I played pretty good,” he said in a press conferburrow to find roots to suck on. There they’ll course, known for its tricky putting greens, consistently ence after the Masters. “There are still a lot of things to stay until the year 2030. well to be the youngest ever to make the Masters cut improve.” AP/Wide World Photos

14-year-old Youngest Ever to Play Masters


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May 2013

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May 2013

Glorious Greyhounds! by Reporter Riley Meurer, Rattlesnake Ridge Elementary What animal runs 45 mph and 80 percent of the time with all of its feet off the ground? A greyhound! Greyhounds are one of the oldest breeds of dogs. They were in Ancient Egypt. In of ll the Middle Ages, Ha y nd Ci Riley meets option. only royalty could Ad nd ou yh re G S. Arizona own them. Greyhounds were used as hunting dogs for their speed. They could run a short distance very quickly and catch prey. The lungs of the greyhound can take in lots of air, enabling them to run very fast. Greyhounds are intelligent, calm, easily trained dogs that are good with children and can be used as service dogs for people with handicaps. Sometimes, they are seen wearing muzzles and can look rather menacing. In fact, these muzzles protect their delicate noses.

Greyhounds are often made to race on a track to make money for their owners. These greyhounds can be treated very poorly. The food they are given is bad for their bodies and teeth. In fact, many greyhounds have problems with their teeth because of their food. When greyhounds stop winning races, or if they get injured, sick or too old, they need to find homes because their owners don’t need or want them anymore. The Southern Arizona Greyhound Adoption rescues these dogs and finds them loving homes. I spoke with Cindy Hall, operations director for this organization. She’s in charge of animal care. She gets the greyhounds from the track, brings them to the veterinarian for check-ups and places them with foster families who take good care of them until someone adopts them. She usually takes care of about 25 greyhounds at a time. Everyone who works for this rescue is a volunteer who loves greyhounds. The Southern Arizona Greyhound Adoption loves to have new volunteers to help with the greyhounds or with fund-raisers. If you would like to volunteer, check out its website, www.sagreyhoundadoption.org.

Bear essential news for kids!

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‘Rise of the Turtles’ DVD by Reporter Odalys Catalan Arizona Virtual Academy We all love turtles, especially the little baby ones. But I’m talking about a different kind of turtle—the teenage, mutated, ninja kind. We all know what I’m talking about! The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! I had the opportunity to get my hands on the new TMNT DVD! It came with five episodes including “Rise of the Turtles,” the first episode. Each episode has its own unique, humorous—and dramatic—twists! They even eat pizza for the very first time! “Rise of the Turtles” is about 60 minutes long, making it a double-length episode.

Kids Take Taste Test for Nat’l Licorice Day by Reporter Maricela Peralta, Brichta Elementary Two out of the eight people who taste tested Red April 12 was National Licorice Day! To celebrate, I Vines Original Red Twists said that it was their favorite conducted a licorice taste test between three different kind. They said that it tasted like candy, strawberries, types of licorice, Natural Vines Black Licorice, Red cherries, and red velvet cake. A lot of people said that Vines Original Red Twists, and Grape Vines, which is Red Vines Original Twists and Grape Vines Grape from the Red Vines company but grape flavored. The Twists were too dry. A lot of people said that they liked testers included seven kids and one teacher at Brichta this flavor but preferred Grape Vines more. Elementary. I also put out comment sheets for them. Grape Vines was the most popular flavor of the Only one out of all eight testers enjoyed the flavor licorice tested, with five out of eight people saying that of Natural Vines Black Licorice. One tester said that it was their favorite. People said that this licorice was the Natural Vines Black Licorice tasted sort of like root beer. Another tester said that it smelled like their mom’s awesome, and it tasted like grapes, grape popsicles, cinnamon French vanilla coffee. They also said that it root beer, and other kinds of fruit. Like Red Vines, some tasted like grape juice and blackberries mixed together, people said that it was too dry. One person commented and another person said it tasted and smelled like that at first it tasted great, but then it started having a rotten raisins. Most didn’t like the Natural Vines. Some bad aftertaste. people would not even want to try this licorice because Of all of the licorice flavors I tested, people liked of the smell. Grape Vines the most. I think people liked Grape Vines so much because it was new and a completely different flavor from red or black, the original licorice flavors. The Be a young reporter! least popular flavor was Natural Vines Black Licorice. Join us at Young Reporter Night Thursday, May 16, from Only one out of the eight people who took the test liked 4 to 6 p.m. at Peter Piper Pizza across from Park Place Mall. Call 792-9930 to find out more. this flavor. A lot of people liked Red Vines, but they liked Grape Vines better. Happy Licorice Day everyone! MORE SCOOPS! page 12 ➧

It’s a very interesting episode, and gave me information on how the turtles came to be, including Master Splinter! It explains the mutagen that turned them into mutant turtles, and a mutant rat. During the episode they are finally able to go to the surface. While they journey up on the surface, Donatello falls in love with a girl—the only girl he has met—April. Unfortunately, April and her father are kidnapped by Kraang-droids! It’s up to Leonardo, Donatello, Rafael and Michelangelo to save them! Obviously, this new series is awesome! It is comedic, adventurous, mysterious and full of action! Don’t forget the total bromance! I watched the DVD many, many times! It’s something the whole family can watch on the weekend, non-stop.

Go to Bear’s Website for a Chance to Win July’s Big Release: “TMNT: Enter Shredder” BearEssentialNews.com/contests.php


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Substance Abuse, Bullying, Peer Pressure “Come on, just try it!” “What’s the worst that can happen?” “It’s no big deal.” Early on we’re taught never to take candy from a stranger, but it should also be taught never to take pills or other unknown substances from friends or friends of friends. Bullying and substance abuse are both huge problems in our schools. These issues are often discussed individually and as not being related to each other. However, when we take a closer look at bullies and the people they bully, we often find a common thread of substance abuse among them. Unfortunately, drugs, alcohol or tobacco are sometimes a way kids or teens try to cope with other things going on in their lives. Some students who’ve been bullied say that they turned to illegal substances to cope with depression, a common result of being bullied. If you’re tempted to try cigarettes, alcohol or drugs, talk to your parent(s), teacher or some other trusted adult FIRST! Avoid situations where these substances may be present and choose friends who do NOT use. It’s OK to say “No!”—these things could kill you, make you sick, decrease your ability to breathe or think, and decrease your physical and mental capacities. Research shows for kids who’ve been bullied, 27.1

percent use alcohol, 13.1 percent use marijuana, and 9.5 percent abuse prescription medicines. Additionally, for kids who reported being cyber-bullied, 35.6 percent say they use alcohol, 17.7 percent use marijuana, and 12.3 percent abuse prescription medicine. If someone you know changes suddenly in their personality, performance in school or who they hang out with, tell someone who can get help or ask your friend what’s going on. Communication can save lives. Research supports the idea that bullies are more likely to be substance users when they get to high school because engaging in one type of bad behavior can sometimes lead to others. Drugs can cause a sense of empowerment and aggressive behavior. Peer pressure also plays a big role when it comes to students using illegal substances. If a bully is smoking, drinking or using drugs, it’s not much of a stretch to think that he or she would pressure or bully others to do the same. So how can I get out of these situations? When being bullied or pressured into using some type of illegal substance, it can be really hard to say no. To avoid being caught off guard when asked if you want to try something, practice what you want to say or do ahead of time. Never feel bad about saying no to someone who asks you to do something you know is wrong and/or dangerous. Tell a parent or teacher when this happens, or even contact law enforcement. Avoid being around people who use drugs, alcohol or tobacco. If offered something, say something like “I can’t, my mom is on her way to pick me up” or “I’m allergic to practically everything and don’t want to risk going to the hospital.” Sometimes smart decisions are tough ones. You always can just say “No” and walk away.

May 2013

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Let’s Do It... ACTIVITIES! Substance Abuse & Bullying Word Search: Can you find all the words and phrases? They appear up, down, forward, backward and diagonally.

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May 2013

Teacher of the

MONTH!

Parents, faculty & students—nominate a teacher today!

Nominate Your Teacher Teacher name: _______________________ School: _______________________________ Your name: ___________________________ Grade: ______ Phone: _________________ email: _________________________________ Why is your teacher great? ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________

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Teacher Enriches Her Life, and Others, with Positive Energy Pamela Johnson teaches special education at Utterback Middle School. In 35 years of teaching, she has taught first through eighth grade. Parent Bambi Monroe considers her to be more than a teacher. Monroe says that for her son Michael, Johnson is “the mom away from home.” “She’s constantly going out of her way for her students, in and out of the classroom,” writes Monroe. “My son has so much respect for her...she’s great!” Johnson says she was raised by her grandparents in a conservative home. There were not many careers options open to her. “Girls were either nurses or teachers, and I couldn’t stand the sight of blood,” explains Johnson. “If I’d had my druthers, I would have been a marine biologist.” Johnson moved to Tucson when she was in middle school. She went to high school in TUSD and graduated from the UofA. “Even though I fell into teaching by default, it’s the best thing

that happened to me,” says Johnson. “I love teaching. I love the kids. When you are working on a concept, when you see the bulb turn on, it’s the most rewarding thing.” Johnson enjoys reading in her free time. She loves mysteries and historical books, and has been reading more about politics. Johnson says she is inspired as a teacher by “The Energy Bus” by Jon Gordon. She volunteers once a week at Casa de los Niños and stays involved in church activities.

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Have a New Kid by

Friday! by Dr. Kevin Leman

A column to help parents with their kid’s attitude, behavior and character

Your College Student Is Coming Home Your college kid is coming home for the summer. This can be a great time for your family—another chance to be together before your kid is truly launched into this world. But for your sanity, it’s important to lay some ground rules and stick to them. When your college kid comes back home, in their mind you are just a small appendage of their very busy world. You have moved from not knowing much to not knowing anything. They are as adult as can be. They have done laundry. They’ve eaten out. They’ve learned to cook a bit, and they are as footloose and fancy-free as can be. The learning curve is interesting. They’ve been out on their own and feel like they know everything about life. Over the next three years, however, this learning curve is going to form a circle. Once they get out of college, they’ll discover that good ol’ mom and dad are pretty smart people and they are lucky to have them. But with their coming home, that son or daughter is going to test some things that were always a part of your life at home—how they acted, what time they came home, their personal habits. Let’s take something like smoking. At college, he or she decided it was cool to smoke, and all of the sudden your 19-year-old lights up right in front of you. How do you handle that? I think you say, “Oh, you smoke now—I thought you were beyond that kind of stuff. Listen, you need to understand you are not going to smoke in this home.” Other kids might come home feeling like they are adults and they don’t have to report to anybody. They can stay out as long as they want. That’s when you say, “Can we go out for lunch? I want to talk to you about something important.” This is where you sit the kid down and say, “You know, it’s been an interesting year. You are the first one to go away to college (or maybe the last), and there have certainly been changes. We are seeing changes in your life that your dad and I feel we need to talk to you about. “Number one, it seems to me like you brought home a little attitude from school. And the attitude comes across that you don’t care much about what happens in this house. But this is our home. It hasn’t changed, and we still have expectations. Your dad is 52 and I see him lugging the garbage out. If you forgot, it goes out on Friday mornings. I expect you during the summer to take the garbage out.” If your kid isn’t inclined to come home at a decent hour, here’s the conversation: “As parents we have a right to know where you’re going and what time you’re coming home. I don’t want you coming back in the middle of the night because, frankly, I’m not going to get any sleep until you return. We need to come to an agreement here or you need to find another place this summer.” This can be a great summer, and it’s a good time for the family to reconnect. Laying ground rules early can make all of the difference. Next month: Bringing home the new baby! Dr. Kevin Leman is a Tucson psychologist and author of more than 30 best-selling books. His latest is “The Way of the Wise: Simple Truths for Living Well.” Read his parenting blogs at www.birthorderguy.com.

May 2013

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A Child Language Center Program

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May 2013

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Continued from page 7

Grant Helps Student’s Dream Come True

by Reporter Mikaila Hishaw, Manzanita Elementary “I believe the sky is the limit,” states Adrienne Pallante, a 41-year-old mother of two and a recent graduate of the medical assisting program at Pima Community College with the help of the federally funded Health Profession Opportunity Grant (HPOG). This program provides training and education to lowincome individuals for healthcare occupations that provide good pay and are in high demand. Twenty years ago, Pallante wanted to go to school to become a medical assistant but could not continue because her child became sick. Throughout the years she has worked many jobs that did not pay well, did not allow her to advance or was laid off. In 2010, she received a flyer about the HPOG and knew this could help her accomplish her goal. She completed the College Readiness program at Pima Community College to improve her math and reading skills and she received her GED. This helped her successfully test into the HPOG program! All classes are held at the PCC Desert Vista Campus and last between 1318 months. Pallante recommends keeping up reading skills for this program. She suggests reading all you can from books to magazines and newspapers. She will get hands-on experience as an intern at Dr. Gann’s Diet of Hope where she will complete 160 hours of work. Pallante believes you are never too old to learn and wants to continue schooling to become a health care administrator. Thanks to the Health Profession Opportunity Grant, her dreams can become a reality. MORE SCOOPS! page 15➧ Tackle Football Cheer & Dance Flag Football

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May 2013

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May 2013

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driving through the town of Sweetwater, Texas, when it hit him. “I called up Fred and said look this name up! Does anyone have it?” As luck would have it, the name was available. “We had to come up with a name quickly…We had our first music video ready to go, and we still didn’t have a name,” Stallcup added. The band has been on the road for several by Reporter Bailey Todd, Liberty Elementary months. When asked what has changed in their Country music came thundering into Arizona April 4 as Country lives over the past year, they all agreed they Thunder opened in Florence, Arizona. This was the first year in the don’t get to see their families as often as they used to. They also no longer eat festival’s history that it sold out. That means 25,000 people came to see four days of performances. The festival is famous for bringing in top country singers as much fast food, which the band agreed was a good thing. as well as up and coming artists. Without a doubt, the most promising new band “We met after many years of failing and doing things the wrong way. That’s the way we learned,” Rivera said. “If I had been discouraged every time things to hit the industry is Sweetwater Rain. Sweetwater Rain is made up by Danny Rivera on lead vocals, lead guitarist Fred Stallcup and bass player Thomas Hewlett. didn’t turn out the way I wanted them to, I probably would not be here, so I’m The band came up with its name because of its love for rain. “We wanted to glad I kept going.” have rain in our name” said Rivera. “We tried every combination we could think The band reflected what it was like to hear their song on the radio for the first time. “We were at a gas station...I started high fiving people in the gas station,” of! We even thought about calling ourselves the ‘Rain-Bros,’” he chuckled. The Rivera said. “We were hugging each other on the bus,” Stallcup added. band is full of jokes. When asked where they came up with their name, Rivera asked, “Is there a town called Sweetwater in Arizona?” I told him no, but there is Their hard work is paying off. Sweetwater Rain is heading out on the road this year. The band has two songs out currently, "Starshine" and “Pray For Me.” a road in Phoenix…so Rivera quickly changed his story and said, “While I was driving down Sweetwater Road in Phoenix…” Actually, it wasn’t until Rivera was MORE SCOOPS! page 18➧ Continued from page 12

Sweetwater Rain Adds Lightning to Country Thunder

e t a r b e l Ce rning! Lea

In our 8th year we are EXPANDING OUR HORIZONS

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May 2013

STAR Student Nominate A Student!!! Nominate Your Teacher Student Name: _______________________ School: _______________________________ Grade: ______ Phone: _________________ Your name: ___________________________ email: _________________________________ Why is this student great? ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________ ________________________________________

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Sponsored by “so that you can go to college and do better things and have more opportunities when you are grown.” Besides being academically gifted and athletic, Madelynn is artful. She takes piano lessons and says art is her favorite school subject. In her free time, she loves doing arts and crafts. She is a devoted fan of American Girl—the dolls and the books. Her favorite character is Kit. Teacher Cally Cook calls Madelynn an “ideal student” and “a really sweet girl.” Cook 6 says, “(Madelynn) loves working with people.” Madelynn is a good role model for her younger sister and brother, and for all of her classmates and teammates. She’s a Star!

