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THE 2 0 1 4 A N N U A L R E P O R T Fostering Regional Partnerships for 45 Years


ROA N O K E VA L L L E Y - A L L E G H A N Y REGIONAL COMMISSION MEMBER GOVERNMENTS

COMMISSION MEMBERS AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS (Served during program year July 1, 2013-June 30, 2014)

ALLEGHANY COUNTY

The Honorable Shannon Cox The Honorable Richard L. Shull John Strutner

BOTETOURT COUNTY

Erin Henderson The Honorable Billy Martin, Sr. Ned McElwaine The Honorable John Williamson, III

CITY OF COVINGTON

J.B. Broughman The Honorable Bill Zimmerman

CITY OF ROANOKE

THE MISSION

To be a leader in driving collaboration and strategy within our communities on issues that are critical to the economic growth, quality of life, and sustainability of this region.

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ANNUAL REPORT

The Honorable Bill Bestpitch The Honorable David Bowers Matt Bullington The Honorable Ray Ferris Chris Morrill Braxton Naff

CITY OF SALEM

The Honorable Lisa Garst The Honorable Jane Johnson Melinda Payne

CRAIG COUNTY

ROANOKE COUNTY

Clay Goodman, III The Honorable Kevin Hutchins Dean Martin The Honorable Joe McNamara The Honorable Charlotte Moore J. Lee E. Osborne

TOWN OF CLIFTON FORGE

Darlene Burcham The Honorable Johnette Roberts

TOWN OF ROCKY MOUNT

The Honorable Bobby Cundiff James Ervin

TOWN OF VINTON

The Honorable Bradley E. Grose Chris Lawrence

LIAISON MEMBERS (NON-VOTING)

Beth Doughty

Roanoke Regional Partnership

Teresa Hammond

Alleghany Highlands Chamber of Commerce & Tourism

Landon Howard

Richard Flora The Honorable Martha Murphy

Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau

FRANKLIN COUNTY

Salem-Roanoke County Chamber of Commerce

The Honorable Bob Camicia Mike Smith The Honorable Ronnie Thompson The Honorable Charles Wagner Chris Whitlow

Debbie Kavitz

Dr. John Rainone

Dabney S. Lancaster Community College

Dr. Robert Sandel

Virginia Western Community College

Joyce Waugh

Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce

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ROANOKE VALLEY-ALLEGHANY REGIONAL COMMISSION Roanoke Valley-Alleghany Region Town of Clifton Forge 2012 Population: 3,900 3.1 Square Miles

City of Covington 2013 Population: 6,259 5.7 Square Miles

Clifton Forge

SECTION

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Remarks................................ 4

Covington

Alleghany County 2013 Population: 15,961 445 Square Miles (Includes Clifton Forge)

CONTENTS

Staff....................................... 5 Alleghany County Botetourt County 2013 Population: 33,423 543 Square Miles

Craig County 2013 Population: 5,305 331 Square Miles

Blueways............................... 6 Greenways............................ 7 Economic Development..... 8

Botetourt County

Sustainable Region.............. 10 Craig

City of Salem 2013 Population: 25,274 14.6 Square Miles Montgomery County (Member of MPO)

County

Salem

Town of Vinton 2012 Population: 8,087 3.2 Square Miles

Roanoke Vinton

Town of Rocky Mount 2012 Population: 4,813 6.5 Square Miles

Bedford County (Member of MPO)

RIDE Solutions...................... 16 Regional Planning................. 18 Regional Community............ 20

Roanoke County Franklin County 2013 Population: 56,574 692 Square Miles (includes Rocky Mount)

City of Roanoke 2013 Population: 98,913 42.9 Square Miles Roanoke County 2013 Population: 92,703 251 Square Miles (includes Vinton)

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Transportation Planning...... 14

Franklin County

Financial Report.................... 21 2014/15 Work Program......... 22 Regional Images..................... 23

Rocky Mount 2013 Region: 334,412 People 2325 Square Miles

Roanoke Valley Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) 2040 Boundary

Sources: Cities and Counties-Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, 2014. Towns: US Census Bureau 2008-2012 ACS Estimates. 2014

Sources: Esri, DeLorme, NAVTEQ, USGS, Intermap, iPC, NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri (Thailand), TomTom, 2013

CELEBRATING 45 YEARS Since 1969, the Regional Commission has dedicated itself to fostering collaboration and cooperation between our local goverments.

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Front Cover Photo: Courtesy Terry Aldhizer Back Cover Photo: Courtesy Kurt Konrad

2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 3


REMARKS FROM THE CHAIR

from the local government. However, other projects arise during the year that are not covered in the work program, but are important to our constituents.

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s I reflect back on my first year as Chair of the Regional Commission, I think about the importance of our organization’s work in the region. Each year we have a work program that guides the projects that the staff undertakes. The items in the Annual Work Program are proposed by our member governments and reviewed by our Work Program Committee. The 30+ projects range from regional transportation initiatives to high speed broadband related efforts. In most cases, the staff provides support to various local government projects, under the direction of staff members

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ANNUAL REPORT

Below is a small list of some of the activities we have pursued which were not covered under the annual work program. They represent how we respond to our member governments when projects arise and need a quick response. • School district mapping for Alleghany County • Site selection assistance for Alleghany County tourism prospect • Bike, Hike & Bus Map • Wall map for Town of Rocky Mount • Economic impact analysis of Alleghany Highlands events • Technical assistance to the Blacksburg-Roanoke Innovation Network • Economic impact of the Masonic Theater in Clifton Forge w w w.r varc .org

