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EGYPTIAN SLATE

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This half of the book is a type specimen for the new typeface, Egyptian Slate.

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To read this book turn the pages of each book at the same time.

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07 08 Egyptian Slate was designed in 20 -

Rod McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Slate design has emerged from its sans serif predecessor with help from Carl Crossgrove to create the italics.


I’M A...


Rod McDonald recalls,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was considering the addition of a serif complement to the sans serif designs from the get-go. After a number of trials incorporating different serif styles, it became readily apparent that a slab serif version would be the best route to take.â&#x20AC;?


SANS TO SERIF Rod McDonald had the first sketches for the Egyptian Slate typeface design in the works even before the original sans serif branch of the family had been released. McDonald soon discovered that the openness of the letterforms in the Slate design allowed him to add the strong slab serifs without losing any of the character of the original design. To maintain visual parity between the two designs, McDonald had to change the basic weights of the new slab serif design. Adjustments were needed on every character to compensate for the added visual weight of the serifs.


EGYPTIAN + SLATE = The name Egyptian Slate came about in a rather unexpected way. From the beginning McDonald had trouble coming up with an appropriate name. He tried several, but none stuck. But when McDonald was in the final stages of the design, Robert Bringhurst, author of the acclaimed Elements of Typographic Style, happened to be visiting. On one occasion, McDonald was muttering about “slabs of Slate” and generally complaining about not being able to find the right name for this new typeface.

Slabs

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Slate ?

Slate of Slabs

Without missing a beat, Bringhurst offered,

“Why don’t you call it Egyptian Slate?” This apt name stuck. McDonald soon discovered that the openness of the letterforms in the Slate design allowed him to add the strong slab serifs without losing any of the character of the original design. “I was surprised that Egyptian Slate held its own with Slate,” recalls McDonald, “but I was also stunned when I realized that it was going to be a lot more work to add the serifs than I initially thought.


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Egyptian Slabs

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Egyptian Slate


Egyptian Slate has four hundred and eighty seven specially designed glyphs for each weight thats five thousand, eight hundred and fourty four glyphs in total.


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MO NO T YP E × >


The evolution of a global typographic leader

From 19th-century origins to today’s Monotype

20 . 11 . 1887

13 . 11 . 2013

A selected, chronological list of notable events in the long, complex history of Monotype.

1887 - Patents granted to Tolbert Lanston (1844-1913) for a system for composing single metal types mechanically, which he had been developing since 1883. Lanston Monotype company founded in US. 1897 - Lanston Monotype Corporation Ltd formed in UK, with offices at 42 Drury Lane, London. 1899 Construction begins on factory at Salfords. 1900 - The first typeface issued by the Lanston Monotype Corporation Ltd as Modern (Series 1) based on a design by the Miller & Richard type foundry. 1902 - First issue of the Monotype Recorder. Sol Hess employed as first type designer. 1907 - First Cyrillic font, Cushing (Series 46). 1912 Imprint (Series 101), for The Imprint. First original design for mechanical composition. 1923 - Stanley Morison appointed Typographical Adviser. 1927 - Beatrice Warde appointed editor of the Monotype Recorder. 1929 - Perpetua, Gill Sans and Bembo by Eric Gill. Beatrice Warde appointed Publicity Manager. 1931 - Name of the Lanston Monotype Corporation Ltd in Britain changed to the

Monotype Corporation Ltd. 1932 - Times New Roman (Series 327). First used in The Times, 3 October (see pp.84-89). Beatrice Warde wrote the essay that begins, ‘This is a printing office ...’ originally intended to demonstrate Perpetua Titling in a broadside type specimen. It has been translated into at least 28 languages. Monotype Newsletter first published. 1941 - Monotype offices in London at 43 Fetter Lane destroyed by enemy bombing on 10 May. To maintain trading, a temporary office was taken at nearby Clifford’s Inn. 1943 - Monotype Technical Bulletin first issued.

M * N O -

A Monotype timeline

1944 - Research begins on project that eventually produces the Monophoto Filmsetter. 1955 - Monophoto Filmsetter actively promoted in marketplace for first time. 1961 - Univers (Series 689) by Adrian Frutiger. (Originally produced in 1957 for Photon / Lumitype machines.) 1965 Robin Nicholas joins (see pp.68-79). 1968 - Barbou – final hot metal typeface. 1972 - Helvetica available on Monotype machines. 1973 - Monotype Corporation is acquired by the Grendon Trust; then taken over by CST Investments Ltd.

T Y / E Monotype leaves stock market after 42 years as a public company. 1976 - Monotype Lasercomp, the first commercially successful digital laser imagesetter. 1979 - Monotype Recorder published (after a ten-year hiatus). 1980 - Nimrod (series 814) by Robin Nicholas. 1987 - Last Monotype caster manufactured. 1990 - Entire Monotype Classic Font Library issued in PostScript Type 1 format on a CD-ROM (with the Adobe Type Library). 1992 - The Monotype Corporation Ltd appointed Administrative Receivers on 5 March. Four days later Monotype Typography Ltd was established. 1996 - Monotype begins licensing fonts through its website monotype.com. 1997 - Agfa acquires Monotype. Agfa and Monotype formally combine their resources. Renamed as Agfa Monotype. 2000 - Agfa Monotype acquires International Typeface Corporation (ITC). 2004 - Agfa Monotype is acquired by TA Associates in November.


MONOTYPES PRODUCTS

1,440,000 In the digital era, advanced tools are required to render, scale, optimize and display type on screen and in a wide range of products and devices. Without this technology, type is simply an artful collection of interesting shapes. With it, type becomes a powerful communication tool. Monotype complements its extensive libraries of exceptional typefaces with more than two dozen innovative technologies that empower creative professionals to do their best work and enhance the value of our OEM customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; products. We combine these tools with expert services leveraging our long-standing experience as leaders in type.

More than...

typeface designs

Type is the core of our business. The ultimate goal of all our products, services and solutions is to ensure that customers can use our type to the fullest, preserving its high quality and aesthetic value on screens, printers and the Web. Monotype offers an extensive selection of fonts, from classics to modern designs, for every purpose. We also create custom fonts and consult on typographic issues for an organisationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s branding programs.


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Egyptian Slate Type Specimen