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reporter the ruyton

spring 2019

POTENTIAL PURPOSE PASSION AND PLACE


CONTENTS FROM THE STUDY

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FROM THE BOARD

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WOMEN SUPPORTING WOMEN

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WE RUN FOR EACH OTHER

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FENCING FOR AUSTRALIA

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PRETTY POWERFUL MESSAGES

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REAL WORLD ENTERPRISE SKILLS

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THE GAMIFICATION OF LEARNING

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COMMUNITY WALKS

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WELCOME TO SOUTH HOUSE

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MODEL UNITED NATIONS FORUM

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PASSIONATE PERFORMERS

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COMMUNITY

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FOUNDATION

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PARENTS OF RUYTON (POR)

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OLD RUYTONIANS’ ASSOCIATION

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ALUMNAE

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RUYTON REMEMBERS

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REUNIONS

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Mrs Elizabeth Beattie, Staff Editor Ms Elaine Doyle, Director of Communications and Marketing If you have any articles or updates you would like to be considered for publication please email community@ruyton.vic.edu.au or post to 12 Selbourne Road, Kew Victoria 3101. Please mark all correspondence for the attention of the Ruyton Reporter Editor – Mrs Elizabeth Beattie.

the ruyton reporter


FROM THE STUDY The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme urges young people to ‘explore their full potential and find their purpose, passion and place in the world’. As I read this edition of the Ruyton Reporter, I kept coming back to those words: potential, purpose, passion and place, as they are reflected in nearly every article. Through their engagement in curricular and co-curricular activities, this is what our girls are truly striving towards and achieving, finding what brings them joy and ignites their passion. I strongly believe that our proudest moments in life are when we realise our potential and achieve personal best. These are the moments that resonate with us for a lifetime; far more than any award, medal or certificate. In a 2012 interview Australian Sportswoman Ellyse Perry reflected, ‘What I love about sport is the continued challenge about it – you’re never as good as you can be. And that is what really motivates me and excites me about playing. The good thing is you can always come back, the next ball, the next day. You can keep working on things. I do enjoy the challenge of trying to get better …’ Perry refers to sport, as it was here that she found her tribe, playing international cricket and soccer from the age of 16. It is where she dug deep, showed grit, overcame hardship, and continually strived to be her best. In the process she has also inspired many other girls and young women to take up the challenge. So many of our girls find their passion and their place through their engagement in Community Service, Sustainability, Drama, Music, Sport, Debating or a particular subject area. Obviously we can’t all be the best in the world at something, but finding your passion and purpose, experiencing that true sense of joy, must never be under-rated. spring 2019

What I love most about the Ellyse Perry story is that from the time she was old enough to grip a cricket bat she has toiled for hours in the practice nets with her father, fashioning a technique considered to be among the best in the world. She recognises these sessions as one of her favourite parts of training and can still be found regularly in the nets at St Ives with her father; an international star keeping it real and recognising her personal support team. Our girls could not achieve what they do without the support of parents, families, staff and each other. The people who know them best also know the risks they take to achieve their potential. You see their personal growth and are there to support them in times of hardship or setback. It is your belief in them, when sometimes they struggle to believe in themselves, that makes all the difference. It doesn’t matter if you are the best in the world or a Prep girl trying something for the first time; everyone needs a support team, to know that someone is on their side and has their back. We thank all those who provide this important support to our girls. Potential, purpose, passion and place. As you enjoy this edition please celebrate with us how our girls are truly living their lives with impact and purpose. Ms Linda Douglas, Principal

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FROM THE BOARD ADVANCING RUYTON FOR CURRENT AND FUTURE GENERATIONS In April 2019 I began my tenure as President of the Ruyton Board, a position that is a privilege to hold. I have been warmly welcomed and it is inspiring to work with the dedicated members of the Board, who do their utmost in so many ways to continue the advancement of Ruyton. A strong and healthy culture of a school undoubtedly grows from a foundation of teamwork, collaboration and good communication. The Ruyton Board, together with the Principal, the Ruyton School Executive team, our staff, the Ruyton Foundation and the support and involvement of many dedicated parents, all play a part in ensuring that we are well placed indeed in our community to advance Ruyton for current and future generations. The philanthropic culture of Ruyton has also long supported building works and scholarship opportunities that enrich the diversity of our community. This year we warmly welcomed Sally de Guingand as part of the Executive team at Ruyton, in the role of Director of Philanthropy and Engagement. In fact, we have welcomed Sally ‘home’, as an Old Girl (Class of 1986). We are sure that Sally’s sense of belonging, combined with her experience and energy, will play a pivotal role in engaging and developing a culture of philanthropy at Ruyton and within our school community, as we embark on the redevelopment of our Performing Arts and Library precinct. The philanthropic culture of Ruyton has been important in supporting significant building works and scholarship opportunities that enrich the diversity of our community. We hope to continue to grow this together. 2

Ruyton is undoubtedly an exciting school to serve, whose leaders and teachers continually provide stimulating and engaging learning for our girls. As a Board, we strive to support Ruyton’s forwardthinking learning culture, equipping staff and students with facilities and infrastructure for now and the future, enabling Ruyton to continue to be a leading school for girls. With the combined efforts and mutual support of the Ruyton community, we not only continue to achieve our goals, but also build a culture that is the signature experience of being a Ruyton girl. Ms Virginia McLaughlan, President of the Board

the ruyton reporter


GIVING POSITIVELY IMPACTS LIVES As an old girl I am thrilled to return to Ruyton. The education I had at Ruyton is an important part of making me who I am today. I believe women have to stand up and be counted. I am passionate about how a Ruyton education can make a real difference and that as a connected community we can provide opportunities to allow all our girls to develop and grow. INTRODUCING MS SALLY DE GUINGAND (’86) Sally de Guingand is our new Director of Philanthropy and Engagement. She brings a range of experiences that will continue and further develop the philanthropic and engagement journey for the Ruyton community. Sally’s career spans corporate, not-for-profit and independent school sectors, equipping her with a breadth of knowledge in the development and leadership of long-term advancement and philanthropic strategies. Sally is a passionate advocate for independent girls’ education and understands the importance of relationships to develop and sustain a strong culture of philanthropy in a community. Sally graduated from the University of Tasmania with an arts degree, majoring in sociology and marketing. She has two sons aged 10 and 15, and is planning a trip with them this Christmas, including a visit to Ruyton-XI-Towns in Shropshire, UK.

spring 2019

At Ruyton, our girls are benefitting from those who have gone before us. By giving today we help the students of the future. We belong to a community that is passionate about effecting change and the powerful impact philanthropy can bring. Giving can take many forms, such as giving your time and expertise in a voluntary capacity, as well as financial gifts and bequests. I believe it all makes a real difference and through my diverse career in the corporate and notfor-profit sector, I have seen first-hand how life changing opportunities are brought about through a community engaged in philanthropy. You are a Ruyton girl for life and I am proud to be part of our thriving community. I am energised and committed to making a positive impact today and for the future. Ms Sally de Guingand (’86), Director of Philanthropy and Engagement

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leadership

WOMEN SUPPORTING WOMEN A reflection from our School Co-Captains, Jacqueline D and Olivia H We’d always been told how fast time flies in Year 12, but it wasn’t until we reached it that we truly understood how surreal the year feels. All too quickly, three terms have passed and we now find ourselves preparing for the final stretch of VCE. Exam dates have been written into our diaries, university course applications have been submitted, and reality is beginning to sink in; our time at Ruyton really is coming to an end. As we reflect on this past year, it is hard to put into words how challenging, yet also incredibly rewarding, it has been. We’ve ridden the emotional highs and lows with our peers and emerged stronger for it. Whether it be flaunting our footy colours on Community Service Day, or singing at the top of our lungs in support of the inaugural Anti-bullying Day Concert, the Year 12 girls have forged strong relationships with students across the year levels and done their best to uphold the vibrant culture of the School. This was particularly apparent in the Cross Country team and with the Pretty Foundation Assembly.