As you look through our 45th Annual Report, I think you would agree that our Commission is very responsive to communities in our region. Our goal is to ensure that we provide high level services to our local governments and the citizens they serve. I applaud the members of our Regional Commission for their commitment to ensuring that our region continues to offer the best quality of life to our citizens and our businesses. JANE W. JOHNSON Chair


REMARKS FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIREC TOR

REGIONAL COMMISSION STAFF (left to right) Matt Miller, Eddie Wells, Jackie Pace, Jeremy Holmes, Bryan Hill, Cristina Finch, Wayne Strickland, Shane Sawyer, Jake Gilmer, Olivia Dooley, Mark McCaskill, Tyler Godsey

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he staff of the Regional Commission continues to work hard in providing our local governments with the support and assistance that our members have come to expect over the last 45 years. The Regional Commission’s success in promoting the collaborative partnerships that serve our region is directly attributed to the support and commitment from our local governments. This commitment is highlighted in each of the programs and projects outlined in this year’s Annual Report. Over the years, we have examined regional approaches

to water supply, stormwater management, regional jails, reducing air pollution, deployment of high-speed fiber broadband, development of greenways, and many other cooperative activities. The Regional Commission has been at the forefront of each of these issues. Of particular note this year, we have finalized the Livable Roanoke Valley Plan, formalized the creation of the Roanoke Valley Broadband Authority, expanded our regional greenway network in addition to our regional blueways, supported our rural communities with comprehensive planning

and grant writing, and played a role in numerous other regionally significant projects. With our collective focus on the issues that are critical to the economic growth and quality of life in our region, the Regional Commission will continue to assist our member governments in whatever capacity is needed. The staff of the Regional Commission looks forward to continuing our support for our member government’s regional initiatives. WAYNE STRICKLAND Executive Director

Every year, the Regional Commission receives the help of interns, volunteers, and supporters who help play critical roles in the work we do. This year, we were honored to have Amanda McGee, Dale Saylor, and Ben Wickstein assist the staff in various capacities. We thank each of them and the many other volunteers and supporters that may be unnamed, but are no less appreciated. Thank you. w w w.r varc .org

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PARTN E RSHI P S FO R OUR RE GI O N A L B LU EWAYS

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ROANOKE RIVER BLUEWAY

n 2013, the Regional Commission began working with a stakeholder committee composed of local governments, non-profits, paddlers, fishermen, local outfitters and watershed groups to develop the Roanoke River Blueway, a 45-mile water trail on the upper Roanoke River. The Roanoke River Blueway flows through or borders the Cities of Roanoke and Salem, the Counties of Montgomery, Roanoke, Bedford, and Franklin, and the Town of Vinton, providing river access for canoeing, kayaking, fishing, tubing, wading, wildlife viewing, and other recreational opportunities. The Blueway also connects to numerous local parks: • Roanoke River Greenway • Tinker Creek Greenway • Mill Mountain Greenway Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

• Blue Ridge Parkway • Explore Park

The overall goal of the Roanoke River Blueway project is to facilitate and encourage recreational use of the Upper Roanoke River

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ANNUAL REPORT

• Smith Mountain Lake The overall goal of the Roanoke River Blueway project is to facilitate and encourage

recreational use of the Upper Roanoke River and tributaries by residents and visitors. Additionally, the project seeks to encourage watershed awareness and sustainable stewardship of the regional waterways. For those wishing to explore our regional blueways, we have created the Roanoke River Blueway Guide that provides river access descriptions, hazards and portages, recommended streamflow levels, contact information, and links to useful websites. The Roanoke River Blueway Guide is available for viewing and download at the Regional Commission’s website, rvarc.org/blueway.

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oving forward, the Regional Commission, local governments, and the Roanoke River Blueway stakeholder group will work to improve and promote the Roanoke River Blueway; seek grant funding and other financial support; work with local outfitters, businesses, and other entities to promote the blueway and increase river related recreation and tourism; and increase watershed awareness.

DID YOU KNOW? You can paddle the Roanoke River Blueway using Valley Metro as a return shuttle. Download the Paddle By Bus map at rvarc.org/blueway w w w.r varc .org


PA RT N ER S H IP S FOR OU R R EG IO N A L G R EEN WAYS

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REGIONAL GREENWAYS

he Regional Commission was recognized by the Roanoke Valley Greenway Commission this year with a resolution highlighting the broad contributions that have been made to greenway development in the Roanoke Valley. When the idea for a new greenway project arose in the 1990’s, the Regional

Commission helped to foster a regional plan that would bring together our local governments in supporting and developing what is now over 27 miles of expanding greenways throughout our region. Below are just some of the ways that the Regional Commission continues to support our regional greenway system.

• Roanoke Valley Greenway Commission- Provides support for ongoing initiatives, including website management, mapping, marketing, and technical analysis.

Courtesy Bradley Bayne

• Interactive Greenway Maps- Provides GIS and technical support in creating and updating online maps for our region’s ever expanding greenway network. • National Bicycle and Pedestrian Documentation Project- Coordination and management of this collection of ongoing data for use by planners, governments, and others to improve regional bicycle and pedestrian planning strategies. • 2014 Regional Bike, Hike and Bus Maps- Designed and published by the Regional Commission, this is the region’s most complete map for exploring our greenways, trails, and public transit system.

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he Regional Greenway and Trail User Count Program, established in 2010, is an ongoing effort to conduct user counts on area greenways and trails. The goal of the Regional Greenway and Trail User Count Program is to collect longitudinal data for use in general planning and maintenance purposes and to compare to future use as the regional greenway network is expanded, connected, and promoted.

