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THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF RUTGERS-NEWARK

December 8, 2010

Final exam schedule on page 6

NEWS

Bed bug update By Joshua Hoyos

A R-N professor promoted to Vice Chancellor of Research p. 2

OPINION

The top three winnders of Rutgers-Newark’s First-Year Idol: Mercedes Glover, Nalie Jo, Rebeccah Sampson. Photo by Jane Cho and Anar Sheth.

First-Year Idol: freshmen show they have talent By Jane Cho and Anar Sheth

The post 9/11 G.I. Bill not a sure way to cover tuition. p. 4

LIFE & LEISURE

I love the 90s: A review of childhood pop culture p. 7

SPORTS

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Contributors

s the Student Life and Leadership Council rounded up it’s top six contestants, the first ever First-Year Idol was redeemed a success. On Tuesday, Nov. 30, RutgersNewark students gathered at the Paul Robeson Campus Center for a night filled with entertainment. While anticipating the night’s performances, the excited audience was occupied with DJ’ing, raffle prizes, t-shirt giveaways and refreshments. As the competition kicked off, the first-year participants portrayed diversity through their unique talents. The three judges, Cherae Boyce, Jason Khurdan, and Andre Keith, critiqued the performances,

which consisted of dancing, playing an instrument, and singing. “I enjoyed seeing all my friends on stage putting in their best efforts!” said Roxanne Hall, one member in the crowd. “All of the performers were great.” After the contestants performed their talents, the crowd voted for their favorite performer as the judges deliberated on their top three winners. Combining both the crowd and the judge’s decisions, the results were the following: Rebeccah Sampson placing first with singing “King of Anything,” by Sara Bareilles. Nalie Jo, who came in second, also performed a song, and Mercedes Glover finished in third showing the audience a mix of her energetic dance moves.

Staff writer

ccording to information provided by RutgersNewark health services, there have been no new visits by students in regards to the bed bug scare on campus. In addition, Chancellor Steven Diner expressed his limited knowledge of the bed bug issue. Evelyn Ambrose, Senior Nurse Practitioner at R-N Health Services states that there have been no new cases of bites but one student with a previous case has gone to Health Services. In emailed comments Ambrose says that one patient has come in “for another problem and as an aside said her room had been treated but she is still getting bites.” Diner stated, in an interview, during the week of the first publication of the reported cases of bed bugs three weeks ago, that he knew “very little” and that he had seen an email “a day or two ago and forwarded it to Kemil [Dawkins].” Dawkins serves as the Executive Vice Chancellor of Administration. Diner added that as chancellor, he is not able to solve every problem in the university. “The chancellor can’t deal with every situation on campus,” Diner said. “However, if there is a problem, we have to address it.” Ambrose wanted to emphasize that bed bugs cannot fly, and are oval shaped.

Although bed bug have wings, they do not fly.

Printing cap still an issue: Students divided by printing costs

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By Monica De Leon Layout Design Editor

n August before the Fall 2010 semester began, Rutgers sent out an e-mail to students on the new printing limit that would take effect. Students would be allotted a $30 maximum for printing, and would have to pay out of pocket after exceeding their limits. Many students complained about the new limit, stating that with the additional fees included on the tuition bill, they weren’t getting their money’s worth of what they needed. The university reasoned that 80% of the students wouldn’t even use the full $30. “I used to print a lot,” said Peter Yeung, 22, a biology major. “I stopped because I’m afraid I’m goScarlet Raider ing to go over my limit.” The university implemented the basketball undefeated limit as part of their Printing Conserto start the season vation Program. p. 12 At the end of the semester, many

students haven’t used their full $30 budget. For a lot of students, their budget is still somewhere around the full amount. Some students don’t like the limit simply because they don’t use that much printing. “I print three or four times a semester, if that,” said Joel Cepeda,

“I stopped [printing] because I’m afraid I’m going to go over my limit.” - Peter Yeung, 22

23, a criminal justice major. “I have $29.32 left in my account.” Some students claim that whatever’s left of the unused budget should carry over to the following semester, while others complain that they need more in their limit.

“I have thirty cents left in my budget,” said Savira Ravianne, 19, a business major. “I used to take advantage and print out a tuition’s worth, but sadly I can’t do that anymore.” The printing budget was imposed so that students wouldn’t waste paper on extra copies or incorrect printouts. But for students like Ravianne, it’s problem because she uses the printing for all of her paper work and school work. “It’s easier to print at school,” Ravianne said. “But now I feel restricted.” As the semester comes to an end, the first step of Rutgers’ go green movement starts to show results, as the conservation has reduced a lot of wasted printing. “I tried to save printing in case I needed to print something important,” said Yeung. “So I ended up not printing that much this semester.”


News

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News briefs

ix people were shot throughout the city in five separate incidents between Friday evening and Saturday morning. All of the victims are believed to be male, according to law enforcement officials, and all were transported to University Hospital for treatment. All six survived, and one is in critical condition.

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n R-N team placed fourth in the national finals of a Federal Reserve competition after placing first at the regional finals NYC on Nov. 12. The five-student team fielded by the Economic Department represented the New York Federal Reserve District at the national finals in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 30. Congratulations to Victor Castaneda, Lakshya Aeri, Gassia Assadourian, Sher Singh, Henry M. Ruiz and team advisor John Graham.

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ewark’s schools have satisfied the legal prerequisites for more autonomy, bringing it closer to ending 15 years of state control. The district passed four of the five benchmarks under the state’s monitoring system known as the Quality Single Accountability Continuum. Now the city’s schools must pass a detailed checklist of more than 100 indicators in five areas.

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he first NJ bear hunt in five years began earlier this week amid protests and lawsuits. State officials estimate there are 3,400 bears in New Jersey. They anticipate the hunt will remove 300 to 400 animals across the seven counties it will be held in. Around 7,000 permits have been awarded for the hunt, up from 5,000 in 2005.

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fter a 4-8 season, Rutgers Football coach Greg Schiano said, “there will be no knee-jerk reactions.” He also said that he will speak to former starting quarterback, Tom Savage, about his future at the university. Schiano is 59-63 overall (24-45 in Big East play) for his 10 years.

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37-year-old gas station attendant was shot in the chest on Sunday night during a robbery in Bayonne. He is currently in stable condition at the Jersey City Medical Center. Police have released security camera footage showing the man being robbed and shot. Investigators are hoping witnesses or others with information about the crime will call the confidential tip line at (877) 900-8477.

CHAMPION

Rebeccah Sampson, winner of Student Life and Leadership Council’s First Year Idol talent contest.

