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Volume 75 | Issue 9

THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF RUTGERS-NEWARK

NEWS

October 27, 2010

SGAs face problems with student involvement By Joshua Hoyos

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R-N Health Services provides free annual flu shots p. 3

OPINION SGA student leaders bring healthcare to Honduras Story on page 2

The piece-by-piece guide to campus fees By Naina Kamath

Four Loko, the beverage that led to a ban on college campuses. p. 5

LIFE & LEISURE

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Staff Writer

he fees listed on the Rutgers University term bill cause confusion for many students. Accompanying the expected cost of tuition is a variety of miscellaneous expenses, such as the ‘School’, ‘Campus’ and ‘Computer’ fees. Up until now, the question has remained as to what these titles mean, and what students are actually paying for. There are those who have given up trying to decipher these costs and simply pay up every semester. “There’s not much we can do,” says Sher Singh, an Economics major. The chart (on page 3) displays a comprehensive breakdown of our annual ‘Campus Fee’, which makes up the largest portion of additional costs in the term bill. However, this breakdown is still ambiguous and requires further explanation. The $600 allocated to ‘University’ is used to “support expenses

administered on a university-wide basis”, according to the Allocation of the Newark Campus & Computer Fee 2010 – 2011 document. Student recreational centers, utilities and maintenance are funded through this allocation. The $489.50 for ‘Program and Services’ goes to services that RutgersNewark provides its students, such as the Counseling Center, co-curricular academic programs and placement testing. The other items are relatively self-explanatory: ‘Capital Improvement’ goes toward the costs of constructing and renovating campus sites, such as the current Dana Library project, while ‘Health’ and ‘Athletics’ each provide funds for their respective necessities. Other fees included in the term bill include the computer fee and the school fee.

See FEES, page 3

Staff Writer

he longing to keep RutgersNewark students actively involved with their surroundings has been a problem the Student Governing Associations (SGA) has been facing for many years now. Office of Student Life and Leadership has said it is getting better. According to the Newark College of Arts and Sciences (NCAS) SGA’s CollegiateLink website, the mission of NCAS SGA is to “serve and protect the interests of its student population in the Newark College of Arts and Sciences. We face a plethora of issues each semester and help address them by facilitating an annual dialogue series with campus administrators, faculty, and staff.” Genevieve Sumski, Assistant Dean in the Office OF Student Life and Leadership does notice some changes to student involvement in the SGA. “What I have noticed, especially in the last two years, is the interest of students getting involved and running for positions.” Sumski also adds that her role is to serve as the advisor for both the University College (UC) SGA and the NCAS SGA. “The student government’s role with student organizations is they’re responsible for recognize and funding process for all of your student groups,” Sumski adds. This semester the UC-SGA implemented a second free period that lasts from 5:20 p.m. to 6 p.m., to help evening students. This free period is the result of a two year initiative begun by the SGA in 2008. Sara Levi, a freshman believes that this newly instituted free block is a good idea but SGA’s should be doing more. “Common period is good because everyone needs a break and needs to get stuff done.”

See SGA, page 2

OPINION:

U. Square has a thirteenth floor, one reporter investigates p. 8

SPORTS

Life After Sports, R-N athletes talk about their experiences p. 12

Fast food nation quietly killing America By Halema Wali

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Opinions editor

egardless of race or class, there is one epidemic that continues to plague most of America’s population. This epidemic affects 68% of adults and 48% of children and adolescents. What is it? Obesity and those overweight. No matter which statistic you deem to be true, all obese and overweight statistics point to one alarming trend: that it continues to grow at a steady rate. According to 2009 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, thirty-three states have a prevalence of obesity at 25% or higher. Of which, nine have a prevalence of obesity at 30% or higher. These nine states are: Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and West Virginia. New Jersey falls at 23%. The population of New Jersey is a little over 8.7 million people. So at a 23% obesity rate, we’re looking at approximately 2 million of New Jersey’s population overweight. Yikes. With such statistics readily available I put most, if not all, of the blame

on 1) fast food chains and 2) the fatigue and laziness caused by 1. So really, it’s just the fast food chains. Here’s some statistics on McDonald’s you can digest: Want to burn off the calories of the Big Mac, fries, and Super Sized Coke you just had? Sure, no problem. Just walk seven to eight hours nonstop. McDonald’s feeds 46 million people a day, more than the entire population of Spain. There are more than 30,000 McDonald’s in more than 100 countries on six continents. Children readily recognize the golden “M” before being able to even speak. Last, but not least, McDonald’s represents 43% of the total U.S. fast food market. How convenient for McDonald’s, becoming richer by the day while the people who eat their food have deteriorating health. It is completely sad to see how much a “friendly” corporation is destroying lives. I can assure you, no one wants Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, liver and gallbladder disease, sleep apnea, respiratory problems, or cancer. Yet, unknowingly (or even knowingly) massive amounts of people are setting themselves up for the abovementioned diseases.

I honestly believe that fast food should not even exist, as it is disgusting, and clearly unhealthy. The combination of increased consumption of energy-dense foods high in saturated fats and sugars, and reduced physical activity all lead to harmful consequences. McDonald’s and other fast food chains are knowingly putting at risk millions of people with their highly saturated and greasy foods. At the rate that obesity is increasing, it is slated to be the number one cause of preventable deaths, surpassing the tobacco industry. As someone who has had to face all types of family health problems, I do not want to end up in a hospital with a condition that could have been prevented. This is why I do not eat at fast food restaurants and this is why I urge you to try and eat healthier, too. I know college is filled with temptation of burgers, fries, and late night (really unhealthy) snacks, but please add some sort of a healthy variation. Maybe an apple? Or, skip that bottle of Coke and instead grab a bottle of water. Don’t let the food chains win. They will take over your life and your health.


News

PAGE 2

Rutgers student leader brings healthcare to Honduras

Police Blotter

Mischief Night Just after midnight on Sunday the 24th Rutgers University Police responded to a call of criminal mischief at 249 MLK BLVD. The complainant stated that his car had been scratched while parked. The value of the damage has not yet been determined. Harassment/ Warrant On Sunday at 7:45 p.m. RUPD was dispatched to 185 University Ave. on a harassment complaint. At the scene a record check on Stacey N. Boone revealed an outstanding warrant. Theft On Sunday RUPD received a phone call from 91 Bleeker St. where a complainant stated that her property was stolen. The total value of the property was about $400.00. DUI On Friday the 22nd, Shane T. Calendar was arrested after a motor vehicle stop around 2 a.m. for driving under the influence near 123 Washington Ave. Dorm room mischief RUPD was dispatched to 101 Bleeker St. on the afternoon of Wednesday the 20th, on a report of damage done to a dorm room. Theft Last Tuesday a student called RUPD stating that his property had been stolen from 42 Warren St. The total value of the stolen property is around $700.00.

News Briefs

Donation NJ Nets players, coaches and ownership donate $75,000 to help paralyzed Rutgers football player Eric LeGrand. According to the Rutgers junior’s family, he is optimistic about his future. But the family would not comment specifically on LeGran’s medical status. Bullying Lawmakers in Trenton introduced ‘anti-bullying’ legislation earlier this week that they hope will save the lives and childhoods of harassed students across New Jersey. If passed, the bill would require all teachers, school board and administrators to complete anti-bullying training. Essex County A 25-year-old North Plainfield man wanted in the shooting death of a transgender Newark woman surrendered to authorities this Saturday night, the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office announced. Marquise Foster turned himself in more than a month after the fatal shooting of Victoria Carmen White, 28, in Maplewood. He is charged with murder. Bail was set at $1 million. A second man, Alrashim Chambers, 23, remains at-large and is also charged with murder. Atlantic City Boyd Gaming said it won’t buy the remaining half of the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, Atlantic City’s top casino. The Las Vegas-based company owns half of the Borgata, and had the right of first refusal to buy the remaining half from MGM Resorts International. Boyd says it’s comfortable owning half of the AC casino-hotel. Financial Aid Nearly 49,000 New Jersey college students may be on the verge of losing their state tuition grants and scholarships because they failed to fill out a new one-page financial aid form required by the state. College financial aid officials and the state Higher Education Student Assistance Authority are in a last-minute scramble to track down the students and their missing paperwork before the Nov. 15 deadline.