GREENWAY AND TRAIL USER COUNT PROGRAM

Trail counter and housing employed along Murray Run Greenway.

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The Regional Greenway and Trail User Count Program was developed and is managed by the Regional Commission with support from the Cities of Roanoke and Salem, Roanoke County, the Town of Vinton, Roanoke Valley Greenway Commission, and Pathfinders for Greenways. Funding sources for the program include regional transportation funding, local governments, and Roanoke Valley Greenway Commission. 2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 7


PA RT N E R S H I P S I N ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ROANOKE VALLEY BROADBAND AUTHORITY

Board Members

Kevin S. Boggess City of Salem- Chair

Kathleen D. Guzi Botetourt County

Michael McEvoy Citizen- Vice Chair

Christopher P. Morrill City of Roanoke

Daniel O’Donnell Roanoke County

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ROANOKE VALLEY BROADBAND AUTHORITY

n December of 2013, four Roanoke Valley governments held public hearings and approved the formation of the Roanoke Valley Broadband Authority, as authorized by the Virginia Wireless Services Authority Act. After approval by the State Corporation Commission, the first Authority meeting was held in January 2014.  The Board has a goal of increasing access to affordable broadband internet, enhancing business attraction and retention, supporting educational services, and promoting the cost efficiencies of government.  A consultant was hired in the Spring of 2014 to develop a business and operations plan for the Authority.  A focus on 8 | 2014

ANNUAL REPORT

economic development evolved as a priority and several options were developed for the deployment of an open-access broadband network to serve industrial and office parks as well as other large users. Chairman, Kevin Boggess, City Manager of Salem, recently told Government Executive magazine that supporters of the Roanoke Valley Broadband Authority view the region’s investment in the open-access

network as one that will attract new businesses and help existing ones get improved connectivity. The open-access network will allow multiple providers to use the same infrastructure to deliver broadband services in a more competitive marketplace. The Broadband Authority is currently evaluating route options, and will be seeking other ways to improve access to affordable broadband. “We believe our efforts have already pushed incumbent providers to improve service and speeds, so we know the Authority has already had an impact,” says Boggess.

Coutesy City of Salem

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PA RT N E R S H I P S I N ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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ECONOMIC IMPACT OF THE ARTS

n October of 2013, the Regional Commission published a study that highlighted the significant economic impact that the Arts and Cultural Industry has on our region. Central to this economic activity are the non-profit organizations that serve as a support and stimulus to the entire industry. By holding culturally relevant and exciting events, these non-profits contribute to the economy by attracting dollars to the region by tourists who spend money for traveler services (food, gas, and lodging). By attracting dollars from visitors and other outside sources, arts and cultural organizations in the City of Roanoke have a large impact on the region. There are undoubtedly other ways that the arts and cultural industry of the City of Roanoke contributes to economic well-being. These other contributions are much more difficult to track.

For instance, arts and culture are a large part of the area’s overall package of quality of life amenities that make the region unique. Companies who have located to this region have been undoubtedly influenced by this overall package of amenities which include the arts and cultural attractions. The degree to which these amenities have played a role in relation to other traditional factors, including cost of doing business, differs depending upon the individual company and indeed the individual decision-maker. While quantifying this type of impact may require more effort, it is clear that our regional economy benefits when our arts and cultural industry is active and healthy. Courtesy Kurt Konrad

KEY FINDINGS 2012

2012

$10,470,217

$13,268,864

$23,922,591

NEW ECONOMIC ACTIVITY GENERATED THROUGH TOURISTS

TOTAL REVENUE OF ARTS AND CULTURE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE REGION

TOTAL ECONOMIC IMPACT OF ARTS AND CULTURE ORGANIZATIONS IN THE REGION

2012

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PA RT N E R S H I P S F O R A SUSTAINABLE REGION

“ This shared vision of all w level of trust between neigh is unprecedented. I am ho process and to see it deve

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ituated between the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains, the Roanoke Valley has natural beauty and outdoor amenities that have always made it an attractive place to live, work, and visit. Our valley has a lower unemployment rate than the national average. We have growing

health care employment and stability in our traditional industries that capitalize on our position as a transportation hub. Students in our schools are doing well and we’re now seeing positive signs that our urban and rural schools are closing the achievement gap.

OUR VISION FOR THE FUTURE

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e are living the dream. Beautiful mountains. Clean rivers and streams. People who care. The Roanoke Valley is filled with promise. To make the most of these opportunities, we will work to provide quality education, access to healthcare, work and 10 | 2014

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career opportunities, responsible stewardship of the environment, and greater regional cooperation. As we strive to fulfill our promises, we will be the destination for individuals, families and businesses who share our same dream. w w w.r varc .org

While there are many things that the Roanoke Valley can proudly proclaim, there are also challenges and threats to our continued progress. Our employment rates and population growth, while stable, are far from vigorous and trail other parts of Virginia. Our economy is driven by employers that are often dependent upon the Commonwealth and federal government, which is disconcerting in an era of decreasing government funding. We are an aging region that is losing some of its most promising young people to large metropolitan areas. We suffer challenges with obesity, teenage-pregnancy, smoking, and drug use. There is an increased demand for safety net health care services and a shift in the use of emergency services for primary care by the uninsured and low income. The Roanoke Valley is also experiencing growing poverty, especially within its urban and more rural areas. To address these challenges and better plan for the future, in 2011 the Regional Commission spearheaded the effort


PA RT N E R S H I P S F O R A SUSTAINABLE REGION

we can achieve has led to a hboring municipalities that onored to be a part of this elop firsthand.” Lisa Garst

REGIONAL GOALS Lisa Garst

to create the Partnership for a Livable Roanoke Valley to address these challenges and plan for a better future. With a goal to promote economic opportunity and a greater quality of life for all residents, we have developed the Valley’s first integrated regional plan. To that end, we sought to answer important questions such as: • What does the future hold for the Roanoke Valley? • How can we ensure a strong quality of life in our communities? • Can we improve access to economic opportunity for all of our residents?