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May 2013

Central Arizona Project (CAP) is a modern aqueduct system that stretches 336 miles across the state. CAP delivers water from the mighty Colorado River to where it’s needed in Arizona. KIDS & FAMILIES —Welcome to Bear’s water conservation page. Water means life to all of us desert dwellers. In fact, water is Arizona’s most precious natural resource, and using it wisely is everybody’s responsibility!

Saving Water in the Summer With the sweltering days of summer coming up fast, did you know that your family’s water use can easily triple during summer? Most of the increase is due to outdoor water use, which can cost your family plenty. Grass areas require a lot more water this time of year. Other plants, especially ones not adapted for the desert, are really thirsty, too. And if you have a swimming pool, evaporation rates go up as temperatures rise. But there is hope! Here are some ideas that'll help save water outdoors and cut your family’s water bill this summer.

Get Ready to Harvest the Rain Our monsoon season runs from June 15 to Sept. 30. It can bring us more than half our annual rainfall! Through rainwater harvesting, your family can collect this free water or redirect it to where it’s needed. Roofs have a lot of surface area to help collect the rain. A system of gutters and downspouts consolidates the roof runoff, and you can direct it to nearby plants or collect it in a water barrel called a cistern for later use on dry days.

Know When & How Much to Water Outdoor landscaping can use a lot of water, especially this time of year. Water-smart families water early in the morning or evening to reduce evaporation. They don’t water every day, but when they do, they make sure to water down to the plant’s root zone!

It’s Time to Xeriscape! Smart families use low-water-use plants for their landscaping. Good xeriscape designs help shade the house from the sun and group plants by their water and sunlight needs. An automatic drip irrigation system can put just enough water at the plants’ root zone. A proper xeriscape design also traps and keeps water from storms where plants can best absorb it.

Wash the Family Car the Right Way! It’s nice to cruise in a shiny clean car. So when it’s time to wash the family car or truck, don’t leave the hose running. Use a bucket filled with hot, soapy water and scrub it down with a big sponge or soft brush. Then turn on the hose just to rinse the suds off. Dry and wax and you are done! Info adapted from the “Conserve Water” booklet. CAP is a proud sponsor of this year’s Fair for Education! June 24 at Tucson Magnet High, details on page 15

For more water-related information, please visit:

www.CentralArizonaProject.com or call toll free: (888)

891-5795

Make It a Clean Sweep Instead of hosing off your porch, sidewalk or driveway, grab a broom and make it a clean sweep. Hosing off your cement is just a waste of water.

Outdoor Plants Love Gray Water! With a bit of handywork, your family can get double use out of the water that ordinarily goes down the drain. A gray water system takes the used water from your clothes washer, bathroom sink and/or shower and diverts it to keep your outside plants green and healthy.

Bear essential news for kids!

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May 2013

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Continued from page 15

Tucson Jazz Institute by Reporter Toby Chivers, Sabino High School

Expires 5/31/13

Have you ever wanted to play in a jazz band? At the Tucson Jazz Institute you can have that opportunity. The TJI is a school that combines learning and a band experience. They take players of all different instruments and all different skill levels, and put them into several jazz bands within the school. A combination of schools joined together to form the Tucson Jazz Institute. It has been thriving under the TJI name for about four years now, and is still going strong! Scott Black from TJI tells me that the institute encourages you to work hard at your instrument, while having fun in a band setting. He tells me that all the different bands are constantly traveling all around the country—and even the world—for different jazz competitions. They travel to places such as California, New York, Europe, and more! The idea behind the jazz institute is simple: to give kids an opportunity to play good music with other kids as both a hobby and a career focus. It looks like the idea of the institute was a good one. Kids put many hours of fun/work into what they do, and it all pays off in the end. The experience builds talent, stamina and maybe even a little bit of an ego, which is well earned, because the critically acclaimed bands have been called the best in the country! TJI often goes to Tucson area middle and high schools to recruit students, but the institute accepts anyone who wants to join. For information on the school, or to register, just visit www.tucsoncommunitymusicschool.com! The Tucson Jazz Institute already has over 100 students from over 30 different schools around town, so why not be the newest one? MORE SCOOPS! page 43➧


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May 2013

Bear essential news for kids!

Kids Aren’t Waterproof! Water Safety Quiz Swim season is here! But do you know how to prevent drowning or near- drowning tragedies? Even though a child knows how to swim, it doesn’t make the person waterproof. NEVER SWIM ALONE! Take this quiz with your parents and remember to be safe this summer! 1. Which is considered a layer of protection for a swimming pool? a) an adult actively watching children around the pool b) a poolside emergency phone c) an adequate pool fence (see question 2.) d) all of the above 2. An adequate pool fence should: a) be at least 5 feet high, with bars spaced 4 inches or less b) have a self-closing, self-latching gate at least 5 feet high, swinging away from the pool c) completely separate the pool from the house and play yard d) all of the above 3. What is the leading cause of death for Arizona kids under 5? a) bike accidents b) drowning c) car crashes d) choking

A B C

Adult supervision Barrier around the pool Classes— swimming and CPR

SAFETY

POOL RULES

4. Which is NOT a recommended layer of protection around a pool? a) an adult watching the pool b) inflatable swim “floaties” c) a Coast-Guard approved personal flotation device (PFD) d) learning CPR

1. Never swim alone.

5. True or False: Drownings are 100-percent preventable. True False

3. Never dive in shallow water.

2. Know how deep the water is.

4. Walk—don’t run. And keep the pool area clear so no one will trip. 5. Have a cell phone handy in case of emergency.

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Answers: 1. Layers of protection are those safety steps between a child and drowning. d Nothing replaces an adult keeping eye-to-eye contact with those in the pool; a phone should be kept by the pool; and an adequate pool fence is a must! 2. d All of the above. 3. b Drownings are typically the leading cause of accidental death for Arizona kids under 5. 4. b Inflatable swim floaties can easily deflate and should not be considered a layer of protection against drowning. 5. Water experts say that drownings ARE 100-percent preventable.


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May 2013

Find Bear Essential News all SUMMER long!

Find us at... • Public libraries • Pizza Hut • Bookmans • Parks & Rec Centers • Girls & Boys Clubs • McDonald’s • YMCA locations • Baskin Robbins • Peter Piper Pizza • Foothills Mall • Play It Again Sports

Find Our Comprehensive Summer Camp Guide Online All Summer Long! www.BearEssentialNews.com

Cool Ideas Your Pet Really Needs for Summer!

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chool’s getting out, and it’s a good time to give your pet the extra attention that it needs. That’s because summer can be a dangerous season for your dog or cat. Here are some cool ideas for keeping your furry-faced friend safe during summer. • NEVER leave your dog or cat in the car. Things heat up quickly in a parked car—even in the shade. Temperatures can climb quickly to well over 120° F, which can be deadly for humans and pets! Your pet is better off staying at home. • If your pet stays outside, make sure it has constant access to plenty of cool, clean water and shade. Your dog, in particular, will appreciate a kiddie pool with a few inches of water so it can cool off. During the hottest part of the day, consider bringing your dog or cat inside for a while. • Get a check-up for your pet. If your dog isn’t on a preventative medicine, have it tested for heartworm. If the test is negative, it can go on the medicine. Mosquitos transmit this dangerous parasite. Dear Paw Prints, My dog Pepe is a great dog and very playful, but he chews on shoes when he’s angry. What can I do? Thank you, M.T. Dear M.T., The best way to stop your dog from chewing on your shoes is to take responsibility for your own belongings—put your shoes and anything else you don’t want your dog to chew out of Pepe’s reach! You should also: 1. Make sure your dog has plenty of his own toys; 2. Supervise your dog until he learns the house rules; 3. Make sure to walk your dog every day; 4. Give your dog lots of love and positive attention.

• Dogs still need exercise during summer, so go for walks when it’s cooler—in the morning or evening. • Dogs with thick coats can keep their cool better if they’re trimmed. Leave hair about an inch long to protect against insects and sunburn. • Learn the signs of an overheated dog: heavy panting, glazed eyes, a racing heartbeat or pulse, a staggered or unsteady walk, vomiting, or a deep red or purple tongue. Dogs and cats get rid of excess heat by panting and through the pads of their feet. If your pet becomes overheated, contact your parents immediately. Move your pet inside or into the shade and apply cool (not cold) water to its body to gradually lower its temperature. Apply cold towels or ice packs to your pet’s head, neck and chest only; and let it drink some water or lick ice cubes. Your family should take it to the veterinarian immediately. • Make sure your pet wears an ID tag and consider getting it a microchip ID. Monsoon thunderstorms and loud summer events (like parties and 4th of July fireworks) can spook your dog. Keep it safe at home. PACC is extremely fortunate to have a dedicated group of volunteers who walk the adoptable dogs daily. They also spend time playing with the adoptable cats. All the love and attention given to the animals helps to keep them happy and increases their chance of being adopted. PACC is always striving to maintain the highest quality of life possible for the animals while they’re in the shelter. Recently, a new sound system was installed in the kennels that plays relaxing music for the animals! PACC is also developing a training program that will include simple, effective, reward-based training techniques aimed at improving behaviors and enhancing the adoptability of the shelter dogs. If you would like to find out more about the volunteer program at PACC, please contact our Volunteer Coordinator or check the PACC website at www.pima.gov/animalcare.

Dear Paw Prints, Do animals get to play and go for walks at your shelter? Your friend, T.S. Send your pet questions to Dear T.S., Paw Prints Absolutely! Regular walks and socialization are vital to 1037 N. Alvernon Way #150 a shelter animal’s well-being. Tucson, AZ 85711

Pima Animal Care Center 4000 N. Silverbell Rd. • 243-5969 www.pimaanimalcare.org


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May 2013

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Bear essential news for kids!

Jellyfish Discovery Opening May 10th!

You don’t have to be near an ocean to see ocean animals. There’s an oasis in the middle of our desert at SEA LIFE!

Come see the Largest Collection of Jellyfish in the State! Did you know that jellyfish are not fish at all, but more closely related to sea anemones and urchins? Fish are classified as having bones, fins and gills—which jellyfish do not! Use the code below to decode the jellyfish trivia 1. Jellyfish have no __ __ __ __ __ __ , and no __ __ __ __ __ __ . 2. They are made of 95% __ __ __ __ __ . 3. Each __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ is lined with thousands of cells that contain stinging coils with venom. 4. Scientists have discovered over 2,000 species of jellyfish, only 70 are __ __ __ __ __ __ __ to humans. 5. Jellyfish can adapt to live in an environmental “ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ,” where there is a lack of oxygen. B

C

D

E

F

H

I

L M

N

O

R

S

T U

1. hearts, brains, 2. water, 3. tentacles, 4. harmful, 5. dead zone

A

Key Code

For more information call

W Y Z

480-478-7600

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Animals In Arizona

Go On Safari—Without Leaving the State!

Quickly—what’s your favorite critter in Arizona? Our state is home to an amazing assortment of animals, from the Arizona alligator lizard to the Zuni bluehead sucker.

Dazzling Diversity

Sandhill Crane • Cicada • Colorado River Toad

Arizona’s variety of habitats (living spaces for plants and animals) is the main reason we have such incredible DIVERSITY when it comes to our wildlife. From high mountains down to the desert floor, and even underground in spectacular caverns, there’s an impressive range of habitats in our state. Everything from large omnivorous black bears to the tiny bright red velvet mite can be found in Arizona!

Our Desert

Coyote • Anna’s Hummingbird • Gila Monster

Ribbons of Green

Photo courtesy of Jeff

Servoss, USFWS

Water means life to all of us living in No doubt about it, the desert. Arizona has some critically our Sonoran Desert important streamside habitats called is super special. For RIPARIAN areas. Because there’s wadifferent plant and ter either flowing or running just below animal species, it’s ground level, riparian areas can supthe most diverse port a complex structure of plants, Photo courtesy of Mar it Alanen, USFWS desert in the world! some of them more tropical than A Mount Graham red squirrel Covering more desert like. than 100,000 square miles, the Sonoran Desert These “ribbons of green” includes much of the southern half of Arizona includ- can clearly be seen from a ing Phoenix and Tucson, a small part of California, bird’s-eye view. In fact, most of Baja California, islands in the Gulf of they often serve as California and most of the state of Sonora, Mexico. corridors for amazing Although droughts (long periods with little or no numbers of migrating rainfall) are common, this is still one of the wettest birds. When healthy, d toa na A very bumpy Arizo deserts of North America, receiving 3 to 16 inches these areas provide water, of rain a year. About half of this life-giving rain food, shelter and cooling for all Mountain Lion • Apache Trout • Western Diamondback comes down hard during our summer monsoon. sorts of wildlife. In fact, 80 percent of Arizona’s verOur storms are often spotty, drenching one place tebrates (animals with spinal columns) spend some while leaving nearby areas bone dry. While sumpart of their lives in our riparian areas! mer daytime temperatures can soar to over 120°F, “It’s a unique habitat within the desert,” Tuegel Biologists define different areas into major types things quickly cool down after sundown. Because of says. “You have all these areas we talked about— of ecological communities that they call BIOMES. the extreme conditions, many of the native animals the Lower Colorado River, the Sonoran uplands, For example, we have a very large desert biome, have developed amazing adaptations for survival. the grasslands. And through them are these waterand up high in the mountains we have coniferous Some animals, like the kangaroo rat, don’t ever courses, drainages where water gets concentrated.” forest biomes (areas with the tall pine and fir trees). need a drink—they get the The bad news is that most riparian areas have Starting at the lower elevations, moisture they need from eatbeen damaged or destroyed here. Less than 10 “you’ve got everything ranging from Lower ing seeds! Some amphibians, percent of Arizona’s original riparian area remains Colorado Sonoran Desert communities like the spadefoot toad, stay in its natural form, and humans are largely to blame. (that have plants like Joshua trees and dormant underground (called People tend to live near water. As the population creosote bushes), all the way through the estivation) until the rains grows, we saguaro desert, which is considered the come! “Most of the year, they can use up Sonoran uplands, through the semiare underground, and they the water. desert grasslands in southeastern are all up usually by the first “We use a Arizona, and that moves up into piñonof July when the monsoons Photo courtesy of Jeff Servoss, USFWS lot of water, juniper,” explains Marty Tuegel, an A desert horned lizard start to roll in,” Tuegel says. whether it be endangered species biologist for U.S. And many desert dwellers hang out in burrows or for agriFish and Wildlife Service. Moving higher, “you get cultural or into evergreen oak forests that surround each of the shady spots until nighttime to avoid the deadly heat and deadly daytime predators. urban uses,” sky islands at a certain elevation.” Sky islands are The Sonoran Desert is home to thousands of Tuegel mountain ranges separated by a “sea” of desert. insect species, 350 bird species, 100 reptile species, explains. 60 mammal species, 20 amphibian species and A venomous coral snake 30 native fish species! Photo courtesy of Jeff Servoss, USFW

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Biomes

WIN TICKETS!