october 27, 2010

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By Allison Baldwin News Editor

fter spending a week in Honduras, Jaydev Mistry said his love of helping was solidified. “It was a great experience,” said Mistry. “It strengthened my love of helping people, of serving them.” Planned by Global Medical Brigades, an organization started at Rutgers New Brunswick in Sept. 2009, the trip, which lasted from Aug 22-29, allowed Mistry, senior biology major, along with 30 other students, a doctor and a pharmacist, to travel to Central America and provide healthcare to people who didn’t have access to it. “We were there for seven days,” said Mistry. “Four of those days we Mistry sees a patient during one of the clinc days. The students spent four spent in the clinics. We collected our days out of their week stay in the clinics. own supplies and each student had to “My first two days were spent came up to me. He remembered me. It raise about $1,200 to pay for airfare, in the pharmacy,” he said. “I work as was a touching experience.” board and any extra supplies that we a pharmacy technician now so that However, the hardest part of the needed.” helped because I was familiar with experience was turning away patients The clinics, which were set up the medications, could recognize the once the clinics had filled capacity for names, and also the doses the day. that doctors might write “It was hard because a lot of these prescriptions for.” people lived far away, and the clinics “Sometimes three or were far from each other, so they four prescriptions would couldn’t really come back the next be written at a time,” adds day,” he said. Mistry. “Sometimes whole “The experience gave everyone families would come.” a reality check,” said Mistry. “We However, Mistry’s thought we were going to be staying favorite part of the clinics was somewhere nicer, but we had to stay in triage. a place with bunk beds. We saw what “I liked to interact with we took for granted like paved roads the patients,” he said. “We had and clean water. We even had to use to talk to them in Spanish, had bottled water to brush our teeth.” to break that language barrier, However, despite the conditions, but we saw patients of all Mistry said that he loved the experience different ages, from children and recommends that someone start an to seniors.” organization similar to Global Medical “It was such a humbling Brigades on the Newark campus. experience. We couldn’t Mistry, who is also vice president always understand what they of the NCAS-SGA, says that as a were saying, but we could see student leader, having an organization on their faces that they were like Global Medical Brigades is so thankful.” something that is really important to Mistry recalls one him. particular experience, on “It’s a lot of hard work, but the he had on a day off when students who planned it showed that it the students went to the can be done,” said Mistry. “You don’t Mistry on his day off with kids at the orphanorphanage. necessarily have to be interested in the age. “On our first day there, health profession; you may just want in schools that had gotten out for the we went to an orphanage, and there to have a new experience or to help day, were comprised of four medical was this kid named Antonio there,” he out.” stations, each one set up in a classroom. said. “I gave him some candy, and the Photos courtesy of Jaydev Mistry The stations included intake, second time, when we came back, he where the patients’ basic information, such as name and date birth was taken, triage, where blood pressure, glucose level, and symptoms were noted, diagnosis, where the patients met with a doctor, and the pharmacy, where patients received medication and vitamins. Clinical days lasted from ten in the morning until four in the afternoon, often times with the students working afterward to restock and reload their supplies. “All of the medication that the patients received we brought with us,” said Mistry. “We took the clothes out of our luggage and put the meds in our bags. We would separate the medications by what they were used for.” Mistry adds that vitamins sought after the most, and that his training as a pharmacy technician helped him in Mistry takes blood pressure of a patient in Honduras. the field.

SGA

continued from Page 1

Yet as much as the SGA’s are working, the issue of getting students involved and active is a problem that the SGA’s have been facing for a number of years. “I feel that they [SGA] should go into exploring more of what people want,” said Levi. Fallen officer Jaydev Mistry, Vice President A Teaneck police officer died follow- of the NCAS SGA said that there is ing a one-vehicle accident, according to a report on News 12 New Jersey. some difficulties in trying to reach out John Abraham’s cruiser struck a util- to students including clearing up the ity pole near police headquarters on mystery of what NCAS SGA does and Teaneck Road around 2 a.m Monday. how to get involved. “One of the biggest problems He was taken to Holy Name Hospital we face is just the student body being before being pronounced dead Monaware that SGA exists. Over the past day morning.

few years, we didn’t have the best reputation; people have taken it as a joke but us and out platform is to revitalize the prestige that SGA deserves. Sumski believes the that SGA is working in the students’ interests but needs student involvement to get working on critical student issues. “I think with Student Government, they work on the issues that are brought to them…if there are issues that no one brings forward, that is when we rely on the senators to be out there to be talking with different people.” The current structure of the NCAS SGA includes five senators for each class, five members of the executive board and five University representatives. The elections for sophomore, junior and senior are held in the spring time. The first year student elections

were held at the end of September. Sumski advises NCAS SGA that they should “…connect with the student body more so students would feel more comfortable coming forward and being part of the organization.” Mistry believes that the Pakistani Flood Fundraiser that is happening this week is, to a degree, a part of the re-imaging process of NCAS SGA. “We are just doing what every governing council would do. We are holding an event, we are trying to make people aware of a disaster that occurred in another country while at the same time showing that student government is doing things to this level.” University College’s SGA did not respond to e-mails to schedule an interview.


News

October 27, 2010

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Health services offers free annual flu shot By Sandra Grossett Contributor

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s a part of their emergency preparedness planning Student Health Services and Occupational Health Services distributed free flu shots on Oct. 18 in the Multipurpose Room of the Paul Robeson Campus Center. The turnout totaled close to 300 students, lasted until about 4p.m, with an expected extra hundred shots given by the end of the day. In order to ensure that those who received a flu shot were Rutgers students and employees, the presentation of a valid ID was required upon entrance. Dr. Sandra Samuels, head of student health services, allowed Dr. Luis De Jesus, a physician who has been working with health services for twelve years, to provide advice on the

importance of getting flu shot vaccines. “We do this every year as part of our practice for Emergency Preparedness,” said De Jesus. “We want to give as much vaccine as possible in the shortest amount of time, similar to how we would act if we had provide emergency vaccination medication.” In addition to practicing Emergency Preparedness, Health Services also provides the flu shot for students and employees around this time. “Because the flu starts around December, you need to get the shot a month or so before so that you’re protected before the season comes,” said De Jesus. “October is a good time to get the vaccine.” Over the last four to five years, the number of students getting the flu shot has varied. However, during the 2009 swine flu outbreak, more and more students requested the shot.

“Last year we had so many people coming in that we actually ran out of the vaccine within three to four hours,” said De Jesus. “There was really an urgent need for the flu shot then, and its less urgent now.” Although De Jesus emphasizes the importance of getting the flu shot, he concedes that there are some possible side effects. “The most common side effects are aches and pains over the area where the shot was given, otherwise it’s fairly safe,” said De Jesus. To remedy these side effects De Jesus suggests that people take over the counter pain medications like Tylenol and Advil. “As long as people are not allergic to these medications, they are safe and should take away aches and pains,” he said. De Jesus says that the side effects may be a reason that people do not

come to get the shot. “Because the vaccine has chicken egg product in it, those who have severe allergic reactions such as hives and breathing problems, cannot get it,” he said. “Also, if you are very sick you shouldn’t get the shot.” For the event, health services worked closely the school to discuss emergency flu issues, working mainly with Student Life, the College of Nursing, Physical Plant, and the Rutgers Police. Nurses were present to help distribute the vaccine and police to help transport it. As a final thought, De Jesus says that he hopes students and employees get the vaccine. He also adds that there are a lot of reasons to get vaccinated; a lot of people can get sick and die from the flu. “We don’t want people to get sick.” De Jesus said. “Getting the shot only takes a minute and you’re done.”

