Page 1

M Maayy//JJuunnee 22001133

Electrical System

Troubleshooting For Air Conditioner Controls P Paaggee 55

Boo- Boo Patch Repair Page 9

10 Tips For

RV Safety Page 12

Too Much

Electricity

New Products Page 19

Page 16


May/June 2013

Air Conditioner 5 Electrical System Troubleshooting

Exterior Repair

55 EElleeccttrriiccaall ttrroouubblleesshhoooottiinngg

9 Boo-Boo Patch Repair Technique

Safety 99 BBoooo--BBoooo rreeppaaiirrss 12

10 Tips for RV Safety

Top This! 16 A Little Too Much Power

1122 SSaaffeettyy aawwaarreenneessss

Certification 18 Take the first step to certification

DEPARTMENTS 3

Board of Directors

4

From the Editor

19 New Products 21 Recalls

Certification Page 25

1166 TToooo m muucchh ppoowweerr!!


RV LEARNING CENTER BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chairman Jeff Pastore Hartville RV Center Inc. Hartville, OH (330) 877-3500 jeff@hartvillerv.com

Director

Director

Eleonore Hamm RVDA of Canada Richmond, BC (604) 204-0559 eleonore_hamm@rvda.ca

Matthew Miller Newmar Corporation Nappanee, IN (574) 773-2381 mlmiller@newmarcorp.com

Vice Chairman Dan Pearson PleasureLand RV Center Inc. St. Cloud, MN (320) 251-7588 D.Pearson@pleasurelandrv.com

Director Andy Heck Alpin Haus Amsterdam, NY (518) 842-5900 aheck@alpinhaus.com

Director Russ Patton Byerly RV Center 295 East 5th St. Eureka, MO (636) 938-2000 rpatton@byerlyrv.com

Secretary/Treasurer Bill Koster Protective St. Louis, MO (636) 5365704 bill.koster@protective.com

Director Jeff Hirsch Campers Inn of Kingston Kingston, NH (603) 6425555 jhirsch@campersinn.com

President Phil Ingrassia, CAE RVDA Fairfax, VA (703) 591-7130 pingrassia@rvda.org

Director Rick Horsey Parkview RV Center Smyrna, DE (302) 653-6619 rhorsey@parkviewrv.com

Director Mick Ferkey Greeneway Inc. (Route 66 Dealer) Wisconsin Rapids, W I (715) 325-5170 mickferkey@greenewayrv.com

Director Newt Kindlund Kindlund Investments Winter Park, FL (407) 628-4211 newt@kindlund.com

Director Darrel Friesen All Seasons RV Center Yuba City, CA (530) 671-9070 Darrel@allseasonsrvcenter.com

Director John McCluskey Florida Outdoors RV Center Stuart, FL (772) 288-2221 john@floridaoutdoorsrv.com

Director Steve Plemmons Bill Plemmons RV W orld Rural Hall, NC (336) 3772213 steve@billplemmonsrv.com Director Tom Stinnett Tom Stinnett RV Freedom Center Clarksville, IN (812) 2827718 tstinnett@stinnettrv.com Director Brian Wilkins Wilkins R.V. Inc. Bath, NY (607) 776-3103 bwilkins@wilkinsrv.com

RV LEARNING CENTER STAFF

Phil Ingrassia, CAE RVDA Education Foundation President

Hank Fortune Director of Finance

Julianne Ryder Marketing Communications Specialist

Ronnie Hepp, CAE Vice President for Administration

Jeff Kurowski Director of Industry Relations

Liz Shoemaker Education Coordinator

Karin Van Duyse Chief, RV Learning Center

Isabel McGrath Technician Certification Registrar

Tony Yerman RV Service Consultant

Mary Anne Shreve Editor

Julie Anna Newhouse Marketing Manager

Trish Williams Accounting Clerk

Chuck Boyd Dealer Services Manager

Brett Richardson, Esq., CAE Director of Legal & Regulatory Affairs

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FROM THE EDITOR

May/June 2013

Boo-Boo Repairs And Too Much Power Welcome to this issue of RV Technician.

Next up is a story you’ll want to share with

With hot weather here, dealerships are sure

your customers—especially those who are

to be getting calls about non-functioning air

new to RVing—called “Ten Tips for RV

conditioners, so first up is a story on

Safety.” This commonsense list of how-to’s

troubleshooting AC electrical systems. It

will help them have a safer and more

starts with a quick checklist to help narrow

enjoyable experience. In fact, you might

down and diagnose the problem, followed

want to use this story as a hand-out for all

by more detailed instructions for repairing

service department customers.

various scenarios. Finally, this issue includes a new Top This! Also in this issue, RVDA Service Consultant

column, “A Little Too Much Power,” that

Tony Yerman reveals his technique for

involves a problem familiar to all

dealing with small punctures to an RV’s roof

technicians: customers who won’t admit to

or sides, holes that are too small to warrant

you what repairs they’ve already attempted

replacing the entire roof or body panel. You

to make to their units. Read about how a

know the kind—those one-inch punctures

misguided neighbor helped blow out the

caused by things like small falling branches

entire electrical system of the customer’s

or “dings” while the unit is in tight quarters.

RV, not once but twice. The story begins on

Yerman demonstrates some ingenious

page 16.

ways to repair small damaged areas with

“Boo-Boo Patch Repair Technique,” begins

Mary Anne Shreve Editor 3930 University Drive Fairfax, VA 22030 mashreve@rvda.org

on page 9.

(703) 591-7130 x117

less-invasive cover-up elements that are unobtrusive and blend right in. His story,

Randy Biles, Pikes Peak Traveland Inc. Tom Fribley, Fribley Technical Services Inc. Ellen Kietzmann, Blue Ox Gary Motley, Motley RV Repair Steve Savage, Mobility RV Service Tony Yerman, RV Service Consultant

Page 4


Air Conditioner

Electrical System Troubleshooting for Air Conditioner Controls From Dometic Corp. This article from Dometic focuses on troubleshooting electrical controls on air conditioners. Below is a quick check list of items that should be inspected when problems occur with an air conditioner. 1. Air conditioner turned on – no operation a. Power source problem b. Wiring c. Main board d. Control board 2. Air conditioner turned on – fan runs, no compressor operation a. Wiring b. Compressor c. Cold control d. Main board e. Control board 3. Air conditioner turned on – compressor runs, no fan operation a. Wiring b. Run capacitor c. Motor d. Main board e. Control board Detailed Troubleshooting For Electronic Controls 1. General a. On electronically controlled units, the switch and thermostat have been replaced Page 5

with the main board and control board. A visual check of the ribbon cables, connectors, and board components should be made for loose, damaged, or burned components. b. To check all other components except the main board and the control board: • Disconnect all power to the air conditioner. Remove the incoming AC black wire, the compressor wire from the compressor relay on the main board, and the high fan wire from the main board. Then connect the three wires together; connect the AC power to the air conditioner. The compressor and the motor should operate. • If all other components check out correctly, the module board or control board should be replaced. Of these two, the main board will usually be the primary problem; replace parts as necessary. Note: There is more than one type of main board and control. Defective boards and controls must be replaced with identical parts. Operational failure or damage may occur if a substitute is used. 2. Main board On electronic units, two types of main boards have been used. They are 120 AC volt and DC volt controlled. See the following two diagrams.


a. 120 AC volt controlled: •

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Disconnect all power to the air conditioner. Remove the fan speed wires and the compressor wire from the main board. Set the control board to “COOL” and “HIGH FAN” positions. Connect power to the air conditioner. Verify that the lights on the control board are on. If no lights are on, remove control board and attach directly into main board ribbon cable. If lights do not come on, replace the main board.