Saving water can help our riparian areas. “Wildlife is one of those values that we all share. To conserve water we can use as little as possible and also protect our drainage systems,” he continues.

May 2013

A baby desert tortoise naviga tes over rocky terr ain.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Humphrey, US FWS

May 2013

Great Blue Heron • Dragonfly • Desert Pupfish • Tiger Salamander

Get Out & Explore Spring is a great time to head outdoors with your family. Get on the computer and start planning your animal adventure. B.E.A.R. Tuegel has studied reptiles and amphibians. His favorite sightings are box turtles up in the grasslands. When it comes to enjoying our wildlife, the best rule is to look, but don’t touch! In fact, lots of animals are protected species, either threatened or endangered. “Leave them where they’re at—don’t take them home,” Tuegel says. Never go off on Check out this ocelot’s camoufl your own and alage! ways have an adult with you. Be aware of what’s around you, watch where you step, and don’t put your hands where you can’t see what’s there. Tuegel says protecting yourself from the sun and heat are probably most important. So put on sunscreen, wear a hat with a brim and a T-shirt, and bring along a lightweight long-sleeve shirt. Comfortable shoes work for most areas, but boots are good for hiking. Long pants help protect you if you go off trail. Each person should have a couple liters of water or something with electrolytes. To take in beautiful scenery and wildlife, Tuegel suggests looking into San Pedro House near Sierra Vista. “Big cottonwoods, you’ve got live water and a lot of wildlife opportunities—a lot of birds, some reptiles and amphibians. It’s best to choose a good time that’s not going to be too hot.” He also suggests checking out Arivaca Cienega. Nearby is the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, which has parts open to the public. The Nature Conservancy manages the Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Preserve. There’s also the Cienega Creek Natural Preserve, Winkleman, Bonita Creek and the Gila River. He says forests are great, too. S

30 YEARS OF BEAR ESSENTIAL NEWS FOR KIDS!

Photo courtesy of Tom Smylie, USFW

Page 22

30 YEARS OF BEAR ESSENTIAL NEWS FOR KIDS!

Page 23

Exotic Animals

Who Call Arizona Home!

A sure way to have fun encounters with native and exotic wildlife is to visit your local zoo, wildlife park, animal museum or aquarium. Many great animal conservation groups let local kids and families learn about wildlife. You can see all kinds of awesome animals up close—right here in our community! You don't have to go on safari to see elephants, antelope, lions, giraffes and zebras. No need to strap on an air tank to see a sea turtle, jellyfish, sharks and rays. You don’t have to travel far to ogle an otter, orangutan or ostrich. Perhaps you prefer a peek at a penguin, peccary or a pack of prairie dogs. No matter what kind of critter makes you go wild, you can probably plan a trip to see it without ever leaving Arizona. Here are some great places to visit that feature fabulous furry, feathered and finned fauna. So what are you waiting for? Get out there to see some of the cool creatures who call Arizona home. Check out page 25 for a chance to win tickets to one of these amazing animal attractions. All you have to do is tell us about your favorite animal!

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Reid Park Zoo

2021 North Kinney Road • Tucson 520-883-2702 • www.desertmuseum.org

1100 S. Randolph Way • Tucson 520-791-4022 • www.tucsonzoo.org

Turn your idea of a museum inside out! The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is a world-renowned zoo, natural history museum and botanical garden, all in one! See live animals—mountain lions, prairie dogs, Gila monsters and more—in natural settings. Visit the Earth Sciences Center or the new Warden Aquarium and dip into the touch tanks. Catch one of two live-animal presentations or relax in the hummingbird or mixed species aviary.

Travel from South America to the Asian rainforest, and then to the African savannah in one day! Explore beautiful habitats housing hundreds of exotic animals from around the world. Reid Park Zoo is a hidden gem, nestled in the center of Tucson, and is the perfect place to enjoy time outside while discovering the wonders of wildlife. Project Tanzania lets you observe a herd of African elephants and engage in hands-on education opportunities.

Out of Africa Wildlife Park

SEA LIFE Arizona

3505 W. SR-260 • Camp Verde 928-567-2842 • www.outofafricapark.com

5000 S. Arizona Mills Cir. • Tempe 480-478-7600 • www.sealifeus.com

You don’t have to leave Arizona to go on safari, just head to Out of Africa Wildlife Park! You can see lions, tigers and bears, and so much more. There are hyena, serval and watusi, too. Hundreds of exotic animals roam in spacious natural habitats. Embark on an Adventure Tour, feed a tiger, or check out one of the entertaining and educational animal shows. You won’t believe how close you can get!

You don’t have to be near an ocean to see ocean animals! There is an oasis in the middle of our desert at SEA LIFE! The sea turtles are crowd pleasers at SEA LIFE. You also can see sharks, octopus and the new jellyfish exhibit. Jellyfish Discovery opens May 10. Did you know that jellyfish have no brains or hearts? Find out more about these amazing creatures and other wonders of the sea at SEA LIFE.

Phoenix Zoo

Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium

455 N. Galvin Parkway • Phoenix 602-914-4333 • www.phoenixzoo.org

16501 W. Northern Ave. • Litchfield Park 623-935-WILD • www.wildlifeworld.com

Ride a dromedary camel, get up-close and personal with giraffes, and walk into Monkey Village— an open exhibit where squirrel monkeys scamper through the trees just inches away! Get a unique view of the “people of the forest,” the orangutan, as they climb, relax and play in their expansive indoor and outdoor habitats. The orangutan exhibit’s indoor viewing area is a cool place to hang out this summer!

Sea lions are making a big splash in Arizona! Paris and Andi are Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium’s new California sea lions. These playful pinnipeds are the first marine mammals to be on exhibit in the state in years! The sea lion exhibit opened earlier this year. Other new residents include a baby white tiger, a baby giraffe and a baby black jaguar! Check out the Wildlife Encounter shows, animal feeding stations, touch tanks and more.

Bear’s “Animals In Arizona Contest” is on page 25. Write about your favorite animal for a chance to win a family 4-pack of tickets to a wildlife destination!


www.bearessentialnews.com

Animals In Arizona

Go On Safari—Without Leaving the State!

Quickly—what’s your favorite critter in Arizona? Our state is home to an amazing assortment of animals, from the Arizona alligator lizard to the Zuni bluehead sucker.

Dazzling Diversity

Sandhill Crane • Cicada • Colorado River Toad

Arizona’s variety of habitats (living spaces for plants and animals) is the main reason we have such incredible DIVERSITY when it comes to our wildlife. From high mountains down to the desert floor, and even underground in spectacular caverns, there’s an impressive range of habitats in our state. Everything from large omnivorous black bears to the tiny bright red velvet mite can be found in Arizona!

Our Desert

Coyote • Anna’s Hummingbird • Gila Monster

Ribbons of Green

Photo courtesy of Jeff

Servoss, USFWS

Water means life to all of us living in No doubt about it, the desert. Arizona has some critically our Sonoran Desert important streamside habitats called is super special. For RIPARIAN areas. Because there’s wadifferent plant and ter either flowing or running just below animal species, it’s ground level, riparian areas can supthe most diverse port a complex structure of plants, Photo courtesy of Mar it Alanen, USFWS desert in the world! some of them more tropical than A Mount Graham red squirrel Covering more desert like. than 100,000 square miles, the Sonoran Desert These “ribbons of green” includes much of the southern half of Arizona includ- can clearly be seen from a ing Phoenix and Tucson, a small part of California, bird’s-eye view. In fact, most of Baja California, islands in the Gulf of they often serve as California and most of the state of Sonora, Mexico. corridors for amazing Although droughts (long periods with little or no numbers of migrating rainfall) are common, this is still one of the wettest birds. When healthy, d toa na A very bumpy Arizo deserts of North America, receiving 3 to 16 inches these areas provide water, of rain a year. About half of this life-giving rain food, shelter and cooling for all Mountain Lion • Apache Trout • Western Diamondback comes down hard during our summer monsoon. sorts of wildlife. In fact, 80 percent of Arizona’s verOur storms are often spotty, drenching one place tebrates (animals with spinal columns) spend some while leaving nearby areas bone dry. While sumpart of their lives in our riparian areas! mer daytime temperatures can soar to over 120°F, “It’s a unique habitat within the desert,” Tuegel Biologists define different areas into major types things quickly cool down after sundown. Because of says. “You have all these areas we talked about— of ecological communities that they call BIOMES. the extreme conditions, many of the native animals the Lower Colorado River, the Sonoran uplands, For example, we have a very large desert biome, have developed amazing adaptations for survival. the grasslands. And through them are these waterand up high in the mountains we have coniferous Some animals, like the kangaroo rat, don’t ever courses, drainages where water gets concentrated.” forest biomes (areas with the tall pine and fir trees). need a drink—they get the The bad news is that most riparian areas have Starting at the lower elevations, moisture they need from eatbeen damaged or destroyed here. Less than 10 “you’ve got everything ranging from Lower ing seeds! Some amphibians, percent of Arizona’s original riparian area remains Colorado Sonoran Desert communities like the spadefoot toad, stay in its natural form, and humans are largely to blame. (that have plants like Joshua trees and dormant underground (called People tend to live near water. As the population creosote bushes), all the way through the estivation) until the rains grows, we saguaro desert, which is considered the come! “Most of the year, they can use up Sonoran uplands, through the semiare underground, and they the water. desert grasslands in southeastern are all up usually by the first “We use a Arizona, and that moves up into piñonof July when the monsoons Photo courtesy of Jeff Servoss, USFWS lot of water, juniper,” explains Marty Tuegel, an A desert horned lizard start to roll in,” Tuegel says. whether it be endangered species biologist for U.S. And many desert dwellers hang out in burrows or for agriFish and Wildlife Service. Moving higher, “you get cultural or into evergreen oak forests that surround each of the shady spots until nighttime to avoid the deadly heat and deadly daytime predators. urban uses,” sky islands at a certain elevation.” Sky islands are The Sonoran Desert is home to thousands of Tuegel mountain ranges separated by a “sea” of desert. insect species, 350 bird species, 100 reptile species, explains. 60 mammal species, 20 amphibian species and A venomous coral snake 30 native fish species! Photo courtesy of Jeff Servoss, USFW

S

Biomes

WIN TICKETS!

Saving water can help our riparian areas. “Wildlife is one of those values that we all share. To conserve water we can use as little as possible and also protect our drainage systems,” he continues.

May 2013

A baby desert tortoise naviga tes over rocky terr ain.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Humphrey, US FWS

May 2013

Great Blue Heron • Dragonfly • Desert Pupfish • Tiger Salamander

Get Out & Explore Spring is a great time to head outdoors with your family. Get on the computer and start planning your animal adventure. B.E.A.R. Tuegel has studied reptiles and amphibians. His favorite sightings are box turtles up in the grasslands. When it comes to enjoying our wildlife, the best rule is to look, but don’t touch! In fact, lots of animals are protected species, either threatened or endangered. “Leave them where they’re at—don’t take them home,” Tuegel says. Never go off on Check out this ocelot’s camoufl your own and alage! ways have an adult with you. Be aware of what’s around you, watch where you step, and don’t put your hands where you can’t see what’s there. Tuegel says protecting yourself from the sun and heat are probably most important. So put on sunscreen, wear a hat with a brim and a T-shirt, and bring along a lightweight long-sleeve shirt. Comfortable shoes work for most areas, but boots are good for hiking. Long pants help protect you if you go off trail. Each person should have a couple liters of water or something with electrolytes. To take in beautiful scenery and wildlife, Tuegel suggests looking into San Pedro House near Sierra Vista. “Big cottonwoods, you’ve got live water and a lot of wildlife opportunities—a lot of birds, some reptiles and amphibians. It’s best to choose a good time that’s not going to be too hot.” He also suggests checking out Arivaca Cienega. Nearby is the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, which has parts open to the public. The Nature Conservancy manages the Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Preserve. There’s also the Cienega Creek Natural Preserve, Winkleman, Bonita Creek and the Gila River. He says forests are great, too. S

30 YEARS OF BEAR ESSENTIAL NEWS FOR KIDS!

Photo courtesy of Tom Smylie, USFW

Page 22

30 YEARS OF BEAR ESSENTIAL NEWS FOR KIDS!

Page 23

Exotic Animals

Who Call Arizona Home!

A sure way to have fun encounters with native and exotic wildlife is to visit your local zoo, wildlife park, animal museum or aquarium. Many great animal conservation groups let local kids and families learn about wildlife. You can see all kinds of awesome animals up close—right here in our community! You don't have to go on safari to see elephants, antelope, lions, giraffes and zebras. No need to strap on an air tank to see a sea turtle, jellyfish, sharks and rays. You don’t have to travel far to ogle an otter, orangutan or ostrich. Perhaps you prefer a peek at a penguin, peccary or a pack of prairie dogs. No matter what kind of critter makes you go wild, you can probably plan a trip to see it without ever leaving Arizona. Here are some great places to visit that feature fabulous furry, feathered and finned fauna. So what are you waiting for? Get out there to see some of the cool creatures who call Arizona home. Check out page 25 for a chance to win tickets to one of these amazing animal attractions. All you have to do is tell us about your favorite animal!

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Reid Park Zoo

2021 North Kinney Road • Tucson 520-883-2702 • www.desertmuseum.org

1100 S. Randolph Way • Tucson 520-791-4022 • www.tucsonzoo.org

Turn your idea of a museum inside out! The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is a world-renowned zoo, natural history museum and botanical garden, all in one! See live animals—mountain lions, prairie dogs, Gila monsters and more—in natural settings. Visit the Earth Sciences Center or the new Warden Aquarium and dip into the touch tanks. Catch one of two live-animal presentations or relax in the hummingbird or mixed species aviary.