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Our teachers have encouraged us to embrace each other for who we are. They have believed in us every step of the way, and these invaluable lessons will be carried with us as we journey into the next stage of our lives. We have endeavoured to be role models for the girls in upcoming years, just as the Year 12s from previous years have been for us, and we know this legacy of women supporting women is a large part of what makes Ruyton so special. It is both daunting and exhilarating to think that soon we will step out of the warm red-brick gates of 12 Selbourne Road for the final time, yet, undoubtedly, there is a part of this incredible community that will never leave us. It is the spirit of Ruyton; the innate strength we have been instilled with that will serve us well as we dream beyond what currently is, and start to envision what could be. Though we may be going our separate ways, we have every faith that each girl will approach whatever life throws at her with courage and ardour. Thus, it is with bitter-sweet sentiments that we hand over the reins to the next generation of girls, whom we know will do a wonderful job leading the School. And though we never quite imagined the day would come, we are so excited to join the ranks of the Old Ruytonians, as we watch our beloved School continue to flourish, whilst carving our own paths in the wider world. Olivia H and Jacqueline D, School Co-Captains

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LEARNING ABOUT OURSELVES THROUGH LEADERSHIP Congratulations to Ellora K and Maddy M, Year 12, on achieving the Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award this year. The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme is a youth development programme, urging young Australians to ‘explore their full potential and find their purpose, passion and place in the world.’ There are three stages, Bronze, Silver and Gold, with three components; skill, service and physical recreation. The Gold Award requires 12 months of weekly commitment. It also includes a five-day, four-night residential project with unknown people, to develop personal and community skills.

We both decided to embark on the Duke of Ed journey to learn more about ourselves and to help out in the wider community. For the adventurous journey, both Ellora and Maddy were able to use School camps, such as white-water rafting, central Australia, hiking and the Kakadu trip. For service, Ellora coached U12 and U14 groups at hockey each week during winter, and helped teach seven-year olds the basics in the offseason; Maddy volunteered at a St Vincent de Paul shop, as well as with other organisations, such as the R U OK? Charity.

Perhaps the most challenging activity to organise was the recreational project for the Gold Award. Ellora was awarded a partial scholarship to attend the annual LEAP week Leadership camp experience at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2018. Here she developed her personal leadership, teamwork, organisational and future job skills. Ellora met people from around the world in different walks of life. Her experiences and friendships will last a lifetime. It was an amazing experience where she learnt life-changing skills. Maddy was fortunate to attend a Years 7-10 camp in Gippsland, where she was a camp leader and helper. This experience enabled Maddy to improve her leadership, communication, and teamwork skills, as well as being able to interact and form new friendships with people from around Australia. It was an amazing experience and she learnt life-changing skills. Duke of Ed was an unforgettable experience, which allowed Ellora and Maddy to broaden their perspective on the world, connecting with society and learning valuable life skills. They discovered how passion and commitment can make a difference in other people’s lives. Ellora and Maddy encourage any girl going into Year 9 to take up this incredible opportunity on offer at Ruyton. It is unlike any other award or endeavour.

spring 2019

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GRIT

WE RUN FOR EACH OTHER FIFTY CONSECUTIVE STATE CROSS COUNTRY CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORIES SINCE 2003 Great teams are developed and consolidated when every participant feels as though they belong, and they can contribute in some way to the team performance. Throughout the winter months, the Ruyton Cross Country team train together as one close-knit unit in harsh morning conditions at Xavier College. After training, the girls from a variety of year levels walk to School together and socialise throughout the school day as a sorority. These are the building blocks of an unbreakable team bond. On race day, these girls don’t walk to the line with trepidation because they stand alongside girls they know, train with and care about.

In the sport of Cross Country, there are three major State Team Championships each year: the State Cross Country Relays, the State Road Relays and the Overall State Championship. To win just one of these overall trophies would be considered a major achievement by a school. Up until June of this year, Ruyton had won 49 consecutive State Championships since 2003. With over 515 girls competing over 16 years, Ruyton’s success in this sport is peerless. With one final meeting before the State Championship, it was impressed upon the team by the Coaches and Captains that ‘if this event is to be the end of our 16-year undefeated run, we fight to the very end.’ Everybody was challenged that when the pain came, and it would come, that they would have to absorb it and think as a team, and go again. Belief and purpose are such powerful weapons in sport. After that meeting the urgency of the team was palpable. At the State Championships all eyes were on the Captains, Molly M, Olivia H and Amy A, as they addressed the Ruyton team one last time. ‘We run for each other’ was the message from the Captains. It prompted such a powerful and sustained response from the team that Ruyton won the 2019 State Cross Country Championship by a record margin. After 16 years, Ruyton had finally achieved that magical number of 50 straight Championship victories in all State Cross Country Competitions.

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Character is when athletes push themselves to what they sense is their limit and, just when they think they are exhausted, when the breathing becomes coarse, the legs get heavy, the arms stall and everything stands still; then, at that moment, they find something. This sudden surge of adrenalin is a reminder of their passion for the team. It lifts their spirits and enables them to regain their posture and find a rhythm which is quicker, lighter and faster. At that very moment they are fearless and selfless. All the girls in the Ruyton Cross Country team run for something they believe in.

spring 2019

Close-knit and courageous defines this special group of girls. They run for one another, support each other as a family, and purposefully and methodically dismantle the opposition by ‘out teaming’ them. These 515 Ruyton girls have contributed to this tremendous achievement, leaving an indelible mark on the School. Mr Stephen Ellinghaus, Director of Athletics

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GRIT

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RUYTON GIRLS ALWAYS MAKE ME PROUD OF THEIR POSITIVE ATTITUDES FENCING FOR AUSTRALIA

What do you love about fencing?

‘Every time you fence it’s a different story; a different game.’

Every time you fence it’s a different story; a different game. It’s necessary to change your strategy each time. You need to be ready to change your position and tactic in a blink of an eye, and that’s the difference between winning and losing. I love the community. Wherever I go in the world, I have a group of friends and fencers waiting for me. They are very inclusive and we leave our competitive nature on the piste.

Year 11 student, Lily W, earned a place on the Junior Australian Fencing team this year and is the youngest member of this age category currently representing Australia. She travels to Italy and Israel in the December/January holidays to train and compete on the European circuit, in preparation for the World Championships in Salt Lake City in April 2020. Lily’s Cadet world ranking is currently 96th. Fencing was recently introduced at Ruyton for girls in Years 5-12, thanks to Lily’s vision, coached by Pieter Leeuwenburgh from the Victorian Fencing Academy. Pieter is also a National Coach for Épée. We talked to Lily about what fencing means to her.