With lights on control board, use a 120 VAC incandescent bulb with one lead on the AC WHITE terminal and the other lead on HIGH, and then to compressor terminal to verify the circuit is being completed through the main board. Switch the control pad to other settings and verify all circuits are being completed. If not, replace the main board.

b. DC volt controlled: • This main board is controlled by DC volts supplied from the control board. • To check DC volts, be sure “OFF/ON” switch on control board is on. Measure the outside terminals (#1and #10) on the cable between the main board and the control board. The operating range is 10 to 16 volts DC. If DC volt is not within this range, correct the DC volt supply. • To check the circuit completing capabilities of this board, follow the same procedure as in the previous section, 120 AC volt board. 3. Control board On electronic units, two types of control boards have been used. They are 120 AC volt and DC volt controlled.


a. 120 AC volt controlled • This control board is a signal receiver and completer. All power is supplied by the 120 AC volt main board. With the power switch “ON”, the FAN and MODE LEDs will illuminate. • Move the fan switch to all positions – the LED for each position should light. Next, move MODE switch to all positions – the LED for each position should light. If all the LEDs light when switches are changed, the control board is good. • If a LED does not light when switch is at that position, check the cable connections for a bent pin or improper connection. Also check for any discolored or burnt areas on the board. If a discolored or burnt area is found, correct the short in the cable before installing a new control board. • If all lights light, and no discoloration or burnt area is found, the control board does NOT need to be replaced.

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b. DC volt controlled • This control board is wired to a DC volt supply and is capable of operating a DC volt furnace as well as operating the air conditioner. Only one of these will operate at a time. When the mode selection switch is at “GAS HEAT,” all lights for the air conditioner will not illuminate, and gas heat will illuminate. • DC volts are wired to the control pad attaching positive (+) DC to the red Wire and negative (–) to the black wire. POLARITY has to be correct for operation. • The control board sends DC volts to the main board, and the main board sends signals to control board. It then completes the signals according to fan selection and mode selection to the appropriate appliance (air conditioner or furnace) • The DC volt operation range is 10 to 16 volts. To verify DC volts, check between the black wire and the red wire. If no volts are detected or voltage is outside of the operation range, correct the DC volt supply. If voltage is within the operating range, next check between pin 1 and 10 on the cable. • The voltage should be the same. If none is detected, the control pad is defective. Before replacing the part, verify where the wire is shorted and correct the problem. The most likely problem area would be in the cable that connects the main board and control board. • To check the gas heat mode, verify that the control board is turned on, temperature control slide is all the


way to the right, mode switch is to gas heat position, and green LED is on. Next, remove furnace wiring from the two blue wires. Then check for continuity on the blue wires. Continuity means the thermostat is good. If your results are no continuity, then check for DC volts between black wire and bottom of CR2 Anode (side closest to green device). If DC volts are not present, check cable and main board. If DC volts are present (10 to 16), place a jumper wire between black wire and bottom of CR2 Anode. Next, check continuity on the blue wires. Lack of continuity designates a defective control board. A continuity reading indicates a problem with the cable or main board. If the furnace continues to operate when the control board is turned “OFF,” check continuity on blue wires. Lack of continuity designates the control board is good. Continuity on the blue wires designates a defective control board.

4. Cold control (Low Temperature Protection Device) a. On the roof mounted ducted (in ceiling duct) air conditioners, the cold control is

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used to prevent the evaporator coil from forming ice on the coil. Restricted air entering or exiting the air conditioner is the most common cause. b. There are two types of cold controls: normally closed and normally open. c. If the cold control is wired in the power supply to the compressor, it is a “normally closed” type (continuity). d. It will open the circuit at a temperature below freezing and will close when the temperature of the line reaches approximately 65 to 70 degrees F. e. Do a continuity test through the control. Continuity means the control is completing the circuit; no continuity means the control is not completing the circuit. Verify the temperature of the line before changing. f. If the cold control is wired other than in the power supply to the compressor, it is a normally open type (no continuity). When the refrigerant line it is attached to reaches below freezing temperatures, it will close (continuity) and will open (no continuity) when the temperature of the line reaches approximately 65 to 70 degrees F. Verify temperature of the refrigerant line before changing.


Exterior Repair

Boo-Boo Patch Repair Technique By Tony Yerman

There are many cases in RV damage repair when the damaged area is only a tiny fraction of the overall portion of the vehicle. For example, perhaps a tree limb about 1 ½ inches in diameter falls from a tree and makes a perfectly straight dive through an RV’s roof, leaving a hole no bigger than the diameter of the limb itself. The overall roof size is 38 feet by 8 feet— would you replace the entire 43,776 square inches of roof to repair an area about 2 ¼ square inches? Technically, in an insurance or possibly a warranty situation, it could be argued that the entire roof would have to be at least recovered with all of the substrate damaged material replaced in order to return the unit to pre-loss condition. This would be profoundly more expensive, more invasive, and could cause even more problems in the long run. Would you really want to disturb parts of a vehicle that have no history of any problems such as water leaks? When the roof is removed in its entirety, other parts of the vehicle, such as the sidewalls or interior fixtures, might shift during repairs, causing a fit problem when the new roof is installed. That’s not to say that a new roof should never be installed. There are situations where it must be done. But there’s a degree of risk with the procedure. It just doesn’t make sense to take the risk when it’s not necessary.

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With that said, I present a repair technique fondly known in the industry as the booboo patch. Manufacturers have used this technique for years. The repair involves adding a piece of equipment, an accessory, or an acess panel to an area where once there was none. Manufacturers sometimes assemble RVs in tight quarters, and it’s not uncommon for a fork lift truck to puncture a sidewall or for an access port to be opened in the wrong spot. Example: A manufacturer won’t replace a complete sidewall; they will add a cable hatch. A problem in the RV industry is the lack of defined “acceptable repair techniques.” When RV manufacturers advertise onepiece seamless roofs or smooth, automotive style sidewalls, these claims are generally marketing tools, and it doesn’t mean that repairs can’t be made in lieu of replacing compete sections of a vehicle. The following provides some less invasive and clever ideas for repairing small areas of damage. They are quite simple, inexpensive and, when performed by a manufacturer, are rarely even noticed by the customer. I have, more than once, opened a hatch on a vehicle freshly delivered from the factory to find that the access goes nowhere--but the hatch looked like it belonged on the vehicle.


All boo-boo repairs start with securing the damaged area from moisture and making sure that no electrical or structural parts are damaged. Once the area is secured and sealed, a suitable fixture can be installed. Sometimes securing and sealing an area can also be accomplished with the additional fixture. Basically, the hole or crack must be roughed in, so to speak, using spray foam or autobody plastic fill as a filler, to be sanded smooth with the attachment light, stack cover, or reflector mounted to cover the damage. Or, when adding a hatch, functional vent or other equipment, you must cut and frame an opening to accommodate the equipment.

round air conditioner outlet vent, or even a ceiling light could cover the inside.

Fill hole with foam insulation, seal hole, install stack cover and seal. Install battery smoke detector. Labor: 1.0 hour

1) In the case of a roof puncture, a crankup roof vent could be installed. This would repair exterior and interior damage.

Fill hole with foam insulation, smooth surface. Labor: 0.5 hour. Note: if 12v DC is available, a ceiling light could be used instead.