Travel from South America to the Asian rainforest, and then to the African savannah in one day! Explore beautiful habitats housing hundreds of exotic animals from around the world. Reid Park Zoo is a hidden gem, nestled in the center of Tucson, and is the perfect place to enjoy time outside while discovering the wonders of wildlife. Project Tanzania lets you observe a herd of African elephants and engage in hands-on education opportunities.

Out of Africa Wildlife Park

SEA LIFE Arizona

3505 W. SR-260 • Camp Verde 928-567-2842 • www.outofafricapark.com

5000 S. Arizona Mills Cir. • Tempe 480-478-7600 • www.sealifeus.com

You don’t have to leave Arizona to go on safari, just head to Out of Africa Wildlife Park! You can see lions, tigers and bears, and so much more. There are hyena, serval and watusi, too. Hundreds of exotic animals roam in spacious natural habitats. Embark on an Adventure Tour, feed a tiger, or check out one of the entertaining and educational animal shows. You won’t believe how close you can get!

You don’t have to be near an ocean to see ocean animals! There is an oasis in the middle of our desert at SEA LIFE! The sea turtles are crowd pleasers at SEA LIFE. You also can see sharks, octopus and the new jellyfish exhibit. Jellyfish Discovery opens May 10. Did you know that jellyfish have no brains or hearts? Find out more about these amazing creatures and other wonders of the sea at SEA LIFE.

Phoenix Zoo

Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium

455 N. Galvin Parkway • Phoenix 602-914-4333 • www.phoenixzoo.org

16501 W. Northern Ave. • Litchfield Park 623-935-WILD • www.wildlifeworld.com

Ride a dromedary camel, get up-close and personal with giraffes, and walk into Monkey Village— an open exhibit where squirrel monkeys scamper through the trees just inches away! Get a unique view of the “people of the forest,” the orangutan, as they climb, relax and play in their expansive indoor and outdoor habitats. The orangutan exhibit’s indoor viewing area is a cool place to hang out this summer!

Sea lions are making a big splash in Arizona! Paris and Andi are Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium’s new California sea lions. These playful pinnipeds are the first marine mammals to be on exhibit in the state in years! The sea lion exhibit opened earlier this year. Other new residents include a baby white tiger, a baby giraffe and a baby black jaguar! Check out the Wildlife Encounter shows, animal feeding stations, touch tanks and more.

Bear’s “Animals In Arizona Contest” is on page 25. Write about your favorite animal for a chance to win a family 4-pack of tickets to a wildlife destination!


24

Bear essential news for kids!

www.bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

See the New Sea Lions! Visitors can be inspired by Paris and Andi, Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium’s new California sea lion residents! These two females are the only marine mammals on exhibit in Arizona. Marine mammals are protected by law. To keep these sea lions, Wildlife World Zoo went through a long and complicated accreditation process with the Alliance of Marine Mammal Parks and Aquariums.

The Ultimate Year-Round Family-Fun and Dining Destination! Plunge into super splashy fun on the Log Flume Ride. An exciting adventure through a South Pacific Reef Tunnel winds by alligators, exotic birds and monkeys. Climb aboard the Safari Train Ride for a breathtaking narrated journey through the plains of Africa where ostriches, gazelles, endangered antelope and other exotic species roam free. Get a close look at small monkeys, rodents, bats and more while visiting It’s A Small World Small Mammal Exhibit. Be sure to stop by the Baby Animal Nursery where you’re sure to fall in love with our newest arrivals! Children’s Petting Area, Merry-Go-Round and Educational Wildlife Encounters Show are filled with fun for all ages. For an interactive adventure, stop by the Lory Parrot Feeding Area

(the first in the nation) where South Pacific birds perch on your arm while enjoying apple slices. For reptile fans, there’s Dragon World, home to Arizona’s first saltwater croc and a 20-foot, 200-pound python. Then enjoy the Tropics of the World Reptile Exhibit. For an indoor wildlife adventure, check out fish, mammals, birds, invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles at the Wildlife World Aquarium. Explore four aquarium buildings: The Diversity of Life in Water, The Wild and The Wonderful, Predators and River Monsters. You can experience hundreds of aquatic species like black-tip sharks, zebra sharks, black-footed penquins, eels, stingrays, seahorses, barracuda, white alligator, Nile crocodile, South American freshwater fish, otters, marine turtles and more. Complete your visit with a unique dining experience and a visit to two exciting gift shops!

Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium, in Litchfield Park, is open seven days a week, 365 days a year, including all holidays. Zoo exhibits are open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (last zoo admission is at 5 p.m.) Aquarium exhibits are open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Daytime admission includes access to the zoo and aquarium. Special reduced evening Aquarium-Only admission is available after 5 p.m.

Discount coupons available: www.BearEssentialNews.com

Find your way to the Newest Aquarium Exhibit enter here

Good job— You found it!


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

Bear essential news for kids!

25

Animals In Arizona CONTEST! If You Really Love Animals...

T

ell us about your favorite animal and why you love this particular critter so much. Whether it’s the most marvelous mammal, a really rad reptile or raptor, or a simply stupendous sea creature—tell us all about your pick and why you consider it king of the beasts. Then choose the great location where you would like to go. Just check the box of your top choices. You could win tickets to potentially see your pick up close—or visit other great animals in Arizona!

You’ll Really Love this Contest!

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum

Win 4 passes

2021 N. Kinney Road • Tucson 520-883-2702 • www.desertmuseum.org

Out of Africa Wildlife Park

Win a Family 4-pack 3505 W. SR-260 • Camp Verde 928-567-2842 • www.outofafricapark.com

Phoenix Zoo

Win 4 tickets plus a Safari Train Tour 455 N. Galvin Parkway • Phoenix 602-914-4333 • www.phoenixzoo.org

Reid Park Zoo

Win 4 admission tickets 1100 S. Randolph Way • Tucson 520-791-4022 • www.tucsonzoo.org

SEA LIFE Arizona

Win a 4-pack of tickets 5000 S. Arizona Mills Cir. • Tempe 480-478-7600 • www.sealifeus.com

Wildlife World Zoo & Aquarium Win 4 passes 16501 W. Northern Ave. • Litchfield Park 623-935-WILD • www.wildlifeworld.com

My favorite animal is... _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________

Animals In Arizona CONTEST! Name: ____________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ City: _____________________ZIP: __________ Grade:_____ School: _____________________ Phone #: ______________ email: ____________________________________________ Parent Signature: ___________________________________ Send your completed page to Bear Essential/Animals • 1037 S. Alvernon Way #150 Tucson, AZ 85711 • Entry Deadline: June 15, 2013


26

Bear essential news for kids!

www.bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

Open the World to Your Child SUMMER Language Camps Register Now! Come and visit our NEW LOCATION in Jefferson Park by UMC at 1701 E. Seneca Preschool–Elementary Language Immersion

Spanish • Chinese • French German

International School of Tucson Contact Head of Admissions, Melissa Elliott at admissions@internationalschoolofTucson.org

or phone 808-3167

Schedule a tour today and see why IST is one of the fastest growing schools in Tucson!

Professional Artists from Broadway, Film, TV & the Gaslight Theater

ummer

A Broadway Camp

CAMPS 2013

9071 E. Old Spanish Trail • 204-2663 www.broadway-camp.com June 3–14 (ages 13–19) • 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Performances June 14 & 15 June 17–28 (ages 7–12) • 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Performances June 28 & 29

• Family owned & operated

Register NOW, Enrollment limited

7878 E. Wrightstown Rd., Tucson

Summer camp gives kids a chance to try new things, learn or improve skills, and make friends that will last a lifetime! Camp also can give kids new found confidence and boost their self esteem. Ginger Pauley, the executive director of American Camp Association Southwest, says that improving self- esteem, team building and acquiring leadership skills are some of the many benefits of going to camp. Academic enrichment, gaining job skills and learning about the environment are other great bonuses kids can get by attending a camp, she says. According to Pauley, the experience of going to camp can give kids “the ability to think on their own, work on their own and be comfortable away from home. To help you get started, check out Bear’s Summer Camp Guide online and in this isue, pages 27 through 43.

S

• Musical Theater Production SUMMER CAMPS, starting June 2013

(520) 971-9566

Summer Camp Time!

www.act1academyofperformingarts.com act1academy@gmail.com

Enjoy your summer by performing in a full length Broadway musical! At A Broadway Camp you will spend 2 weeks rehearsing, learning lines, singing, dancing and

performing in a production of Once Upon A Mattress. There will be two performances at the end of the camp session in front of a live audience! This show is an “ensemble” musical, which allows each camper the opportunity to have lots of stage time. Sessions are limited to the size of the cast, so please sign up quickly to reserve your spot! Our counselors are certified teachers, and our director is a professional performer. This will be an educational experience and an entertaining production!


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

ACADEMY OF MUSIC & DANCE Catalina Foothills (Sunrise/Swan) 4811 E. Sunrise Dr. • 327-2303 Oro Valley (Oracle/Magee) 7954 N. Oracle • 219-9950 www.MusicDanceTucson.com Enrich your child’s summer and keep them active with a wide variety of Music and Dance camps. Choose from one day mini camps and/or week long camps offered all summer long for ages 2.5 to 12 years! Join us for summer fun! Learn new instruments and dance styles and make new friends.Private lessons also offered in ALL music instruments, voice and dance. Available for All ages, levels, and abilities. To register call 3272303 • 219-9950 or visit us online at www. MusicDanceTucson.com

ACT 1 ACADEMY OF PERFORMING ARTS 7878 E. Wrightstown Rd. • 971-9566 Starting June 2013 9 a.m.–4 p.m. • 2 weeks, full day act1academy@gmail.com www.act1academyofperformingarts.com This hands on, whole learning camp experience will have your child singing, dancing, acting, painting, designing and more! With a structure curriculum, we produce an entire musical in 2 weeks and perform on the GASLIGHT Theater stage! Our 12-1 student-teacher ratio Insures your child receives optimum learning in a self

May 2013

esteem building environment. We have a Broadway professional director and certified professional artist educators! “THE LULLABY OF BROADWAY” Betty-Jo, a country bumpkin, goes to New York City to become an actress. Through a series of mishaps and hilarity she bumbles and stumbles her way to success but not without help from her unlikely allies…JavoJoe, who runs the local coffee shop, BigBob, the taxi driver and a man in a gorilla suit. Material from musicals such as: You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown, Les Miserables, Annie and more… Session 1: June 3–15 Session 2: June 17–29 2 weeks, FULL Day 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $325 Tom Sawyer ..the musical: is based on Mark Twain’s novel. Mischievous Tom matches wits with stern Aunt Polly, falls in love with the Becky Thatcher and goes the adventure of a life time with that lovable renegade Huckleberry Finn! It’s a tale of escapes and comedy! July 8–20 2 weeks, FULL Day 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $325 Modeling Camp: Runway Show, Photo shoot & Headshots! May 28–June 1 Ages 7–11 / 12 & older 1 week, FULL Day 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $295 This is a fun, inexpensive way to learn poise, polish, etiquette, fitness, nutrition, dance, acting! You will experience a professional photo shoot with hair and make-up provided and participate in a Runway Show! You will receive your photo disc with commercial print and headshots!

continued on page 28 ➧

Bear essential news for kids!

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S

ummer

CAMPS 2013

Continued from page 27 www.arts-express.org

Arizona State Parks

AZStateParks.com/Family Lyman Lake State Park, St. Johns • June 1–2 623-282-2267 • Shawn shyde@azstateparks.gov Patagonia Lake State Park • May 11–12 Howard • 520-287-2791 or 520-216-7337 hbuchanan@azstateparks.gov

The Arizona Family Campout Program is for families that have little or no experience camping. The program will teach the art of camping outdoors! Activities include: Archery, a petroglyph hike (Lyman Lake only), and more! Cost: $65 for family of 4. Ages: 6 and up.

Arizona Youth University 888 N. Euclid Ave. #322 • 621-7724 May 28–July 26 ocollege@email.arizona.edu AYU.arizona.edu

ATA Martial Arts

AYU, a summer program of the University of Arizona Outreach College, partners with campus departments and others to provide students the opportunity to explore future academic and career paths. Subjects include pre-med, forensics, drama, game and mobile app design, robotics, law, photography and more! Cost: Prices vary. Ages: 8–17.

Arts Express Fine Arts Youth Academy 2013 Palo Verde High School & Sahuaro High School • 319-0400 June 3–28 • info@arts-express.org

Distinctive features: FAYA 2013 offers arts immersion classes in dance and visual arts, plus full musical theater productions with public performances. Description: Students in grades 4–6 participate in two morning classes and/or afternoon Musical Theater rehearsals (Disney’s Aladdin Kids). Students grade 7–9 join in two morning classes and/or afternoon Musical Theatre rehearsals (The Pirates of Penzance Jr.). Budget friendly feature: Best price in Tucson for a fine arts program. Half day and full day available. FREE lunch. Cost: $395/half day and $790/full day. Grades: incoming 4–outgoing 9. 877-7767 • Mr. Kim orovalley@usaata.com www.usaata.com Distinctive features: Learn respect, courtesy, self-control and self-discipline through martial arts. Description: Summer camps offered at La Cañada, Swan & Sunrise and Houghton locations. Dates to be announced. Please call for details. For all levels of participants. Learning to use blocking, kicking and punch with self-control, discipline and respect. Participate in self-defense classes, bully prevention and child abduction prevention classes. Fun activities and training to develop coordination speed, agility and strength.

Hands on Horsemanship & Riding Lessons!

A Summer Camp Like No Other! Students at our summer camp won’t just learn how to ride. They’ll learn how to care for the horse, how to prepare it for riding and much more.

Summer Camp Sessions

Monday through Friday • 8 am–noon Family and multiple week discounts

May 27–31, June 3–7 June 17–21 June 24–28, Scenic July 1–5 New Location! In the foothills of the Tucson Register before May 27 Mountains Mention ad

5% Discount

Sarabande Academy of Riding

6405 W. Ina Rd. info@sarabandeacademy.com

(520) 907-3965


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

BASKETBALL ESSENTIALS SUMMER CAMP AT SALPOINTE CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL 1545 E. Copper St. 547-9359 • Coach Brian Holstrom Session 1: June 10–13 • 1–5 p.m. Session 2: June 24–27 • 8 a.m.–Noon bholstrom@salpointe.org http://www.salpointe.org/

Camp Lawton on Mt. Lemmon. Adventure Camps for Cub Scouts and week long camps for Scouts, from June 9–15 thru July 14–20. Training in archery, air rifle, canoeing, rock climbing, swimming. Learn outdoor skills. Earn merit badges-many subjects offered. National BSA accredited camp.