December 8, 2010

Research is on the rise Environmental Sciences chair becomes new Vice Chancellor of Research

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By Allison Baldwin News editor

nvironmental Science professor and chair, Alexander Gates is probably the only professor at Rutgers-Newark who tells students not to reach their goals. “You should never reach your goals,” Gates said. “You should always try to reach higher.” Now, with his new job as the Vice Chancellor for Research, Gates plans to do just that. “I see the job as a big opportunity to change the perspective of the Newark campus,” Gates said. “I was s u r p r i s e d when the other administrators offered me the job, because I had no aspirations to go into administration. I simply wanted to remain in this department, fixing our current science program.” In his new position, effective Jan. 2, 2011, Gates will be in charge of the grants office, where he will work with faculty to help them gain external funding for programs. In addition, he will also aid in increasing research opportunities for undergraduate students. “I want to help the faculty gain, and I encourage them to seek out as much external funding as possible,” Gates said. He adds that he is looking for anyone who has a good idea and that he will listen. “I see it this way,” Gates began. “Rutgers is one of four major research universities in New Jersey. There is Rutgers-Newark, Rutgers-New

Brunswick, NJIT and Princeton. We should use that to our advantage and shoot for the best.” Gates also said that the faculty and students at Rutgers should be taking advantage of it’s location for research purposes. “Rutgers-Newark is not recognized for what it’s worth,” Gates said. “Being a research university is a different grade. We have the chance to bring that status up, to make connections, to take advantage of the

location. We will pass the status of NJIT right away.We may never pass the status of Rutgers-New Brunswick and Princeton, but we should try.” Gates admits, however, that he had mixed feelings about taking the position. “I am not sure if I can make changes, but the people who hired me thought that because I did it for the [Environmental Science department] maybe I could do it for the entire campus,” he said. Gates, who has been at R-N for 23 years, first arrived in 1987, after attending Stony Brook College on Long Island where he majored in Geology.

In 1981, he obtained a masters degree in Geology from Virginia Tech, and then worked for Chevron USA for two years, where he helped look for oil in New Orleans. Then in 1983, Gates to returned to Virginia Tech and got his PH.D in Geological Sciences. Gates focuses his research on fault lines. “I applied for 20 or 30 jobs, all over the world,” said Gates. “I had two or three job offers that year and Rutgers-Newark seemed like the best fit. It was a research university. I really wanted to be involved in higher level research, and it was close to my family.” Since his time at R-N, Gates has taken the environmental sciences program from what he calls “traditional” to a department that studies “higher environmental things.” Gates says that the department used to be more about studying rocks and minerals and the history of geology, and then he took it and tried to focus more on studying air, soil and water pollution. Gates also worked with the Newark Museum to set up the “Dynamic Earth” exhibit and hopes to create closer connections with them in the future. He says the museum is a great educational resource that the school should use more. Gates hopes to bring more positive changes to R-N through his new position as Vice Chancellor of Research. “I want to do the best I can for Rutgers,” Gates said. “I want students and faculty to be proud to be here. When you have good faculty, students have more opportunities, and when you give students good research opportunities they are proud to be here.” However, Gates says that if he doesn’t make positive changes, he will go back to teaching. “If I am not doing something that makes a difference, I don’t want to do it,” he said. “I don’t do things small.”

Professor wins award for neuroscience research negative. The second part is about how those values influence decisionmaking and behavior. The third part is about how emotions and desires are regulated to agree with the decision. Further research in this field ow can your desire to snack on unhealthy foods could help simple issues like making be controlled? Or that diets more tolerable to stopping longing to get an extra cup difficult drug addictions. The lab will be getting a new of coffee? Or maybe even the need to have nicotine coursing through your body? Assistant Professor Mauricio Delgado won the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers while researching the answer to that question. The award program was created to support the achievements, as well as nurture independent researching careers, of young scientists and engineers showing high levels of potential in their field. The award also highlights the importance of science and technology to the magnetic resonance government as well as the nation’s functional imaging (fMRI) sometime during the future. Delgado’s research, funded by Spring or Summer 2011 semester to a grant given by the National Institute help with the research. The fMRI is on Drug Abuse, consists of three parts. a machine that looks at how the brain The first part is about how the brain functions while a task is being done. Born in Sao Paulo, Brazil, picks up values on the environment. Delgado received his Bachelor of For example, pizza might be a positive value to someone, while Science degree, in neuroscience, Wesleyan University in getting fat from pizza might be from By Zarna Patel STAFF WRITER

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Connecticut. His doctoral degree, also in neuroscience, from the University of Pittsburgh, and his post-doctoral fellow at New York University. He has been the head of Social and Affective Neuroscience laboratory at RutgersNewark for five years. Delgado’s inspiration to partake in this research was everyday life. “I was always curious on why something was viewed as a reward” says Delgado “It was something we could relate to everyday. We develop these emotions and it’s interesting to see how these emotions effect people differently”. But since this is only the beginning of Delgado’s research, there is still a long way to go. “There’s still a lot of work to do” says Delgado “I think it’ll be exciting to see if this translates into decision making and whether we can control stress as well as emotions.” For more information on Delgado’s neuroscience research visit http://psychology.rutgers.edu/ neuroscience/index.html


News

december 8, 2010

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Director’s Project a showcases student directors

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By Steven Albano Contributor

he Directors’ Project 2010” is a program coordinated by Louis Wells and features short, one act student directed plays. The cast and stagehands were also all students attending Rutgers and NJIT. They have been rehearsing for about a month and these performances are the culmination of all their hard work and dedication. The night was composed of seven different one act plays chosen by their specific director. “Missed Connections” by Samuel Brett Williams, directed by Krystal Teabout was the first performance and started out with an overwhelming but believable nerd, Ameer Muhammad, walking into a restaurant with this beautiful woman, Brittany Patterson. The set design was very minimalistic, as were all the plays, so there was really nothing to distract from the performances. These two actors played off each other incredibly well and perfectly timed their lines to match up with the audiences’ laughter. This performance was consistently hilarious. “Sure Thing” by David Ives followed and this was my favorite performance of the night. Bryan Hamilton and Monica Salermo worked so well together. It was quick, eccentric, and energized. It had a very similar setup to “Missed Connections” taking place in a café instead of a restaurant, so it also had a very similar mood, too. I felt that the director of this act, Eric Campos, understood his material the best and delivered completely. Mark Borkowski’s “Don’t Listen To What It Sounds Like” featured a neurotic brother, Roberto Valentin, and his ex-neurotic sister, Dana Kemp. The lighting of this play was slightly darker than the previous ones, and it reflected the material nicely. However, I felt that the director, Jazmyn Arroyo, missed the mark on what the piece meant.