In the case of sidewall damage, fill and seal the hole or crack and cover with a vent plate or reflector/marker lamp, or cut an opening to accommodate a hatch, entertainment center, or other exterior attachment. Cut opening, frame opening, install vent, seal vent. Labor: 4.0 hours

2) If the location doesn’t allow a larger vent, a small stack cover can be installed on the exterior and a smoke detector,

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Fill and seal hole or crack, install vent plate or reflector. Labor: 0.6 hour


Cut opening, install hatch, reseal. Labor: 1.0 hour

Some attachments, such as lights or entertainment centers or exterior showers, require additional work for electricity or water.

For these attachments, cut opening, frame if needed, add appliance, and reseal. Labor: 2.0 hour. * Add up to 4.0 hours to connect services.

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These ideas are alternatives to more extensive and invasive repairs. Imagination and common sense are important when making a repair of this nature. The customer and/or RV or appliance manufacturer should be contacted for approval and technical help to insure safety and structural integrity. Under warranties, an authorization with explanation and drawing may be required by a manufacturer to continue warranty coverage. The customer or vehicle owner must always approve of any repair and his authorization should be gotten in writing. RVDA Service Consultant Tony Yerman is a Master Certified Technician, an Ohio repair specialist, an RV Technician Advisory Group member, and author of The RV Damage Repair Estimator. If you have questions or comments, contact him at tyerman@rvda.org.


Safety • • Ten Tips for RV •Safety • By GMAC Insurance •

During the busy summer vacation season, • there• are millions of RV enthusiasts hitting the highways and byways across America, • • many for the first time. • As more people join the fun, it’s important to • educate your customers on how to safely • enjoy • their RVs. Here are tips to share. •

1. Don’t blow it: Essential propane tank know-how From refueling to inspecting the exhaust system, propane tank operation and maintenance is a big job. And although propane tanks are deemed safe for RV travel, there are some key tips to help ensure an enjoyable ride: •

No matter how big a home-town fan you are, never paint your tank a dark color, which more readily absorbs the sun’s rays and can cause the tank to overheat and explode.

Don’t travel with the stove, oven, or heater burners lit.

Never refuel while any propane appliance, or the engine, is running.

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Make sure older propane tanks are checked to ensure they have an overfill protection device, and check

intake and exhaust vents for bird nests and other blockages. •

Avoid refrigerator fires (powered by propane). Have your propane tank regularly checked by a certified dealer to ensure lines are in good shape and not leaking. And install a propane gas detector.

2. Tighten up: Conduct a pre-drive safety check Many accidents are caused by simple forgetfulness--leaving doors unlatched, awnings up, or steps attached. Create a step-by-step checklist and, like a jet pilot, conduct a walk-around visual inspection before driving away. A preflight checklist should include: •

Making sure bay doors are closed and latched

Double-checking tow bar and safety cables


Disconnecting all power, TV, phone, water and sewer lines

Retracting jacks, steps, and awnings

Looking under the rig for signs of fluid leaks

Checking oil, transmission, and coolant levels Checking air brakes, parking brake, and tow brakes

Making sure stove, oven, and heater burners aren’t lit Checking the propane tank for leaks and intake/exhaust lines for blockages

Inspecting tire inflation pressure and tread wear

Making sure smoke and propane leak detectors are working

Checking your surroundings (weather, overhangs and ground hazards)

3. Go easy on the brakes RVs use air brakes rather than the typical hydraulic brakes found in cars. They have a very different feel-- easy does it. There’s a slight delay when applying the brakes, but don’t overcompensate with a hard, fast push on the pedal that will cause an abrupt stop. 4. Practice S.A.F.E. cornering RVers must compensate for the extra weight, height, and length of their vehicles

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when cornering. Practice S.A.F.E. cornering:

Slowly approach the turn. It’s much easier to speed up in the corner than to have to brake. Arc the turn, being careful not to arc the first swing in the opposite direction, confusing drivers behind as to where you really intend to go. Finish the turn completely. Drivers make a common mistake when they straighten before the back end of the vehicle has cleared the pivot point. Experience is key. The best way to become a good RV driver is practice, practice, practice.

5. Follow the Rule of 20 Percent Fully loaded rigs have slower acceleration and take longer to come to a full stop than autos. To compensate, add 20 percent to everything you do, from increasing your following distance and judging if you have enough clearance, to safely merging into traffic. 6. Know your height Sounds simple, but it’s amazing how many people forget the extra height of an RV while driving. Hitting bridges and overhangs are some of the most common accidents. To avoid getting hung up – literally – try this simple trick: Put a sticky note on the dashboard with your exact clearance. Another vital fact: a typical RV is 8.5 feet wide; the typical highway lane is only 10 feet wide. This gives you about a foot-anda-half to work with. 7. Break out of a rut


Driving on secondary roads has the advantage of being beautiful but the disadvantage of being narrow. If you feel the front wheel slipping off the road into a rut, follow these steps: •

Take your foot off the gas and gently brake. Jamming the brakes can get you deeper into the rut.

Keep your RV steering forward.

Once slowed down, gently turn to the left and get out of the rut, slowly back onto the road. Over-correction by jerking the wheel left could cause you to jack-knife.

8. See and be seen Always use turn signals. Be sure to allow sufficient distance so motorists around you can anticipate. For example, the California Department of Motor Vehicles recommends signaling in the last 100 feet before you turn. One very common accident is caused when RVers slow to begin a turn, and impatient drivers behind attempt to pass at the same time.

wash tires with mild soapy water and a soft brush, removing ozone build-up. Dirt is also a tire killer, acting as an abrasive that inhibits the tires’ natural wax protection. Keep tires covered (including the spare) when your RV is not in use to prevent ozone and UV damage. Additional tire care hints include: •

Watch your pressure for underand over inflation, both of which can lead to blowouts. Check your tires at least once a month and always before starting a trip. Do this when tires are cold, as heat generated during driving temporarily increases air pressure. Never remove air from a hot tire, which may result in under inflation when the tire cools.

Block and level your RV each time you plan to keep it in one place for a couple of days or longer. This will help avoid unnecessary stresses that lead to excessive tire wear.

Make it an inside job: If you pick up a nail, don’t fix it by installing a plug from the outside. Have the tire dismounted and a repair made from the inside. This is the only way to properly inspect for damage to the inside sidewall.

Avoid tire products that contain petroleum-based substances. Products containing alcohol or petrochemicals may create and accelerate deterioration and cracking, in addition to stripping the tire of its ozone protection. Some

And always drive with your headlights on. It seems like a vehicle this big would be easily seen, but you’d be surprised how many accident reports say, "I never saw them coming." 9. Avoiding unexpected blowouts Blowouts can mean big trouble. And tires normally fail for one of three reasons: improper inflation, worn tread, or an overloaded/overweight vehicle. Over time, ozone and UV exposure contribute to cracks in tires, especially on the sidewall. To avoid cracking, regularly

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silicone oils found in such products may cause similar damage. •

Get the Seven Year Itch: Any tire on an RV that’s more than seven years old should be replaced, even if it has no apparent tread wear.

10. Have eyes in the back of your head: Tips for backing up and maneuvering in tight places Many hazards such as overhangs, low branches, or anything sticking out of the ground, aren’t visible from the driver’s seat of an RV. The best way to avoid these obstructions is to have someone stand outside the RV and guide you into a confined or congested area. Here are a

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few tips for getting in and out of close quarters: •

Pull out of an area with the RV’s front facing forward. That makes it easier to see traffic conditions.

If you can't avoid a tight spot, backing in is generally recommended, as long as it’s not prohibited by the parking lot.

Develop a set of hand signals with your assistant or purchase inexpensive walkie-talkies so there’s no misunderstanding.


Top This!