CAMP ADVENTURE

We are looking forward to another June of youth basketball camps open to all boys. Our coaching staff as well as varsity and collegiate players will again create active camps full of skill development, gameplay, and enjoyment in our gyms. Contact us for a brochure! Cost: $100/session and $90 for additional sessions for same individual or siblings. All boys entering grades 4–9.

BOOKMANS ENTERTAINMENT EXCHANGE Bookmans.com Speedway • 748-9555 Ina • 579-0303 Grant • 325-5767 & state-wide Check out Bookmans.com for a complete list of weekly free in-store summer kids events and activities starting June 2013!

BOY SCOUT CAMP Mount Lemmon • 750-0385 Cub Scout Adventure camps • May 28–June 3 Weekly Scout camps June 10–continues through week of July 8 azbsa.org Boy Scouts of America: Summer camps at

9239 E. Wrightstown Rd. 296-0883 • Jen Peña & Debbie Ross June 3–July 26 jpena@tcdcharterschool.com www.TucsonCampAdventure.com For a summer to remember come to Camp Adventure! Enjoy archery, swimming, science, arts & crafts, Dance and much more! Grades: PreK–8.

CAMP INVENTION Tucson—Tanque Verde Elementary (TVUSD), Agua Caliente (TVUSD), Tuller School, & Quail Run Elementary (Marana USD) 1-800-968-4332 See website and ad for camp dates & locations campinvention@invent.org www.campinvention.org A nationwide summer camp on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) to inspire innovation and invention. Description: Experience an exciting, weeklong adventure in creativity which immerses children in imaginative play that reinforces and supplements schoolyear learning. Led by local educators, the program is for children entering grades 1–6. New curriculum. Cost: $220–$245. Discounts and partial scholarships available.

continued on page 30 ➧

Youth Programs “A” Camp –10 Weeks of Adventure, Discovery, Community and Fun! • Quality experiential opportunities for children ages 5–11 • Counselor-in-Training (CIT) Program for ages 12–15 Teen Adventure Camp—Rock climbing, canoeing, and camping • Three day-trips and an overnight expedition for ages 12–15 Aquatics—Lifeguard Certification, AquaCub Swim Lessons and AQUA Day! School and Birthday Parties—Custom designed for all ages

Check us out: Contact Dana Mendoza danamendoza@email.arizona.edu (520) 621-6891 • Campusrec.arizona.edu/youthcamps

Bear essential news for kids!

Meet Your Arizona Wildcats and Pump up Your Game!

29

SEAN MILLER BASKETBALL CAMP

Learn the fundamentals with the Arizona coaching staff and players. A week of competition, skill development and BASKETBALL!

Boys entering 1st–8th grade Call Today! • Play where the Cats play • Get an Arizona Basketball T-shirt • Autograph Session • Presentations by Arizona Coaches

Two sessions to choose from

June 10–13 • $230 June 17–20 • $230 Register for both sessions and get $50 OFF!

For registration information email: ®

seanmiller@arizona.edu or call 621-2430 The Sean Miller Basketball Camp is not an official function of the University of Arizona


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May 2013

Community Education

Summer Programs Providing Summer enrichment programs throughout Tucson at selected TUSD elementary schools

Ages 3–12 Contact us for more information. Call 225-3226 www.tusd1.org/communityeducation Communityeducation@tusd1.org

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CARTOON CAMP WITH MARK ZEPEZAUER

June 3–21, June 24–July 12 SummerFlight@casaschristianschool.com CasasChristianSchool.com/ summer-flight/

Rhythm Industry Performance Factory 1013 S. Tyndall Ave. 320-5105 or 370-1923 July 8–12 (Mon.–Fri.) mzepezauer@cox.net Cartoon Camp with art teacher and cartoonist Mark Zepezauer—Ages 9–up. Mon.–Fri., morning and afternoon, July 8–12. $200 plus materials list. Learn about the history and practice of cartooning and create a multi-page cartoon story over five days. Ages: 9–up.

CASAS ADOBES CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 6801 N. Oracle Rd. • 520-297-1181 July 8–12 • 9 a.m.–3 p.m. (Mon.–Fri.) info@casasadobesucc.org www.casasadobesucc.org Day Camp: ages 4–12. 9 a.m.–3 p.m., Monday–Friday, July 8–12. per week: $40; $20 mornings only. Lunch included. Multicultural art, storytelling and music introduce students to lives and needs of people around the world. Grass courtyard, spacious class areas. Register by June 17. 520-297-1181.

CASAS CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 10801 N. La Cholla Blvd. 297-0922 • Jessica Delfs

1st–8th Grade Campers

Join us for our Summer Flight program! Classes and schedules can be customized. Let’s get ready for take-off! Cost: $37–$345. Grades: Students going into 1–8.

CATALINA FOOTHILLS COMMUNITY SCHOOLS 4300 E. Sunrise Dr. 209-7551 • Mary Glenn Hoge May 28–July 26 • cs@cfsd16.org www.cfsd16.org/schools/communityschools Camp Foothillls: Fun, Adventure, Friends! Weekly half-day and full-day camps with something for everyone! Build memories with friends and enjoy art, sports, theatre, science, robotics, technology, swimming, field trips, outdoor adventures and so much more! Options for early and late scheduling (7–9 a.m. & 4–6 p.m.). Cost: Varies by program. Grades: PreK–9.

CENTERFIELD BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL ACADEMY 1861 W. Grant Rd. #107 440-4487 • Ryan Lineberger 9 one-week sessions beginning June 3 mail to: ryancbsa@gmail.com www.centerfieldhits.com Indoor summer baseball and softball camps for boys and girls of all skill levels. Kids will

Cub Scout

$125

Registration Special! June 3–July 26, 2013 • One Cub Scout Registration (boys, grades 1–5) for 2013 • Boy’s Life Magazine thru Dec. 2013 • Voucher for Cub Scout Handbook

$110

• Bobcat Booklet • Loads of Fun and Skills

or stop by the Tucson Country Day School Office 9239 E. Wrightstown Rd., Tucson, AZ 85715

296-0883 Monday–Friday between 7:30 a.m. & 4:00 p.m.

All this for only $ azbsa.org 750-0385

2500

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

CENTERFIELD CONTINUED enjoy a great week of instruction, exercise, competition, fun and games while improving their overall ability and health. Extended day campers will enjoy hitting, playing wiffle ball, dodge ball, watching movies and playing games. Campers can be picked up anytime up until 6 p.m.! Weekly on-field instruction plus indoor training. Only $20 per day for great instruction. Cost: $99/week, extended day is only $10 more per day. Discount for multiple sessions; multiple registrations from one family. Ages: 6–14.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM TUCSON 200 S. 6th Ave. • 792-9985 x114

June 3–Aug. 2 camps@childrensmuseumtucson.org www.childrensmuseumtucson.org Kinder and Junior Camps offer fun-filled learning all summer long! Campers ages 4 to 9 will enjoy hands-on experiments, demonstrations and the Museum’s exhibits. A variety of themes! Cost: $100 member, $135 nonmember. Ages: 4–9.

CONGREGATION ANSHEI ISRAEL’S –ESTHER B. FELDMAN PRESCHOOL/ KINDERGARTEN 5550 E. 5th St. • www.caiaz.org Lynne Falkow-Strauss, Director Phone 745-5550 x229 E-mail lynne@caiaz.org June 3–July 26 (no camp July 4) Mon.–Fri. • Full-days 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Half days 9 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (Before/After Care 8–9 a.m. and/or 3–4 p.m. daily for $7 per child, per hour.) All children 2 to 6 years old welcome! Enjoy story time, creative movement and singing with a specialist, playground time, water play, arts & crafts, and weekly special guests (topics vary). Secure facility with modern, park-like shaded playground. Snacks provided. Weekly cost: (Discounts for synagogue members.) 5 full days $180/ child, 5 half days $130/child, 3 full days $135/child, 3 half days $95. Non-refundable registration fee: $50 if paid by April 26; $100 thereafter.

CREATIVE JUICE ART BAR 6530 E. Tanque Verde #160 in La Plaza Shoppes 271-5023 • Chellie Krajnak June 3–7 • Just Sculpt It June 10–14 • Fiber Art Fun June 17–21 • Mixed MEdia Mania

May 2013

Bear essential news for kids!

June 24–28 • Passion for Painting chellie@creativejuiceartbar.com www.creativejuiceartbar.com Creative Juice Art Bar presents The Juicebox: a summer camp for kids. Calling all kids ages 6–13! Each week we will explore a different art form through the use of a variety of mediums and techniques. 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Cost: $225/week. Ages: 6–13.

CYT TUCSON THEATER FOR KIDS! SUMMER CAMPS 7000 E. Tanque Verde Rd. #29 751-7510 • Kathy Thuerbach June–July • kthuerbach@cyttucson.org www.cyttucson.org Theater for Kids! Summer camp allows kids to explore their dramatic side...touching on acting, vocal and dance skills. Camps run for one week at each of our two locations. Each camp culminates with a showcase performance! Two themes: Jungle Book and Sleeping Beauty for ages 5–12. See cyttucson.org for more details. Cost: $125/week and up. Ages: 5–12.

DAVID RUBIO VOLLEYBALL CAMPS Tucson • 520-818-8668 Contact: Amanda Rubio davidrubiovolleyballcamp@gmail.com www.davidrubiovolleyballcamp.com Five sessions for boys and girls emphasizing different skills or age groups. Directed by UA Head Coach David Rubio. MINI CAMP: May 28–30 • 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Girls and boys. Ages: 8–13. Cost: $150/ player. INTERMEDIATE ALL SKILLS CAMP: July 8–10. Girls and boys. Ages: 10–18. Cost: Resident $340 or Commuter: $240. POSITION CAMP (SETTER/ATTACKER/ LIBERO/MB): July 11–14 Girls and boys. Ages: 10–18, Cost: Resident $440 or Commuter $340. ADVANCED ALL-SKILLS CAMP: July 15– 18. Girls and boys. Ages: 10–18. Cost: Resident $440 or Commuter $340. HIGH SCHOOL TEAM CAMP—BOYS & GIRLS TEAMS: July 19–21. High school girls and boys teams (no individual registrations). Cost: $90–$120 per camper (see Team Camp webpage for details). DRVC is not an official function of the UA. It is open to all entrants, limited only by space and grade level.

continued on page 32 ➧ Tucson’s premier summer arts immersion program! Courses in visual arts, dance and musical theatre. Half day and full day options available for grades 4–9

Traditional Camp Activities in the Heart of the

Chiricauha Mountains Archery • Hiking • Sports • Campfires Nature Walks • Arts & Crafts Talent Shows and More!

Youth Camp

Teen Camp

Family Camp

June 17–July 20 Ages 8–14 or entering 3rd–9th grade $299–$349 per week

June 17–July 20 Ages 14–18 or entering 9th–12th grade $359–$412 /2-weeks

July 1–July 7 All Ages Prices Vary

For more information see our listing and or go to

www.pinecanyoncamp.com • 520-824-3553

Trak Ranch Summer Program The place to be this summer if you love animals!

June 2013

Arts, Crafts, Water Play, Pony Rides and More!

East & Central Locations More information & online registration:

drinks & snacks provided

May 27th–June 28th

www.arts-express.org

319-0400

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A program of Arts Express, Inc.

One Week Sessions 8:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Mon.–Fri.

• Interact with our animal family • Make goat milk ice cream • Dye sheep wool • Make egg shell mosaics

Call for Details!

298-9808 TRAK • 3230 N. Craycroft www.traktucson.org


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DeMONT FAMILY SWIM SCHOOL 2850 W. Ina Rd. #130 • 877–SWIM (7946) info@demontswim.com www.demontswim.com Demont Family Swim School is proud to offer the only state-of-the-art indoor swim facility in Southern Arizona and curriculum driven swim programs. Our wonderful teachers provide babies as young as one month with early mastery of water movement while engaging older students (children and adults) to learn stroke technique and endurance year-round. Join the DeMont Family Swim School and give your child the joy of swimming!

Horse Around this Summer!

EL GRUPO YOUTH CYCLING 23 W. 4th St. 329-BIKE • Daniela June 3–7, July 22–26 www.elgrupocycling.org

• Learn to ride or improve your skills • Work with professional trainers • Round pen and arena work • Trail riding • Beginners through intermediate riders

Summer Bike Camp 2013: Half-day camp to empower yourself, gain confidence and skills, and have fun on bikes! Cost: $150-financial aid available. Ages: 7–14.

Monday–Friday • 8:00 am to 4:00 pm May 27–31, June 3–7, June 17–21, June 24–28, July 8–12, July 15–19 (Ages 8 to 18) For more info, email us at

justhorsininvail@yahoo.com • 591-1615

Tucson Clay Co-Op

Vail & Tucson transportation available!

CALL NOW!

Summer Pottery Camp

Interactive camp featuring theatre, music, hand building & potters wheel. All ages welcome at our community-based studio!

• Classes • Parties • Paint Bar

4 Sessions • June 18th–Aug. 8th

FRIENDLY PINES CAMP 933 Friendly Pines Rd. • Prescott, AZ 1-888-281-2267 (CAMP) • 928-445-2128 Kevin Nissen Session 1: June 16–June 29 (14 days) Session 2: June 30–July 13 (14 days) Session 3: July 14–July 28 (18 days) Trailseekers (8-day sessions only available to first-time campers ages 6-10): July 14–21, July 21–28 info@friendlypines.com www.friendlypines.com Nestled in the tall, cool pines, Friendly Pines offers 30+ activities to choose from— horseback riding, swimming, waterskiing, rock climbing, ropes course, archery, sports, hiking, pets & more. Excellent campers to staff radios. Professional background checks and drug tests on staff. ACA accredited. 72 years of experience. An Arizona Tradition

since 1941. Cost: Contact for prices. Ages: 6–13 COED overnight camp.

GIRL SCOUTS OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA 4300 E. Broadway Blvd. 319-3174 • Kristin Wakefield

Dates vary • kwakefield@girlscoutssoaz.org www.girlscoutssoaz.org Choose your adventure at Girl Scout Summer Camp. We offer camps from singing and dancing, drama, science, horse, sports and more. Camp is open to all girls in southern Arizona ages 5–18. Scholarships Available. Cost: $188–$346 (cost varies).

HAPPY HOURS SUMMER ENRICHMENT 700 N. Wilson 321-3773 • Lisa Rice May 28–July 19 • lrice@cfraz.org www.happyhoursforkids.org Located at Sam Hughes Elementary School, Happy Hours is an all-inclusive, all-day summer program for children ages 5–12. We offer two tracks: early childhood, which minimizes transitions and uses weekly thematic units; and a middle childhood track that offers children a choice of weekly enrichment classes. Budget Friendly Feature: Everything is included in our low weekly rate—materials, field trips, swimming and snacks! Cost: $135/ week, $30/day. Ages: 5–12.