Where do you train? I train at the Victorian Fencing Centre in North Melbourne, with the Australian National Coach, Vlad Sher, three to four times a week. I also train at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) four times a year for five days each time. The camps are incredible, with fantastic facilities and they take great care of us. I also assist Pieter Leeuwenburgh with the Ruyton Fencing Team, running warm-up sessions and giving the girls tips on footwork and blade position. The girls always make me proud of their positive attitudes. Are there any particular characteristics that help you when you are fencing? Features I use in my everyday life, such as the ability to focus, as well as determination, help me when I am fencing. If I am down 10-14, I need to be focused and concentrate on nothing but the next hit. I don’t think about the possibility of losing, as if you get into that headspace you have already lost. I focus on the next step. Congratulations to Lily on her fine achievements and good luck on the upcoming stages of her journey.

spring 2019

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empowering girls

PRETTY POWERFUL MESSAGES

At Ruyton, we believe in the importance of having open conversations about our bodies throughout Junior School and Senior School. Healthy eating, the importance of fitness, the influence of genes and DNA, mindfulness/relaxation strategies and celebrations of diverse body shapes are all encompassed through our Wellbeing Programme and are embedded in the curriculum. A study in the US (2015) found children as young as five were developing concerns about body image, expressing a desire to be thinner and more attractive. Furthermore, the Australian-based Pretty Foundation highlights the growing incidence of skewed perceptions of body image. They share statistics that 38 percent of four-yearolds say they are dissatisfied with their body shape and 34 percent of five year-old children reported an intention to diet.

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‘Imagine a world where girls are comfortable in their bodies and confident in their ability to conquer through their endeavours …’ If the basis for body image is laid in early childhood, and is further perpetuated through adolescence, then the value that girls place on their looks and concepts of what is ‘pretty’ may be fixed. This has the potential to change the way they see, feel and think about their bodies in the long term. It was these concerns that prompted the Year 7 students to embrace a programme celebrating beauty from within. After meeting Ms Merissa Forsyth, Founder and CEO of the Pretty Foundation, and hearing about the influences on the way we perceive our bodies, our students completed a programme in their Wellbeing sessions. They explored how to develop a more positive view of themselves by acknowledging what is pretty remarkable about their personalities, attributes and qualities. The aim of this work was also to celebrate someone they know who they find pretty inspirational and have the confidence to articulate this.

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Year 7 students shared their strengths by flipping their clothes inside-out to show the way they value themselves from the inside, not out. In a Senior School Assembly, Elise C, Millie McF-S and Stephanie Z spoke of a traditional view of ‘beauty and pretty’ as a context regarding female appearance. They urged us to go beyond the superficial and reclaim the power of pretty by using it to describe the true value of women and girls. ‘Imagine a world where girls are comfortable in their bodies and confident in their ability to conquer through their endeavours, regardless of how they look. In wearing our uniforms inside-out, we want to drive home the message of the need to flip ‘pretty’ on its head. Pretty what? Pretty Inspirational, Pretty Brave and Pretty Creative. Pretty Amazing Ruyton girls. That is me. That is you.’ Stephanie Z, Year 7

‘Something happened that morning, something very powerful.’ We were delighted Merissa was available to attend our Assembly and afterwards she commented on the experience. ‘After a few of the girls had shared their thoughts about flipping the way girls are valued, a video clip came on the screen and a song called ‘Pretty on the Inside’ was played. At that point all the Year 7 girls stood up from where they were in the audience, faced the other girls and joined in the song. I couldn’t hold in my tears of joy any longer, as not only were the girls singing about true beauty, but also they were holding up signs they had made starting with the words ‘I am pretty …’ and ending with an attribute they aligned with – ‘… pretty strong, pretty creative, pretty determined.’ I looked around as the voices reverberated in that auditorium and there didn’t seem to be a dry eye. Something happened that morning, something very powerful.’ What a pretty remarkable group of Ruyton girls. We are proud of you! Ms Jane d’Oliveyra, Middle Years Co-ordinator

spring 2019

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empowering girls

REAL WORLD ENTERPRISE SKILLS What does a Turkish-Kurdish shepherd have in common with a Year 9 or 10 Ruyton girl? A shared sense of business leadership based on dignity, hard work, gratitude and kindness. Turkish-born American immigrant Hamdi Ulukaya developed a natural yoghurt called Chobani in New York, which went on to become the number one Greek yoghurt brand in the country. With the initial profit his company built a Little League baseball field for the children of the community. Hamdi’s story is an important lesson for us all, but especially for our young women as they contemplate their contribution to society.

In Humanities, Year 9 and 10 students experienced a new elective called $20 Boss. Developed by the Foundation for Young Australians (FYA), $20 Boss is an in-school programme run in co-operation with teachers and schools, which lends students $20 of start-up capital to create their own business. An immersive learning experience that builds financial literacy and enterprise skills. Students are able to put these skills into practice in a ‘real world’ context by planning, budgeting and marketing their business idea and then running their business. In Semester 1 we had 15 budding young entrepreneurs who explored business ideas and took their concepts to the marketplace. The students all committed to supporting a social cause. Emily conducted a series of basketball skills sessions for Junior School students; Sophia, Ellie and Mikaylee held a very successful cookie dough stall; Hana, Talaja and Aimee developed a range of scented sachets; Kylie and Mary created homemade lip balm with all natural ingredients; Angela and Stephanie took orders for bespoke iPhone covers; Annie and Jordan developed a range of study aids; Dorothy made a range of beeswax wrappers; and Mary created a professionally presented range of healthy snack bars. The experience immersed them in the creation of ideas and methods, and also prompted them to identify problems and seek solutions.

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Aimee, Hana and Talaja, sharing their story as Assembly, talked us through their business, Sachet Co., from its creation to its ultimate success. Delivering a profit, their business donated to Breast Cancer to help make a difference. They outlined their problem solving, critical thinking, decision-making and logistics processes and skills. By working hard and taking risks they created something to be proud of. Their focus enabled them to succeed and allowed them to make a meaningful difference to others. Mr Chris Moloney, Humanities Teacher

spring 2019

15 BUDDING ENTREPRENEURS MADE A MEANINGFUL DIFFERENCE TO OTHERS

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powerful learning

THE GAMIFICATION OF LEARNING Why do Ruyton teachers promote gamification skills to our Year 8 students? Could it have something to do with the benefits of experiential learning opportunities at all ages? At the end of the first Semester, Year 8 girls were completely immersed in an escape room experience designed to foster collaborative learning and problemsolving skills. This Signature Programme introduced the girls to gamification, whereby game-elements and gamethinking was used in a non-game environment increasing engagement and problem-solving skills. Students participated in learning that allowed them to work closely in teams to solve complex puzzles in theme-based rooms at commercial escape rooms in Melbourne. Game Masters met with the students, to teach them the intricacies of game design, from the theme and narrative, to the importance of puzzle complexity and the creation of anticipation and mood through the use of sound effects, scent and lighting choices.

Puzzles included the use of cyphers, Morse code and Braille; physical challenges, finding information hidden within diary entries, letters and poems; locating hidden objects from the inside of cut-out books, determining location using maps and globes; retrieving items using magnets and straws and solving mazes and jigsaw puzzles. Students were motivated to create experiences for their guests that fostered communication and collaboration to solve the puzzles. They also spoke of their renewed understanding of the importance of clear communication and working in teams. Experiencing this Urban Escape Programme, our Year 8 girls will be more cognisant of alternate, creative ways to improve their learning, retain new knowledge and apply problem-solving skills to complex issues, using a variety of collaborative learning strategies. Ms Jane d’Oliveyra, Middle Years Co-ordinator.

Upon their return to School, the girls worked in their teams to create their own Escape Rooms. The decoration of the spaces was crucial to the experiential nature of this activity. Classrooms were converted into luxury areas on the Titanic, colourful rooms of Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, a medical facility, a jail, an art gallery, the Queen’s boudoir, the interior of private homes and a secret tower festooned with thousands of fairy lights.