A Little Too Much Power By Tony Yerman

How to blow out an RV’s entire electrical system—twice.

This story starts like an old joke: A man walks into an RV shop…The customer in question drove into our shop and informed us that nothing electrical in his motorhome worked. Upon inspection, we find that pretty much every safety switch, breaker, and fuse has been blown. We also find that most circuit boards on appliances are not functioning. What’s really going on here? As hard as I try, I can’t always get a person to admit that he’s done something he shouldn’t have. I asked this customer if he’d had any welding done or if perhaps the unit had been hit by lightning. He said no. So we spent a lot of time replacing a lot of damaged equipment. We then went through the entire electrical system and determined that everything was functioning correctly. Since this person couldn’t shed any light on what might have happened, we concluded that the damage had been the result of a power surge of some sort. I recommended that he add a built-in surge protector. This device is capable of taking surges of mild severity more than once and is good for

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surges over 132 volts. The customer was happy, paid his bill, and went on his way. Here we go again A few days later, the customer came back and said that, once again, nothing is working on electricity. This time, we can see that the surge protector has literally exploded, and power has been disconnected. I ask him, “You’re getting an awful lot of power through here somehow. Do you have any idea how this might be happening?” This time, he tells me that his neighbor, who is also a mechanic, told him there was a way that he could get more power from his generator to operate two air conditioners at the same time, along with anything else he would need to use. All the so-called mechanic had to do was give the generator a good tune-up and spray a carbon remover through the carburetor. During the customer’s first visit to the shop, we had tested the generator and found that it was about due for some maintenance but was operating at the correct voltage and frequency and was handling its rated load.


It didn’t take long to figure out the problem. The owner, or his “mechanic” neighbor, didn’t think that running the generator motor could affect the electrical system. He was partially correct. The issue was that his neighbor was running the generator without disconnecting it from the unit’s electrical system. While running the carbon remover, and whatever other additive he was using (we found several assorted aerosol cans), he was raising the speed of the engine by manually operating the generator’s throttle. When he added the cleaner, the engine would bog or slow down. The throttle would need to be raised to add more fuel and more power or speed to overcome this. So, what happens when the speed of the motor increased? So did the output of the generator. When the unit is connected to the electrical system, this power enters the

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system as a power surge. The “mechanic” felt that the higher the engine speed, the more carbon would be blown out. I have never tried to see how much voltage a generator will put out by revving the engine as high as it could go, but I’m sure it’s a lot. In fact, I now know that it’s about enough to vaporize a surge protector. I don’t know how the two resolved the financial end of this, or whether they’re still on speaking terms. This is a good time to say, “Don’t try this at home.” Sometimes you really should leave it to the professionals. RVDA Service Consultant Tony Yerman is a Master Certified Technician, an Ohio repair specialist, an RV Technician Advisory Group member, and author of The RV Damage Repair Estimator. If you have questions or comments, contact him at tyerman@rvda.org.


Certification How-to

It’s time to take the first step toward certification! The RV technician certification process is just a click away. Visit www.rvtechnician.com to learn more.

Step 1 Technician Certification Candidate: The candidate test is a basic orientation to the RV service technician career. The training and test is available at no cost and is located at: http://www.rvst.org/Candidate/.

Step 2 Registered Technician: This test establishes that the technician is proficient in core knowledge areas such as propane, basic electrical, fire & life safety, weight knowledge, and other technical skills.

Step 3 Select a Career Path Traditional Certification: This test is designed to evaluate both the general and specific knowledge in 12 different areas--propane, electrical, plumbing, brakes, suspension, towing, appliances, generators, hydraulics, interior, exterior, slide out systems and other technical skills. Specialty Certifications: There are five certified specialist areas that make up the right path on the RV Service Technician Career Ladder: body, chassis, electrical systems, appliances, and plumbing. Each test focuses on the subject related to the specialty.

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New Products

Equalizer Stabi-Lite Offers Stabilizing Solution For Small Motorhomes

style mount that requires no welding or drilling. Anyone with basic mechanical skills should be able to install the whole system in about two hours. RVers will find the system to be an affordable alternative to more expensive hydraulic leveling systems. For more information, visit www.equalizersystems.com.

Buff Magic Restores Metal and Chrome

Equalizer Systems Inc. is introducing its Stabi-LiteŽ automatic electric RV stabilizing system to the RV dealer and retail aftermarket. The Stabi-Lite system is an excellent, durable solution for Classes B and C motorhomes and other smaller RVs that can experience a noticeable lean and constant swaying when RVers walk around inside with the slide room extended. Stabi-Lite eliminates this insecure situation by providing a solid, level platform through a system that deploys automatically with a single touch. It is the only custom-fit, bolt-on, electric stabilizing system for the increasingly popular Sprinter chassis. Weighing less than 80 pounds, it’s a fuel-efficient and green add-on. Its low-profile design decreases height, adding to the aerodynamic profile of contemporary RVs. Stabi-Lite is designed for easy, quick installation with a chassis-specific clamp

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Over time, metal surfaces oxidize, causing them to lose their brilliance. Do-ityourselfers can easily restore sparkle to lackluster metal and chrome with Shurhold's Buff Magic, an all-in-one metal polish and buffing and polishing cream. Owners can transform RV surfaces from dull to ultra-glossy using Buff Magic alone. Buff Magic's formula includes jeweler's rouge for unequalled results. Buffing causes the compound to change as its proprietary abrasives break down, resulting in a gleaming finish. Oxidation, clear coat staining, surface rust, tarnish and Plexiglas scratches disappear with an application of Buff Magic. It works equally well with machine buffing or hand polishing methods and is effective on P800 and finer DA scratches.


Buff Magic also restores kitchenware and acrylic tubs and showers and makes an ideal metal cleaner/polisher for steel, aluminum, brass, bronze, copper and gold. Shurhold manufactures specialty care items and accessories to clean, polish, and detail. Contact Shurhold at 800-962-6241 or visit www.shurhold.com/rv.

Vent Cover Allows Air Exchange In any Weather

provide maximum cross ventilation. The solid one-piece unit comes in four popular colors-- translucent white, shell white (almond), smoke tint, and black. Made of high-density polyethylene material, it resists damage from harmful UV rays. Users don’t need tools to unsnap the MaxxAir II's lock pins. Its cover opens on hinged brackets, allowing full access for cleaning or inspecting the roof vent seal. MaxxAir II can safely be installed over most high-powered RV ventilator fans, such as the MaxxFan Standard or Fantastic Vent Fans. Contact MaxxAir at 316-832-3400 or visit www.maxxair.com.

Fastway Chain-Up Lifts Chains off the Ground

Inclement weather doesn't have to mean a build-up of musty, stale odors inside an RV. The MaxxAir II vent cover allows RVers to enjoy fresh air any time while keeping rain out, even during a downpour. The deluxe MaxxAir II offers twice the vent area of the company's original MaxxAir, while mounting to the same holes. Installation is simple, with the unit readily fitting over most 14" x 14" standard RV roof vents using the exclusive easy-open hinged brackets that are included. The whole cover measures 22.125" L x 20.25" W x 9.5" H. Sleek in appearance and aerodynamic in design, the cover has side louvers to

Page 20

Fastway Trailer Products introduces a solution to dragging safety chains. Fastway® Chain-Up™ is a durable rubber sling designed to lift chains off the ground without compromising safety. The ChainUp comes in two styles, one for standard ball mount applications and another for weight distribution hitches. It lifts chains without having to wrap or twist the links, giving customers peace of mind knowing their chains are secure. The Chain-Up makes lifting the chains easier because it stays with the truck or trailer when not in use.