HUMANE SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA Dog Days in the Desert Summer Programs 3465 E. Kleindale Ages 6–8: Pampered Paws & Cuddle Companions June 3–6 Pet Vet: Caring for Furry and Four-Legged Friends at the Children’s Museum Tucson July 15–18 Ages 9–11:

See our listing, call or email for details!

3326 N. Dodge (Just North of Ft. Lowell) www.tucsonclayco-op.com Call 792-6263 for more information.

The Tucson Girls Chorus Celebrating our 28th Season “Oh My Glee!” Musical Theatre Summer Camp For Boys and Girls Ages 6-15 June 17-22, 24-29 and July 8-13, 15-20

Zuzi! High Flyin’ Arts Camp Literature-based arts camp for ages 7–15 Explore all aspects of performing arts! • Aerial Trapeze Each camp session ends with a performance in our professional theater! • Dance • Writing All camps are from 9:00–3:00 • Choreorgaphy May 28–June 7 • Theatre June 17–June 28 • Costuming July 8–July 19 • Music...and more! July 22–July 26

Call 629-0237 or go to www.zuzimoveit.org for details or to register

Early bird discount

15% OFF for registration by May 15 ($195.50)

This camp is dedicated to singing, dancing, acting, and music making. Work with experienced professionals and perform a show at the end of the week. Feel like you're on Glee! • Choreography • Proper Vocal Technique • Music Reading Skills • Improvisation • Stage Presence

Tuition: $230.00 per week Sibling discount: 15% off for sibling ($195.50 for sibling) Multi-week discount: 15% off for second week ($195.50 for second week)

(520) 577-6064 • www.tucsongirlschorus.org 4020 E. River Rd., Tucson, AZ 85718


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

HUMANE SOCIETY CONTINUED Featured Pet Productions • June 10–13 When Dogs Were Wolves and Cats Were Wild July 8–11 Ages 12–14: Junior Vet; Caring Careers • June 17–20 Pet Pads and Cool Cribs • July 22–25 All programs run Mon.–Thu. Freshmen 6–8, Juniors 9–11, Seniors 11–14 $225 for the public, $200 for Hand-In-Paw Kids Club Members Inge Koopman-Leyva 321-3704 x142 ikoopmanleyva@hssaz.org www.hssaz.org Dog Days programs provide children with in-depth, hands-on education about animal care while instilling kindness and compassion. Utilizing classroom activities, arts and crafts and hands-on animal care, participants will develop good animal stewardship skills by caring for dozens of homeless pets from the Humane Society Shelter.

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF TUCSON 1701 E. Seneca St. in Jefferson Park 5 blocks from UMC • 406-0552 Mon., June 3–Fri., July 26 admissions@InternationalSchoolofTucson.org InternationalSchoolofTucson.org Spend the summer with creative, curious and motivated students learning language and culture from around the world! IST’s summer language-immersion camp, offered in Spanish, French, Chinese and German with enrichment program options of sports, science, art, circus, music and more, will engage, motivate and stimulate your child. Cost: $200 full-time, $150 half-time, and $60 daily. Discounts for 4-week and 8-week packages. Ages: 3–12.

May 2013

Bear essential news for kids!

JUST HORSIN’ AROUND

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PO Box 910 • Vail 520-591-1615 • May 27–July 19 Justhorsininvail@yahoo.com www.justhorsin.zoomshare.com Does your child love horses? So do we! Send your child to a hands-on horse camp where we spend our day riding. Professional instructors, round pens, arena, trail riding. Full day camp with transportation to and from Tucson/Vail. We keep our horse camps’ cost low, so your child can ride more often! Cost: $165/week. Ages: 8–18.

KATANA GAMES 5420 E. Broadway Blvd. #254 908-6648 • Jason or Sarah Program dates vary between 2 classes sarah@katanagames.net www.katanagames.net Camp Katana will take kids through the experience of creating a video game from their own ideas and imagination. We offer two classes based on age, maturity, artistic, computer and group skills. We give hands-on demos from many different genres in gaming. The Gamer class will involve the drawing and writing process, while the Design class will use computer software. Ages: 7–13, 14–18.

KIDZART Locations across Tucson Metro area 495-4952 • Dates all summer kidzarttucson@gmail.com www.KidzArtAZ.com KidzArt offers up a fun-filled summer of colorful and exciting creative arts activities. Stretch your imagination, build skills in the visual arts, and have fun! Campers create original drawings, paintings, sculpture and multi-media projects. It’s ART-rageous!! Ages: 5 and up.

continued on page 34 ➧

Ages 5-12

View the camp catalog, register and pay online at: www.pima.edu/continuinged Questions? Send an email to continuinged@pima.edu or call (520) 206-6579.

S T E M

SFLHQFH‡THFKQRORJ\‡EQJLQHHULQJ‡MDWK Introducing a NEW program for teens ages 13-17. Go to www.pima.edu and enter “Teen Scene” in the search field.

Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity College. To request a reasonable accommodation, a minimum of 5 working days’ advance notice is requested. Contact (520) 206-4539.

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Glass Art Summer Camp for KIDS! June 3rd–July 27 • Mosaic , Fusing, and Bead Making Classes • Half Day and Full Day Camps from 8 am–5 pm • Starting at $210/Week TO REGISTER: CALL (520) 884-7814 or visit www.sonoranglass.org

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KU Studios

6066 N. Oracle Rd. 293-1225 • Lisa Holtorf kustudiostucson@gmail.com www.kustars.com

Third annual SUMMER CAMP at KU Studios! Join us for a fun-filled week of singing, dancing and exploration—for kids of all ages. Preschool camps (9 a.m.–12 p.m.) $100. Full day camps—1–6 graders (9 a.m.–4 p.m.) $200. Late pick up available! www.kustars.com dates & details! Grades: PreK–6.

Kung Fu Theater Kung Fu Theater Acting Camp For Kids

k o o b y r o t S Camps ok • Jungle Bo Beauty • Sleeping

re for Kiadms ps Theatm Su mer C

e Book Eastsid 3-7. Jungle urch Dates: June Verde Lutheran Ch /week Tanque 8-12. $150 es ag pm 9am-3 $85/week Ages 5-7. n. oo -n m 9a est ok Northw 1. Jungle Bo p June 17-2 e Fellowshi bl Bi fe Li New $150/week ages 8-12. 9am-3pm 7. $85/week 5es ag 9am- noon e Eastsid ping Beauty 8-12. Slee an Church Dates: July rde Luther eek Tanque Ve 12. $150/w 8es ag 9am-3pm 5/week es 5-7. $8 ag n oo -n 9am est auty Northw Sleeping Be July 15-19. llowship Fe e bl Bi fe New Li $150/week ages 8-12. 9am-3pm 5/week $8 7. 5es ag ll be held 9am-noon e public wi th r fo ce performan p at 7pm! m Showcase ca of g evenin each Friday

For more information or to register, go to cyttucson.org, or call 751-7510

3915 E. Pima • 548-7090 Session 1: June 17–21, Session 2: June 24–28 10 a.m.–4 p.m. s_firestine@yahoo.com kungfuacademytucson.com

Play Kung Fu games, theater games, perform skits, learn to be a tiger, a crane, a snake, a monkey, and of course...a panda. We even learn the ancient wisdom of Shifu! Cost: $195/session (siblings $135); attend both sessions for only $300 (siblings $200). Ages: 6–12.

sleininger@lpatucson.org www.LPATucson.org Daily activities include weekly themes, arts & crafts, sports (basketball, volley ball, tae kwando), music & movement and academic enrichment. DES approved. Stop summer brain drain the fun way! Cost: $125/week. Grades: K–8.

MAD SCIENCE OF PIMA COUNTY

2608 N. Stone Ave. • 733-7000 www.madscience.org/tucson office@madscienceaz.com June 10–14 • Rancho Sahuarita Clubhouse 9 a.m.–noon June 17–21 • St. Michael’s School 9 a.m.–noon June 24–28 • Tanque Verde Lutheran Church 9 a.m.–3 p.m.

We are the best in HANDS-ON science for kids. With camp locations all over Tucson, you’re sure to find one that fits your needs. See our web site for details and to sign up. Or give our office a call. Ages: 6–12.

The Mini Time Machine Museum of Miniatures

KXCI 91.3 FM

220 S. 4th Ave. 623-1000 x17 • Amanda July 8–11, July 22–25 amanda@kxci.org • KXCI.org

Learn broadcasting skills in a fun setting. Actual deejays show you everything you need to know. Students “graduate” by going on-air, live, with their favorite music. Cost: $125. Ages: 9–12, 13–16.

La Paloma Academy 8140 E. Golf Links & 2050 N. Wilmot 861-2611 • Steve Leininger May 28–July 19

Home of Kids Unlimited

4455 E. Camp Lowell Dr. 881-0606 • Lisa Hastreiter-Lamb June 3–Aug. 2 lisahl@theminitimemachine.org www.theminitimemachine.org

Distinctive Features: New this year is a daily, afternoon program called clubHOUSE. Description: Fill the lazy days of your summer with some summertime fun at the Mini Time Machine Museum! Join us for our week-long half-day summer camps or drop in to our new daily program, clubHOUSE. Play games and create different miniatures according to the week’s theme. Ages: 5–12. Cost: $20–$90. Member discounts available. Complete details and list of activities at www.theminitimemachine.org/summertime

Summer Camp at KU Studios!

Preschool Camps 3–6, one week sessions. 4 Sessions, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, $100 each. Dates: June 3–7, June 17–21, July 15–19, July 22–26—Princess Camp, Disney Camp, Sesame Street and Dr. Seuss. Full Day Camps 1st thru 6th grade, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., $200 each session. 3 Sessions, Dates: June 10–14, June 24–28, July 8–12 • Fairy Tale Camp • Classic KU Performing Camp—Be a Star! • The Best of Broadway and Television

KU Studios • Home of Kids Unlimited 6066 N Oracle Road • 520.293.1225 kukidsbase@aol.com • www.kustars.com


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

ORME SCHOOL SUMMER CAMP HC 63 Box 3040 • Mayer 928-632-7601 www.ormecamp.org Come out to the Ranch this summer and explore the Southwest! From June 16–July 28, ages 9–16 can enjoy a variety of camps for every adventure. Choose from Traditional Camp, Intensified Horsemanship, Caravans throughout the Southwest region, ESL Language Institutes, as well as the option of Summer School. Traditional camp, Intensified Horsemanship, and Caravans run for two weeks each session. Come make new friends and learn or improve your horsemanship skills. Other camp activities include paintball, camping, swimming and arts & crafts.

PHOENIX ZOO CAMP ZOO 455 N. Galvin Pkwy. • Phoenix 602-914-4333 www.phoenixzoo.org Children will have fascinating adventures with the natural world this summer at Camp Zoo. Each age-appropriate, weeklong session is filled with up-close animal encounters, hands-on activities, games, in-depth investigations and organized free-time. During the mornings, we’ll take advantage of the cooler temperatures and participate in outdoor activities such as water-play and hiking. In the afternoons, we will spend more time participating in indoor activities. Camp Zoo is for students entering K–8 grade in the fall of 2013. Full and half day sessions available. 7 and 8 grade are only full-days and Kindergarten is only a half-day option. Reservations required, please call 602-914-4333 or register at phoenixzoo.org. Cost: Full day $275 nonmembers, $250 members; Half day $170 non-members, $155 members.

PIMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE PIMA FOR KIDS 401 N. Bonita Ave. 206-6579 • Noel Hensley June 3–July 26 continuinged@pima.edu www.pima.edu/continuinged Legos, Rockets, Video Gamemaking,

May 2013

Spanish, Golf, Fly, Animate, Camera, Action, Build, Destroy, Sizzle, Dance, Bake, Create, Collide, Investigate. Quality teachers Quality classrooms Quality activities for your Quality child. P4K: where play meets learning. Ages: 5–12. Cost: $45–$350. 10% discount if you register and pay online by May 15 http://pima.edu/continuinged

PIMA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 101 N. Stone Ave. • 520-594-5612 May 24–July 20, 2013 www.library.pima.gov Read, read, read and more this summer at the Pima County Public Library! For more information, go to your local Pima County branch library or online at: www.library. pima.gov. Cost: FREE. Ages: All ages.

PINE CANYON CAMP & RETREAT CENTER www.pinecanyoncamp.com 11701 S. Downings Pass Rd. (in the heart of the incomparable Chiricahua Mountains) • Willcox 520-824-3553 MaryLou Chopelas, Camp Director info@pinecamp.org Youth Camp • Ages: 8–14 • June 17–July 20 Cost: $349/week, $299/week for members of Friends of Pine Canyon Camp Experience traditional camp activities like: Archery, Arts & Crafts, Team Building, Hiking, Sports, Campfires, S’Mores, Talent Shows and optional Religious Studies!

Teen Camp (ages: 8–14) • June 17–July 20 Cost for 2 weeks: $419, $359 for members Sessions are designed to develop your teen’s leadership potential. Includes Interactive Trust and Teambuilding Workshops, Organizing Camp Activities, Leading Songs & Skits, Working with Campers thru a service project.

Family Camp (ALL ages) • July 1–7 Prices vary • Discount for members Our Family Camp offers an affordable mountain getaway. It is the perfect setting for a relaxing and/or adventurous vacation! Highlights include campfires, volleyball, bingo, tie dye, arts & crafts, S’mores, hiking, nature walks!

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RAWHIDE RANCH Bonsall, Calif. (near San Diego) PO Box 216 • 760-758-0083

June 16–Aug. 17, 2013 info@rawhideranch.com www.rawhideranch.com A Southern California tradition since 1963. Features ranch activities, daily Western riding lessons, animal & horse science classes, animal care time, archery/riflery, climbing tower, vaulting lessons (gymnastics on horseback) and much more. Ideal for beginning/intermediate riders. Overnight program. ACA & CHA accredited. WAIC member camp. Cost: $930/weekly session. Ages: 7–15.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN 8845 N. Silverbell Rd. • 520-572-8136 June 17–21, July 15–21 office@redeemertucson.org Redeemertucson.org/summer Escape the dulldrums of summer with “Recreation Station” June 17–21 and learn crazy, zany games. Explore the lives of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates with animal interactions in “Leapin Lizards” July 15–19. Discover the world of books with a weekly story hour and music in “Book Blast!” Cost: Varies. Ages: 6–12.

REDEEMER LUTHERAN PRESCHOOL 8845 N. Silverbell Rd. • 520-572-8136 June 17–21, July 15–19 office@redeemertucson.org Redeemertucson.org/summer Come explore the animal kingdom! With educational games and activities, children will explore the “small, small pond” June 17–21 and wild zoo animals July 15–19! Cost: $100/ week. Ages: 3 (potty-trained)–5 .