There seemed to be something off with the performances and both actors seemed to be on a different wavelength regarding the material. It was not as emotionally cohesive as I wanted it to be. Director Scott Kesselman chose “Let Us Go Out into the Starry Night” by John Patrick Shanley as his piece. The play started off fine with a woman, Hoda Abdullah, having a hilarious conversation with a paper replica of a person. Eventually she is drawn to this man, Adrian Garcia, across the room and pours water on herself to have an excuse to go over him. The accent of the man was almost too hard to understand for me, and I felt that took away from the performance. There is a moment

where the director had all the panels of the room they were in to open up to a beautiful blue night sky, and while I do not think it saved the performance that movement definitely redeemed it. “Eukiah” by Lanford Wilson and directed by Jon Noto was the most polarizing play for me. It started off with an entire black stage and having Butch, played by Randy Cordero, pushing these panels apart to create the most aesthetically pleasing moment of the night: his silhouette outlined by these bright orange colors. Then he closed the door panels and the stage went into almost complete darkness. While I understand the dramatic nature of using almost no lighting, I feel that the director’s choice ultimately failed because it dis-

tracted me from the actor’s really strong opening monologue. “Foul Territory” by Craig Wright opens with Allegra Hoffmaster and Nilesh Parikh as two friends at a baseball game. After some really witty and playful banter, we hear the crack of a baseball and immediately the announcer, Emanuel Vizzotti, who is standing stage right of the friends, holds up mini-baseball and nonchalantly walks over to the man and throws it at his face. This repeats over the course of the play, and director Shawn Banerjee made it so that each time was more hilarious than the previous. It grew more and more intense and comical with each moment but the actors never lost their ground in reality. John Patrick Shanley’s “Lonely Impulse of Delight” was directed by Lioniemar Reyes. This play had one friend take another friend to Central Park to try and find his mermaid lover. While this was not my favorite play, I felt this one was the best acted. The two actors, Westmore Bowman and Antonio Araujo could have been best friends for their entire lives, and I really believed everything they said. The set also was the most promising of the night and really made me believe that it took place in Central Park. I felt the director made everything work together in a really cohesive manner to reflect her vision. Ultimately, I felt that “The Directors’ Project 2010” was a complete success. While I may not have thoroughly enjoyed every single performance, I saw that some directors took risks with their pieces and definitely will learn from them. I look forward to next year’s event, where I can see more rising stars at Rutgers and NJIT direct for the first time.


Opinions

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December 8, 2010

Letter to the Editor:

THE OBSERVER OBSERVER THE The Voice of Rutgers-Newark Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Paul Robeson Campus Center 350 Dr. Martin Luther King, Blvd. Newark, New Jersey 07102-1898 Main office: (973) 353-5023

Editor-in-Chief Diego M. Ortiz Editor-in-Chief Diego M. Ortiz managing editor Thomas Hahn managing editor Thomas Hahn LAYOUT DESIGN Editor Monica DeEditor Leon LAYOUT DESIGN Monica De Leon news editor Allison news Baldwin editor Allison Baldwin sports editor Camilo Brun sports editor Camilo Brun opinions editor Halema Wali opinion editor Halema Wali life & Leisure editor Caroline McLaughlin life & Leisure editor Caroline McLaughlin multiMedia Editor Christian Torres-Rossi multiMedia Editor Christian Torres-Rossi business manager Omar manager Khan business Omar Khan staff writers Laquay Weekes Patricia staffSerrantonio writers Bimpe Fageyimbo Laquay Weekes Farbod Rajaei Calvin Okwuego Joshua Hoyos Mauricio Moreno James Rountree Ramona Alcantara Elizabeth Rodriguez Hassan Muhammad Yaroslav Imshenetsky Frances Perez Enzo Domingo Tricia Serrantonio Naina Kamath Breanne McCarthy Shashwat Dave Bimpe Fageyimbo Euney Kim Rodolfo Cardenas Kelvin Pau Farbod Rajai Zarna Patel Joshua Hoyos Gabriela Barkho Alvin Anarah Contributors Desiree Hadley Calvin I. Okwuego advisor Contributors George Garneau Steven Albano advisor Letters toGarneau the editor George and Opinions: observercopy@ Letters to the editor gmail.com and Opinions: observeropinions@ News desk: gmail.com observernews@ gmail.com News desk: observernews@ To advertise with gmail.com The Observer please contact To advertise with Omar Khan The Observer pleaseat contact observerbiz@ Omar Khan gmail.com at observerbiz@ gmail.com

The views expressed in the Opinion with exThe goal ofsection, The Observer editoriception of the main Editoal pages is to present the diversity rial, do not reflect of views of allnecessarily the R-N communithe views of The Observer. ty, especially the students whose student fees support this newspaper, on timely and relevant topics. Letters (50-100 words) and essays (600-800 words) are accepted for publication at the discretion of the editor and/or his/ her designees. Unsolicited manuscripts are not returned. Editors reserve the right to edit for space and clarity.

In defense of feminism

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he December 1st issue of The Observer included in its opinion section an article titled “The Faults of Feminism” in which the author, Naina Kamath, expressed her frustration with Feminism. I agree with Ms. Kamath’s definition of equality; however I believe she has been misinformed about the definition of feminism. Yes, feminists seek equality, which is to be treated “same as” men; however, Ms. Kamath failed to acknowledge that although men and women (in the US and Europe) are given similar opportunities, we are still not equal. Ms. Kamath gave her opinion; I am giving you the facts. The truth is that in the US women are not “getting more powerful” than men. The Government Accountability Office presented a report in October 2010 to a House of Representatives committee; the report indicates that women managers earn 81 cents for every dollar that men made. This proves that women in the Unites States of America are still earning less than men. In addition to the gender pay gap, there is representation disparity in the US government. There are 57 men and

78 women in Congress; in the Senate, there are 18 women and 82 men. How can it be that in a country where women make up over 50.9 percent of the population, women in congress make up less than one third of all congressional representatives? Yes, in India, one third of the seats in parliament are held by women; however, there is still great level of discrimination against women at grassroots level. In India people still practice gender-selective abortion; in India there are 93 women for every 100 men. Although sex-selective abortions were outlawed in India over a decade ago, death toll of female fetuses continues to rise. The UN Human Rights Council reports that the illegal sex-selective abortion industry makes about $250 million a year in India. Last time I checked, that is not gender equality. In Germany, a country where over 50 percent of the population is female, only 20 percent of managers are women. Men occupy most “top positions” in research in Germany; women professors currently represent 9.8 per cent of the total number, and women occupy only 5.1 per cent of the top jobs in research institutes. Although these

numbers focus on the male oriented research work culture, it serves as a reflection of the gender oriented division of labor, due in part to the belief that women’s role is limited to the three Ks, “Kirche, Kueche, Kinder” (church, kitchen, children.) It is evident that women in the United States and around the world are still not equal to men, and that something must be done to reduce the gender gap. I am a proud feminist; I believe that men and women are equally capable of achieving the same goals. I am also aware of the immense progress women have made in this country and in other developed countries around the world; but I believe a lot more is still needed. I am not content with gender inequality of any kind, and neither should any other human being. Men and women are equal, and those so-called feminists that Ms. Kammath is referring to –the ones that say that men are inferior to women—are just as sexists as those who believe that women are not equal to men. No one should be treated inferiorly due to their gender, whichever they may be. - Andrea N. Coronado