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‘The escape rooms were an amazing experience, providing a wonderful, joyful feeling of developing a world and putting our hearts into something entirely of our own creation. Obviously, the teachers did so much, but the creations were our own! It was pure ideas, trial and error and exploring our thoughts. It also felt really freeing as we got to think for ourselves. We were allowed to do things our way, which meant we had to do all the planning and time-management for ourselves. We were also passionate, so it was great to be able to create our worlds using our ideas, accepting the limitations but also pushing beyond them.

THE BENEFITS OF EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

I feel like it also brought the year level together, as even though we were spread apart throughout the Margaret McRae building, we could go into any room and have a look around and trial the various puzzles. Everyone was happy to see you! Girls shared their whiteboard markers, or costumes, or whatever else people needed. I loved creating our escape rooms, because it really did feel like our own: our ideas and our little world.’ Juliet B, Year 8 ‘It was pleasing to see so many people enjoy our rooms! Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed the Urban Escape Challenge, as it was a great programme that provided an opportunity for students to work collaboratively, whilst having fun at the same time.’ Cindy J, Year 8

spring 2019

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global citizenship

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COMMUNITY WALKS The Ruyton value of citizenship enables our youngest students to connect and learn about our local environment and take action to effect positive change. We know that a sense of belonging, a connection to people and place, is necessary for active community participation and to maintain a strong sense of wellbeing and physical health. In term two, our Community Walks programme was intentionally crafted to offer children opportunities to encounter the outdoors in all types of weather, promoting an understanding of the impact of climate and seasons on our environment and the interdependence of living things. It also enabled children to witness examples of human activity on the environment, such as pollution and litter on the land. These experiences prompted our students to wonder and research, and subsequently take action to make the community a better place for both people and animals.

spring 2019

The Community Walks programme has significantly impacted our learning and teaching. From children using technology to record data on the sights and sounds in our community; to contacting the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to share their findings and ideas on landfill, recycling and sustainability; to creating an animation to educate the world on the consequences of rubbish and landfill; and promoting the rights of all creatures. There have been many projects evolving from our connection with the animals, people and places in our neighbourhood. We look forward to Community Walks becoming a regular part of our Pre Prep programmes in 2020. Miss Sarah Denholm, Director of Early Learning

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global citizenship

WELCOME TO SOUTH HOUSE Why do we have a Signature Programme in Year 4? Year 4 is a really exciting time in a young person’s development, a time when they are becoming increasingly aware of themselves as members of a community and as global citizens. We see our girls ready to take on greater responsibility as members of society and to embrace opportunities to use their voice and act to make a positive difference. Importantly, the programme in Year 4 fosters intellectual curiosity in the girls as they create their own garden plots, learn about the science of the land and seasonal produce, and design creative recipes. The Space South House is a vibrant environment that is a home for learning, filled with natural light and wonder. It has been designed to be inclusive, promoting both independent and collaborative exploration, with flexible learning for all girls. The main learning space connects seamlessly with the upstairs mezzanine, as well as with the kitchen, through to the outdoor deck and area.

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Connection with the Land The outdoor environment is of great significance to the South House Programme. This connection sees our girls learning about the science of harvesting and planting herbs and vegetables. Additionally, they extend their understanding of the natural ecosystem, learning about interdependent relationships between the environment, plants and animals. What’s Cooking? This year, as we have continued to evolve the programme as a unique and dynamic experience for our Year 4 girls, cooking workshops have been developed to complement the teaching and learning programme. In these workshops cooking experiences explore seasonal foods, culinary techniques and creativity in cooking. Ms Kate Giles, Head of Junior School

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MODEL UNITED NATIONS FORUM In August, Ruyton hosted a Model United Nations Forum day on the topic of Hear my Voice: Recognising the Rights of Indigenous peoples. Ruyton teams consisted of 22 students as delegates representing the countries: Bolivia, Cameroon, Nepal, New Zealand, United States, Russia and Romania. In all a total of 87 students participated in the forum, including students from Trinity Grammar School, Our Lady of Mercy College (Heidelberg), Siena College and Xavier College. The event afforded students the chance to work in small teams to ‘step inside’ the viewpoints of a nominated country. Using genuine United Nations protocols the students debated proposed resolutions and worked to build consensus on a worthy topic of international significance. Students had the chance to discuss and reflect on how their school community can continue to stand in solidarity with Aboriginal peoples and affirm an ongoing commitment to reconciliation.

‘[What I learned most was] the power of negotiating and the range of views within a group on one specific amendment and topic.’ Hannah S, Year 10 ‘[The event made me understand] how different perspectives rely on compromise to achieve a common goal.’ Jane F, Year 11 ‘[I learnt] that to make change you need to work with other countries and, even if you disagree, how important it is to come to a compromise.’ Guwanya K, Year 11

The forum was facilitated through the United Nation Association of Australia (Victorian division) and was chaired by Mr Carlisle Richardson, a former Diplomat to the United Nations from St Kitts and Nevis who acted as ‘Secretary General’ on the day. Ruyton students who participated in the event from Years 10-12 included: Year 12, Molly M, Lily S, Piper W; Year 11, Lily C, Susan F, Jane F, Ashley G, Guwanya K, Jordana M, Rita T, Maddy T Mia W, Maya W, Fiona W, Angela Y, Maggie Z; Year 10, Coco C, Emma H, Cynthia H, Imaan I, Hannah S, Lily W. Mr Tom Crowle, Learning Leader Humanities

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creativity

PASSIONATE PERFORMERS At Ruyton we are fortunate to have such a thriving Performing Arts Programme of Drama and Music. The creativity of the students and their teachers is testament to the passion they bring to each performance. In 2019 we have witnessed powerful and engaging displays of the human spirit. PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK

PERFORMING ARTS HOUSE FESTIVAL (PAHF)

The Australian story, Picnic at Hanging Rock, had the audience on edge, as Miranda, Marion and Irma walked slowly behind Hanging Rock. At the start of Term 1, 26 Year 9 students set out on the adventure that was the Ruyton/Trinity Year 9 play. To participate in Drama at Ruyton is a remarkable experience. It’s not only the creativity that’s displayed, but also the lifelong friendships and close bonds that are made.

Each year the excitement builds during the last two weeks of Term 2, as the girls create their 20-minute PAHF performances. On show is a wide range of incredible acting performances, amazing scripts and inventive stagecraft, co-ordinated by the Year 11 girls. The theme this year was Play the Game, where each House was given one Queen song, one board game and one prop to incorporate into their performance. Whether it is singing, dancing, acting or behind the scenes, each girl has the opportunity to engage in PAHF and every year we discover new and amazing talent.

Ella C-S, Year 9

Izzy H, Year 12

TOP CLASS Earlier this year I was lucky enough to be selected to perform my VCE Unit 4 Drama solo in Top Class Drama. I can wholeheartedly say that this was one of the most enriching experiences that I have ever had the privilege of undergoing. Not only was I able to meet a mix of different people, but also it allowed me to have my first encounter with a real ‘acting experience’, performing on the Playhouse stage at the Arts Centre. It was such a pleasure to be a part of this and was a significant learning opportunity for me. Laura P, Captain of Drama, Year 12

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THE CRUCIBLE This year, Ruyton and Trinity had the privilege of putting on Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. Full of nerves, excitement and gratitude, the cast put on four intense and captivating performances. There was almost an audible and collective sigh of relief from the audience after the final line; glad and somewhat comforted to be living in a world free of the struggles that plagued the characters in the world of the play. In addition to contributing to the rich drama culture of the two schools, the Senior School play created many lasting friendships and an unwavering respect for all cast, crew and production team members involved. Charly O, Year 11

‘TO SUCCEED AS A WOMAN IN THE ART WORLD, OR IN ANY FIELD, YOU HAVE TO BE UNAPOLOGETICALLY YOU’ Josephine Ford, Australian production designer, art director, winner of multiple AACTA and AFI Awards.