ROCKS AND ROPES AND THE BLOC 330 S. Toole Ave. #400 • 882-5924 mail@rocksandropes.com 8975 E. Tanque Verde • 209-2562 theBLOC@rocksandropes.com May 27–July 26 rocksandropes.com

Camp Katana will take you through the experience of creating your own Video Game! Ages 7–13 & 14–18

Create a Video Game with your own ideas and imagination. 2 classes based on age, maturity, artistic, computer and group skills. • Gamer Class—Drawing & Writing Process June 3–7, 10–14, 17–21• July 8–12, 22–26 • Design Class—Computer Software June 24–28, July 15–19 Register Now for Summer Camp Program. Call for dates and times.

5420 E. Broadway, #254 • 908-6648 KatanaGames.net


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

ROCKS AND ROPES CONTINUED Since 1992, Rocks and Ropes has hosted summer climbing camps. Thousands of children of all ages and climbing abilities have found out that our camp is the most fun, unique and safe way to make your summer exciting and educational. Ages: 5–15.

SARABANDE ACADEMY OF RIDING SUMMER PROGRAM 6406 W. Ina Rd. • 907-3965 Weekly Camps • May 27–July 5 (no camp June 11–17) 8 a.m.–12 p.m. (Mon.–Fri.) info@sarabandeacademy.com www.sarabandeacademy.com

Bear essential news for kids!

621-2430 • Marissa Elias-Casteneda June 10–13 & June 17–20 • 9 a.m.–4 p.m. seanmilller@arizona.edu www.arizonawildcats.com/camps/ m-basketball.html The Sean Miller Basketball Camp teaches the basic fundamentals of the game of basketball. We will have an exciting week of competition and skill instruction aided by the camp staff and UA coaches. Campers will play in McKale Center, Richard Jefferson Gym, and Bear Down Gym. Cost: $230/ session. Grades: 1–8 (entering).

SKATE COUNTRY

Beyond riding...a summer camp like no other in the foothills of the Tucson Mountains. Students at our camp won’t just learn how to ride. They’ll learn how to care for the horse, how to prepare it for riding and much more. Family and multiple week discounts.

SATORI SUMMER 2013 3801 N. 1st Ave. • 887-4003 Mon., June 3–Fri., July 26

7980 E. 22nd St. • 298-4409 May 29–Aug. 5 • 1–4 p.m. Valid 7 days a week www.SkateCountry.com Our Summer Pass is valid 7 days a week from 1–4 p.m. Starting May 28–Aug. 4.This equals 69 available skating sessions or 207 hours of skating. Cost of the pass is $50, skate rental extra if necessary. Pass has a potential value of $414. All ages welcome! www.skatecountry.com

SUNSHINE SCHOOL IN ORO VALLEY Summer Fun for Preschoolers

9 a.m.–1 p.m. (Mon.–Fri.) Before-camp starting at 7:30 a.m. After-camp care until 5:45 p.m. www.satorischool.org Ages 21/2–8: Explore arts, athletics, academics, science, technology and more in fun, week-long, thematic summer sessions including Zoo, Spanish, Drumming, Soccer, Water/Water/Water, Gardening & Cooking, Field Trips, Back-to-School Prep, etc. Cost: $110/week, 10% discount with 3-week registrations.

SONORAN GLASS SCHOOL

9000 N. Oracle Rd. #204 742-6874 • Kristen Tues., Wed., Thu. during June & July 8 a.m.–1 p.m. www.sunshineschooltucson.org Loving children since 1984. Themes include: Take a Trip, the World of Eric Carle, Amazing Animals, Literature-based Cooking, The Ocean, Mad about Science, Space, and The Arts.

TANQUE VERDE RANCH

633 W. 18th St. 520-884-7814 • John-Peter Wilhite June 3–July 26 • info@sonoranglass.org www.sonoranglass.org Sonoran Glass School will be offering All-Day and Half-Day Summer Camps for kids ages 7–18. Each camp will be a week long and camps start the first week of June. Full day camps cost $400 and half-day camps cost $210. The kids will work in the Warm Shop making fused glass pieces and mosaics and the Flame Shop making beads. Please go to our website for more information about each camp. Costs: $210–$400. Ages: 7–18.

SEAN MILLER BASKETBALL CAMP

14301 E. Speedway 296-6275 • Lisa Bedient Summer Day Camp Daily (ages 7–15) Summer Overnight Camp (ages 9–13) June 29–Aug. 3 lbedient@tvgr.com www.tanqueverderanch.com Tanque Verde Ranch offers an exciting, indepth, summer horse camp, available in both 7-day and 14-day sessions. Campers will also participate in horseback riding lessons, trail rides and fun-filled riding competitions. Campers will learn to become independent riders, as they enhance their skills and form a deeper relationship with their horse.

1 National Championship Dr. Rm 242

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Creative Juice Art Bar

Presents...

The Juice Box

A Summer Camp for Kids ages 6–13 Explore a variety of mediums and techniques with a different art form each week.

4 weekly sessions in June • 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Join Us NOW for Saturday 271-5023 • CreativeJuiceArtBar.com Kids 6530 E. Tanque Verde #160 in La Plaza Shoppes Workshops!

928-632-7601

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CAMPS 2013

TONY AMATO SOCCER CAMP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA PO Box 42785 954-552-7556 • Samantha Amato June 3–7, June 10–13, June 28–30 tonyamatosoccercamps@gmail.com www.tonyamatosoccercamps.com Offering 3 sessions this summer! Check out our website to find the best fit for you. www.TonyAmatoSoccerCamps.com. UA Head Soccer Coach is involved in all sessions along with his staff and players. See you out at the field soon! Ages: Boys & Girls 5–18.

TOSCANA STUDIO AND GALLERY 9040 N. Oracle Rd. • Oro Valley 575-1445 • Linda Ahearn May 28–Aug. 1 linda@toscanastudioandgallery.com www.toscanastudioandgallery.com Toscana Studio offers a dynamic art camp experience for kids grades 2–12. A wide variety of media including Clay and Plaster Sculpture, Mixed Media and Collage, Painting, Paper Mache, and Book Making. Camps run 4 consecutive days from 10 a.m.–3 p.m. and end with a gallery show. Kids are open to create freely with in the selected week, and small classes are guaranteed to provide individual instruction. Cost: $225/week.

Continued from page 37 TRAK RANCH SUMMER PROGRAM 3230 N. Craycroft Rd. • 298-9808 May 27–June 28 • one-week sessions 8 a.m.–12:30 p.m. • Mon.–Fri. www.traktucson.org Our summer program is designed to help campers learn, grow, make friends and have fun. We offer many positive and rewarding experiences through animal education and interaction, pony rides, water play, arts & crafts and games. Campers will participate in various activities like making goat milk ice cream, dyeing sheep wool, making eggshell mosaics and more. $225/week. Ages: 5–12.

TRIANGLE Y RANCH SUMMER CAMP AND RETREAT CENTER 520-884-0987 tucsonymca.org/triangle Triangle Y Ranch Camp offers a unique adventure experience for kids and families. If your child wants to experience an adventure, while making new friends and having the time of their life, this is the place!

TUCSON BOTANICAL GARDENS 2150 N. Alvernon Wy. 326-9686 • Alyson Greene June 3–7, June 24–29, July 15–19 education2@tucsonbontanical.org www.tucsonbotanical.org


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

TUCSON BOTANICAL CONTINUED In these week-long camps students will learn not only about desert flora but desert fauna as well as this year Tucson Bontanical Gardens is partnering with the Reid Park Zoo for an exciting camp. Grades: 1–6.

TUCSON CLAY CO-OP 3326 N. Dodge Blvd. 792-6263 • Maxine Krasnow 2 Week Sessions held on Tues., Wed., Thr. (9 am –noon) Session 1: June 18–27 Session 2: July 2–11 Session 3: July 16–25 Session 4: July 30–Aug. 8 tucsonclaycoop@yahoo.com www.tucsonclayco-op.com Interactive Summer Clay Camp at the Tucson Clay Co-op includes wheel throwing, hand building and theatre for children 6 to 12 years old (session 4 is clay only). Each educational and fun-filled 2 week session ends with a party and play performance.

Cost: 2 weeks $108. Ages: 6–12. See pg. 23

TUCSON GIRLS CHORUS 4020 E. River Rd. 577–6064 • Chris Fresolone June 17–22, June 24–29, July 8–13, July 15–20 cfresolone@tucsongirlschorus.org www.tucsongirlschorus.org Attend the “Oh My Glee!” Musical Theatre Summer Camp, for boys and girls. Learn to sing, dance, act and make music. Work with experienced professionals and perform a show at the end of the week. Cost: $230/ week. Early Bird Discount: 15% off by May 15. Sibling discount: 15% ($195.50 for sibling). Multi-week discount: 15% off for 2nd week. Ages: 6–15.

TUCSON JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER CAMP “J” 3800 E. River Rd. 299-3000 • Camp Director Scott Zorn May 28–Aug. 2 • camp@tucsonjcc.org mailto: szorn@tucsonjcc.org www.tucsonjcc.org Rock away with Camp J for a memorable summer of fun and adventure. Swimming, arts & crafts, field trips, theme days, sports

ER M M U S CAMP 2013

camps and so much more! Our professional staff brings excitement to the programs and helps to create memories to last a lifetime. Cost: Varies. Ages: 2–17.

TUCSON MUSEUM OF ART 140 N. Main Ave. 624-2333 • Morgan Wells June 3–Aug. 2 Education@TucsonMuseumofArt.org www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org Draw, paint, sculpt, collage, print and more at the Tucson Museum of Art! Planned and taught by art teachers, the Summer Arts Program will inspire children to create original works of art in a variety of gallery and studio activities. Cost: Prices start at $100 for museum members, $155 for nonmembers, $20 for after care. Ages: 5–13.

TUCSON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT www.tucsonaz.gov/parksandrec 900 S. Randolph Wy. • 791-4877 Dates vary • June–July Find your fun with Tucson Parks and Recreation for a safe and educational summertime experience. Pick-up your free copy of the Summer Program Guide and Class Catalog available at all rec centers or online at: www.tucsonaz.gov/parksandrec. City of Tucson residents Use EZEEreg online: www.ezeereg.com • Ages: 5–17. 18 city pools open May 30–July 30. Swim lessons offered for $15 for youth 17 and under.

Bear essential news for kids!

SATORI Summer 2013 Monday, June 3 through Friday, July 26 Ages 2 1/2 –8 years old: Explore arts, athletics, academics, science, and more in fun, week-long, thematic Summer sessions including Zoo, Spanish, Drumming, Soccer, Water/Water/Water, Gardening & Cooking, Field Trips, Back-to-School Prep, & more. $110 per week. Mon.–Fri. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 10% discount with three-week registrations. One-week sessions. Before- and after- camp care available. 7:30 a.m. – 5:45 p.m. Call for more information and a flyer.

887-4003 3801 N. 1st Avenue

www.satorischool.org A Non-Profit Organization

Happy Hours Summer Enrichment

A No ll Inclu Ext sive ra F ! ees !

PALO VERDE LITTLE KIDS SUMMER BASKETBALL PROGRAM

Sam Hughes Elementary School

Palo Verde High School 1302 S. Avenida Vega 906-9375 • Coach Marty Roth June 3–June 27 • 11 a.m.–1 p.m. (Mon.–Thu.) Martin.roth@tusd1.org

May 28 to July 19 Monday–Friday • 7am–6p.m. Field Trips and Snacks Included DES Contracted • $135/week or $30/day

This is our 1st annual June basketball camp for boys and girls. One league is for current 4th and 5th graders, the other is for current 6th and 7th graders. Our varsity coaching staff and players will teach skill development, gameplay, and sportsmanship. Stop by the school to register or contact Coach Marty Roth. Cost: Only $25.

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700 N. Wilson

A Summer of fun and hands-on learning including cooking, sports, art, science, music and much more!

Call (520) 321-3773 today! For more information, visit www.happyhoursforkids.org

continued on page 40 ➧

Basketball Essentials All Boys entering Grades 4–9

Session 1: June 10–13, 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Session 2: June 24–27, 8:00 a.m. to Noon

Planned and taught by art teachers, the Summer Arts program will inspire children to create original works of art in a variety of gallery and studio activities. Morning and afternoon sessions with after care offered. Call 520-624-2333 or email Education@TucsonMuseumofArt.org

LOCATION:

for more information, or visit

Salpointe Catholic High School

our website at

1545 E. Copper St. • Tucson, AZ 85719

www.TucsonMuseumofArt.org.

bholstrom@Salpointe.org •

547-9359


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Serving Around the World Church Day Camp July 8–12 •Ages 4–12 Cost for week: $20, 9 a.m. to noon $40, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Includes lunch Learn about global needs and service in a faith context, through sacred stories, mapping, multi-cultural music, crafts, recreation. Skilled teachers. Spacious campus. Register by June 17. Information: Call church office (520) 297-1181

Casas Adobes Congregational Church, UCC 6801 N. Oracle Rd. (between Ina and Orange Grove)

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TUCSON RACQUET CLUB SUMMER CAMP

TUTORING CLUB OF THE FOOTHILLS

4001 N. Country Club Rd. 520-303-7902 • Gary Engelbrecht May 28–Aug. 2 summercamp@tucsonracquetclub.com www.tucsonracquetclub.com A “Sports Camp” for all ages and abilities. From 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Extended hours also available. “All Sports Camp” (ages 7–15) Lifetime sports include tennis, basketball, volleyball, swimming, racquetball and martial arts. “Pee Wee Camp” (ages 5–7) Features basketball, tennis, swimming, and arts & crafts. “Tennis Camp” (ages 7–17) Tennis, instruction, drill, and matchplay. “Soccer Camp” Ages (ages 8–10) Get ready for the “World Cup”. “Pee Wee Soccer Camp” (ages5–7) A soccer morning, jump in the pool, and a fun afternoon. “Jr. Evening Tennis Camp” (Ages 7–17)

4772 E. Sunrise Dr. 299-8899 • Vicki Capin Dates ongoing information@tutoringclubfoothills.com www.tutoringclub.com/tucsonaz

TUCSON YOUTH FOOTBALL & SPIRIT FEDERATION, INC. 322-9779 • Liana Lukowski LLLukowski@msn.com www.tyfsf.com Tucson Youth Football and Spirit Federation, Inc. is a non-profit 501c3 organization. We provide the youth of Southern Arizona with an opportunity to learn, play and compete safely in tackle football, flag football, cheerleading, and dance while encouraging academic achievement, physical fitness and sportsmanship. Ages: 5–15.

TUSD COMMUNITY SCHOOL 102 N. Plumer • 520-225-3226 May 27–July 26 communityeducation@tusd1.org www.tusd1.org/CommunityEducation We provide a variety of activities for children ages 3–12. Our Community Schools sites offer a variety of fee based programs that differ from site to site. This summer we will have activities such as arts & crafts, cooking, science/sensory, drama, indoor/outdoor physical activities and more. Ages: 3–12.