New academic program comes to Rutgers LGBTQ concentration arrives in Fall 2010 By Desiree Hadley

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Staff writer

all 2010 welcomes the brand new studies program of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered. This minor analyzes all aspects of the LGBT culture. Some of the classes offered are LGBT Politics, LGBT History, and The Psychology of Sexual Orientation. Assistant professor in the History Department, an LGBT scholar, as well as a Professor of the Introduction to LGBT Studies Timothy StewartWinter had this to say explaining the role of the minor “… LGBT Studies is both a set of analytic tools and also a mirror held up to society, reflecting how we see ourselves and who we think we are. The LGBT Studies minor sends a message that Rutgers-Newark is preparing its students for a world that has a place for LGBT people.” LGBT studies being offered as a minor program was initiated by RU Pride (the LGBT student group on campus). Years ago the students expressed to faculty in the Psychology, History, and Women’s Studies Departments of the importance of

FEES

continued from Page 1

The ‘Computer Fee’, which totals to $288.50 annually,goes towards providing towards providing the Rutgers-Newark community with services such as wireless internet, anti-virus software, and the maintenance of school servers and

offering such courses. Rutgers began offering courses like The History of LGBT and The Psychology of Sexual Orientation. According to Beryl Satter who was the head of the LGBT studies Committee, is a professor of LGBT History, and Women’s History was aware that “A minor required more courses offered in more regular sequence, however. Faculty affiliated with Women’s and Gender Studies therefore created an LGBT Studies committee in order to plan the minor.” Satter went on to say “ In the

spring of 2010, thanks to support from the Dean’s office, two new faculty, Timothy Stewart-Winter and Whitney Strub, were hired to teach courses in History, Women’s and Gender Studies, American Studies dealing with LGBT Studies and LGBT History. In the spring of 2010 Women’s and Gender Studies was therefore able to design the LGBT minor.” Satter is also the author of Proposal to Create a New Minor: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Studies. Her book became the committee’s foundation for the LGBT minor. In order to have LGBT considered

computers. “The majority of the School Fee goes to the student government,” said Mary Tamasco, Assistant Chancellor for Budget and Administrative Services at RutgersNewark. She explained that all of the extra costs that students pay are put to good use. This information is meant to provide students with not only a

sound explanation of where their hard-earned ‘dough’ is going, but also to assure the Rutgers-Newark community that the university is using their fees to benefit everyone, as Tamasco proved. However, the PIRG fee that is put on the term bill is optional and students can choose to adjust their term bill so that they don’t have to pay it.

as a minor students are required to take 18 credits in LGBT studies and one has to be Introduction to LGBT studies taught by Timothy Stewart-Winter. Satter said Rutgers New Brunswick offers a similar studies program but its’ entitled “Critical Sexuality Studies”. Rutgers Newark is not the first school to offer LGBT as a studies program. Few colleges began to offer such programs of study in the late 70’s by the early 90’s LGBT studies was more prevalent amongst college courses. University of Maryland College Park and Cornell University offer degree programs related to LGBT studies. Jan Ellen Lewis the Senior Associate for Faculty and Professor of History stated “…we do hope that the LGBT minor, as well as the new courses in LGBT studies will help create an understanding of LGBT life, history, and culture, for both members of the LGBT community and for straight people as well. The Tyler Clementi tragedy makes it very clear that all of us have to work very hard and continuously to combat ignorance and intolerance, and the new courses and minor in LGBT studies can help educate the entire RN community.”

“I would have liked it if they’d told me that it (the PIRG fee) was voluntary,” says Rachel Herdman, a Zoology and Environmental Science major. “I wondered what else was on it (the term bill) … that wasn’t explained.”


Opinion

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THE OBSERVER OBSERVER THE The Voice of Rutgers-Newark Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Paul Robeson Campus Center 350 Dr. Martin Luther King, Blvd. Newark, New Jersey 07102-1898 Main office: (973) 353-5023

Editor-in-Chief Diego M. Ortiz Editor-in-Chief Diego M. Ortiz managing editor Thomas Hahn managing editor Thomas Hahn LAYOUT DESIGN Editor Monica DeEditor Leon LAYOUT DESIGN Monica De Leon news editor Allison news Baldwin editor Allison Baldwin sports editor Camilo Brun sports editor Camilo Brun opinion editor Halema Wali opinion editor Halema Wali life & Leisure editor Caroline McLaughlin life & Leisure editor Caroline McLaughlin multiMedia Editor Christian Torres-Rossi multiMedia Editor Christian Torres-Rossi business manager Omar manager Khan business Omar Khan staff writers Laquay Weekes staff writers Tricia Serrantonio Laquay Weekes Bimpe CalvinFageyimbo Okwuego Farbod Rajai Mauricio Moreno JoshuaAlcantara Hoyos Ramona James Rountree Hassan Muhammad Elizabeth Rodriguez Frances Perez Yaroslav Imshenetsky Tricia Serrantonio Enzo Domingo Breanne McCarthy Naina Kamath Bimpe Fageyimbo Shashwat Dave Rodolfo Cardenas Euney Kim Farbod Rajai KelvinHoyos Pau Joshua Zarna Patel Matthew Rozsa Contributors Contributors Sandra Grossett advisor DesireeGarneau Hadley George Maxine Bogle Sandra Grossett

Lettersadvisor to the editor and Opinions: George Garneau observercopy@ gmail.com Letters to the editor and Opinions: News desk: observercopy@ observernews@ gmail.com News desk: with To advertise observernews@ The Observer gmail.com please contact Omar Khan To advertise with at The Observer observerbiz@ please contact gmail.com Omar Khan at The observerbiz@ views expressed in the gmail.com Opinion section, with ex-

october 27, 2010

Apology to “Rude Professor in Bradley Hall” By Euney Kim staff writer

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wo weeks ago, I submitted an anonymous letter to the Observer about a specific, but unnamed, professor in Bradley Hall on the Rutgers-Newark campus who was rude to me. I’m writing now to say that I realize it was ethically wrong to submit something like that without specifying who the professor was and who wrote it. Because the professor was not specified, an unknown person assumed it was about Allan Wolper, a journalism professor at R-N. That person stapled the anonymous letter on his office door. The letter was not about Professor Wolper. It was meant to address Robert Shoup, a professor of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at R-N. I apologize for submitting the letter anonymously and not identifying

the professor. By doing so, it did not give the person who I wrote about a fair chance to respond. It also allowed the public to wrongly assume that it was about someone else. After speaking to Dana Damiani, the unit computing manager at Bradley Hall, I learned that students using the computer lab as a hallway is a common concern among professors. This fact helps me understand Professor Shoup’s reaction when he saw me walking out of the room. Students cut through the computer lab so often that Shoup always reminds students that it isn’t a hallway. He simply did not know that I was there to begin with before his class entered. “I understood in your article where you were coming from, which I didn’t understand at the time when it happened,” said Shoup. “You weren’t the only person walking through that day and I get tired of it.”

This has taught me and The Observer a valuable lesson. It is dangerous and ethically wrong to publish something anonymously and without naming the people concerned in it. Despite the blunder I made, this ordeal has ended up revealing a recurring issue of students using the computer lab at Bradley Hall as a hallway. “We try to keep the Bradley Labs an open and relaxed atmosphere where people can come and go as they please when the lab is open, but it would be really great if students could be conscious of when there is a class happening in the lab, and not walk through it and disturb the class,” said Damiani. Damiani is taking positive steps by creating signs for professors to use when having class in the lab. This serves as a way to remind students to not use the computer lab as a shortcut, and in turn, prevent any sort of class disruption.

Preservatives make my food yummy By Zarna Patel Staff Writer

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o be honest, I eat McDonald’s at least once a week, and ONLY McDonalds. Not Wendy’s, not White Castle, not even Burger

King. It’s right on my way home, and cheap enough. So it’s nice to know, that when I head down to McDonald’s and buy a large order of fries, I know I’m getting my money’s worth. McDonald’s is so chalked up with chemicals that it lasts way longer then any other fast food. Meaning I can buy the fries and keep it in my backpack for days and not one spot of mold will grow on them. Can you really tell me that this is a major issue? Honestly, most people don’t even know what they eat. And most people don’t die of all the chemicals ingested from fast food anyways. It’s important to be aware of what’s being consumed, but between alcohol consumption, inhaling cigarettes, pollution, and oil spills, who cares what preservatives McDonald’s have in their food anyways? I’ve read numerous articles on this subject, but when Friday roles by, I’m still going to

McDonald’s. In fact, it’s probably amazing that McDonald’s doesn’t spoil. How many times have you forgotten that zip locked

sandwich bag in your backpack? It happens. I mean, if we’re all so concerned about the state of the food we consume, let’s replace all waiters and waitresses with machines. Every time you eat out, you trust a stranger to handle your food. You trust that they wash their hands after using the bathroom or picking their nose.