LES MISÉRABLES Being a part of the Ruyton and Trinity musicals throughout my years at Ruyton has been an amazing experience, filled with memories I will never forget and friends I will cherish for a lifetime. From Into the Woods in 2016, The Addams Family in 2017, The Wiz in 2018 and then finally Les Misérables this year, I strongly believe participating in these musicals has been the highlight of my years at Ruyton. Allegra B, Year 12

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Les Misérables Photography © Ben Fon – Fon Photography

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COMMUNITY Staff News

CELEBRATING HELEN WILD’S SERVICE TO RUYTON Under Ruyton’s beloved Moreton Bay Fig tree we said farewell to a much-valued member of staff, Mrs Helen Wild, in June this year. The Co-Ed Pre Preps joined in a celebration for Helen to mark her fourteen years of dedicated service to our Early Learning (EL) Programme. Helen has worked closely with the children and their families, as well as with EL staff members, and takes away with her many treasured memories. Helen and her husband, Gordon, are moving to Bendigo to join their family and we send them our best wishes for the next exciting chapter in their lives.

STAFF BABIES

Congratulations to current staff member Sophie Pidgeon and Katherine Woolcock (’03), who introduced Rosie Alexandra to the world on 6 February this year. Pictured is Rosie with big sister, Evie.

Many congratulations to Junior School Librarian, Amy Brown, and partner Chris, who welcomed Betty McRae Campbell to the world on Thursday 5 September.

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spring 2019

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FOUNDATION FROM THE RUYTON FOUNDATION CHAIR, MS FIONA GRIFFITHS (’87) Diversity and gratitude in its many forms is a topic frequently discussed with our girls. So it was very heartening to see our girls and hundreds within our Ruyton community embrace and support the economic diversity in our cohort by donating to the Founder’s Scholarship in April. This annual appeal raised $256,866, taking the total funds invested in the programme to $721,600. On the day of our appeal we spoke to many Old Ruytonians, who generously donated in support of the Scholarship. Two Old Girls who contributed also shared their stories of gratitude for the financial assistance given to their families, which allowed them the opportunity of a Ruyton Education. It was wonderful to hear first-hand how it truly can change a life. We look forward to sharing more stories as they unfold, so that, as a community, you can really see the impact of your support. This year our first Founder’s Scholarship recipient started in the Senior School. She has been embodying the spirit of a Ruyton girl, getting involved in the many opportunities and aspects of School life. She has a keen interest in sport and has actively participated in representing Ruyton in the GSV sports each term. This student also has a love of art and was proud to have her work included in Ruyton’s recent art exhibition, MUSE Circus. Ruyton has been enriched with the presence of our Founder’s Scholar. I thank the hundreds of donors who, over the last two years, have contributed to make these means-tested scholarships possible. With continued community support we hope to offer a second Founder’s Scholarship. Our ultimate vision is to be able to support six girls in perpetuity at any one time with this financial needs-based scholarship. With your help I know we can achieve this.

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AS A COMMUNITY, YOU CAN REALLY SEE THE IMPACT OF YOUR SUPPORT In August we celebrated with the community through our Foundation Black and White Ball, a highlight of the Ruyton calendar. It was a wonderful evening held at Zinc@Fed Square, with fine food, wine, dancing and great company, as our community embraced the occasion. While the night is principally about our engaged and connected community, we are delighted to advise we also raised just over $19,000. I sincerely thank all those who supported the evening and enabled us to achieve this important contribution to the Foundation. In particular, our thanks go to the gold sponsors CHH Property, Consolidated Travel, Endota Spa, Sukhavati Bali Wellness Retreat and Xfoli8 by Kara Fedele; and our silver sponsors, Bella Vita, Mill’s Kitchen, Mister Bianco and Velissaris Photography. The Ball committee played a vital role, and I thank Alyssa Caplan, Joanne Chapman and Kara Fedele for all their support. Last but not least, our sincere thanks to all of you who attended the evening. We would not be the School we are without all of you in our community helping to make a difference.

the ruyton reporter


THE TRANSFORMATIONAL POWER OF A BEQUESTS – THE WARDYNSKI’S HOUSE As I sit in my office typing, the playtime bell has rung at the primary school next door. The air is suddenly filled with laughter and the sound of play. The pleasure taken in listening to these simple sounds is responsible for the most generous gift Ruyton has ever received. Mr Viktor Lapcik and his adored wife Maria lived much of their lives across the road from Ruyton. They had no children of their own, and the friendly waves and smiles of our girls prompted them to bequeath their home to us. None of us knew the Lapciks, who had been living quietly across the street. It was from Mr Lapcik’s eulogies that we came to learn more about him. He had a rich and creative professional life, with many community connections, and yet he chose to give his home to us, on the condition that it only ever be used for School life, and that it be named after Maria’s family, the Wardynskis. It was a way for Maria’s memory to live on, in the place where they had shared their lives. With this generous donation we were able to rearrange our learning spaces to create the Signature Programme South House. Our current students continue to benefit from this gift, just as future generations of girls will benefit from every gift made this year and next. Such resources ensure our vision of a future education for Ruyton girls will be rich in potential and opportunity.

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The transformational power of a bequest such as Mr Lapcik’s, and Ruyton’s desire to honour bequests of any size, inspired the Ruyton Foundation to establish the Moreton Bay Fig Society in 2018. Its members understand the need to support girls’ education through exceptional teachers, learning opportunities and environments. Looking back, the first donation we made to the School was when our now very grown up elder daughter was a student in Early Learning and the latest was for the financial needs-based Founder’s Scholarship. While none of my gifts will be as financially significant as Mr Lapcik’s, I know that each of them has been used to continue to support the School for our girls and those who follow. I understand very well that our girls also benefitted from the generosity of families before our time. Together we can all contribute to the wonderful futures of all Ruyton girls. Ms Kathryn Watt, Foundation Committee Member, Past President of the Ruyton Board 2012-2016, Ruyton Board Member 2009-2016 If you are considering the possibility of leaving a bequest of any size to the School and would like to discuss this, please do not hesitate to contact the Alumnae and Bequests Manager, Mrs Jenni Musgrove (Manton ’73) on 03 9290 9335 or send an email to moretonbay@ruyton.vic.edu.au All discussions are treated in the utmost confidence. Alternatively, please feel free to speak direct to Ms Sally de Guingand (’86), Director of Philanthropy and Engagement, on 03 9290 9318. We would love to have the opportunity to acknowledge any bequest or gift and to say thank you.

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PARENTS OF RUYTON (POR) THE VALUE OF VOLUNTEERING Every parent or guardian at the School is a member of the Parents of Ruyton (POR). Our main purpose is to build and maintain the wonderful School community we have here at Ruyton. We aim to create connections between people, both within individual year levels and across the School. We also support our girls in their many endeavours. Volunteering brings its own rewards and you really do end up gaining more then you put in. Helping to organise an event that brings people together feels so worthwhile and further strengthens our school community. Ruyton is such a big part of our daughters’ lives and, through the POR, we are fortunate that we can support both our girls and the School. There are lots of opportunities to be involved and your contribution does not have to be large. Even volunteering your time for a couple of hours is fantastic and we value input from everyone.