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he results of this effort to engage our stakeholders and community in a process that articulates a vision, principles and goals, and develops a strategic action plan have been realized and can be explored in detail at livableroanoke.org. As we go forward, the Regional Commission will work to facilitate the efforts and goals of our regional stakeholders in

GUIDING PRINCIPLES • Protect the beauty and ecology of the Roanoke Valley. • Provide a healthy and equitable quality of life for all of our citizens. • Celebrate the diversity of our region and its contribution to our culture. • Embrace both our traditions and new innovations to create economic vitality. • Anticipate and adapt to change with responsible leadership. • Build on the assets of our local communities to strengthen our regional collaboration. • Invest in regional infrastructure improvements that meet the communities’ needs of the 21st century. • Promote excellence in education, job training, and a culture of lifelong learning.

These goals respond to public input received throughout the process. • ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  Create jobs, increase incomes and grow businesses to improve the quality of life for all residents of the Roanoke Region. • WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT  Provide access to job training and educational advancement by fostering a culture of lifelong learning for people of all ages and abilities. • HEALTHY ROANOKE VALLEY  Mobilize community resources to improve access to care, coordination of services, and promote a culture of wellness. • NATURAL ASSETS Work collaboratively to preserve the historic, cultural, and natural assets of the region.

affirming our committment to the realizing the region’s vision for a “Livable Roanoke Valley.” w w w.r varc .org

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PA RT N E R S H I P S F O R A SUSTAINABLE RE GION

STRATEGIES A

The following strategies a path forward for each fo Commission is now work implement these strategie toward a Livable Courtesy Barton Malow Company

PRESERVE SCENIC AND RURAL LAND

3 3Protect ridgetops, viewsheds, and critical rural lands.  3 3Encourage infill and redevelopment. 

ALIGN WORKFORCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INVESTMENTS

3 3Provide large, m

development network.  3 3Develop and maintain a data exchange.  3 3Create industry sector partnerships.  3 3Create relevant career pathways.  3 3Track outcomes of network and partnerships.

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buildings.  3 3Redevelop small 3 3Provide high-spe 3 3Improve the mo the workforce. 

IMPROVE AIR AND WATER QUALITY

COORDINATE HE

regional connectivity.  3 3Restore and maintain stream buffers.

3 3Enlist local partn 3 3Form a coordina

3 3Develop a stormwater banking system.  3 3Increase alternative transportation options and

92%

of survey respondents indicated clean air and water as a top priority

3 3Host a regional 3 3Bring alumni ba 3 3Create an onlin

INVEST IN REGIO

3 3Form a regional workforce and economic

85%

INNOVATE THRO

projected 84% increase in population aged 65+ from 2000 to 2030

ANNUAL REPORT

Survey respondents listed economic development, job creation, and job retention as a top priority

3 3Define and deve practices. 

PREPARE STUDENTS FOR CAREERS IN HIGHDEMAND FIELDS 3 3Form a regional task force for a STEM-H

program.  3 3Develop feasibility analysis of the regional program. 3 3Engage industry and employers.  3 3Create career and technical ambassadors.  w w w.r varc .org


PA RT N E R S H I P S F O R A SUSTAINABLE REGION

AND ACTIONS

and actions represent the ocus area. The Regional king with our partners to es and march steadfastly e Roanoke Valley. Courtesy Flickr user ShowPaul

OUGH HIGHER EDUCATION

IMPROVE ACCESS TO HEALTHCARE SERVICES

ONAL INFRASTRUCTURE

CULTIVATE AND MARKET OUTDOOR AND CULTURAL AMENITIES

3 3Identify provider capacity needs.  3 3Advocate for a health information exchange.  3 3Create a community dental clinic. 

l internship fair.  ack to the region.  ne academic clearinghouse. 

market-ready industrial sites and

3 3Enhance sports tournaments infrastructure. 3 3Package and sell current outdoor amenities.  3 3Create outdoor ambassadors.  3 3Create a premier outdoor adventure destination.  3 3Provide more unique accommodations.  3 3Advance arts and culture.

l industrial sites.  eed broadband.  obility for freight, travelers, and

EALTHCARE RESOURCES

ENCOURAGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY

elop coordination of care best

3 3Provide energy efficiency & renewable energy incentives.  3 3Encourage utilities to use renewable energy. 

ners.  ation of care forum. 

BROADEN WELLNESS SUPPORT SERVICES 3 3Address obesity.  3 3Reduce risky behaviors in youth. 3 3Identify wellness funding and other resources 3 3Promote active living

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colleges and universities are within a 60-mile radius of the valley

industry experts believe energy costs will continue to increase in the long-term

28% of the valley’s residents are obese

2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 13


PA RT N E R S H I P S I N TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ROANOKE VALLEY TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATION (RVTPO)

* Note: In September of 2014, the MPO began operating as the Roanoke Valley Transportation Planning Organization in order to better reflect its mission and ongoing work.