If you don’t like it, don’t eat it. There are hundreds of other options open. And it’s not the FDA’s job to close down McDonald’s just because a couple people can’t handle themselves and gorge on fast food on a daily bases. Life choices on consuming shouldn’t be blamed on the producer. Businesses thrive on consumer life choices, so really, just don’t eat there. If enough people are buying, they should be able to have a chance to stay in business, despite how crappy the food is. General rules are set up so no one goes around pulling a Sweeney Todd. The whole Super Size Me issue should not have been such a shock. It’s fast food, what did you expect? It’s very important to be informed about what you’re eating and food should be regulated to an extent, but it can’t be that surprising to find out all the unhealthy aspects of fast food. Of course they’re frozen, it’s not possible to cook real food in 2 minutes. Obviously they’re high in fat, it’s all made out of cheap ingredients. Yeah, they’re full of preservatives, there’s no farm next door supplying fresh potatoes for French fries. Shock about this stuff is over rated.

The fatigue of financial aid By Naina Kamath

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Staff Writer

ere is how a typical visit to the Financial Aid Office goes: wait in line for half an hour, be told that you should visit another counter, wait in line for another half hour, and hear that there is nothing Financial Aid can do for you. Needless to say, the idea of visiting the top floor of Blumenthal Hall has become a nightmare for me. It is hard to understand why a visit to the Financial Aid Office is so tedious, but I have attempted to break it down into layman’s terms. The first reason is that the masses are eternally yearning; unless you happen to share the waking hours of an owl, you will always find a huge line upon exiting the elevator.

“They should get more employees,” said Steven Mero, a History major, when asked about the constant rush at the Financial Aid Office. “There’s a huge line…it takes forever!” The second and most important reason lies in the hands of the personnel themselves; it seems that most employees in the Financial Aid Office are inclined to send you off to talk with another department. Except for the select few, who feel your pain and take matters into their own hands, most of the staff will inform you that you have to ‘speak to someone else’. “If you want to get things done, you need to contact higher officials,” said Jessica Villaquiran, a Psychology and Biology major. Out of all the issues students at

Rutgers-Newark face, this lack of actual aid from Financial Aid is one of the most pertinent. We are young, we want to learn, but we often don’t have the money to fuel the college’s exuberant expenses. Financial aid is essential, but the process of actually receiving it is sometimes harder than the classes we’re taking! Is this fair? For the prices we pay to attend this university, should we have to deal with such hardships just to get a little help? Now don’t get me wrong: I understand that the job of a financial aid officer must be difficult. Every semester, thousands of files must be sorted, reviewed and awarded. I understand that having to deal with impatient young adults can be immensely tiring. Yet, is it wrong that all we ask for is a little assistance?

Haitian immigrant restores one student’s patriotism By James Rountree

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staff writer

fter my political science class I have the pleasure of discussing current events with a Haitian immigrant, Mr. ception of the main Edito- Bruce Ocean. I have discovered over rial, do not necessarily reflect the last few weeks that he is a far better the views of The Observer. American than I am. I was born here, with a lineage of American ancestry of 200 years; it seems that even though I apprehend the founding documents and the revolutionary ideals they represent, The views expressed in the I lack a wholehearted understanding. It appears that I’m desensitized to the decOpinion section, with laration of life, liberty, and the pursuit exception of the main Editorial, do not necessarily of happiness. I take them for granted, not knowing any different. Mr. Ocean reflect the views of on the other hand is filled with the spirit The Observer. of the Revolution, a true patriot, not of a misguided Tea Party variety. This week while talking about

the impending doom of a Palin presidency, I said that I would just leave, seek a better deal, Canada perhaps. I continued to profess the benefits of many other Western countries that don’t exist here: universal healthcare, education, etc. I finished by saying that even though I was born and raised here; I suppose I don’t possess a real loyalty. Mr. Ocean was shocked by this and had a completely opposite response. He said that regardless of the depressing discourse of our current political atmosphere I shouldn’t give up so easily. I told him that this was most likely a result of coming of age during the Bush administration, but he didn’t accept this excuse. You always hear about the greatness of America, often said out of pride without fact, but when it is exclaimed with such earnest conviction, I felt ashamed yet convinced. He said that America is the place the whole world

wants to be, even though we’ve been off the course for a little while. When we are determined the American people can accomplish seemingly impossible feats. To never give up on this nation no matter the struggle you’re up against you must fight and never back down. For many, immigrants are looked down upon, rhetoric comes to mind of them taking our jobs and being a plague on our social services; made worse in economic hardship. Mr. Ocean exemplifies that the American spirit isn’t the sole property to those born here. Instead, it is deeply rooted in the psyche of those who are searching for a better life. I can personally proclaim that Mr. Ocean has made me believe once more, though in the event of a Palin presidency we should all look north.


Opinions

October 27, 2010

“Four Loko”: Alcoholic beverage and energy drink in one By Bimpe Fageyinbo Staff writer

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our Loko, also referred to “as liquid cocaine” or “blackout in a can”, is being marketed as a “caffeinated energy drink” and is what college students are using to enhance their drink. That’s unless you go to Ramapo College. Ramapo has just banned the drink from its campus after 23 students were hospitalized. This drink contains caffeine, taurine, guarana, and twelve percent alcohol. These three ingredients are all highly intense energy boosters, plus the always-reliable alcohol. I mean it’s not really rocket science as to why Ramapo’s President Peter Mercer banned the drink from his campus: people are being hospitalized. Banning the drink may not end world intoxi-

cation, but it is one more way to keep students out of the ER and to avoid a possible lawsuit or parental backlash. Before Four Loko became popular, students were being rushed to the hospital left and right because of alcohol poisoning. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like it’s going to seize anytime soon. Students will either move on to the next heinous concoction that’s released, or resort back to getting drunk the old fashion way, also known as: what they were doing last week before they knew Four Loko even existed. What’s interesting and ironic about Four Loko and most other alcoholic beverages, is their “concern” and promotion for responsible consumption of their products, which also happen to be the most irresponsible combinations of ingredients to mix together.

In essence Phusion Projects, the manufacturers of Four Loko, wants you to drink this irresponsible drink responsibly. Caffeine is a stimulant and alcohol is a depressant, two things that I’m almost positive any medical professional would not co-sign on. Four Loko is doing exactly what it set out to do, get people extra wasted. At the end of the day, it is a personal choice and maybe a lapse in better judgment whether or not you choose to consume this drink and consume it in excess. Phusion Projects can’t be too surprised that their product is causing a bit of an uproar because the drink is a little reckless. A ban of Four Loko at colleges and universities seems reasonable, because I guess that’s just the responsible thing to do.

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video at therutgersobserver.com

Scarlet Radar compiled by Neil Hemnarine

Do you read emails from the Chancellor?

John Florek Junior, Graphic Design

“No I think it’s a waste of time and email space.”

I accuse Chris Christie... By Matthew Rozsa

A

Staff writer

s a historically-minded Jew, I am very familiar with the story of the Dreyfus Affair. In an incident that rocked the foundations of turn-of-the-century France (the last century, not this one), a Jewish military officer was falsely accused of treason, framed for the crime even after his innocence had been proven, and ultimately had his case become a rallying point for liberals throughout the world fighting against corruption and injustice. Along with this, the Dreyfus Affair is also noteworthy for having produced one of the most memorable letters in the history of Western politics. Written in 1898 by the esteemed author Emile Zola, it was addressed to French President Felix Faure and, under the title “J’Accuse” (translation: “I Accuse”), it accused the French government of sloppy criminal prosecution, wrongful imprisonment, and blatant bigotry. Ever since then, the term “J’Accuse” refers not only to Zola’s work, but to any piece composed with the intent of exposing injustice by pointing a finger at those responsible for perpetrating it. Needless to say, I mention all of this because I think it is high time for a “J’Accuse” letter. The man who needs to be accused is New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. When he took office at the beginning of this year, Christie claimed that the state’s budgetary crisis required him to demand sacrifices from all of that state’s citizens. Before long, thousands of school teachers and other state employees lost their jobs in the name of fiscal solvency; thousands of retirees found their medical benefits reduced and their pensions forever frozen; and public schools lost $1 billion of funds, depriving an entire generation of children of the education they’ll need to be economically competitive. All of this, Christie and his supporters insisted, was necessary, perhaps even heroic. These were not the actions of a callous man casting countless of the very citizens he had sworn to the wolves, but a valiant warrior fighting for fiscal sanity. His legacy was not the snatching of vital support systems from the elderly, the denial of a fair future for the young, and the infliction of terrible financial hardship on the working class by tossing thousands of them onto the unemployment rolls during the nadir of the worst economic crisis in more than six decades. No, his legacy was the attainment of an ideal so magnificent that responsible men and women should ignore such trifles as massive human suffering – that ideal, of course, being a balanced bud-