Recalls

Dometic Awning Recalls The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration has recalled thousands of RVs that are equipped with a potentially defective power awning manufactured by Dometic Corporation. If the awning installation sequence wasn’t followed completely, the awning motor may become damaged, and the awning could unfurl unexpectedly while the RV is on the road or at rest. The affected products include certain 9100 Power Awnings, Weatherpro Awnings, and Motor Service Kits made between February 13 and April 9 of this year. Dometic has advised OEMs and aftermarket dealers to call 1/888/9434905 for instructions on replacing the units. NHTSA and Dometic are advising owners not to take their RVs on the road until they’ve been repaired. Owners can call the above number for instructions on how to determine if their RV is affected and how to get it repaired. The following RV manufacturers have issued product recalls.

Dutchmen Manufacturing is recalling certain model year 2013 Breckenridge RVs manufactured February 13, 2013, through April 9, 2013. Dutchmen will notify owners and dealers will replace the affected motors. Owners are being instructed not to drive their vehicle until repairs can be performed. Owners may contact Dutchmen at 1-574537-0700. Newmar Corporation is recalling certain model year 2013 Bay Star Sport, Ventana, and Ventana LE and model year 2013-2014 Bay Star, Canyon Star, and Dutch Star motorhomes. Owners may contact Newmar at 1-574-7737791 or Dometic at 1-888-447-0003 for more information.

Page 21

Forest River is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Forest River models Blue Ridge, Cardinal, Cherokee, Columbus, EVO, Georgetown, Flagstaff, Forester, Lexington, Puma, Rockwood, Sabre, Salem, Sandpiper, Sandstorm, Sierra, Stealth, Sunseeker, Wildcat, Wildwood, Work and Play and XLR; Coachmen models Brookstone, Catalina, Chaparral, Concord, Encounter, Freedom Express, Freelander, Leprechaun, Mirada, Pursuit, and Sportcoach; Prime Time models Avenger, Crusader, Lacrosse, Saniber, and Tracer; Palomino model Maverick Truck Camper; Cargo Mate model Eliminator, and Shasta models Revere, Phoenix RVs manufactured from February 13, 2013, through April 18, 2013.


Owners may contact Forest River at 1-574389-4600 or Dometic at 1-888-447-0003 for more information. Fleetwood RV Inc. is recalling certain model year 2013 Jamboree Sport Diesel, Providence, Tioga DSL and Tioga Ranger DSL; 2014 Excursion, Expedition, Jamboree Sport, Montara Commercial, Searcher Commercial, Southwind, Storm, Terra, and Tioga Ranger; and 2013-2014 Bounder, Bounder Classic, and Discovery RVs. The vehicles are equipped with Weatherpro and 9100 series power awnings. Owners may contact Fleetwood RV Owner Relations at 1-800-509-3418 or Dometic at 1-888-447-0003 for more information.

Forest River Tire Label Recall Forest River is recalling certain model year 2013 Shasta Revere model SHT27DB, SHT30BH, SHT27BH, SHT26TB, and SHT27KS trailers manufactured September 4, 2012, through April 10, 2013. These vehicles were manufactured with incorrect tire load rating and pressure information on the Federal Certification Tag and Tire Information Tag. The incorrect tire pressure information given may lead to the tire being overinflated, resulting in sudden tire failure, increasing the risk of a crash. Forest River will notify owners and send corrected labels. Customers may contact Forest River at 1-574-825-7178. Heartland Trailer Axle Recall Heartland Recreational Vehicles (Heartland) is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Sundance travel trailers, model 322RES, manufactured September 13, 2012, through April 30, 2013. Page 22

Heartland Recreational Vehicles is recalling certain model year 2013-2014 Big Country, Bighorn, Elk Ridge, Elk Ridge Express, Landmark, Prowler, Sundance, Sundance XLT, and Silverado fifth wheel and travel trailers manufactured February 13, 2013, through April 16, 2013. Owners may contact Heartland at 1-888262-5992 or Dometic at 1-888-447-0003. Tiffin Motorhomes Inc. is recalling certain model year 2013 Breeze and Allegro motorhomes. Tiffin will notify owners and Dometic staff will replace the affected motors. Owners may contact Tiffin at 1256-356-8661 or Dometic at 1-888-4470003 for more information.

The axles are mounted too far forward on the frame which may cause improper trailer balance while towing. Improper trailer balance may lead to uncontrollable trailer sway, increasing the risk of a crash, property damage, and/or personal injury. Heartland will notify owners and the trailers will be returned to the factory where axles will be moved rearward, free of charge. Owners may contact Heartland Recreational Trailers' Warranty/Service Department by email at "parts@heartlandrvs.com," or by phone at 1-877-262-8032. Dutchmen GVWR Tag Recall Dutchmen Manufacturing Inc. is recalling certain model year 2013 Dutchmen 245RKS recreational vehicles for failing to comply with the requirements of Federal Motor


Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) Number 110, "Tire Selection and Rims." On these vehicles, the federal identification tag lists the wrong Gross Vehicle Weight Rating and the wrong gross axle weight rating. Incorrect tag information could result in overloading of the vehicle, causing tire or axle failure, resulting in loss of vehicle control, increasing the risk of a crash. Dutchmen will notify owners and mail replacement labels with corrected information. Owners may contact Dutchmen at 1-574-537-0700. Newmar Rear Cap Reflector Recall Newmar Corporation is recalling certain model year 2012-2013 Canyon Star motorhomes manufactured August 4, 2011, through February 19, 2013, for failing to conform to the requirements of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) number 108, "Lamps, Reflective Devices, and Associated Equipment." The affected vehicles may have missing reflectors on the rear cap. The absence of reflectors could reduce the ability for others to see the motorhome, increasing the risk that another vehicle may crash into the motorhome. Newmar will notify owners and dealers will install the required reflectors. Owners may contact Newmar at 1-574-773-7791.

Page 23

Gulf Stream Wiring Recall Gulf Stream Coach is recalling certain model year 2001 Ultra, Conquest, Independence, Ultra Supreme, Yellowstone, and Cavalier motorhomes with floor plans 6316 or 8325. The motorhomes were manufactured May 17, 2000, through December 31, 2000. A portion of the electrical wiring may not be properly secured. This condition may cause wear and possible heat development between the refrigerator coils and the wire. A failure of the wiring could result in property damage, fire, or injury. Gulf Stream will notify owners, and dealers will repair the motorhomes free of charge. Owners may contact Gulf Stream at 1-800289-8787. Spartan Steering Brackets Recall Spartan Motors Chassis (Spartan) is recalling certain model year 2006-2011 K2, and K3 and 2006-2010 MM motorhome chassis manufactured July 20, 2005, through December 17, 2010. The steering gear mounting brackets may crack and detach resulting in a loss of steering. A loss of steering control may increase the risk of a crash. Spartan will notify owners. Starting in midJune 2013, dealers will install a replacement bracket or a reinforcement to the existing bracket. Until the remedy is available, owners may have their vehicle inspected at any Spartan service center.