Formally known as the RVAMPO Policy Board Members (July 2013-June 2014)

BEDFORD COUNTY

The Honorable Bill Thomasson

BOTETOURT COUNTY

The Honorable Billy Martin, Chair Ron Smith

ROANOKE COUNTY

The Honorable Al Bedrosian The Honorable Charlotte Moore

MONTGOMERY COUNTY

The Honorable Annette Perkins

CITY OF ROANOKE

Dr. M. Rupert Cutler The Honorable Ray Ferris

CITY OF SALEM

The Honorable Jane Johnson, Vice Chair Melinda Payne

TOWN OF VINTON

The Honorable Doug Adams Thomas Rotenberry

GREATER ROANOKE TRANSIT COMPANY (VALLEY METRO)

Carl Palmer

ROANOKE-BLACKSBURG REGIONAL AIRPORT

Jacqueline L. Shuck

ROANOKE VALLEY-ALLEGHANY REGIONAL COMMISSION J. Lee E. Osborne

VDOT–SALEM DISTRICT

Rob Cary, P.E.

VIRGINIA DEPT. OF RAIL & PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Michael Todd

NON-VOTING MEMBERS

Tammye Davis- Federal

Highway Administration Tony Cho- Federal Transit Administration

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CORE PROGRAMS OF THE ROANOKE VALLEY TRANSPORTATION PLANNING ORGANIZATION 1. The Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) guides the region in creating a more efficient, responsive and environmentally-sensitive transportation system over the next twenty years. The plan examines transportation issues/trends and offers a list of specific projects for addressing the region’s mobility needs. The plan is updated every four years so that it continues to support the goals of the region. 2. Regional Surface Transporation Program (RSTP) provides federal funding that is used by states and localities for a wide range of highway and transit projects. RSTP funds are STP funds that are apportioned to specific regions within a state. The RVTPO is responsible for project selection and allocation of funds under the federally funded Regional Surface Transportation Program. In early 2013, RSTP funding provided $28 million for 15 projects over the next 6 years. Included in this was $12.7 million in funding to complete the Roanoke Greenway, in addition to various other projects. 3. The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) is a four-year schedule of all federally funded and regionally significant transportation projects to be implemented in the RVTPO region. It functions like a budget and only projects that are consistent with the goals in the LRTP can be funded. The TIP is updated every four years or sooner as needed. 4. The Congestion Management Plan (CMP) provides for the safe and effective management of new and existing transportation facilities through the use of demand reduction and operational management strategies. The CMP is required to be developed and implemented as an integral part of the transportation planning process in urbanized areas with a population over 200,000. w w w.r varc .org


T R A N S PO RTAT I ON P RO GR A MS A ND H IG H L IGH TS MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

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ransportation professionals and decision-makers in the Roanoke Valley desire to provide citizens with options for getting around our region. “Multimodal” transportation refers to people traveling from one place to another MULTIMODAL CENTERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Apperson Dr. Brookside Carilion Cave Spring Countryside Crossroads Crystal Spring Daleville Downtown Roanoke 10. Downtown Salem 11. Downtown Vinton 12. Fincastle 13. Grandin

14. Hollins 15. Hurt Park 16. Lewis Gale 17. Melrose Ave. 18. Oak Grove 19. Old Southwest 20. Richfield 21. SE Roanoke 22. Tanglewood 23. VA Medical 24. Vallley View

via foot, vehicle, transit, or bicycle. This year the Transportation Technical Committee, the TPO Policy Board, and Regional Commission staff have spent much time discussing the following regarding multimodal transportation: Multimodal Center Multimodal District RVTPO Study Area

• Multimodal Districts: Places in our region where traveling without a personal vehicle is or should be feasible. • Multimodal Centers: Places in our region where roughly a 10-minute walk can accomplish any trip. • Multimodal Corridors: The key roads or off-road routes that should provide an accommodation for transit, bicycles, and/or pedestrians within Centers, Districts, destinations in between and beyond. These components will be used to create the region’s multimodal system plan and be incorporated into the Region’s Long Range Transportation Plan.

25. WilliamsonBreckenridge 26. Williamson-Civic

Towers Shopping Center multimodal infrastructure

REGIONAL PEDESTRIAN VISION PLAN

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alking is a wellused mode of transportation in some parts of our region, such as downtowns where the land was initially developed for people walking to their destinations. The Regional Commission developed a plan that identified the region’s

needs for pedestrian infrastructure. Based on results from public surveys, it is apparent that the citizens in our region desire more walking-friendly places beyond downtown centers and into other areas where economic activity occurs. The desire to walk to a destination is predicated on the perceived safety and convenience of the trip. There are many places outside of w w w.r varc .org

the core downtown markets in which our region’s pedestrian infrastructure can be enhanced. The Regional Pedestrian Vision Plan discusses each of these areas and provides citizens and local stakeholders with a plan that addresses the values, vision, goals, and strategies for becoming a region where people commonly walk for transportation. 2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 15


PARTNERSHIPS IN ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

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IDE Solutions works to support and create transportation opportunities for commuters and travelers throughout the region. We are focused on creating tools that improve access to our commuter support services for anyone, anytime and anywhere. With our growing online resources like carpool matching, Google Transit and interactive bike routes, we are focused on helping commuters and our local governments address some of the region’s transportation needs.

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RIDE Solutions has become one of the nation’s most respected Transportation Demand Management agencies for its creativity and unique approaches towards regional engagement. The rapid growth and success of its Bike Month events are a key part of this. The Bike Shorts Film Festival, the Clean Commute Challenge, and the Night Rider’s Ball are the feature events for each Bike Month.