The work of our volunteers is so important for the School community, but being a volunteer is also enriching on a personal level. New friendships are made, stories are shared, advice is sought and there is joy in coming together for a common purpose. Thank you to everyone who has helped with the POR in 2019 We would encourage all parents to consider volunteering and we look forward to welcoming new faces. Mrs Melinda Gray and Mrs Melissa Haberfield, POR Co-Presidents

BEING A VOLUNTEER IS ENRICHING ON A PERSONAL LEVEL

The POR holds a variety of events throughout the year, including Mother’s and Father’s Day breakfasts and stalls, a Luncheon, and sausage sizzles. There are also several more specific POR groups, such as Year Level Representatives, Friends of Ruyton Performing Arts (FORPA), Questers and Secondhand Uniform Sales (SHUS), all of which require volunteers to be successful. Sometimes we just need help for small things, such as wrapping the Year 12 valedictory gifts. We usually ask for assistance for events or tasks by email and in the Wednesday Weekly, and sometimes we use the online tool, Signup Genius.

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Through volunteering, I have been fortunate to form fantastic friendships Volunteering at Ruyton is one of the pillars on which our vibrant community rests. We talk to Mrs Domenica Lamont, mother of Aurelia, Year 9, about how she got involved and what a difference it has made in her life. How did you find out about volunteering? I first heard about volunteering at a Prep Information evening when my daughter Aurelia started her schooling life at Ruyton in 2010. The POR President spoke to incoming parents about the many opportunities to get involved at School as a volunteer. These included becoming a year level rep, helping to organise the Mother’s and Father’s Day Breakfasts, or joining one of the support groups, such as FORPA. Being new to the School, I felt it would be a great way to meet parents and get involved. Tell us about some of the activities you have enjoyed. I have been a Year Level Rep, and helped organise social events for our year level, such as coffee catch ups, mothers’ dinners and parent drinks evenings. In 2016, I worked with Mrs Melinda Gray as the Year Level Rep Co-ordinator for the Junior School and Early Learning. We co-ordinated term meetings with all Year Level Reps as a way of exchanging ideas and brainstorming.

My daughter is now in Senior School and I still thoroughly enjoy being part of the POR Committee, helping with various activities. What did you get out of volunteering? You don’t have to invest tons of time in order to be a parent volunteer. For me, putting up my hand to help with different activities allowed me to get involved and be part of our wonderful School community. Through my involvement, I have been fortunate to form fantastic friendships and meet wonderful parents across different year levels. These parents become very useful sources of information when trying to make the best decision for our daughter’s education. Helping at the School has also allowed me to meet some amazing teachers and watch our girls grow and transform into gorgeous women. Would you recommend it to other parents? Absolutely! Volunteering allows us to come together in the spirit of building a community to foster a sense of belonging. Our support is always appreciated. It also provides a positive educational experience for our children. When we make time to help, our children can see that we value their education.

I have also been a volunteer for the amazing Junior School productions, helping with hair and make-up. Backstage was always a fun and electrifying environment; girls buzzing with excitement before their performances started! I also co-ordinated the design and production of the Year 6 hoodie tops in 2016.

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OLD RUYTONIANS’ ASSOCIATION FROM THE PRESIDENT I am delighted to provide this report, my first, as ORA President. It has been an incredibly busy period for the ORA Committee and I am most grateful for the tremendous support I have been given. The strategic focus of the ORA Committee in 2019-2020 centres on a core philosophy of modernising and growing our organisation and operations. Our renewed vision is to provide a rewarding, relevant and enjoyable avenue for Old Girls to stay connected, to network and to empower them in their professional lives. We shall continue to provide and administer a range of bursaries, scholarships and other financial support for Ruyton.

In May, the School hosted a reunion for past Boarders and Golden Girls (50 years + alumnae). It was a glorious autumn morning and guests enjoyed a lovely morning tea, while hearing reflections from several Old Girls and a performance by the Mini Madrigals Choir. A particular highlight of the morning was when the Year 2 students, who are currently studying the history of Ruyton, were able to ask the Old Girls some questions about their experiences at the School. The Old Girls were delighted to assist the students, who proved to be both confident and articulate young researchers. Other recent reunions have also been held for girls who graduated in years 2014, 2009, 1999, 1989, 1969 and 1979. The attendance at all these events has been most pleasing, as has been the overwhelmingly positive feedback from guests. In Term 2, the ORA launched RuytonORA, a networking platform made exclusively available for Old Ruytonians. RuytonORA supports alumnae to re-connect with past classmates, establish professional networks and interest groups and employ or mentor Old Girls. This platform also enables ORA members to view RuytonORA events and Reunions, photos and news. We encourage anyone who is yet to join the platform to do so at www.ruytonora.com.au. I look forward to catching up with many of you at our upcoming ORA events. Phoebe Demiris (Tallent ’03), President, ORA

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DAUGHTERS OF OLD RUYTONIANS

Row 5: P. Angliss, E. Lamb, E. Kerr, C. Kerr, T. O’Callaghan, R. Beadle, M. Wilson, G. Murrell Row 4: A. Coldwell, E. Raudys, M. Charles, L. Laird, H. Murray, A. Barry, S. Marsh, L. A., E. Patterson, A. Osmond Row 3: S. Mulready, E. Johnson, A. Laird, K. Kafasis, E. Murray, Y. Alevras, L. Long, G. Long, M. Power Row 2: S. Burch, L. Gillon, M. Gillon, A. Kafasis, T. Caligiuri, I. Caligiuri, R. Magoutis, O. Michelini, A. Batt, P. Parkinson Row 1: L. Uthmeyer, A. Minott, E. Bai, C. McCombe, S. Caligiuri, Q. Caligiuri, L. Gallace, Z. Kokovas Absent: S. Bendall, Z. Boussioutas, P. Brown, H. Charlesworth, M. Cook, C. Gillon, S. Hughes, S. MacIsaac, E. Marsh, C. McCormick, H. Mitchelhill, L. Power, L. Richardson, O. Thompson

STAY CONNECTED ON RUYTONORA RuytonORA is a private online network dedicated for Ruyton Alumnae.

• Share and discuss online news of interest to other former students

Introduced in 2019, Alumnae have embraced connecting with past students of all year levels.

• Explore employment opportunities – search for, or post jobs or intern opportunities

Alumnae can use RuytonORA to:

• Offer your services as a Mentor to new Alumnae, or find a Mentor

• Stay in touch with former classmates • Be informed about reunions and other event dates, details and photos • Publicise events to the Ruyton Alumnae community

• Contribute an article to a monthly newsletter on your post-Ruyton journey, telling us about your business or cause. All enquiries to ora@ruyton.vic.edu.au

Join now at www.ruytonora.com.au

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ALUMNAE A CURIOUS, CREATIVE AND COURAGEOUS LEARNER … Helen Gwendoline Gordon (Cole ’52), at 84 years-young, is the oldest physiotherapist still practising in Australia. She was awarded an OAM in the Queen’s Birthday 2019 Honours in the General Division for service to community health as a physiotherapist. ‘I loved every minute of my school days … Miss Daniell always seemed available and very approachable. What a wonderful start for a young girl on her educational journey!’ At Speech Night in 1952 Helen was awarded ‘Best All-Round Girl’ and went on to Melbourne University to study Physiotherapy. During the years when her family were young, Helen continued to work part time, relocating to the Mornington Peninsula. In 1975 she became the first physiotherapist to work at Frankston Hospital, whose wards were burgeoning with the expanding population, and remained there for 23 years.