The RV Learning Center proudly recognizes these

CONTRIBUTORS *Active donors are those who have contributed to the RV Learning Center since 07/01/11. Received From

Contributed 07/01/11 05/29/13*

Total Lifetime Pledge

Last Contribution

Received From

Contributed 07/01/11 05/29/13*

Total Lifetime Pledge

Last Contribution

MAJOR GIFTS active donors* with cumulative donation or pledge of $25,000 or more Newmar Corporation Bank of America Merrill Lynch Protective Tom Stinnett Derby City RV PleasureLand RV Center, Inc. Horsey Family Memorial Fund Bill & Kristen Fenech Campers Inn of Kingston Byerly RV Center

$45,000 $5,000 $44,713 $1,000 $3,000 $1,000 $2,500 $18,578 $20,000

$260,000 $173,000 $132,558 $101,500 $86,350 $68,000 $52,500 $50,000 $46,000

01/28/13 04/29/13 01/18/13 12/28/12 10/22/12 06/28/12 07/25/12 03/20/13 11/30/12

Ace Fogdall, Inc. McClain's RV Superstore Winnebago Industries RVAC Pikes Peak Traveland Paul Evert’s RV Country, Inc. Tiffin Motor Homes, Inc. Avalon RV Center, Inc. Bill Plemmons RV World

$2,500 $1,000 $6,000 $8,000 $1,000 $1,000 $5,000 $1,000 $2,500

$39,100 $36,000 $34,000 $31,000 $31,000 $30,000 $28,500 $26,500 $25,000

12/27/11 08/14/12 09/30/11 02/15/13 05/29/13 04/01/13 03/11/13 04/12/13 09/21/12

$4,000 $135 $1,000 $1,000 $250 $300 $1,000 $1,000 $5,000 $1,000 $1,000 ,$1,000 $2,000 $500 $1,000 $500

$10,000 $8,075 $8,000 $6,925 $6,000 $5,400 $5,100 $5,000 $5,000 $4,350 $3,500 $3,000 $3,000 $2,750 $2,750 $2,500

11/21/12 11/04/11 05/29/13 10/04/12 06/08/12 02/01/13 04/22/13 08/21/12 01/11/13 06/25/12 04/18/13 02/01/13 09/20/12 08/07/12 04/08/13 10/26/12

$1,250 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $250

$1,250 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000

07/03/12 09/05/12 09/01/11 05/07/12 12/02/11 05/09/13

$200 $500 $500 $500

$500 $500 $500 $500

03/20/13 06/26/12 12/19/12 12/31/12

$250 $250 $100 $100

$250 $250 $100 $100

06/05/12 10/25/12 10/19/12 11/30/12

CHAMPIONS active donors* with a cumulative donation or pledge between $2,500 and $24,999 Reines RV Center, Inc. Diversified Insurance Mgmt. Inc. Wilkins R.V., Inc. Jayco, Inc. Greeneway, Inc. (Route 66 Dealer) Rivers RV Alpin Haus Butch Thomas Hartville RV Center, Inc. MBA Insurance, Inc. Mike Molino Affinity RV Service Sales & Rentals AIRXCEL - RV Group United States Warranty Corp. Little Dealer, Little Prices Great Lakes RVA Hemlock Hill RV Sales, Inc.

$4,500 $2,200 $1,500 $1,000 $5,000 $500 $1,500 $1,000 $1,250 $1,000 $550 $1,000 $500 $2,000 $5,000 $10,000 $639

$24,525 $21,000 $19,600 $18,500 $18,300 $17,350 $17,000 $16,000 $15,500 $15,100 $11,311 $11,000 $10,500 $10,250 $10,050 $10,000 $10,000

12/19/12 11/05/12 06/28/12 12/27/11 10/10/12 06/15/12 06/29/12 11/30/12 05/07/13 05/14/12 07/03/12 11/21/12 06/14/12 04/12/13 01/23/13 02/27/13 09/14/12

Rich & Sons Camper Sales Motley RV Repair Curtis Trailers American RV Circle K RV's, Inc. Hayes RV Center Webster City RV, Inc. Madison RV Supercenter Minnesota RVDA Camperland of Oklahoma, LLC Topper’s Camping Center. Myers RV Center, Inc. United RV Center J. D. Sanders, Inc. Best Value RV Sales & Service Alliance Coach, Inc.

LEADERS active donors* with a cumulative donation or pledge between $1,000 and $2,499 RV Outlet Mall RCD Sales Company, Ltd. Hilltop Trailer Sales, Inc. Tacoma RV Center Noble RV, Inc. The Trail Center

$750 $500 $41 $1,000 $1,000 $250

$2,300 $2,250 $1,622 $1,500 $1,400 $1,350

10/22/12 07/20/12 07/20/12 06/15/12 03/11/13 02/01/13

Skyline RV & Home Sales, Inc. Phil Ingrassia Newell Coach Pete's RV Center Spader Business Management Bill Mirrielees

BENEFACTORS active donors* with a cumulative donation or pledge between $500 and $999 Dinosaur Electronics Fretz Enterprises, Inc. Steinbring Motorcoach Ronnie Hepp

$500 $750 $500 $300

$750 $750 $750 $625

06/13/12 06/18/12 11/21/12 08/24/12

Holiday Hour, Inc. All Valley RV Center Lindsey Reines Camp-Site RV

SUPPORTERS active donors* with a cumulative donation or pledge between $100 and $499 Bowling Motors & RV Sales Beckley's Camping Center Foley RV Center Kroubetz Lakeside Campers Mayflower RV, Inc.

$300 $250 $250 $250 $250

$300 $250 $250 $250 $250

ENDOWMENTS Kindlund Family Scholarship

Page 24

$270,000

12/16/11 06/05/12 09/01/12 12/02/11 07/27/12

Quality Drive-Away, Inc. Karin Van Duyse Happy Camping RV Amy Pennington


RV Technician Certification Preparation Online Self-Study Course Time Tested. Dealer Approved.  

Join over 1,700 technicians who used the course for training and  as a resource for cer fica on prepara on.  Individual enrollment.    40 hours of content. One year course term.    

 Enrollment Informa   Enrollment Informa on  on 

Video course overview, policies, technical requirements and FAQs  Video preview, policies, technical requirements and FAQs available at  available at rvtechnician.com.  rvtechnician.com. 

Company:    

TUITION: $249 per technician.  

Billing Address:   City:  

All enrollments must be pre‐paid in U.S. Funds.  

State:       Zip:  

Phone:    

 

Fax:  

Enroll the following RV Technician (s) from our dealership:  (Each technician must have a unique email address).    

1. Name:         Email:  

O  Check enclosed ‐ Payable to RV Learning Center   O  Credit Card (circle)   

VISA                 MC               AMEX       

DISCOVER

Credit card #:  Exp. Date:   

Security code:   

Cardholder:  

2. Name:  

Signature:  

    Email:  

Quan ty discounts available when enrolling four or more technicians at one  me. Email info@rvda.org for help. Tui on subject to change without no ce.  The RVDA‐RVIA RV Technician Cer fica on Test is a separate applica on and  fee.   

3. Name:        Email:   Send progress reports to this supervisor:  Supervisor’s Name:   Email: 

Page 25

Fax to (703) 359‐0152, or mail to RVDA, 3930  University Dr., Fairfax, VA, 22030.    Call (703) 591‐7130 to enroll by phone.  


10th Edition Service Management Guide (Flat Rate Manual) The expanded Service Management Guide offers over 100 pages of average work unit times for the most basic service functions performed by competent RV technicians. th

The 10 Edition of the Service Management Guide offers extensive updates and additions provided by dealers, service managers, and technicians.

It also offers all new Service Check Sheets that provide a valuable reference for service managers and technicians.

It is a great tool for the service department when working with extended service contracts.

The Service Management Guide is also available in CD-ROM.