ART BY BUS LAUNCHES WITH GREAT SUCCESS

he Art by Bus Program launched this year in both the Lynchburg and Roanoke markets. In Roanoke, RIDE Solutions partnered with the Marginal Arts Festival and Valley Metro to install select works from the VisPo (Visual Poetry) movement on two Valley Metro buses. These buses were identified in the Marginal Arts Festival guide by their bus numbers, encouraging people to catch the bus to view the art. Selected buses were also identified by small bus ads that featured pen and ink drawings by Community High School students on the exterior. Works were displayed through the end of April. 16 | 2014

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e create strong bonds with our region through innovative events, community collaboration, art, and effective commuter services. These bonds help us better understand the needs and demands of regional commuters and enable us to better provide new tools and solutions to help with their transportation needs.

ANNUAL REPORT

Star Line Trolley riders got to experience surprise performances by violinist Erin Hunter launching Art By Bus

In addition, RIDE Solutions partnered with local artist Matt Ames and Pat Greene from Orlando, Florida, to bring the Transit Interpretation Project w w w.r varc .org

to Roanoke. The Transit Interpretation Project, or TrIP, is a long running program in Orlando that places artists, writers, bloggers, and photographers on the city buses. The participants create works based on the experience of their trip. Works created by Roanoke’s TrIP participants were displayed at 16 West Marketplace on Church Avenue in downtown Roanoke throughout the festival. In Lynchburg, the Greater Lynchburg Transit Company and Lynchburg City Schools selected works created by local students to be displayed on GLTC’s buses. Students and teachers developed the pieces to run on buses throughout April and May.


RIDE SOLUTIONS R EG IO NA L H IG H L IGH TS LEADERS GATHER FOR SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION SUMMIT

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n March of 2014, The Cabell Brand Center and RIDE Solutions hosted the first annual Sustainable Transportation Summit at Virginia Tech School of Medicine and Research Institute.

2014 BIKE HERO AWARD

Walter Kulash, of the Livable Transportation Movement. Over 60 planners, transportation professionals, elected officials, business leaders, public health officials and community advocates from around the region attended. Ultimately, the summit focused on how investments in sustainable mobility options can improve a region’s vitality and economic competitiveness.

The goal of the summit was to provide a broad educational program that touched on the economic, environmental, and social value of implementing and encouraging transportation choice in the region. Keynote speakers included Nicholas Donohue, Virginia Deputy Secretary of Transportation, and

The Summit returns in March 2015 to further explore the myriad of challenges and opportunities presented by our regional transportation system.

THOMAS HASH Draper Mercantile Pulaski, VA Recognized for his work building a bicycle culture in Pulaski County, his volunteerism supporting trail building and bike organizations, and for making the Draper Mercantile a hub of bike activity for the New River Valley.

2014 EXTRAORDINARY BIKE PROFESSIONAL

PRESENTS THE 4TH ANNUAL

MAY 2014

TAKE THE CLEAN Commute Challenge Simply log your trips to compete and win cash and prizes all May long. The rewards for exploring your alternatives to driving alone have never been bigger! Visit www.ridesolutions.org to register Sponsored By

OVER $1,000 IN CASH PRIZES / DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS APRIL 1, 2014 MAY 2, 2014 (7PM) @ THE TAUBMAN MUSEUM OF ART MAY 8 (7PM) @ THE LYRIC THEATRE MAY 16 (6:30PM) @ THE RIVERVIEWS ARTSPACE RIDESOLUTIONS.ORG/BIKESHORTS

THE 4TH ANNUAL BIKE SHORTS FILM FESTIVAL This year’s film festival featured 14 films from around the world screened at three locations across the region – the premier at the Taubman Museum of Art in Roanoke; the Lyric in Blacksburg; and Riverviews Artspace in Lynchburg. In all, we received 22 films, each of which can be viewed at the Bike Shorts YouTube channel. JURIED PRIZE: “Havana Bikes” by British filmmaker Ian Clark BEST MUSIC VIDEO: “A TwoWheeled Journey into Sound” by local filmmaker Will Sellari

CLEAN COMMUTE CHALLENGE This year was one of the most successful Clean Commute Challenges ever at RIDE Solutions, 71,456 miles were pledged by commuters all across southwest and central Virginia – enough to circle the Earth three times! In addition, clean commuters logged 42,503 miles over the month. AWARDS CLEAN COMMUTER OF THE YEAR: Jerry Ford of Blacksburg THE CLEANEST TEAM: Blue Ridge Regional Office of Virginia’s DEQ

NIGHT RIDER’S BALL Thanks to the over 80 cyclists who rode to Kirk Avenue Music Hall on Friday, May 30th, to hear Larry Keel tear the venue up. In all, over 100 folks packed the hall and the street outside as a fitting end to Bike Month. The evening closed out with a glow ride through downtown Roanoke, including a trip through the new pedestrian plaza on Market street. AWARDS 2014 BIKE HERO Thomas Hash 2014 EXTRAORDINARY PROFESSIONAL Davy Hazlegrove

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DAVY HAZLEGROVE Owner Blackwater Bike Shop Lynchburg, VA Recognized for the support his Blackwater Bike Shop offers to the cycling community in Lynchburg, as well as for his personal dedication to cycling as a volunteer for events, rides, and many local boards and community groups.