Veterans beware: Your tuition might be in jeopardy tion liaison officer that works on our campus. Or Gerald Massenburg, the driving force behind the veterans assoarine Corps Warrant Of- ciation on our campus. But, my warrant officer was right ficer Steve Burnside once told me, “hey Corporal in that the Veterans Administration Torres, let me tell you (VA) is not as helpful and as accomsomething, if you are planning on leaving the corps make sure you know everything about that G.I. bill before leaving us because after you are gone no one will be as helpful as us.” I was shocked that this 18 year veteran warrant officer would say such a thing, especially when I know Marines take care of each other no matter what? In a way, he was right and wrong. Here at Rutgers-Newark we have a great support team for veteran students who need modating as many veterans would like. professional guidance. In that sense my Case in point is my situation with the officer in charge was incorrect. There is expiration of my post 9/11 G.I. Bill. By the beginning of next semesa good support system in our school. I can’t think of anyone else to take good ter, I have only 301 days of tuition left. care of a veteran, such as Mrs. Marie What that means still remains unclear Diaz-Torres, our veterans administra- for me and possibly many other veterBy Christian Torres-Rossi Multimedia editor

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ans who are in the same situation. When I called the VA to figure out how much I am going to pay for next semester, I obtained three different answers. The first answer was that I should not worry about it, that the government would pay the entire bill for next semester. The second time I called, I was told that I would have to come up with a small percentage of the bill since I had only 301 days left. Finally, I thought that I needed to have a word with Mrs. Diaz-Torres to figure out this situation. Mrs. Diaz was a professional as always and did help me. She told me that it would be wise to get a student loan and have it just as a precautionary measure in case the government decides not to award me with full tuition. I hope the Veterans Administration makes sense of this situation, for it could damage not only my graduation date, but of countless other veteran students.

Budget cuts threaten our education

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By Halema Wali Opinions editor

ducation is the most important thing for an individual to acquire to gain knowledge and make something out of them-

selves. Young minds need room for growth and the education to feed it. Elementary school, middle school, and high school are all years of preparation for that first day of college. This is when the past thirteen years are put to the test in every aspect: study habits, writing skills, self-determination, etc. But what happens when the very institution you are supposed to learn and grow from is cutting the resources for that growth? What do you do? The prime example is right here

at Rutgers-Newark. A total of about $18.5 million in funding to the university has been cut as a result of the statewide budget cuts our wonderful New Jersey governor has planned to do. As a result, undergraduate students, meaning US, will have to pay more in tuition. The average tuition for a student is now $12,559. RU has canceled schedule pay raises and has frozen the salaries of 13,000 employees because of the severe financial crisis. With these pay freezes it is estimated that $30 million will be saved from all three campuses. Rutgers-Newark was able to save about $5 million from such freezes. That’s great that such compromise can occur between the teachers union and the university, but what are we sacrificing? When $100 million goes into a new football stadium, what

message is the university sending? Sure the main point of building such a lucrative stadium is to increase attendance and in turn increase revenue. But really? It seems as though the football team is getting the funding it wants, while educators are getting the cuts. College is the final step in gaining all the tools needed to become an active member of society. I sure hope that the millions we’re saving go into programs that will benefit us. After all, we will be the leaders and policy makers of the future. We need all the benefits of college to become the leaders. However, Gov. Chris Christie sure makes that hard when education is given substandard level of priority. Education is the key to development, no ifs or buts.

First semester as a freshman not so bad everyday, in a city nonetheless. Add on top of that, you leave home and are Staff Writer forced to live with complete strangers ’ve got to admit, like many people, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. I agree that college is stressful. I was nervous about going to colIt is not fun all the time, with lengthy lege. I saw myself like many of the papers to syllabi that have your entire freshman I led in high school as a semester planned out in front of you, Peer Leader. college is definitely a lot of work. I saw myself as a little kid who But at the same time is comes with was now entering an ocean, but unlike high school, this is one in which there many great experiences. From running are thousands of people to encounter into hundreds of people during orientation, to walking from one side of camBy Joshua Hoyos

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pus to another and being able to hear 3 or 4 different languages being spoken, college is fun. I have found my niche here at The Observer and have made friends. Though I cannot in anyway speak for the entire class of 2014, college is so far, well, college. A lot of work but shaping up to be a great ride.


Opinions

DECEMBER 8, 2010

Dorm cost differences: Unfair Upperclassmen may prefer to live in Woodward, U-Square because of lower prices By Naina Kamath staff writer

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any students would agree that living on campus is a big part of the university experience. Most students want to dorm to get that fun-filled ‘college life’. Partying every other night, being close to classes, and having easy anytime access to facilities such as the library or the gym are just a few of the advantages that come with being a ‘dormer’. Yet the prices of ‘dorming’ prevent most students from fulfilling this wish. With tuition itself draining out bank accounts, paying thousands of dollars for half a bedroom is often not a possibility, no matter what the benefits are. This is known by all, and it is accepted (most

often grudgingly, but that’s beside the point). However, what is not fair is the fact that upperclassmen have to pay more for their housing than freshmen. Whereas a double room in Woodward Hall for a freshman student costs $7,295 for the academic year, the same double room in University Square for returning and transfer students under the age of 21 costs a whopping $8,227. Talbott Apartments, for students over the age of 21, are slightly cheaper, but are still more than freshmen dorms at $7,401. The rationale behind this pricing is befuddling. Why should students who have been at RutgersNewark for a longer time be paying more for their room? If anything, a junior or a senior will have less money than an incoming

freshman, considering they’ve spent a longer time paying for term bills and whatnot. Upperclassmen can’t even choose which dorm to reside in; if you are not a freshman, it is mandatory to stay in the more expensive dorms. There are a few reasons for the price difference that should be brought into light. The first is that freshmen may pay less for their rooms because a meal plan is mandatory. With the ‘Scarlet Plan’, the cheapest meal plan available, another $998 is added onto housing costs every semester. It is not compulsory, however, for returning and transfer students to purchase a meal plan, which can save them up to $2,095 a semester. There is also the notion of the freshman dorms being ‘dry dorms’, meaning that no alcoholic beverages are allowed to

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video at therutgersobserver.com

Scarlet Radar compiled by Christian Torres-Rossi

be consumed within them. In essence, returning and transfer students above the age of 21 are paying more for their rooms in exchange for the right to drink - this can be seen as good or bad, depending on how naughty or nice you are! There may be some reasons to the price difference, but it can still be seen as unfair. The right to choose which dorm to reside in should be up to the student; after all, we are the ones who know our own available funds the best, right? Dorm assignments should not be something Clara Rodriguez predetermined by the university simply based Junior, Psychology on our advancement in the “I don’t know how much I’ve spent. But I still don’t know college system; we may be wiser, but just because we’re older doesn’t mean we’re richer!