Grab Some Friends

and get to Skate Country! t the Check ou our on calendar r all fo Web site s! the detail

www.skatecountry.com 7980 E. 22nd St.

298-4409

5

Keep up, catch up, or get ahead. Tutoring Club programs offer individualized tutoring in Math, Reading, and Writing. This year we will be offering “Get ready for Kindergarten” and “Get Ready for 1st grade” Camps. FUN camps all summer long. Family discounts available! Grades: K–12.

UA CAMPUS RECREATION: “A” CAMP 1400 E. 6th St. • 621-6891 Runs May 27–Aug. 2 danamendoza@email.arizona.edu Campusrec.arizona.edu/youthcamps The 18th year of “A” Camp continues with a focus on adventure, discovery, wellness and community through experiential projects and field trips. We will play sports and games, swim, create art and develop team-building skills while learning about ourselves, the desert and our community.

Cost: $220/week, $200/week members. Ages: 5–11. CIT Program: 12–15.

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA MEL & ENID ZUCKERMAN COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH Healthy 2 B Me Summer Camp 1400 E. 6th Street 906-8622 June 3–7, June 24–28, July 15–19 9 a.m.–3 p.m. plattner@email.arizona.edu Campers will learn about wellness through many fun interactive activities that will include; nutrition, cooking, physical activities such as, Yoga, Zumba, dance, and swimming along with sun safety, dental health, hygiene, community and team building experiences. Cost: $345. Grades: 2–5. Ages: 7–10.

Sizzling Summer Fun! Au nique

rts program! ative a e r c g in confidence-build

For FREE!

Bring in this coupon and get FREE admission for up to 5 skaters. Valid Mon. thru Thr. 4–6 pm. Not valid for birthday parties or with other offers. Please limit coupon use to 1 per person per week. Not valid for groups or day care providers.

SKATE RENTAL EXTRA

Expires 6/11/13

It’s ART-Rageous 495-4952 * www.KidzArtAZ.com


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

UA FUSION CAMPS uafusion.arizona.edu 1400 E. 6th St. • 621-6891 Eight sessions • June 3–July 26 9 a.m.–4 p.m. • Extended care available UA Fusion Camp offers eight weeks of themed camps that are infused with literacy and creative arts, science explorations, and health and wellness. The camps provide children with unique hands-on experiences that promote excitement for learning. For more details and to register, visit uafusion.arizona.edu • Registration now open. Also offered, summer fun at the Flandrau Science Center & Planetarium for kids entering grades K–5! Week 1 • June 3–7 Grades K–2: Inspector T-Rex • Learn about dinosaurs through stories, handson activities and science investigations. Grades 3–5: The Science Chef. Trade in your lab coat for an apron as we explore how to make nutritious and health food choices. Grades 2–6: Spa Science (especially for Girls) • Whip up some lip gloss, make scented soap, create spa-worthy meals. Week 2 • June 10–14 Grades K–2: Oh Say Can You Say SeussTastic! Enjoy the rhythms and rhymes of Dr. Seuss. Grades 3–5: Mission Impossible. Your mission—explore the tricks of the spy trade using science. Grades 2–6: Adventure with Saige. Live the American Girl books through Saige. Week 3 • June 17–21 Grades K-2. The Science of Illusion. Explore the magical wonder behind science. Grade 3–5: Unbored. Based on the

May 2013

popular book, campers will certainly be “unbored”. Fun activities will spark kids’ curiosity and investigation. Grades 2–6: Adventure with Cecile & MarieGrace (2 weeks • $450) Week 4 •June 27-28 Grades K–2: Kitchen Chemistry. Mix together some basic chemistry fun using everyday foods to learn and test science concepts. Grades 3–5: Grossology. Got boogers, blisters, scabs and snot? We all do! Discover how these human body functions are created. Week 5 • July 1–5 (July 4 off) Grades K–2: Pop, Boom, Fizzle. Enjoy experiments that pop, sizzle, smoke or go boom? Then this class exploring chemical reactions is for you. Grades 3–5: Steve Spangler Science. Push the limits of your inner mad scientist. You’ll do unforgettable experiments that make science fun! Week 6 • July 8–12 Grades K–2: Life Between the Tides. Get your hands wet and learn the fishy facts about the intertidal zone organisms. Grades 3–5: Lost in Space. Learn about and blast off into our solar system the universe. Week 7 • July 15–19 Grades K–2: Space Cadet. Bring your imagination and step into Space Station Flandrau! Share ancient myths, legends and stories inspired by planets and the constellations. Grades 3–5: Exploring Sky Islands. Spend the week “in the islands” learning why the Tucson Region has more kinds of plants and animals than anywhere else in the U.S.

Bear essential news for kids!

3rd

2nd

9 one-week sessions beginning June 3rd

continued on page 42 ➧

2013 David Rubio Volleyball Camp 3-Day Mini Camp at McKale Center May 28– 30 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

“Great introduction to volleyball” Girls & Boys, ages 8–13 • Lunch provided Everything takes place in McKale Center Campers supervised at all times

520-818-8668 davidrubiovolleyballcamp@gmail.com www.davidrubiovolleyballcamp.com

$150 per camper

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UA FUSION CAMPS CONTINUED

Every Tuesday, 11:00am –1:00pm June 4 – July 23 Includes All-You-Can-Eat Lunch Buffet, a kid’s soda and fun activites.

Only $3.99 per child plus tax.

VANTAGE BOWLING CENTERS

No need to go any further than Peter Piper Pizza to check out different kinds of bugs, plants and animals... including our prehistoric friends! Children at Tucson locations will receive a FREE child’s pass to the International Wildlife Museum.

We make safety fun! Plus, meet your local firefighter, police officer or doctor.

Ahoy! We need all hands on deck for an unforgettable pirate adventure! Don’t forget to enter the Peter Piper Pizza treasure hunt.

Roll up your sleeves and get slimy with out Goo Experts as we investigate everyone’s favorite sticky, icky stuff!

Celebrate Independence Day with Peter Piper Pizza! Don’t forget to wear your red, white and blue as we wish the USA a Happy Birthday, and create a Thank You card for America’s military heroes.

Join us for a rockin’ time! Dress like a music star and join our team as we share our musical talents.

5925 E. Broadway (across from Park Mall)...886-5566 Old Spanish Trail & Harrison...........722-4400 22nd & Alvernon........................ .......790-4232 12th & Ajo Way.................................. 624-1111 Valencia &12th................................... 889-0600

Week 8 • July 22–26 Grades K–2: Backyard Detectives. Get down and dirty and learn about what’s in your backyard and the Sonoran Desert. Grades 3–5.: Deep Blue Sea. Discover the wonderful world of the ocean! Learn about marine habitats of the world as you “travel” to a new marine ecosystem each day.

Cactus Bowl, Lucky Strike, Tucson Bowl Santa Cruz, Fiesta Lanes • 629-0802 Register May 11, 2013 • Sat. (10 a.m.) vantagebowling@aol.com vantagebowlingcenters.com Vantage Youth Bowling Club—Saturday mornings 10 a.m., 3 games of bowling, shoes, coaching, awards, discounts, earn college scholarship money. Bowling is a lifetime sport for all ages and abilities. All of our centers are air conditioned, smoke-free, fun-filled family environment. Cost: $8/week (11 weeks). Ages: 4–18.

Saddle up and bring a sidekick! Don your finest Western duds and get ready for a shindig Peter Piper style.

Aloha! Join us for a Peter Piper luau. We’ll enjoy a day in paradise with fun activities and crafts. Mahalo!

Irvington & I-19.........................434-8000 Oracle & Limberlost.................888-5520 Ina & Thornydale......................744-1111 Oracle & Magee........................575-0770 Silverbell & Speedway.............624-7475

CHILD LANGUAGE CENTER WINGS ON WORDS SUMMER DAY CAMP 202 E. Speedway 628-1659 • Karen Zakerwski

Continued from page 41 May 29–July 2 • www.clctucson.org Half- and full-day programs. Therapy available four times a week for children with speech-language impairments. Exciting activities emphasize enriched language, social interaction and love of reading. Affiliated with UA; public servant discounts; DES approved; NAC accredited. Application/ scholarship forms available online. Ages: 3 yrs. 6 mo.–5 yrs. 11 mo.

YMCA OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA DAY CAMPS 520-623-5511 Kids 4–16 think our Day Camps are awesome! Every day is filled with fun– –swimming, indoor and outdoor sports, arts and crafts, field trips, theme weeks, and more ––all in a safe and positive environment for children. Log on to tucsonymca.org and register today! Locations: Desert Willow Elementary, 520-885-2317 Dietz Elementary, 520-885-2317 Erickson Elementary, 520-885-2317 YMCA Holsclaw Family Child Care Center, 520-623-9211 Jacobs/City YMCA, 520-623-9211 Lighthouse/City YMCA, 520-795-9725


e-mail: boomer@bearessentialnews.com

May 2013

Mulcahy/City YMCA, 520-294-1449 Northwest YMCA & Pima County Community Center, 520-229-9001 Old Vail Middle School, 520-885-2317 Ott Family YMCA, 520-885-2317 Great Expectations Academy in Sahuarita, 520-294-1449

ZUZI! DANCE COMPANY SCHOOL & THEATER 738 N. 5th Ave. • 629-0237 June–Aug. zuzisphere@gmail.com www.zuzimoveit.org

SEA LIFE ARIZONA

Campers use stories as inspiration for crafting choreography, creating art and music, making costumes, and exploring various types of dance including hip hop, modern, and aerial trapeze! Camp culminates in an integrative performance for family and friends in a professional theater! Partial scholarships available. Ages: 7–15.

SUMMER ATTRACTIONS & CAMP FIELD TRIP SITES GOLF N’ STUFF

HARKINS THEATRES SUMMER MOVIE FUN www.HarkinsTheatres.com/SMF or call 480-627-7777 Summer Movie Fun is back at the Tucson Spectrum 18 and coming to new Arizona Pavilions 12. Ten kids’ movies for $5 starts May 27. Movies include Mirror Mirror, Hotel Transylvania, Madagasar 3, Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax, Ice Age 4, Rise of the Guardians and more. Don’t miss the fun!

205-5673 • Barb Vandervelde P.O. Box 11900 bvandervelde@hughesfcu.org www.hughesfcu.org

5000 S. Arizona Mills Cir. • Tempe 480-478-7600 www.sealifeus.com A great adventure for any summer camp. Come face to face with more than 5,000 sea creatures in displays that recreate natural habitats. Guests see all types of different sea creatures including sharks, rays, tropical fish, jellyfish, sea horses, a green sea turtle and more. Knowledgeable staff on hand to offer amazing facts about creatures you’ll see. Cost: Check website. Coupon online at bearessentialnews.com/coupons.php. Ages: 3–12.

WILDLIFE WORLD ZOO & AQUARIUM

6503 E. Tanque Verde Rd. • 296-2366 gnssales@gmail.com • www.golfnstuff.com We love summer camps! Bring your group out for an awesome day filled with miniature golf, go-karts, bumper boats, laser tag and video games. Fun for all ages! Special summer rates for unlimited play!!!

HUGHES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Wetmore Branch • 971 W. Wetmore Hermans Road Branch • 951 E. Hermans Rd. Speedway Branch • 3131 E. Speedway Pantano Branch • 280 N. Pantano Rd. Thornydale Branch • 7970 N. Thornydale Rd. Voyager Branch • 8701 S. Kolb Rd. Field trip to a local financial institution. Learn about saving, good money management and check writing. Free classroom presentations and curriculum on financial education for youth, parents and adults. Cost: Free. Ages: 6–17. See page 9.

16501 W. Northern • Litchfield Park 623-935-9453 (WILD) Open 365 days a year • Field trips Mon.–Fri. Zoo: 9 a.m.–6 p.m. • Aquarium: 9 a.m.–9 p.m. Special rates for evening aquarium admission www.wildlifeworld.com Onsite programs • 623-935-5692 x106 Arizona’s largest collection of exotic animals and a new aquarium with 75 exhibits, including Amazon River Monsters, make our zoo perfect for family outings and summer camps. Experience the thrill of our Lory Parrot Feeding and Wildlife Encounters. For a small fee, you can also enjoy the African Safari Train, Australian Boat Ride, Skyride or Carousel. Family membership includes free unlimited zoo & aquarium admission for members. Come as often as you like—we’re open every day of the summer...and year! Field trip: $8/student, $15/adult, one adult free with every 10 paying students (10 student min.). Admission coupon online at bearessentialnews.com/coupons.php.

Find Bear’s Summer Camp Guide Online —All Summer Long!

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Bear essential news for kids!

Continued from page 18

Warm Weather Fun at Tucson Botanical Gardens by Claire Hartigan, Manzanita Elementary There are lots of fun things happening at Tucson Botanical Gardens this summer. Starting on May 1 and going till June 30 is an outdoor birdhouse exhibit, “Flights of Fancy.” You’ll experience many different kinds of birdhouses: ceramic, metal, tiled, painted and more! There also will be a family bird event called “Flock Party” on May 18! Your family will be able to make a birdhouse and bird feeder to take home, as well as take a tour of the Gardens to see what birds you can spot. The Doolen Middle School Band will be playing there as well. Both of these programs are included with admission. Starting in June and going through September the Gardens will host “Twilight Third Thursdays.” This event starts when the sun starts to go down— 5 to 8 p.m. The first one, on June 20, will have live music by the Latin band Tesoro and art by UofA graduate student Jenny Day. There will be food for sale. Also there will be ice cream to eat. You can even get your face painted! Admission will be $9 for adults and $5 for kids.

A Great MATCH! Summer and Dave Rubio

Volleyball Camp Camps in McKale Center • University of Arizona

Boys & Girls, ages 8–18 Register Mini Camp–May 28–30 NOW! For girls & boys ages 8–13, commuter only & lunch provided July 8–10 • Intermediate All Skills Camp This camp is for kids ages 10–18, who have little experience or who have never played volleyball and want to learn how. You can be a resident and stay on campus or commute!

July 11–14 • Position Camp (girls & boys, ages 10–18)

Private Preschool & Public Charter School Preschool — 6th Grade

Now Enrolling

(Setter/Attacker/Libero/MB)

Preschool (ages 3 & 4) Limited space available.

July 15–18 • Advanced All Skills (girls & boys, ages 10–18)

Call today!

July 19–21 • High School Team Camp

1127 N. 6th Avenue

1301 E. Ft. Lowell Road

Boys & Girls Teams • Commuter Only 40 Teams Max (8 player minimum team) $90–$120/camper

622-8668

319-8668

520-818-8668 • davidrubiovolleyballcamp@gmail.com

www.themontessorischoolhouse.com

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www.davidrubiovolleyballcamp.com


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Bear essential news for kids!

May 2013

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Bear Essential News for Kids