2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 17


PARTNERSHIPS FOR REGIONAL PLANNING

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REGIONAL STORMWATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING

n the fall of 2013 the Regional Commission established the Regional Stormwater Advisory Committee to serve as a regional forum for discussion of stormwater and water resources in the Upper Roanoke River watershed. The Committee is composed of a diverse group of stakeholders that includes representatives from local governments area businesses, state and federal agencies, civic groups, educational institutions, and citizens.   Regional Stormwater Advisory Committee activities include, but are not limited to, serving

as a forum for discussion of stormwater related water resource issues involving a diverse group of regional stakeholders; assisting MS4 localities in meeting the Virginia Stormwater Management Act requirements; public education and outreach; support in developing and implementing the Roanoke River TMDL Implementation Plan; serving as liaisons to the stakeholder groups to assist in understanding and promoting stormwater management and related activities. To learn more, visit rvarc.org/environment/stormwater

REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEM PLANNING

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he Regional Commission is working with over 40 area stakeholders to develop a Regional Food System Plan to promote and expand existing local food systems in the Roanoke Valley and surrounding areas. Food system planning seeks to spur local economies by: supporting local businesses and preserving agricultural and natural landscapes; encouraging sustainable farming practices; and improving access to healthy food items such as fresh produce in our local markets and stores. Food system planning is gaining recognition as an integral area of interest for local governments. 18 | 2014

ANNUAL REPORT

The Regional Commission has been hosting committee meetings to get input on issues related to local foods. Be sure to check out our new website devoted to Local Foods. The website provides more about food system planning and its importance to economic development. The site also outlines a list of area non-profits who are working on food projects in our community, and has an interactive Local Foods Map to find community gardens, markets and farms. To learn more, visit rvarc.org/sustainability/local-foods

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REGIONAL LEADERSH

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he Commission, working in conjunction with the Roanoke Area Coalition for Economic Development, coordinated the Regional Leadership Trip to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in September 2013. Thirty-five business,


PARTNERSHIPS FOR R EG IO N A L PL A NNI NG REGIONAL AGE WAVE ANALYSIS

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HIP TRIP: PITTSBURGH community and government leaders attended the two-day trip. The goal of the leadership trips is to have government and business leaders come away with practical and innovative ideas to inspire the work within our region.

s the baby boomers age, and the growth in the younger workforce remains flat, the impacts on the various age groups will be dramatic in the coming decades as well. Population projections generated by the UVA’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service demonstrate the impacts of these trends over the next few decades. Considering the region’s population is expected to grow about 11% over the next 20 years, the increase of 59% in the population age group 65+ should catch the attention of many leaders and service providers in the region. This change will be evident by 2020 as the elderly population will increase by nearly 30%. Furthermore, growth in the working age population (20-64) is expected to remain flat until 2030, but those over age 65 are projected to grow by about 32,700 by 2030.

There has been limited effort to address the implications of the “age wave” in local and regional planning initiatives in the region. The aging population can put a strain on public and social service resources such as “meals-on-wheels”, transportation services, health care, housing options and recreation services, just to name a few.

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he existing regional Senior Citizens Task Force, if provided with more recognition and participation from local governments and other stakeholders, could be tasked to carry out a comprehensive age wave strategic plan, as recommended by the Commonwealth Council on Aging. Assistance could be provided by the Regional Commission staff. Such a process could provide a more comprehensive list of issues and identify ways to raise awareness of the regional implications of our aging population.

Download full report at rvarc.org/documents-maps

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2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 19


PARTNERSHIPS IN A REGIONAL COMMUNITY Every year, the Regional Commission commits hundreds of hours to representing and supporting our region’s localities through various boards, committees, and various initiatives. Our commitment to our communities and our region is bound by our desire to be actively engaged in the issues and causes that shape the vitality of our region. Below are some of the organizations, boards, and committees that the staff serve on during the year.

Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

ORGANIZATIONS AND COMMITTEES SERVED NATIONAL • National Association of Development Organizations • Southeastern Regional Directors Institute • Development District Association of Appalachia and Network Appalachia

Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

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ANNUAL REPORT

STATE • Bike Virginia • I-81 Corridor Coalition • Virginia Association of Metropolitan Planning Organizations • Virginia Association of Planning District Commissions • Virginia Citizens Planning Education Association of Virginia of Directors • Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Recreational Trails Advisory Committee • Senior Citizens Coordination Council • Trans-Dominion Express Committee REGIONAL • AECP/ES Green Living and Energy Expo Planning Committee • Blue Ridge Transportation Safety • Blue Ridge Interagency Council of Homelessness • Cool Cities Coalition • Council of Community Services • City of Roanoke Downtown Mobility Workgroup • City of Roanoke School System ROTEC Advisory Committee  • Greater Roanoke Valley Asthma and Air Quality Coalition • Pathfinders for Greenways • Partnership for a Livable Roanoke Valley • Regional Bicycle Advisory Committee • Regional Stormwater Technical Committee

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• Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce • Roanoke Regional Housing Network • Roanoke River Blueway Stakeholder Committee • Roanoke Valley Greenway Commission - Public Relations and Education Committee • Roanoke Valley Area GIS Managers Users Group • Roanoke Valley Greenway Commission • Roanoke Valley Urban Forestry Council • Salem-Roanoke County Chamber of Commerce • Roanoke Refugee Dialogue Group - Transportation Subcommittee • Roanoke Valley Broadband Authority • Taubman Museum Sidewalk Art Show Committee • United Way of the Roanoke Valley • United Way Community Investment Panel • Upper Roanoke River Roundtable Advisory Committee • Upper James River Resource Conservation and Development District (RC&D) • Vinton Downtown Revitalization Committee • Virginia’s Western Highlands Travel Council • Virginia Western Community College • Virginia Western Community College-Integrated Environmental Studies Advisory Group • Virginia Western Community College- Geospatial Program Lay Advisory Committee