‘Age is only a number. If what you are doing gives you purpose in life and a lot of pleasure – keep going! It will keep you young and fit and help you get the most out of life.’ Her ties established at Ruyton remain strong. She was ORA President from 1966- 1967 and she regularly catches up with some of her year level, including Sally Marshall (Backhouse ‘52) who is Miss Daniell’s niece. Coming full circle, it is fitting that in Ruyton’s Strategic Plan 2017-2020, one of our values neatly sums up what Helen has been practising all her life: ‘Endeavour … to be curious, creative and courageous learners seeking to achieve personal best.’ No one can doubt that Helen really has achieved her personal best.

Helen has continued to work in the community. In 1999 she established hydrotherapy classes at Langwarrin Sports Medicine Centre; she founded a Physio Department at the RSL War Veterans in Mount Eliza; and has worked part time for the last ten years at Beleura Private Hospital.

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FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS TO WINNING AWARDS – HOW I’VE BUILT MY BUSINESS Sam McFarlane (’94) won the 2018 Motivating Mums National Business Brilliance Awards for Most Influential Brand. Here she describes her inspirational journey. For over 20 years since leaving Ruyton I’ve worked in marketing roles, but I finally decided I’d had enough of the corporate world. My children were young at the time, and the manager was making my working life stressful. I knew I had to make changes. In 2012, I started my home-based Marketing business, Sam Says. I am now a content marketer and a social media manager, creating stand out social and online content for solopreneurs and small to medium enterprises (SMEs.)

Since then, my business has gained serious credibility, I have content about winning awards that I can share, and I’m now the go-to expert in my networks. I was also invited to a morning tea by my local MP and was awarded a 2018 Higgins certificate of achievement. This was a very humbling experience, being acknowledged among outstanding people who had done amazing things within the community. Aim high girls – winning awards and running businesses rock!

WEDDING

My business has been built on reputation and I belong to online networks. I also attend in-person networking events to meet people in real life. One of the most valuable things I’ve learnt is that, working online and in a virtual business world, credibility is everything. One of the networks I belong to is Motivating Mum. When I was nominated for the Most Influential Brand award at the annual business awards, I decided to enter. And I won!

Shelley Jayne Lipshut (Sutherland ’07) married Martin John Lipshut on 5 January 2019 at Rippon Lea Estate. The couple live in Surrey Hills and Shelley works at Melbourne Girls Grammar School as a Biology teacher. Our congratulations and best wishes to them both. spring 2019

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alumnae

THE COURAGE TO PERSEVERE … MY JOURNEY TO BECOMING A PUBLISHED AUTHOR Lian Knight, (Smith ’80) In my Ruyton days I was often enthralled by the skill of authors and tried to imagine – just for a moment - what it would be like to be a writer and have other avid readers enjoy my story. But in the blink of an eye, a career in business, writing strategic plans and board reports became my ‘published’ world. Writing a book, it seemed, wasn’t for me. Time was a rare commodity. Finally, when the children were grown, my husband helped me realise that if ever I wanted to do this, here was my chance. So crime fiction it was.

ALUMNAE BABIES

Congratulations to Sumitra Sandrasegar (’98) and her family on the safe arrival of Madeline in January. After completing her VCE at Ruyton, Sumitra went on to gain a degree in Visual Communication from RMIT University and travelled to Norway and Italy. She was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder in 2011, but Sumitra is capably managing her illness and, against many odds, gave birth to her daughter this year. 32

Five minutes is all it took to discover it’s hard. Firstly, I had to adjust and get back to using those long, lost adjectives. Secondly, facts must be correct for every aspect or the reader’s trust would be lost. My biggest challenge, however, was neither of these. No one was giving me direction or boundaries for what I could or couldn’t do and for a while this unlimited freedom became an impediment. Even when the story was finished, the journey to publication was harder. But if you have a dream, you battle on. Now I am delighted, proud and humbled to look back on what I have created. Idle Lies, released by Hybrid Publishers, April 2019. Featured in Woman’s Day Top 20 Winter reads, 13 June 2019.

Caroline (Burke ’98) and Nick Carr are thrilled to announce the arrival of a daughter, Alice Belinda, born on 13 September 2019. A welcome sister for Robbie and Hamish and first granddaughter and future Ruyton girl for Sue Carr (Franklin ’62) and Belinda Burke (Hardie, ’70)

the ruyton reporter


VALE It is with sadness that the Ruyton community notes the passing of the following Old Ruytonians: Lilly Dunne (Kwiatkowski ’96), mother of Angus, Hamish and Patrick, died on 24 August this year. Our deepest condolences are extended to her family and friends. Heather Jennison (’48) passed away on 25 June 2019 at the age of 90 years. Heather travelled extensively with Ansett until her retirement to Echuca in the early 1990s to care for her ageing mother. Heather had very fond memories of her time at Ruyton and served as ORA Secretary from 1957 to 1958.

Lady Peggy Bunting (MacGruer ’36) passed away on 19 March 2019. Peggy was predeceased by her husband, Jack (Edward John) and her sister, Dorothy. She is survived by three children, eight grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. At Ruyton, Peggy was Vice-Captain of Anderson in 1935. You can read more about Lady Bunting as one of our Women of Significance on the Ruyton website under ‘Our Community’.

Beryl Mabel Kings (Newman ’40) passed away peacefully in July 2019, leaving her husband, Eric, a life partnership of 80 years, and a large and loving family. (Jean) Shirley Shepherd (Gillies ’41) passed away in August this year. When at Ruyton, Shirley was Captain of the School, Tennis and Basketball Captain, and also Vice Captain of Anderson House. The family lived at 82 Wellington Street, now known as Derham House, which was purchased from them by the School in 1959. Shirley’s elder daughter, Robyn, also attended Junior School at Ruyton from 1952-1957, before the family moved to another suburb.

Sisters Peggy and Dorothy MacGruer

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RUYTON REMEMBERS CAPTURING RUYTON STORIES Stories are at the heart of the work of the School Archive. There are thousands upon thousands of Ruyton stories, each reflecting the experiences of those who have studied at or worked or volunteered for the School. To capture these stories, the Ruyton Heritage Collection gathers the photographs, oral histories, objects and documents generated through someone’s individual connection to Ruyton. When brought together, these individual threads build a wider picture about the long and rich history of our School.

Over the years since the foundation of Ruyton’s School Archive in 1999, many alumnae have shared something of their Ruyton story, through the donation of material or information for the Ruyton Heritage Collection. This generosity has continued, in this, our 20th year. Acquisitions have been as diverse as digital scans of a 1950s teenager’s scrapbooks of her interstate school trips, to a Ruytoncrested leather purse made to hold coins for the Tuck Shop. Many donors have given original copies or digital scans of photographs from their personal archives. Others have entrusted us to take over care of items of uniform or special event programmes. Even a 60-year-old woollen dressing gown that once kept a Boarder warm in Henty House’s chilly hallways is now part of our Collection! Thank you to all the donors for their contributions.

above: Students gather by the fishpond c.1935. Behind them the science classroom and north veranda of Henty House can be seen. Donated by Susan Morgan, (Burridge ’73) left: Boarding the aeroplane for a School trip to Tasmania, 1952. Donated by Jocelyn Colliver, (Bedford ’52)

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‘AND THE AWARD GOES TO …’ Open the cover of any book and you’ll find stories, creativity and knowledge all captured within its pages. Books give us both pleasure and an opportunity to learn, so there is no better way to acknowledge a student who has excelled than with the gift of a book. Indeed, book prizes have been a staple of any school’s Speech Night for as long as there have been Speech Nights. Through Ruyton’s collection of book prizes we can see that this School has been holding such prize nights since its earliest days. It is the oldest book prize in the collection (indeed, it is the oldest object overall) that gives several clues about the beginnings of the School and the aspirations founding Principal Mrs Charlotte Anderson had for it. Bearing a handwritten inscription awarding The Beauties of Shakespeare to Kate Howard (Mrs Anderson’s niece) on 22 December 1881, the prize shows that Ruyton was holding Speech Nights little more than three years after the School began. The same inscription also gives us the first known instance of the use of the name Ruyton, a title with much more gravitas that Mrs Anderson’s Ladies School which was used in advertising just a few months earlier.