The Service Management Guide is designed to provide reasonable guidance relative to the time required for competent technicians to complete assigned tasks. It is an important part of the service management system, but it is not intended to be the sole determinant of prices or rates charged in that sale of service. Manual or CD-ROM: RVDA Members $164.95

Non-Members: $330.00

Manual and CD-ROM: RVDA Members $275.00

Non-Members: $550.00

Order Online at http://www.rvlearningcenter.com - prices are subject to change without notice

Order Form – 10th Edition Service Management Guide (Flat Rate Manual) Name:____________________________________________________________________________________________ Company Name:___________________________________________________________________________________ Address:_________________________________________________________________________________________ City:__________________________________________State:________Zip Code:______________________________ Phone:___________________________________Fax:______________________E-mail:________________________ ___RVDA Member

___Non-RVDA Member Manual - # of Copies:___ CD-ROM - # of Copies:____

Method of payment (Please check one) ___Check enclosed (Made Payable to The RVDA Education Foundation) ___Send an invoice (members only) Credit Card: __Visa __Master Card __American Express Card Number:____________________________________________Expiration Date:___________________________ Name on Card:_____________________________________Signature:______________________________________ Billing Address:_________________________________________________________Billing Zip:_________________

Page 26

RVDA, 3930 University Dr, Fairfax, VA 22030 (703) 591-7130, Fax (703) 359-0152, Email: info@rvda.org


Online Training with FRVTA’s

DISTANCE LEARNING NETWORK supplier-specific advanced repair and troubleshooting classes designed to upgrade technicians’ skills. Completion of these classes qualifies for recertification hours. Classes are available 24/7 throughout the program year, providing maximum flexibility.

FRVTA–RV Learning Center Partnership $995 per year for each dealership location. Over 50 sessions available, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with full access to training through July 31, 2013. The DLN offers your dealership: • • • • •

Onsite training Group training No travel time or expenses Self-determined pace One fixed price of $995 for the subscription term

• Service Writers/Advisors – This three-hour program is valuable for both new staff and experienced personnel preparing for the RV Learning Center’s Service Writer/Advisor certification. • Greeters/Receptionists – This 50-minute session is suitable for all employees who need customer service skills. It includes a final exam and certificate of completion.

The DLN offers online training for:

• RV Technicians – The certification prep course helps technicians get ready for the certification exam. Your subscription includes unlimited access to more • Dealers/GMs – This program features important topics for management, including lemon laws, LP gas than 50 training sessions, reviews, and test preparalicensing issues, and the federal Red Flags Rule. tion sections. Also included are manufacturer- and

DEALERSHIP REGISTRATION Company

Name:

Address:

City:

State:

Zip:

Phone:

Fax:

Mentor Name:

Phone:

E-mail (at dealership) :

Fax:

**High-speed Internet access required. RVIA service textbooks not included** location(s) at $995 each = payment due: $

PAYMENT METHOD

(select payment method below)

Complete lower section and mail or fax to:

PAY BY CHECK OR MONEY ORDER

PAY BY VISA OR MASTERCARD

Florida RV Trade Association, 10510 Gibsonton Drive, River View, FL 33578, (813) 741-0488, Fax: (813) 741-0688 Name

on

Credit

Card Number: Card Billing Address:

Card:

Security Code: City:

Expires: State:

Card Holder Signature:

For more information, call (386) 754-4285 or go to www.fgc.edu/rv-institute.aspx Page 27

Zip:


RV Service Textbooks   

SUMMARIES & ORDER FORM

Published by RVIA and available through the RV Learning Center These texts help technicians increase their knowledge and understanding of the components and operating systems found in today’s RVs and prepare them for the new testing requirements of the RV Service Technician Career Ladder. The complete set consists of 14 volumes--written by RV service experts--and the “Electricity Demystified” text.

Save 3 0 % when you order a complete hard copy or CD-ROM set! See next page for details. 

Textbook  Title  

Price

     Introduction to RV Service – Provides an introduction to the RV industry, the various types of RVs and their    structural characteristics and systems, the basic tools utilized by RV technicians, and safety in the RV workplace.    Summaries of industry codes and standards and RV technician job classifications are also included as well as basic $19.95  information on using RV service manuals. Developing and demonstrating solid customer relations and record keeping skills are also addressed.

    

#  books  Total  $ 

 

 

 

  RV Electrical Systems – Provides instruction on performing AC and DC voltage systems inspections and tests;    servicing AC and DC power sources; servicing wiring/distribution systems; and maintaining, repairing and inspect- $49.95  ing AC and DC devices.

 

Electricity Demystified – Written in a step-by-step format, this practical guide begins by covering direct current (DC), voltage, resistance, circuits, cells, and batteries. The book goes on to discuss alternating current (AC), power supplies, wire, and cable. Magnetism and electromagnetic effects are also addressed. Detailed examples and concise explanations make it easy to understand the material.

$14.95

 

 

 

 

 

  RV Ranges & Cooktops – Provides instruction on the installation, repair and replacement of ranges and ovens.       This includes verifying gas pressure; verifying grate clips installation; checking lines and fittings; repairing and $39.95  replacing components; verifying range burners are not affected by operation of force air furnace or other appliances; and performing function test.

 

RV Propane Systems – Provides instruction on inspecting and maintaining propane containers and fittings; inspecting and maintaining the piping system; performing propane system tests; purging and filling containers; transferring propane from container to container; and burning off propane in a container. RV Generators – Covers the installation, maintenance and repair of RV generators, the generator section and control system. This includes inspecting, maintaining and repairing generator components and verifying battery voltage, fuel source and pressures, engine operation, output voltage and frequency, and governor operation.

RV Water Heaters – Covers the installation, repair and replacement of RV water heaters — Pilot, DSI (direct spark ignition) and Electric. Topics addressed include inspecting ignition systems, verifying gas pressure; troubleshooting the sequence of operation, repair and replacement of various components; draining and flushing the water heater and inspecting fittings for calcium deposits; checking fittings on the tank; inspecting and replacing the water tank; and checking lines and valves for motor aide.

 

$49.95

 

 

       

$39.95

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

$39.95

RV Plumbing Systems – Provides instruction on performing fresh water systems tests; inspecting and repairing   fresh water storage tanks, distribution systems, and fixtures and devices; performing waste water systems tests; and $39.95  inspecting, repairing and replacing waste holding tanks and drainage piping systems. RV Heating Appliances – Covers installation, repair and replacement of RV heating systems, including gravity, pilot and DSI (direct spark ignition furnaces). Topics examined include verifying pressure and electrical voltage; inspecting and cleaning burner, pilot, exhaust tube and air intake; troubleshooting the sequence of operation; repairing and replacing various furnace components; inspecting and correcting ducting and return air.

Page 28

$39.95


RV Service Textbooks    

    

 

 

 

 

RV Pre-Delivery Inspection – Introduces and explains the many important steps in inspecting the RV before deliver-   ing to the customer, including checking propane systems, pre-testing all appliances and accessories, testing and in   specting the AC and DC electrical system; checking safety items, lighting, window roof molding seals, and wiper $39.95  blades; checking and lubing doors; visually inspecting chassis; checking lug nuts and tire pressure; testing water supply and drainage systems; and conducting a test drive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save almost $200 on a complete book set

$382.00   

 

TOTAL COST OF TEXTBOOKS IF PURCHASED INDIVIDUALLY

$574.25   

 

 

 

RV Refrigerators – Provides instruction on the installation, repair and replacement of absorption refrigerators (manual and automatic selection). This includes verifying proper venting, AC and DC power sources, propane gas pressure, and leveling; diagnosing and replacing electric and gas components; diagnosing and replacing the cooling unit; diagnosing, repairing and replacing the internal ice maker components; and performing function tests.  