get. As Christie and his acolytes would have us believe, the old and infirm, the young and helpless, and the workforce itself should feel honored to have been sacrificed at the altar of this idol. Of course, a handful of observers noted that one group was not being asked to make any such sacrifices. When legislation appeared before his desk that would have raised taxes on the wealthy, Christie promptly vetoed it. Middle-class owners might have had their property tax rebates taken away; college students may have watched as tuition rates rose and scholarship opportunities fell; but it was simply not right, as Christie saw it, for the wealthy to also spend more money. For one thing, they were clearly much more sorely afflicted in these trying times than the working class, the middle class, the elderly, the young, and the college bound; for another, to paraphrase the great economic John Kenneth Galbraith, stuffing their feedbags with piles of oats meant that some might fall on the road for the sparrows (that is, everyone who isn’t rich). Before we could protest, we were patronizingly assured that this was the best of all possible ways to feed the birds. Even if one somehow found all of this objectionable, however, comfort could at least be taken in appreciating the purity of Christie’s motives. The budget would be balanced – perhaps not at a fair cost to everyone, but balanced nevertheless. Now Chris Christie has announced that he is going to fight for a massive tax cut for the rich, one that – if passed – will blow a giant hole in his precious budget, destroying all semblance of its balance. What could this mean? I don’t envy the cognitive dissonance that Christie’s supporters (at least the self-respecting ones) must be experiencing as they try to rationalize this. Nor, for that matter, will I try to plumb the depths of their no doubt tortured psyches. Instead of continuing to promote excuses, it is time to bluntly state what common sense makes clear to all but those too devious, dense, or deep in denial to admit it. Chris Christie does not care about the best interest of the average New Jerseyite. His primary concern is with the self-interest of this state’s wealthiest residents, of which he is a member and from whom he receives the bulk of his campaign funds. As such… I accuse Chris Christie of being a tool of big business. No matter how shiny and colorful the ideological wrapping paper with which he covers his real agenda may be, the reality is that his motivation – as made undeniably clear by the policies he has pursued – is to increase the wealth and influ-

ence of the rich right-wingers who backed his last gubernatorial campaign and can be expected to bankroll his next one. Indeed, the only meaningful difference between Christie’s conduct and that of the type of prostitute viewed less favorably by society is that the former wears a business suit and allows its conscience rather than its body to be violated in exchange for money. I accuse Chris Christie of being a liar, an assertion I can support with the simple act of comparing his claim (that his primary goal is to balance the budget) with the truth (that he is now ruining the balanced budget so as to give more money to the wealthy). I accuse Chris Christie of betraying his oath. The oath to which I refer is the one he took while being sworn in as Governor of New Jersey, in which among his other pledges, he vowed to promote, to the utmost of his ability, “the peace and prosperity… of the said state.” He did not swear to promote the peace and prosperity only of the young, or only of the old, or only of one group or another group. His promise was to promote the peace and prosperity of the entire state – and because he has focused only on the interests of the wealthy, I accuse Chris Christie of failing to uphold that oath. Sadly this article can’t end here; a movement exists, as I write, to run Chris Christie for the American presidency, and barring a drastic unforeseen development, there is every reason to believe it will arrive at its goal in 2012, 2016, or 2020. That is why I have one last accusation: I accuse Chris Christie’s non-wealthy supporters of stupidity. The rich right-wingers who govern this governor at least know that, when doing so, they are making advances for their own personal cause, even if the philosophical core of that cause is the triumph of greed over basic human decency. Non-wealthy Christie supporters, however – the ones who cheer at his speeches, wave placards at his rallies, sign petitions urging him to run for president, and mouth variations of his rhetoric throughout the nation – are guilty of abandoning elementary powers of discernment and self-preservation in the name of believing that solidarity exists between themselves and the men who write their pink slips, and that it they are being moral when they share in the contempt of the upper classes for the vulnerable and the less fortunate. Had these Christie supporters been alive in the days of Robin Hood, they would no doubt denounce the merry men as Communists and hail the Sheriff of Nottingham as a freedom fighter.

Laura Carrione Sophomore, Journalism

“I don’t have that much time to sit and decipher everything he says, but if I come across an email, I read it.”

Christopher Kennedy Junior, Art

“If he says something about parking, maybe I’ll read it.”

Frances Perez-Rodriguez Senior, Journalism

“There is nothing he could do to make me read them, unless the headline was like ‘Rutgers Epidemic’ or ‘Rutgers Mass Murder on Campus’. There’s nothing I feel I need to read immediately.”

Mario Simoes Freshman, Finance

“There is probably nothing the chancellor can do to interest me in reading his addresses. He could just stop sending me messages, he’s kind of cluttering up my inbox.”


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October 27, 2010


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October 27, 2010

PAGE 7

Inside this section: Chic Stranger ................................page 7 TV and Movie Reviews.....................page 8 Observations on Reading.................page 9 Sudoku and Crossword....................page9

Chic Stranger:

Boo! Use Halloween to show off your creative side By Patricia Serrantonio

A

STAFF WRITER

s you begin your pumpkin carving and apple bobbing, Halloween and its thrills are approaching fast. And aside from finding or creating a costume, the entirety of New York City is working toward gaining its haunted aura with new party scenes, movies, and

haunted house options. Still, the spooky fashion sense is my sole favorite about the holiday, maybe the exception of Hocus Pocus reruns. Since we are too old to trick or treat, I think, try to visit the creepy classic downtown event. Starting at Spring St., the annual Village Halloween parade creates a wild and creative scene for anyone. Aside from crowded streets, the parade is definite fun as well as entertaining with over forty thousand contributors, new costumes, and the traditional “Thriller” tribute. On West 27th street, the NYC Haunted House has a distinct set of rules upon entrance. According to their website, no one under 18 is admitted and everyone is required to walk alone and remove their socks and shoes. People must be prepared to “beware,” for they will experience “complete darkness - loud noises - crawling on your hands and knees physical contact,” and other events involving violence. They even supply you with a mask and a flash light. This information undoubtedly creates true fear and confusion to the point of wondering what is inside. For more eerie information, visit nychalloweenhauntedhouse.com. Aside from events, many are saying that popular costumes will circulate Gaga’s leotards to “T-shirt time” references. Either way, the past is full of runway shows dedicated to high Halloween Couture. From full face make-up to large, metallic head gear has graced past collections from Alexander McQueen, who still currently sets the bar for best head dress designs, and John Galliano, who used embellished tights and crowns in his 2007 collection. In a 2009 issue of Harper’s Bazaar, Tim Burton himself got the chance to design some “Magical Fashion.” With big hair, a gargantuan skeleton, and deep red accents, a cloudy background and a deserted field of flowers set the perfect stage for Burton’s costume-integrated photos. He created a fabulously mystical interpretation of Halloween favorites like a bunny, a clown, and even Santa Claus. My personal favorite is one dark photo of a male model dressed as the famously dark Edward Scissorhands. As you make your Halloween arrangements and practice your monster mash, just remember that this is the time to truly be whatever (and whomever) you want. Costumes have been viewed with intimidation due to their limitless opportunity,

Clogs: Backless shoes making a comeback By Maxine Bogle

T

CONTRIBUTOR

he clog, a once popular footwear that your parents or grandparents donned in the seventies, is back and fully equipped with tassels, gold studs and other elements to become the stylish fashion accessory of 2010-2011. For those trying to envision what a clog may be, picture a shoe, designed with a pointed toe, where you could easily slip your feet in and out of due to the shoe having an open back. The clogs, which were traditionally worn by mining workers and farmers in such countries as Sweden and Denmark, were originally wooden and had reinforced steel in the pointed toes, which were used for protection against large equipment in factories. It was not until the late 1970’s in the U.S and other countries when the steel toe and the all wooden look was lost that the Clogs began to be worn as a fashion accessory, and became equipped with a new look of buckles, zippers and prints. Even though clogs are now mainly made for women, clogs for men do exist. Many guys may not consider wearing a pair or may not know that they even exist, but they come in a variety of dark colors and even without the

heels.