How much have of your printing stipend have you used and is it right that they charge us?

Santa Claus gives hope for all By Camilo Brun

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sports editor

llow me to reintroduce myself—Father Clause. So, you’ve asked for my thoughts on Santa clause… here they are. What’s worse, being an antidemocratic, sadistic, manic-depressive, pseudo-fascist, totalitarian capitalist? Or a legitimate beacon of hope for children—and adults—all over the world? Well if you’re like some people—check back to last week’s article entitled, “Unmasking Santa Claus: A Postmodern Perspective”— you’ll quickly realize that some people don’t actually live in the real world. They live in a larger than life, world dictated, anti-establishment world of grandeur. Fact of the matter is Santa Clause does more for children and adults than possibly any other “fictitious” character out there… I mean honestly, do you see the Easter Bunny out there ringing a bell attempting to collect donations for the Salvation Army? Nope—you don’t. This whole idea of the “holiday season,” puts everyone in a giving mood. So, go ahead believers—please continue to allow these dressed up fake Santa’s to give presents to families who can’t afford them. Heck, I’m even going to thank you for donating to all of the children’s toy drives—because that too is Santa’s spirit. Let’s start with the kids. Who is Santa Clause really for?

Children around the world wait for this mythical, even legendary, man to bring gifts when their hope may seem bleak. In the tough economic times we live in today, children may have a grasp on what America is going through--but their hope is uncontainable. Santa is the one who never lets them down, even if tough times have hit close to home. His spirit is larger than any opinion article could ever be—it’s the engine that keeps children smiling the night before the jolly old man comes rumbling down the chimney. And c’mon man, hope ain’t bad-- you probably voted for Obama. The history of Saint Nicholas, Father Christmas, Kris Kringle, or simply “Santa” might be justification enough to prove that hope is not crap, which regardless if you think it is “capitalistic bull,” or just normal run of the mill bull—Santa keeps the dream alive. According to poet, Baha’aist and activist Anis Mojgani, “Dreams are the fire that keeps a child alive.” So unless as a child you were devoid of hope—Santa has a place in everyone’s heart… And I mean everyone. Just because this holiday so happens to fall on Jesus’ birthday, it can still be celebrated as a secular event. Get a clue Napoleon. SIDE NOTE: Santa’s elves are easily the most recognizable part of Santa’s day. While you may be forced to believe that sweatshop workers are sub-human workers, they are actual people. Just like the elves. Elves get cookie breaks, gingerbread cookie breaks, hot chocolate and gingerbread cookie breaks

(and don’t forget the candy-cane breaks). If you really want to get into the semantics of the situation, you may wish that young, overworked, Asian children were treated like Santa’s little helpers. (Let me point out a massive flaw in last week’s argument – sweat shops are not relegated to just Asia). Will Aspe Again, get a clue Napoleon. Junior, Spanish and Portuguese Now for the adults. I was raised in a non-religious “I’ve spent $15, which is roughly 350 pages worth.” household, in fact when I turned ten my father offered me three main religious texts and said, “Choose for yourself.” However, Santa Clause was a major part of our house, as it is for so many people. As an adult I would like to keep the hope alive in my own children—the excitement of opening presents, the holiday songs, the lot of it. As for the children that are adults now. Well, those Salvation Army guys don’t just work for themselves. They’re not a self-employed guy out there making monMargaret Sanchez ey for themselves. Giving some change to a Santa Sophomore, Graphic Design does more than create that childhood “As a graphic design major I have to do a lot of nostalgia, it provides for underpriviprinting, so it doesn’t help. ” leged men and women. So when you’re out judging the naughty and nice list—you can’t. Santa giving gifts to the homeless or underprivileged might be the most God-like thing out there. So if you don’t think Santa is for everyone—think again. Especially you, anti-establishment, government conspiracy kid! Spread some cheer, dress up like Santa—and see kids smile.

Is age more than a number? By Gabriela Barkho STAFF WRITER

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ccording to a recent Askmen. com dating article, women have several reasons for dating older men as opposed to men their own age. These reasons vary from having a stable protector to a financially supportive partner while in a relationship. Even if the excuses seem irrelevant in today’s fast-paced, independent females filled society, they do hold enough value for women to still pursue this type of relationship. Relationships consisting of partners with a considerable age gap have been a subject of

debate over the years. The idea of collegeaged women and men dating partners much older than themselves has shown to trigger different opinions amongst this particular group. Both male and female students on campus have varied reactions to the thought of such relationships and how they may be perceived. While some females do not seem interested in the idea themselves, they don’t seem to find a problem with others going through it. “I’m for it as long as the two are happy. But at the same time, I wouldn’t do it myself,” replied biology major Vrunda Modi to whether society in general is acceping of young women dating

men much older than themselves. “I think the generation gap would effect the way each thinks. The relationship wouldn’t work in the long term,” said junior Krishna Patel when questioned if a relationship of such kind would function. On the other hand, when it comes to young men dating older women, a male reaction takes a surprising stand. When asked what he thinks of women dating older men as opposed to men dating older women, psychology major Alex Basile said, “Personally, I’m not one to cast judgement, they can do what they want. I find it weirder to see guys dating a substantially younger girl than the other way

Dan Digiorgio Senior, Spanish

around.” “I think is fair to have a limit so people When it comes to the general idea of the success don’t go overboard printing unnecessary stuff.” of relationships amongst couples with a large age difference, both male and female reactions seem to agree that it would definitely effect its chances. “The wider the age gap will definitely give ways to hurdles the relationship has to overcome. The further apart the two are in age, the less they’ll have to relate to each other in today’s fast paced world,” continued Basile. As much as the Nadia Zaben subject matter may be Junior, Biology controversial amongst the youth today, it seems that “We paid for tuition why do we need to have a limthere is a consensus of at ited amount? I don’t understand it, but so far I have least the acceptance of it. spent $10.”