21% Regional Transportation Programs 59%

REVENUE, GRANTS AND APPROPRIATIONS

FINANCIAL REPORT

2013-14

EXPENSES Federal 2013-14 Grants and Appropriations

$905,360

State Grants and Appropriations

$384,103

Local Grants and Appropriations

$255,558

In Kind Contributions

$11,638

Operations/Misc Expenditures 26%

Contract Services 23%

FEDERAL FUNDING BREAKDOWN

Personnel 51%

Contract Income

$22,461

Other

$49,946

TOTAL REVENUE

2013-14

Regional Transportation Programs

$531,020

Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

$194,247

Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC)

$53,350

Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ)

$126,743

$1,629,066 TOTAL FEDERAL FUNDING

$905,360

2013-14 REVENUE GRANTS AND APPROPRIATIONS Local Grants and Appropriations 16%

State Grants and Appropriations 24%

In Kind Contributions 1%

Contract Income 1% Other 3%

2013-14 FEDERAL FUNDING BREAKDOWN

Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 21%

Federal Grants and Appropriations 55%

Housing and Urban Development (HUD) 21%

Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ) 14%

Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) 6%

2013-14 FEDERAL FUNDING BREAKDOWN Dept. of Environmental Quality (DEQ) 14%

Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) 6%

2013-14 EXPENSES

Regional Transportation Programs 59%

Regional Transportation Programs 59%

In FY2014, the commission generated $5.37 in additional funding for every $1 invested by local governments Operations/Misc Expenditures 26%

EXPENSES

2013-14

Personnel

$821,589

Contract Services

$365,134

Operations/Misc Expenditures

$421,137

TOTAL EXPENSES END OF YEAR BALANCE

$1,607,860 $21,206

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Contract Services 23% 2013-14

EXPENSES

Personnel 51%

Operations/Misc Expenditures 26%

Contract Services 23%

Personnel 51%

2013-14 REVENUE GRANTS AND APPROPRIATIONS In Kind Contributions 1%

Local Grants and Appropriations 16%

Contract Income 1% Other 3%

2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 21

State Grants and

Appropriations Federal Grants 2013-14 REVENUE GRANTS AND APPROPRIATIONS 24%

In Kind

Contract Income

and


PA RT N E R S H I P S O N T H E H O R I ZO N 2014/15 WORK PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

REGIONAL FUTURE LAND USE MAPPING- Staff will consolidate local governments’ existing future land use maps to develop a region wide map, which will allow the localities to analyze land use decisions and planning. BOONES MILL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE- Staff will assist the Town with developing a new Comprehensive Plan and submission of a DHCD planning grant application. CITY OF SALEM TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE- Staff will assist the City with developing an area plan for downtown including marketing analysis, and analysis of the built environment.

WESTERN VIRGINIA INTERMODAL FACILITY STUDY- The RVTPO will receive

the AECOM produced Western VA Intermodal Facility Study which analyzes the economic business case for a facility and potential paths forward. COMPREHENSIVE PROFILE OF THE CITY OF ROANOKEThe Commission will conduct a study gathering data on demographics, transportation, environment, and the economy as they relate to transportation planning and comprehensive planning.

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ANNUAL REPORT

TOWN OF VINTON WAYFINDING STUDY UPDATE- The Commission will

build on the 2009 Wayfinding study that was completed in 2009 to include changes in destinations and attractions and updated wording/media recommendations and collaborative opportunities with neighboring localities.

TOWN OF VINTON PEDESTRIAN STUDY- The

Regional Commission is studying the areas near W.E. Cundiff Elementary School and Wolf Creek greenway to consider pedestrian crossings, accessibility and safety.

BOTETOURT COUNTY TRANSPORTATION SECTION OF COMPREHENSIVE PLAN-

Working with Botetourt County staff in the inclusion of a transportation section of their comprehensive plan update, which will incorporate the Exit 150 Interchange Project as well.

BICYCLE ROUTE 76 CORRIDOR STUDY- An

analysis of U.S. Bicycle Route 76 will include an inventory of existing conditions and recommendations for safety, wayfinding, and spur routes to connect to other bicycle facilities.

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CLIFTON FORGE BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN MAPPING- Staff is working with

Clifton Forge to develop a map of potential bicycle and pedestrian routes connecting key activity centers for consideration in future planning.

PEDESTRIAN INFRASTRUCTURE MAPPING (PHASE II)-

Staff will map rural pedestrian infrastructure and identify gaps in the network and provide results to VDOT for future planning use.

BOTETOURT COUNTY TRAIL MAPPING- Staff will develop

a comprehensive trail map and online interactive guide of the Botetourt County Trail System and continue trail counts within the Carvins Cove Nature Reserve.

CRAIG COUNTY GREENWAY DEVELOPMENT- Staff will

continue providing planning and development assistance for a greenway to connect downtown New Castle with the Craig County Sports Complex. For a comprehensive look at the Regional Commission’s 2014/15 Work Program, visit rvarc.org/14/15_workprogram


REGIONAL IMAGE S

Courtesy Kurt Konrad

Courtesy Jeff Hoffman

Courtesy Dan Smith

Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

Courtesy Terry Aldhizer

Courtesy Blake Prim

Courtesy Jeff Hoffman

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Courtesy David Lanowitz

2014 ANNUAL REPORT | 23


THE 2 0 1 4 A N N U A L R E P O R T Fostering Regional Partnerships for 45 Years

313 Luck Ave., SW • PO Box 2569 • Roanoke, VA 24010 Ph: 540.343.4417 • Fax: 540.343.4416 Email: rvarc@rvarc.org • www.rvarc.org Media Inquiries: media@rvarc.org w w w.r varc .org

Profile for Roanoke Valley - Alleghany Regional Commission

2014 Annual Report  

2014 Annual Report  

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