At present, popular designers such as Chanel, Jimmy Choo, Nicole Richie and Steve Madden have all developed their own style of the Clog that it has become impossible to choose which has the greatest look for the season. While Jimmy Choo had leather clogs on the runway, which are good for the winter, Madden choose a light model good for any occasion and Chanel chose a more glam up piece sure to wow everyone. Unfortunately, for the average college student on a tight budget, a pair of clogs from Steve Madden or Nicole Richie, which can typically cost over $100, is just out of the question. So where can a student that wants to be stylish find a pair of clogs? After exploring around such stores as DSW and The Burlington Coat Factory, the classic clogs were found and at low price. However, it was a small store called Rainbows that had the clogs for the best price yet, $30. So hurry and buy a few! Clogs are not just a popular trend for the moment; many people continue to wear clogs even if they are not in season. They are worn in gardens and even to work, because they are a practical shoe that can fit into any lifestyle. Clogs have been with us for many years and it’s not likely that they will just go away.

The Cheri style of clogs from Spring Step- $63.99 on Zappos.com

yet they are a form of liberation, whether you are testing your dress-up limits or just sporting scrubs for the night. Either way, it’s fun, so don’t be afraid to strut your creative side; for the city and its ghostly adventures a just a train ride away. Trick or treat!

The ObserverTV has great ideas, but we need some help. We’re looking for camera operators, video producers, photographers, script writers, and broadcasters. No experience necessary; we will train on the job. For more information, contact observercopy@gmail. com and check us out at therutgersobserver.com.


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PAGE 8

October 27, 2010

TV REVIEW

Dead Brit comedy ‘Darkplace’ shows humor alive, well, and with low ratings By Kelvin Pau

I

STAFF WRITER

’m Garth Marenghi: author, dreamweaver, visionary, plus actor. You are about to enter the world of my imagination. You are entering my Darkplace.” So begins each episode of the British television series, Darkplace. Produced during 2004, this series had an ill-fated run of a mere six episodes. Eventually it was cancelled because of poor ratings, ironically fitting considering the general premise of the show. Basically, Darkplace purports to be “lost footage” of an old eighties medical/horror drama which was knocked off the air because it was “so radical, so horrifying, so goddamn insane.” The show also features commentary from famous horror writer Garth Marenghi, his producer Dean Learner, looking back on the show. But in truth, the entire series, including the commentary and “actors” was designed in 2004 as a parody and homage of the horror and medical shows of the 1980s, though mostly it poked fun at the horror ones. Darkplace is a show within a show; the actors present themselves as both the characters they play in the show, as well as the fictional actors of the show itself. The actors Matthew Holness, Richard Ayoade, Matt Berry, and Alice Lowe do a great job at selling the retro feel of the series. Each playing a role in the “actual show”, they manage to show their acting

skills…by acting hilariously—and deliberately—terribly. Matthew Holness plays Dr Rick Dagless, a man who rarely smiles and treats even the most ridiculous of lines as if it were a prophecy of the apocalypse: with deadly seriousness. He also plays as the self-important creator of the show, Garth Marenghi (an anagram for ARGH NIGHTMARE), who portrays himself as a “dreamweaver, visionary” and claims that he is “one of the rare few who has written more books than he has read.” Of course, we find out how credible these claims are when he

displays the sum total of his written work, numbering somewhere between ten and twelve short novels, and as he actually reads from his books just before the show starts, which display such stunningly awful prose as: “Nina’s eyes popped out of what was left of her back. Why oh why had she opened that tomb? The sand turned red. This was because she was bleeding on it. Blood - rubyred blood, her blood. Blood… and piss and shit. This was the worst day of her life.” On the other hand, Matthew Berry as Dr Lucian Sanchez

pronounces his lines with tremendous hamminess, exclaiming trying to make each line sound if he were putting on a Broadway play. Possessed with seemingly endless self-confidence, his gesturing and over-the-top style make him easy to like and laugh at. Alice Lowe as Dr Liz Asher portrays a stereotypical blonde ditz from the eighties. Not very smart and showing the exact same tone of awe and astonishment for, well, everything, she’s an easy target. Finally, Richard Ayoade plays Thornton Reed, hardass boss of the doctors. However, he is very obviously not an actor, appearing to

suffer from stage fright. This leads to him forgetting or saying the wrong lines (and there being numerous very obvious cuts and retakes). It also makes a mockery of his supposed “tough and in charge” boss persona because he possesses all the ferocity and presence of a lost six year old in the mall who didn’t get his candy and can’t find his mommy. Ayoade is also brilliant in his “outer role” as producer of the fake show, Dean Learner, whose comedic brand of sociopathy produced a great deal of the laughs I got from the show. Production and editing values also intentionally mock eighties horror with their terrible quality. Not only do they have the “grainy” look for old recordings, they also feature blatantly out of place spliced in scenes, effects in which you can literally see the strings, a set which is obviously not real, and one notable chase scene which takes place on bicycles but has motor engine sounds added. The plot caps off this send off to the eighties. Often humorously insane, such as when a woman is turning into broccoli and Dr Sanchez must comfort her (and the broccoli virus symbolizes AIDS), the storyline is the finishing touch to a series full of zany acting and endearingly bad effects. Though this show mocks the shows of the eighties, you don’t need to have liked, or even watched, these shows to find Darkplace funny. If you’re up for six episodes of absolute insanity laced humor, then you should definitely check Darkplace out.

‘Elvis and Floor 13: An investigation into Anabelle’: the ‘unlucky’ level of U. Square A film true to teenage confusion T By LaQuay Weekes STAFF WRITER

hirteen. Did that scare you? Probably not. But for some, there’s a real fear in the number and that fear has a name. Triskaidekaphobia is the fear of the number thirteen and anything associated with it. Many people worldwide consider the number unlucky, for a number of reasons. Some believe it is an unlucky number because there were thirteen people present at the Last Supper; Jesus and his Twelve Apostles. Others point to Norse mythology when Loki, the evil Norse God, crashed the Valhalla banquet hall as the thirteenth guest. Death and destruction ensued thereafter. But is there really a global fear in this number? Well, yes. According to corsinet. com, 80 percent of high rises don’t have a thirteenth floor because of the superstition. This includes business towers, dormitories and, not surprisingly, the majority of the Atlantic City casino hotel towers. One building that does have a thirteenth floor is the University Square dormitory here at Rutgers-Newark. Completed in 2006 and colloquially known as U. Square, the thirteenth floor is the highest floor here and highest among all of the campus dormitories. (Woodward Hall tops off at 10 floors, Talbott Hall at 8.) So is there a fear among U. Square students living on this floor of the number thirteen? Why would Rutgers top off U. Square with thirteen floors anyway? Last Friday I made it my mission to find out. My first destination? Room 1313. Yes, it does exist. “It’s the unluckiest number combination you could get,” said Alok Choski, who dorms in 1313 and majors in finance. “I think you should look at the funny side of it.” Choski said that he doesn’t fear the number thirteen and that he thought it was a coincidence that thirteen is the top floor at U. Square. “I’m pretty sure no one would do it deliberately,” he said. Amarat Zaatut, another thirteenth floor U. Square resident, is from Israel and wasn’t aware of the superstition about the number until she came to the United States at the beginning of the school year. “I’ve been told thirteen is a not so lucky number,” said Zaatut. When asked if she thought Rutgers deliberately topped off U. Square at thirteen floors, Zaatut thought they did. “I don’t think it was coincidental,” she said. “If they know that thirteen is an unlucky number, why would they do thirteen?” Still, Zaatut pointed to the advantages of living on the floor. “I can see New York from my window,” she said, beaming. Indeed the thirteenth floor lounge, at least, offers a sweeping view of the Empire State Building, as well as parts of Lower Manhattan. The lounge is where I found Ashish Mago, who majors in finance, studying

By Halema Wali

I

for an exam. Mago dorms on the thirteenth floor but would rather be on another. He, however, believed it’s not feasible. “I have no other options. As a graduate student, I have to stay on the thirteenth floor,” said Mago. Mago considers thirteen to be an unlucky number but pointed out that the thirteenth floor may actually be the twelfth. “My friend told me that the number is thirteen but it’s actually the twelfth floor because they don’t start at zero,” said Mago. Mago, Choski and Zaatut all said that they haven’t noticed any strange occurrences or heard unexplained sounds on the thirteenth floor. So why stop at thirteen? Why couldn’t U. Square be fourteen or fifteen floors, if only to avoid thirteen? I headed on over to the Office of Housing and Residence Life to find out. Shigeo Iwamiya, Director of Residence Life, didn’t know the exact answer. “I think it had something to do with how tall the building was for flight,” said Iwamiya. Iwamiya, however, began working at R-N in 2008, two years after U. Square was completed. When asked if a student with a fear of thirteen assigned to that floor would be accommodated if they preferred a different floor, Iwamiya said they more than likely would be. “We’ve had people that have