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December 8, 2010

PAGE 7

Inside this section: 90s Nostalgia................................page 7 Reviews.....................................page 8 Creative Space and Comic.................page 9 Sudoku and Crossword....................page9

90s Nostalgia: A look at the new classic pop culture Writer misses Nicktoons glory days Terrific Toys By Naina Kamath

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STAFF WRITER

s college students, most of us were made in the nineties, a.k.a. a time when everything was better. Sure, we didn’t yet have the online obsession or the Facebook fever, but that’s only because we were too busy enjoying the superior cartoons that our decade had to offer! Cartoons on Nickelodeon, fondly known as “Nicktoons”, were at their prime in the nineties. Shows like Hey Arnold (my personal favorite), CatDog, Rocket Power and Rugrats reigned supreme and are, for many of us, great specimens to reminisce about. Yet name any of these glorious shows to a member of today’s youth and sadly, they will respond with a blank face. Whereas we could rejoice in the humorous cruelty of Helga shouting “Hey football head!” across the street, it seems as if these days Nickelodeon is simply spewing out random half-hearted attempts at catching & compelling young viewers. Gone are the days of the unique half-fish half-bone house; those were pushed aside to make room for Back at the Barnyard, Fanboy and Chum Chum (what?!), and an array of other names which no-one of our generation is familiar with. In my opinion, this is just a shame. A downright disappointment, something that deserves revolts and protests against Nickelodeon by all of us ‘old school’ Nicktoon lovers. However, while we may be suffering, it is the children of the twenty-first century who deserve the most remorse. They will not be able to wake up on snow days and switch on the television to watch a stream of good-quality cartoons. Oh no, they will be plagued with nonsensical images floating across the screen, derived out of the producer’s commercialism. Maybe the graphics of today’s toons are better and the characters’ movements are more fluid, but come on; this is about quality! The quality of individual stories, and the familiarity of being able to follow the lives of our favorite characters for years. Not simply to succumb to a few episodes of an animation before it is discontinued. Now if you will excuse me, I have an episode of SpongeBob SquarePants to indulge in; thankfully, it is one of the classic cartoons that has not yet died out!

Boybands dominate music memory By Monica De Leon

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LAYOUT DIRECTOR

hese days, girls cry for Justin Bieber and fight over which Jonas Brother they’d marry. No offense to those guys, but my heart will forever belong to AJ McLean from the Backstreet Boys. Or Justin Timberlake from *NSYNC. Growing up in the nineties was awesome. Even if pop music wasn’t exactly your thing, you couldn’t help but love it; boy bands were everywhere. If someone were to play “Quit Playing Games with My Heart” or “It’s Tearing up My Heart” I’m sure many would be able to still sing along. I was too young for the New Kids on the Block craze, but my pre-teen years were dominated by Backstreet Boys, *NYSNC, 98 Degrees, LFO, and other groups. Their music was sweet and cheesy at times but it had millions of girls, both young and old, wishing they could have a boyfriend like Nick Carter, Justin Timberlake, or JC Chasez. Their songs didn’t talk about meeting hot girls in clubs or alcohol, just how much they’d love us, or that they were better than the loser boyfriend we already had. And their heartbreak songs had us wanting to be that girl to ease their pain away. Boys can’t hide that they were into the hype

at some point. After all, boy bands of the nineties had the voice, the dance moves, and the look that girls loved. Boys definitely wanted that. I remember how my friends and I swooned over a singer wearing a tank with an open button down shirt with jeans. I’d probably laugh if I saw someone wearing that now, but back then it was the sexiest thing they could wear. In the nineties, boy bands made it cool to sing and dance, and took over the music world. Their music was definitely fun and catchy, but as we grew older, so did the singers. Sadly by the early 2000s, the fad of boy bands started to die down, but we’ll always have the music to look back on. On a final note, Backstreet Boys > *NSYNC.

Fashion icons, 90s teen style

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STAFF WRITER

very time the mentioning of 1990s television arises, our generation is like a magnet to that classic conversation of childhood greatness, and of course, nostalgia. As we bash current TV like Jake and Josh with their attempt to replace Kenan and Kel, and how miserably they failed at it, we have grown to resent these great shows for leaving us. Now, as I have searched and searched through 1990s TV, it became increasingly hard to choose which ladies I wanted to focus on in regards to 90s fashion. So first, I chose the cool girl who explained it all: Clarissa. Aside from her high ponytail and chatty ideas, Clarissa Darling, played by Melissa Joan Hart, had perfect cliche 90s style. It aired in 1991 and ran for three years of Sam (who also had a great style of jeans, tucked-in t-shirts, and plaid) climbing in and out of windows. Her young character, a teenage realist and know-it-all (who wrote a column too!), has worn army pants, floral skirts with patterned leggings, military boots, ripped jeans, excessive rings, bright tights, high socks, and scrunchies. Even her room was utterly covered with hats, bright posters, retro lamps, and a full closet. She’s the perfect

STAFF WRITER

Furby

If you don’t know what a Furby is, then shame on you. A cute, wide-eyed creature resembling a hamster/ owl combination, the Furby became a commonplace household pet during the 90s. Able to be fed, go to sleep and speak a mixture of ‘Furbish’ and English, this robotic toy was launched in 1998 and had peak sales until 2000. Furby, Baby Furby and Furby Friends took the market by storm, until kids realized that they were actually kind of creepy!

Beanie Baby

A collection of various stuffed animals, Beanie Babies were a collection trend as well as cute cuddly friends to play with. First introduced to the market in 1993, Beanie Babies continued to sell until 1999; but when they were first retracted from the market in ‘99, consumers still wanted them so badly that sales continued until 2000. From bears to frogs to pigs, Beanie Babies came in a wide variety of forms, shapes and colors.

Tamagotchi

Chic Stranger:

By Patricia Serrantonio

By Naina Kamath

transition from the 80s to 90s. I would name her one of the most accessorized and eclectic characters on 90s television. Going through Tia and Tamera, Fi from So Weird, and the fabulous pink power ranger, I couldn’t help but remember Kelly, the beauty on Saved By The Bell. Although the female audience was mostly watching Slater and Zack, I know that Kelly was quite the male attraction. With her long brunette locks and her bright white teeth, Kelly was always a favorite character. Played by Tiffani Amber Thiessen, Kelly was the cheerleader with red nails, big hair, high-waisted skirts and jeans, and keds. Even though Lisa sported massive chandelier earrings and bright suits, and Jessie rocked blazers, brooches, and light denim ensembles, Kelly definitely made a strong iconic spot for herself on the show with flowered mini-dresses and a smile. Although it was extremely hard to resist talking about my 90s fashion idols, like Cher and Ty (Clueless), the Spice Girls, and Vada Sultenfuss (My Girl), I promised to stay with television only. Therefore, I have found my final icon and heartthrob of the 90s: Topanga. She may have never been as wild and daring with her fashion, but she definitely received lots of attention. Topanga Lawrence (Matthews), was played by a girl named Danielle Fishel, something no one even acknowledged; for she will just always be Topanga. Whether is was her curves or her great flowing hair, all of her charm may even be just because of her great and memorable name. She was a cute hippie with long curly locks and flowing dresses who drew on her face with lipstick. She was the blue-eyed girlfriend of Cory Matthews and their romance was a quite original. She often wore skirts and jean vests with basic cardigans and white socks with boots. Either way, it was the charm and the laughter between the friends, and the life guidance from Mr. Feeny that makes Topanga and Boy Meets World a favorite. As the three characters have strutted their bright patterned and denim covered wardrobes, and all of us remember the female 90s style because of them. With some kudos to Dj Tanner and Blossom too, I must say that Clarissa, Kelly, and Topanga have been fashionably adorable throughout the their TV shows in the 90s. Who knows, remembering them may even evoke a revival in neon socks... Now that would be a good time.