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… there is no better way to acknowledge a student who has excelled than with the gift of a book. By 1882 Ruyton had forsaken the handwritten inscription in favour of a handsomely printed book plate pasted inside the first pages. Most of the book prizes feature these, and to browse through them is to be reminded of a veritable A-Z of well-known Ruyton names. However, the most striking thing about most of the book collection is how beautiful they are. With stunningly embossed covers, leather bindings and marbled endpapers these prizes were truly intended to be a precious gift to a student who had ‘done well’, and who might treasure both her memories and her prize for many years to come. Ms Cathy Dodson, School Archivist

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REUNIONS REUNION OF THE 1969 ALUMNAE, FRIDAY 6 SEPTEMBER 2019 AT RUYTON HENTY HOUSE RECEPTION The Class of 1969 enjoyed morning tea, visit to the MUSE Art Show and a guided tour of South House and the School by some very enthusiastic students.

INFORMAL GET-TOGETHER OF THE CLASS OF 1967, SATURDAY 17 AUGUST On Saturday 17 August 17 friends from the Class of ’67 gathered for lunch at The Adeney Cafe in Kew. For many this was a trip down memory-lane, as most of us remember it as a milk bar, where pocket or tram money was spent on the way home from School on bags of mixed lollies. The merry group consisted of Heather Stacey (Tobias), Barb Diver (Ward), Francis Lean (Palmer), Sue Pitt (Eady), Ann Teasdale (Bottomer), Fiona Morris (Mules), Jill Wilkes (Shipp), Yvonne Tompkins (Neville), Robyn Stevens (Eccles), Pat Franklin (Summons), Heather Novak (Birch), Prue Webster (Sewell), Sue Robertson, Di Stanbury (Manning), Barb Young (Piesse), Jude Lieberman (King) and Sue Morwoski (Gove). We were sorry that, because of colds, Juli Tolj (Tonkin) and Judy Kuehne (Menzies) were unable to join us.

1987 INFORMAL CATCH UP Girls from the Class of 1987 got together in August at the London Tavern Hotel in Richmond, London UK, to celebrate significant birthdays. They were thrilled so many girls from their year level were able to attend.

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L–R: Anne Rehfisch (Stewart), Susan Wettenhall (Evans), Julia Morgan (Simms), Leigh Ulmer (Olsson), Judyth Gilchrist (Ellery), Mandy Bruce (Stuckey), Wendy Datson (Woodward), Sandra Howard (Thorn), Linda Dougall (Wallace)

REUNION OF THE 1999 ALUMNAE, FRIDAY 2 AUGUST 2019 From Back – Cara Zaetta-Thomas, George Lewis, Sally McCann (Jones), Sophie Smibert, Jorja Harrison (Burns), Felicity Quilty (Irvine), Laura Weaver, Emma Hardy, Sarah Cleghorn, Victoria Camilleri (Hatcher), Clementine Ball (Young), Steph Franklin, Lucinda Hobson (Kew), Julia Tucker, Ji Hyun Lee, Lucy Terracall, Elissa Bell, Claire Robertson (Golder), Jane Cooper (Tulloch), Gill Beakley (Reid), Ally Walker (Gloster), Sarah Anderson, Zoe Bare (Towell), Peta Eacott (DawkinsWalsh), Arrabelle Forge, Kim Martinow de Navarrete (Martinow), Julia Pannan, Ella Bergin, Rachael Harker, Katia Sanderson, Isabella Bomford (Hobson), Fiona Osborne (Marshall).

the ruyton reporter


REUNION OF THE 1979 ALUMNAE, FRIDAY 15 MARCH 2019 BOARDERS’ AND GOLDEN GIRLS’ REUNION, THURSDAY 23 MAY 2019 The Boarders’ and Golden Girls’ Reunion was held on Thursday 23 May 2019 at Ruyton. Our Old Ruytonians were welcomed by a Guard of Honour, consisting of Prep girls and their Year 6 buddies. Girls in Years 2 and 5 also joined the Reunion, to listen to three speakers. Day girl Joan Balfour (Ditty ’62) and boarders Margaret Myers (Campbell ’49), Sue A’Beckett (Vautier ’62) and Libby Smith (’70) entertained our students with tales from their own School days. For the Year 2 girls studying the history of Ruyton this term, the information they gathered was particularly helpful. As has become tradition, following a lovely piece from our choir, the Mini Mads, there was a boisterous rendition of the School song by all who were there.

From left – top of stairs: Sarah Birtles (Fitzpatrick), Catherine Brown, Sue Mackey, Peta Elliott, Tamsin Miles, Sallie McCleery (Harkin), Jenny Harris (Chandler), Antra Lanskis (Kulnieks), Louise Hattam (Mitchell), Sharon Harris (Tucker), Angela Fiorenza (Sheehan), Eve Kantor, Christine Faella (Hibberd), Katharine Moffatt (Davie), Linda Salwin, Sally Macallan (Beach), Linda Blaufelder (Coco), Michelle Shah (Chapman), Annelise Smart, Joanne Austin (Lawson), Jenny Downie (Coles), Jude Kellett (Manning), Geraldine Maren (Royston), Rowena Bailey, Amanda Thomas (Stoyles), Susie Lukis.

1965 INFORMAL CATCH UP L–R: Marian Kendall (Allison), Di McKie (Whitcroft) and Margaret Falconer (Palmer) Three girls from the Class of 1965 celebrated milestone birthdays in Florence, Italy recently, enjoying sightseeing and an Andrea Bocelli concert.

FOR 2020 REUNION DATES please visit our website under – Our Community, Alumnae. spring 2019

REUNION OF THE 2009 ALUMNAE, FRIDAY 31 MAY 2019 Attendees in alphabetical order: Holly Aitken, Yoshi Bandara, Eliza Bramwell, Emily Carroll, Bianca Charles, Jessica Close, Phoebe Cohen (Grimwade), Ally Franet, Penny Galbraith, Anna Garamszegi, Sarah Halliday, Emily Hooper, Camille Hudson, Laura King (Westerman), Laura McNicol-Smith, Jacqueline McPherson, Charlotte Malon, Stephanie Markopoulos, Amanda Pike, Lily Poulier, Anna Power, Sophie Purdue, Lisa Ransom, Katherine Southwell, Amelia Steel, Emily Stevenson, Sally Tabart, Eliza Tanudjaja, Tess Young.

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ruyton girls’ school

12 Selbourne Road Kew 3101 Victoria Australia Tel 61 3 9819 2422 ruyton@ruyton.vic.edu.au www.ruyton.vic.edu.au CRICOS 00336J

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Profile for Ruyton Girls' School

Ruyton Reporter Spring 2019  

A snapshot of the Ruyton community and our culture. The six monthly Ruyton Reporter is a School community publication that celebrates studen...

Ruyton Reporter Spring 2019  

A snapshot of the Ruyton community and our culture. The six monthly Ruyton Reporter is a School community publication that celebrates studen...