(been scared of heights) and we assign them to a different floor,” said Iwamiya. Iwamiya said it would be no different for someone with a superstition of the number thirteen but that they could only be re-assigned to the twelfth floor at U. Square or be moved to Talbott Hall, given their graduate student status. So the question remained. Why thirteen floors at U. Square? Angelita Bonilla, Associate Director of Residence Life, provided the answer. Bonilla explained that a certain number of beds were designated for U. Square and it so happened that after all of the beds were in place, it corresponded with thirteen floors, with no more beds for another floor. Bonilla said that there was talk about the unluckiness of the number, but it was decided that thirteen would be the highest floor. “We said, you know what, we don’t believe that superstition,” said Bonilla. “We didn’t want to go any higher than that.” When asked if there has been any strange occurrences at U. Square over the years, Bonilla said, “Nope. Not on thirteenth. Not at all in our buildings.” When asked the same question, Iwamiya smiled and jokingly said, “You mean aside from the ghosts and Frankenstein?” She added, “Actually no, not that I know of.”

OPINIONS EDITOR

’ve seen underrated movies before and most often thought they were underrated for a reason, because the movie sucked and it deserved no attention. But this was definitely not the case with the indie film Elvis and Anabelle, starring Blake Lively (Anabelle) and Max Minghella (Elvis) as the two romantically involved leads. Their chemistry together on screen is undeniable, with Lively’s natural beauty and Minghella’s dark and brooding persona carrying the movie throughout. I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, for the simplicity that often lacks in many of today’s Hollywood hits. The premise of the story begins like many movies do, two separate individuals living their own life, until an unforeseen event forces their paths to cross. While being crowned at the Miss Texas Rose beauty pageant, Anabelle suddenly dies of cardiac arrest. Her body is taken to the only embalming services available, Elvis’s family business. The first time Elvis is face to face with Anabelle is when she is on the embalming table. Struck by her beauty Elvis leans in and kisses her, a kiss that not only brings Anabelle back to life, but forever connects them. It seems as though Anabelle and Elvis have nothing in common besides their experience at Elvis’ house. Yet as their friendship blossoms, they find that at the core of their existence is an inner struggle with their families, their gridlocked future, and their suicidal thoughts. I know you’re thinking this is another typical romance movie, but it’s not. At the core of the movie is life’s unfairness and how well people cope (or choose not to cope) with the difficulties of everyday living. The romance is just an added sprinkle on top of an entertaining and hooking movie. As an avid indie film fan, this is definitely on the top of my list. Give it a try, I promise it will not let you down.


October 27, 2010

Why reading sucks (an opinion)

Life & Leisure

Want to see your writing in the next issue of the Observer? Email poems and short stories to observerlife @gmail.com

By Zarna Patel STAFF WRITER

L

et’s not beat around the bush with this one; reading books in general is tiresome, boring, and mundane. Hell, you’re probably falling into your fantasy dream world just from scanning these very words describing the dull task. Instead of reading this tedious pile of words, you could be staring right into your T.V. screen, computer screen, cell phone, or unknowingly at someone’s face while impairing your hearing with Ke$ha’s amped up raspy music. Other, more creative forms, of escapism are within reach, so why exercise your brain at all when there pretty lights are flashing before your eyes. Reading is a much more complex workout for your brain then watching Teen Mom. The length of an average genre novel can start at about 200 pages, while the average T.V. show is barely 30 minutes. On a Thursday night, why would I be reading the classic adventure of Robinson Cruseo instead of watching the promiscuous adventures of Snookie on Jersey Shore? That’s like choosing Harry Potter over Facebook—it’s madness! Why would anyone choose to pick up any of the Harry Potter books instead of constantly updating their status, about themselves, on Facebook. Clearly, being self-absorbed on the internet is a much more profitable and time consuming project then reading and developing an opinion about one of the most sold series in the U.S. I would rather be texting “k”, “lol” and “yup” to my friends instead of physically discussing the satirical humor of Joel Barlow in The Hasty Pudding. There isn’t anything interesting, fun, or witty about satire anyways. Also, why bother flipping through a newspaper when you can watch the clips online. Who cares if there’s more opinionate and sensationalized news online, at least the reading can be avoided. Being misinformed about the world is nothing compared actually picking up a newspaper and spending some time thinking about what’s going on. But thinking about anything besides what to put up as a Tweet is as much a waste of time as actually reading. It’s a good thing that Facebook, Twitter, and most movies and T.V. shows take away the element of thinking as well as reading. At one point, reading was really popular. Back in time, people use to dig holes and grow potatoes for fun. So cracking open a book was actually a source of entertainment, just like actually stepping out of the house and socializing with people. Desperate times call for desperate measures, although digging that hole sounds pretty entertaining. Reading sucks. It’s boring, hard, and requires too much of an effort. Even flipping pages is much harder then pushing buttons. There’s no better way to avoid dull tasks such as reading then by wasting countless minutes surfing the Internet for time-consuming websites.

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SUDOKU & CROSSWORD Rutgers Observer

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Across 1- Metallica drummer Ulrich; 5- Grassy plain; 10- Sugar source; 14- Oil-rich nation; 15- New York city; 16- Hydrox rival; 17Hindu lawgiver; 18- Becoming less; 20- “Pomp and Circumstance” composer; 22- Nipper’s co.; 23- Capital of Japan; 24- 4th letter of the Greek alphabet; 26- “Losing My Religion” band; 27- Vacuum bottle; 30- Russian premier 1964-80; 34- Scag; 35- Curved; 36Bass, e.g.; 37- Algerian port; 38- 9 to 5; 40- Elation; 41- Destiny; 42- Dutch name of The Hague; 43- Like much spam; 45- Science of winemaking; 47- Cutting out?; 48- Guadalajara gold; 49- Eats to a plan; 50- Long stories; 53- Immerse; 54- Stretch; 58- Lacking; 61- Netman Nastase; 62- “___ Rider” starred Clint Eastwood; 63Diamond flaw?; 64- Uh-uh; 65- Celestial body; 66- Senior member; 67- Essence; Down 1- Corona fruit; 2- Asian sea; 3- Pealed; 4- Flight formation; 5- Atlantic food fish; 6- Warns; 7- Birthplace of Muhammad; 8- Graph prefix; 9- Single unit; 10- Busty; 11- Actor Estrada; 12Start of a counting rhyme; 13- Fast-food option; 19- Bikini blast; 21- Do followers; 25- Pertaining to the distant past; 26- Graceful roundness; 27- Fulcrum for an oar; 28- Wading bird; 29- Muse of lyric poetry; 30- Understanding; 31- Ancient physician; 32Pertaining to the small intestine; 33- Destitute; 35- Large; 39- 2004 biopic; 40- Greedy; 42- Stallion, e.g.; 44- Kernels; 46- Stevedore; 47- Stealthy walk; 49- Daybook; 50- Drinks slowly; 51- Med school subj.; 52- Big bash; 53- Hard, in Havana; 55- “The Time Machine” race; 56- Edges; 57- Internet writing system that popularized “pwn3d” and “n00b”; 59- Proof letters; 60- Directional ending; Crossword from bestcrosswords.com, Sudoku from sudoku-puzzles.net