This Japanese handheld pet took the American market by storm when it was released in 1996. Tamagotchi, which loosely translated means ‘egg watch’, allowed the creation and care of a pet, from its birth out of an egg to its everyday life. Kids had to feed, play, and medicate their pet, keeping it healthy to avoid an untimely death. Talk about teaching kids responsibility!

Lite-Brite

This unique toy allowed kids to create their own glowing images by placing colored plastic pegs into a black board, creating beautiful masterpieces for parents to admire. While they are still available in a slimmer, sleeker model, Lite-Brites reached their peak in the 90s (as did the rest of the best toys ever invented).

LEGO

LEGO definitely allowed children to experiment with architecture and their creative sides. Allowing youngsters to build vehicles, robots and buildings with colorful plastic blocks, LEGO became a popular toy that could occupy a kid for hours.


Life & Leisure

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December 8, 2010

REVIEWS Action-packed anime fun in ‘Sengoku Basara’ By Kelvin Pau

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STAFF WRITER

s your life missing something? Have you been feeling a lack of medieval warriors from Japan fighting each other with more weapons than would be possible in real life and hitting so hard they cause explosions that can be felt miles away in your life? Well if you answered yes to either, look no further, the anime Sengoku Basara is ready to fill this gaping hole. This series is set in the Sengoku Era of Japan, also known as the Warring States period. A quick glance at Wikipedia tells us that it was a time where Japan was split up into many different factions and there were almost constant wars as everyone tried to dominate each other. It featured such individuals you might have heard of if you know vaguely of Japanese culture, such as Miyamoto Musashi and Date Masamune (who totally claims copyright infringement for Sephiroth’s sword). Sengoku Basara also features many groups which war with each other, and some of the famous individuals from that period. And that’s pretty much where historical accuracy is drop-kicked and the punched into orbit. Excessively insane action mayhem abounds, where people duel wield huge spears, cause explosions large enough to send entire armies flying dozens of meters into the air, and give incredibly hammy performances about honor and courage and victory. The plot in both seasons is fairly simple. Evil conqueror is planning to take over all of Japan. Evil Conqueror is more successful than

most, due mostly to how absurdly powerful their general is. Therefore, the more powerful states band together and defeat the Evil Conqueror by sending their own absurdly overpowered generals against him. Really, it’s just to get from battle scene to battle scene, although it surprised me by being slightly more intelligent than it needed to be. Still, it’s not Shakespeare. You’ll come to know the main characters pretty well by about the third episode. Sanada Yukimura is the typical hot-blooded shonen hero who wants to prove himself in battle and duel-wields two huge spears and can create fire out of his fighting spirit. He looks up to (and occasionally gets into friendly punch ups with) his leader, Takeda Shingen, the ruler of the Takeda army, a huge man wielding an axe almost as large as himself who is so powerful he can annihilate armies by punching hard enough. He’s also very hammy but has the experience,

wisdom, and canniness that earns him his reputation as a great military leader. He also has a servant, Sarutobi Sasuke, a ninja who

is nothing like the one from Naruto. On the opposing side, Date Masamune is a cool guy who doesn’t afraid of anything and wields six swords, three in each hand and done in such a way that they extend from between his fingers like Wolverine’s claws. He also likes to prove himself in battle and occasionally breaks into spurts of English which should not be possible in the Sengoku period because the British have not arrived in Japan yet and nobody should be able to understand him besides. But that’s all irrelevant because otherwise he wouldn’t be able to motivate his troops in a hilarious and awesome manner by saying phrases like “PUT YOUR GUNS ON!” He also has an eyepatch and rides a horse which has various parts attached to it to make it look like a motorcycle for no reason except coolness and can project bolts of lightning from his body. There’s several more characters that I’m leaving out, such as the dude who fights using a boat anchor as a weapon, the gal who’s special attack involves a golden Gatling gun, and another guy who in the series has been turned into a GIANT ROBOT (the only Mecha in the medieval Japan!), but if you watch the series you’ll get to see this crazy cast yourself. Other than that, there’s not much to say. The battle are intense and packed with more action than most 80s movies, and almost as much explosions as a Michael Bay movie (but more interesting and less generic). If you’re looking for an anime which doesn’t seek to impress philosophy upon your mind or make you think too much, but has a lot of fun action and colorful characters, Sengoku Basara is what you need.

We love Dexter: Insight on Observer Creative Space: everyone’s favorite serial killer Around You

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By Nadia Kadri CONTRIBUTOR

f you have yet to catch Showtime’s fifth season of hit TV Show Dexter, then you are certainly missing out on a joyride of moral ambiguity and a twisted style of justice being served. Originally based on Jeff Lindsay’s novels (Darkly Dreaming Dexter) and running since 2006, Dexter Morgan has become the serial killer who is approved by a generous 2.3 - 2.5 million viewers in the recent month. Dexter is a simple fellow: he has gingerblonde hair, enjoys wearing khakis with polos and is a blood splatter analyst for Miami Metro Police. He is also an intelligent, avid vigilante who believes that justice should be served, with or without the courtroom. Instead of long walks on the beach, he enjoys long rides on his boat, the Slice of Life, while dumping garbage bags carefully chopped body parts of criminals, into the dark waters of the Miami bay. Despite his charisma and unmistakable sleuth, one cannot help but wonder why America is so captivated by a sociopath who gets thrills from taping his criminal victims to a table and then giving himself the honor of ending their lives? What is wrong with the

writers, actors and these 2 million people? What is exactly so appealing about a man who has mixed business with pleasure, using the advantages of the justice system to perfect his stalking, killing and cleaning up abilities? And if this is appealing, are Americans sick to enjoy this sicko? There are simple answers to such simple questions: Dexter delivers the package for viewers that crave the darkest of comedy, thrills/horror, knowledge and romance tied with a ribbon on it. The fact that graphic violence and moral questioning can continue for 5 seasons proves that Dexter is something different and is purely an amazing work of art. His frequent sides slightly mirror Hamlet’s allure and hesitation, except Dexter goes through with his plans and cleans up nicely. Dexter takes you on a roller coaster with just him as the Dark Passenger, hunting his prey and eventually succeeding, while you are glued to your sofa rooting for him to get away with one more kill. The fact of the matter is that, no, we are not sick, we simply enjoy creativity on different and extreme levels. Human beings are often attracted to things are out of the norm; but as a devoted follower who would kill for another season after this Sunday’s finale, I believe if loving Dexter Morgan is wrong, then America doesn’t want to be right.