RV Air Conditioning – Covers the installation, repair and replacement of air conditioning and heat pump units, including verifying air flow, assessing the integrity of the electrical system, and evaluating the integrity of refrigerant systems.

    

$39.95

$39.95

RV Preventive Maintenance – Examines what services to perform for preventative maintenance, including check-   ing propane systems; servicing and adjusting appliances; testing G.F.C.Is; winterizing and de-winterizing coach;    checking safety items; checking and lubricating doors; checking exterior lights; checking window roof molding seals; changing oil and filter on power plants; checking wiper blades; visually inspecting fluid levels; servicing batter- $39.95  ies; inspecting belts and hoses; changing chassis oil and filter and lubricating chassis; changing transmission oil, filter and gasket; visually inspecting chassis; checking lug nuts and tire pressure; flushing and refilling cooling system; and performing a test drive.   

  RV Brakes, Suspension & Towing – Covers the basics of brakes and brake controllers used in RV towable sys   tems. References RV suspension systems as well as wheels and tires. Fully describes types of RV towing systems, hitches, wiring, and accessories. Includes information on troubleshooting, repair and replacement of stabilizer jacks $39.95  and mechanical landing gear jacks. Textbook also covers vehicle weights, weight safety, weight labels, legal regulations, codes and standards.  RV Hydraulics – Covers the basic principles and laws of hydraulics, hydraulic terminology, special tools and equipment and basic hydraulic circuits. The book introduces the technician to hydraulic system components and their functions. Includes information on performing hydraulic system maintenance, safety, and troubleshooting procedures. 

ALSO AVAILABLE ON CD-ROM (NOTE: “Electricity Demystified” is NOT on the CD-ROM but will be included in hard copy format with your order.)  

Price includes shipping and handling. Bulk rate available upon request for six or more individual text books and sets.

 

 

 

$39.95

$382.00

 

Total amount enclosed: $

Name: Shipping address:

Company:

City: Phone:

 

 

Method of payment (check one): ❏ Check (made payable to the RV Learning Center) ❏ Send an invoice (RVDA members only) ❏ Credit card: ❏ Visa ❏ MasterCard ❏ Amex ❏ Discover

Card number Name on card Signature Billing address (if different from above):

State: Fax:

Zip:

Mail this form to the RV Learning Center or fax to (703) 359-0152.  For more information, call (703) 591-7130 or visit  our website at www.rvlearningcenter.com 

Expiration date

Page 29


RV Service Textbooks    

    

 

 

 

 

RV Pre-Delivery Inspection – Introduces and explains the many important steps in inspecting the RV before deliver-   ing to the customer, including checking propane systems, pre-testing all appliances and accessories, testing and in   specting the AC and DC electrical system; checking safety items, lighting, window roof molding seals, and wiper $39.95  blades; checking and lubing doors; visually inspecting chassis; checking lug nuts and tire pressure; testing water supply and drainage systems; and conducting a test drive. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Save almost $200 on a complete book set

$382.00   

 

TOTAL COST OF TEXTBOOKS IF PURCHASED INDIVIDUALLY

$574.25   

 

 

 

RV Refrigerators – Provides instruction on the installation, repair and replacement of absorption refrigerators (manual and automatic selection). This includes verifying proper venting, AC and DC power sources, propane gas pressure, and leveling; diagnosing and replacing electric and gas components; diagnosing and replacing the cooling unit; diagnosing, repairing and replacing the internal ice maker components; and performing function tests.  

RV Air Conditioning – Covers the installation, repair and replacement of air conditioning and heat pump units, including verifying air flow, assessing the integrity of the electrical system, and evaluating the integrity of refrigerant systems.

    

$39.95

$39.95

RV Preventive Maintenance – Examines what services to perform for preventative maintenance, including check-   ing propane systems; servicing and adjusting appliances; testing G.F.C.Is; winterizing and de-winterizing coach;    checking safety items; checking and lubricating doors; checking exterior lights; checking window roof molding seals; changing oil and filter on power plants; checking wiper blades; visually inspecting fluid levels; servicing batter- $39.95  ies; inspecting belts and hoses; changing chassis oil and filter and lubricating chassis; changing transmission oil, filter and gasket; visually inspecting chassis; checking lug nuts and tire pressure; flushing and refilling cooling system; and performing a test drive.   

  RV Brakes, Suspension & Towing – Covers the basics of brakes and brake controllers used in RV towable sys   tems. References RV suspension systems as well as wheels and tires. Fully describes types of RV towing systems, hitches, wiring, and accessories. Includes information on troubleshooting, repair and replacement of stabilizer jacks $39.95  and mechanical landing gear jacks. Textbook also covers vehicle weights, weight safety, weight labels, legal regulations, codes and standards.  RV Hydraulics – Covers the basic principles and laws of hydraulics, hydraulic terminology, special tools and equipment and basic hydraulic circuits. The book introduces the technician to hydraulic system components and their functions. Includes information on performing hydraulic system maintenance, safety, and troubleshooting procedures. 

ALSO AVAILABLE ON CD-ROM (NOTE: “Electricity Demystified” is NOT on the CD-ROM but will be included in hard copy format with your order.)  

Price includes shipping and handling. Bulk rate available upon request for six or more individual text books and sets.

 

 

 

$39.95

$382.00

 

Total amount enclosed: $

Name: Shipping address:

Company:

City: Phone:

 

 

Method of payment (check one): ❏ Check (made payable to the RV Learning Center) ❏ Send an invoice (RVDA members only) ❏ Credit card: ❏ Visa ❏ MasterCard ❏ Amex ❏ Discover

Card number Name on card Signature Billing address (if different from above):

State: Fax:

Zip:

Mail this form to the RV Learning Center or fax to (703) 359-0152.  For more information, call (703) 591-7130 or visit  our website at www.rvlearningcenter.com 

Expiration date

Page 30


We offer more than products. We offer solutions.

RVDA SINCEI99l'

When you work with Protective you offer customers more than products; you offer solutions - solutions that allow people to embrace all today has to offer by protecting their tomorrow.

Protective provides F&l solutions that simplify the selling process with easy to understand products, advanced training and reliable customer care and claims service. We are committed to your profitability by serving the increasing number of RV buyers that are unprotected from the costs of future mechanical expenses.

Like you, we believe in doing the right thing for the customer. Help your customers protect tomorrow and embrace today with F&l solutions from Protective Asset Protection.

Learn more at protectiveassetprotection.com/brand

Protect Tomorrow.Embrace Today™ . XtraRide Service Agreements I Post-Sale Programs Dealer Experience Refund & Reinsurance Programs I Rental Programs F&lTraining I On-Line Rating, Reporting & Agreements

=== 888 274 5104

Protect ive0 Asset Protection

The XtraRideService Apeement Programbacked by Lyn-don Property ln:svrance Company, a Protcompany.in all statt>s except New York In New Yothi5 product ls !)a(.by Old R >pubbc Insurance Companv.·An RVOA endorsed procft•« 01 !ot!r'VIte rs (J(Uth! .Jt h.l!. bct!n 1:!1.lei1Stvcly C\•i.111JJlt:d by Ihe kVDA 10 J UfqUJi rlj', <.kopt.mdJbiJI!y ,ltld twetJII Viifuc RVDA tmd tlufNDA Wucat.Jotl f ow1dJ-llon 11;:( 1\lt' cOtnpcnsatlotl hom 4 PIOf<Xl!'ro (OOll)c}ny fur busu1<3.!. geueroJit.1f by HV di!Jit>r!.

RV Technician May/June 2013  

RVDA's publication for professional RV technicians

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