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Sports

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Devils beat the Canadians, The Jets media circus then get crushed by Sabres The game had a some controversy, as rookie coach John MacLean benched Sports Writer 100 million dollar superstar, Ilya he Devils needed to come up Kovalchuk, for undisclosed reasons. “That’s between him and I,” said with some sort of an answer for their poor game so far this MacLean. “That was my decision.” All the resting and benching season, as they met the Mondid not help the Devils, as they were treal Canadiens on Thursday. Martin Brodeur made 29 saves crushed by the Sabres, 6-1. Brodeur’s for his 112th career shutout, and Dev- substitute in goal, Johan Hedberg, had an awful night, letting in 4 goals on 13 shots. MacLean took all the blame for the loss, “I take full responsibility for all the decisions that I make.” The Devils then went to Madison Square Garden to face their Atlantic division rivals, the New York Rangers. Brodeur was back to start, but this time he could not stop the puck from going in the net. Mike Rozsival and Ryan Callahan scored second-period goals to give New York their third straight win. Kovalchuk, who was back in the lineup after being benched previously, scored a goal to cut the lead to 2-1. The Devils put up a fight in the last few minutes of The Devils were again beat-up by another the game, but the Rangers came team away with the win. Final score: ils center Jason Arnott had a goal and Rangers 3, Devils 1. So far, both Devils’ wins came an assist that led the team to a 3-0 win. Devils seemed to control the from shutouts, which means they will game from the beginning, with defense have to depend on Brodeur and the defense to have a chance of making it paving the way to the win. “It seems like it so far but to the playoffs this season. However, if hopefully we’ll get different kinds of Brodeur doesn’t get his save percentage wins eventually because it’ll be tough up (so far, it’s been traveling between to do that,” Brodeur said. “It’s been .876 and .901), the team might not a rocky start but on the road the last earn a trip there after all. The Devils will play the San Jose few games with Buffalo and here in Montreal, it’s nice to have shutouts but Sharks on Wednesday. definitely wins is what we’re looking for.” The Devils tried to prove that they could win without Brodeur, by giving the 38 year old veteran a rest while hosting the Buffalo Sabres on Saturday. By Yaroslav Imshenetsky

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By Camilo Brun

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Sports Editor

week off for the Jets could mean a mess of things. Rex Ryan could present the media with another outlandish statement. The Jets’ receiving core could go down with another questionable Code of Conduct Violation. Or in tackle Damien Woody’s case, time to give back to the community. Damien Woody and wife, Nicole, presented the John F. Kennedy School in Newark, with $1,000 in donations. JFK is a Title 1 special needs school, which educates 140 students from the ages of 12 to 21. “We love to give back,” Nicole said, “We love being here with the Jets because we love New Jersey, we love the people here, the sense of community and pride that people take in their community.” The experience was a bit overwhelming for the Woody’s, who aside from having six children of their own, constantly interact with the communities children. The project the Woody’s were a part of is a national advocacy campaign called, “A Day Made Better,”” which helped donate a total $1 million to 100,000 schools. Both Damien and Nicole

were caught off guard from the mass of support from students and administrators. During that time both Woody members were chatted up about the Jets’ week eight encounter with the Green Bay Packers. “Football is 24/7,” Damien said, “But it was great to interact with the kids and they really appreciated us coming out here.”

On The Downside: Brett Favre is the most criticized man in the National Football League. However, despite the criticism truth has finally arisen in his Jenn Sterger scandal. The ex-Jets quarterback and ex-Jets TV hostess have both been on the defensive on the current NFL investigation regarding lewd pictures and “questionable” voicemails. In a statement released by the NFL Sunday night, the review of the Favre case has not come to any other revelation, other than the following: Favre has admitted to the voicemails sent to Sterger. Aside from that Brett claims all other questions can be directed to the NFL’s investigation. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello stated, “Our issue here is the conduct of our employees and the question of whether this is a case of sexual harassment.” Whether or not it does become a case of sexual harassment, the following is clear: the Jets organization can try its best to keep its image clean. But, incidents like those of Farve and Edwards can only continue to reinforce the fact that control is missing within the Jets Organization.

Woody poses with wife, Nicole after event.


R-N Sports

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Cross-country team prepares for the NJAC Tournament

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By Camilo Brun Sports Editor

he runners of the cross-country team have been preparing for the next two weeks like their lives depend on it. After following a huge win over Medgar Evers in a duel meet on September 19th, the Rutgers Scarlet Raiders are preparing for the New Jersey Athletic Conference Tournament. Preparations for the next two weeks have resulted in a decrease in their weekly mileage, as well as their practice intensity. “About this time we start to cut down our regular running from 80 miles a week to about 50,” said senior runner Taqueer Qazi, “That way when we get to the NJAC’s and regional’s we’re peeking running-wise.”

Qazi leads the Scarlet charge towards the NJAC Tournament

Being one of the few teams guaranteed a spot in the NJAC tournament, the runners of the Cross

Country team have been ready for it since the season began. Aside from being one of the only teams without captains, they are also one of the only teams to not have a top place within the NJAC. However, despite their lack of experience or leadership assistant coach Kevin Scola believes the team can succeed. “We don’t have a captain, but Taqueer is certainly one of the leaders. He pulls the guys together and keeps them motivated. We should make a lot of noise in the NJAC.” What makes this team so interesting is not only their commitment to each other, but to a sport that provides no accolades. “People don’t see the work we do. They don’t see how hard we work,” Qazi said, “You’re never recognized in anything, but the running community. You run for your coach, your teammates, and yourself.” Amazingly, the men’s crosscountry team is only four years old. Their growth is not inexplicable, surprising, or something to be in awe of. In fact, you could say it was pleasantly calculated. “We’re getting interest from kids who might be better than Taqueer was when he was in high school,” Scola said, “And it’s not surprising, I mean we expected our team to grow at this rate.” As they prepare, the cross-country team goes completely unnoticed, running through the streets of Newark like any other group of citizens. Their mission maybe altogether different: prove themselves to a student body that can’t even see their efforts. Head coach Juan Edney, has been watching their progression since day one, and his excitement is more than palpable, it’s infectious. “The work they did in the summer really paid off,” said Edney, “The end of the season should be some of the most interesting running we’ll have done all season.” This team is based on drive, hard work, and a determination to please each other. As they approach the NJAC Tournament on September 30th , there is only one thing our student body can expect: Pure Effort.

October 27, 2010

Life after sports: An athlete’s crossroads By Diego Ortiz

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Editor-in-Chief

or most athletes, senior year of high school is when they hang up their cleats, spikes or sneakers. A select few are privileged to continue their careers at the college level where the caliber of competition, as well as the commitment to the team, increases. And then, of course, there is that elite bunch that has the skills and passion to take their abilities to the professional ranks where, unlike in college, athletes can earn a living playing the game they love. However, since it is rare for Division III athletes to make the transition to the “big leagues,” the bright lights of Alumni field and the Golden Dome is where most Scarlet Raiders say goodbye to their athletic careers. Jon Keller is trying to buck that trend. As a member of R-N’s former Division I Men’s Volleyball team, he hopes to take his career to the next

level. “My last game at R-N was pretty emotional,” Keller said. “I was saddened and excited at the same time.” Keller was sad to leave his teammates, but excited to pursue playing volleyball professionally overseas. “My goal is to play in a pro league in Puerto Rico this May to get my name out there,” he said. “From there I will go to Europe in September. I am willing to go anywhere that this

sport can take me: Spain, Hungary, Bulgaria. All of those countries have indoor leagues.” Though he knows that most teams pay only modest salaries and provide few amenities, like transportation and lodging, Keller says he is ready to go and see what opportunities may come along. “If it turns into a career, that would be unbelievable,” he says, “but the way I look at it is that I’ll do it for a couple of years as a way to ‘delay the real world’ and get to play the sport I love.” If it doesn’t work out, Keller plans on pursuing career in journalism or coaching volleyball at the college level. He hopes to one day be a head coach. Until he leaves for Puerto Rico, Keller will continue to train every day and he plans on playing as much volleyball as he can. This weekend, his team of high school friends and former college players, won first-place in a tournament in his home state of Pennsylvania. For Eniola Honsberger, who played Women’s basketball at R-N for four years, Rutgers was where she met her future husband. “Playing at Rutgers was the best experience of my life so far,” she said. “My teammates became my family and when I got married 4 of them were my bridesmaids.” Honsberger, who originally came to R-N with the thought of transferring out, says she fell in love with the campus and the diversity. “Originally, I didn’t want to be here,” she said, “but now I miss it, especially living with my friends.” Honsberger is now head women’s basketball coach for Berkeley College in West Paterson. She also works in her former school district as a test coordinator at Parsippany High school, preparing students for the NJ State High School Proficiency Assessment (HSPA). “I am still a die-hard R-N fan,” she said. Honsbeger plans on coming back to R-N for a Masters in Administration. Both of these athletes prove that there is life after college sports.


Rutgers Observer, October 27, 2010