‘Twisted Fantasy’: New album is Kanye’s redemption

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By Alvin Anarah STAFF WRITER

anye West is ready to celebrate again, but not in the way we’ve come to expect. My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy isn’t idly titled. It’s a sinister, orchestral, hugely grandiose affair that owes as much to the artist’s selfaggrandizing ego as to the voracious id that

would destroy it publicly. This is the record that we’ve been hearing about for months. Anyone that was “anybody” had leaked comments to the rest of us about how good it was – how ‘Ye was back and how this record cleared his name. A year ago, Kanye West was an exiled American name. Now, he has returned with a bang that has shaken the Hip-Hop world; G.O.O D Fridays has upped the benchmark for established artists everywhere. A princely narcissist among narcissists, West has never been afraid to marvel at, pose questions to, or generally bask in the inner folds of his psyche, but there was only one way to interpret the early message

sent by “Runaway.” He was calling himself an asshole, in the chorus of an epic, pianodriven, ear worming single. Fantasy is filled wit similar moments, as if West is working from a checklist of his faults, workaholic, commitment phobia, loose cannon, and substance abuser. On “Dark Fantasy”, the albums beyond luxe opener, he raps: “The plan was to drink until the pain’s over, but what’s worse; the pain or the hangover? / Fresh air, rolling down the window / Too many Urkels on your team, that’s why your wins-low.” See what he did there? Loss becomes win. My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy is a true testament to West’s magnificent ability to craft and create music. MBDTF is hisfifth studio record and may very well be his best. Just as you are leaving the feelings Dark Fantasy left you with, quickly you are thrown into “Gorgeous” featuring Kid Cudi and Raekwon who closes out the song. The beat is something to be felt with a guitar that evokes such raw comparisons to 1970’s rock. Other notable songs include the obvious releases, “So Appalled”, “Monster”, “Power” and of course the ensemble driven “All of the lights”. In each of West’s previous four albums, there was always one track, which stood out amongst the rest. College Dropout had “Through the wire”, Late Registration “Diamonds from Sierra Leone”, Graduation “Can’t tell me Nothing” etc. MBDTF is no different in its presentation of “Blame Game” featuring John Legend, easily the best song on the entire album. A gripping tale about lost love, again it plays with your emotions. At first it tells a terrible story of a fallen relationship but then rounds itself into a monologue from Chris Rock. Never has a complete 180-degree turn been so accepted. Chris Rock’s monologue not only completes the song, it adds to how great the song is. West’s affixation with the phoenix has to be a metaphor for his career. In one year his career flourished, died, and resurrected itself in a way that only a mythical creature (Phoenix) or a really talented musician can. My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy is a redemption album after a turbulent year of controversies to say the least.

Camillo Brun I. (Dream) You wear it well, my skin.And when you slip it off, I hear rain.Droplets match the pulsing in my temples.I’d sacrifice oceans to be waist deep in you.Rain,It’s the human symbol for wanting someone.I catch pieces of your skin on my tongue, like a child searches for one lucky drop.Poison precipitation takes complete control of every conscious piece of me.This is wicked witch water.Melt me under endless skies.Lights only shine, because our infinite lips conduct static want.If lust is really a sin, then God never walked this Earth.And his son never met you, And he never met me.My white suit hides my burnt rock skin.Baby, your holy water can’t cleanse this.But you will weather me, walk away with my molten core. My dark anti-matter innards go where lights exists. They destroy hope wherever it may float.But I won’t let them attack your colorful fingers.They need to be around the back of my neck, grabbing me, like the pebble your eyes will cast me away as.Hate my thoughts, as much as you may,But they keep the rain acidic,and me awake. II. (Awake) I am floating downstream, in a jungle.Treading murky night waters, during a storm, this present seems so unclear.The chances I make out intact are slim to none, but that’s something every bravado driven male chances. Within the peace of the water, I hear mermaids.Their voices are mercurybrilliant and bright, but poisonous to the touch.They question the blood within my veins. “Are you a man of travels or just one running away?”I believe I’m moving forward towards sun.”Are you a breaker of hearts, or disguising your own?”I believe I can be repaired, I’m moving forward towards the sun.”Are you a man at all?”I believe... I believe I am home,and the sun is waiting for me. And her light alone can restore the peace I’ve yet to find. III. (Return) You,Pat black sheets.Invite me into endless space so big our mouths move, but sound refuses to exist.Mouth to me, “Hell you don’t know what I can do,”and fear the other half of that thought,”and I don’t know what you’ll like.”If sex was an exorcism, I’d retch demons out of my heart. They’d pour out of me playing our list of songs to purge our lives too.Our bones would shake music, mouths would sit in silent company, and hands would sing:Latin, Italian, French, Spanish.Romance of the farthest kinds. Universes would see this eruption, and all known things would finally recognize our blue and green ball as the place were prayers end.And when the cameras stop rolling, and we think we’re safe.Baby, that when the real loving begins.

Want to see your writing in the next issue of the Observer? Email poems and short stories to observerlife @ gmail.com


Life & Leisure

December 8, 2010

PAGE 9

Observer Creative Space:

Regret- Ryan Vance

Sometimes I wake up and look around And I just wish I didn’t have to be who I am But that’s stupid, I’m just tryin’ to pretend I can’t deny I’m scared to face the problems that she sends Girls like boys who treat them like toys And we lie and we cheat and we hate and we steal Sometimes it makes me wonder, “Can anybody really feel?” Why does everybody think they have to act tough? Why does everyone think that their life is so rough? I hate to break this bad news to myself The friends I once held close have put me on the shelf I’m stuck behind an antique glass case A glass that preserves the horror on my face Girls say they want a nice boy and end up with a jerk I gave her everything I could but she only left me with a picture of her Smirking face, starring on the screen Her eyes so bright like headlights just burnin’ back at me

Childish Lessons- Naina Kamath

A baby who learns how to take his first steps, Wobbly and clumsy equals utter unstructure, Laughs, not cries, at his fallen attempts, The child knows how to make them his best. The toddler who learns how to button her clothes, May fiddle and dilly for hours on end, But persistence turns fumbling into light feathers And at last she will get one whole row in one go. A child who learns how to read his first book, Will stutter until there is more spit than

speak, But day after day he goes sentence by sentence, Until one fine day that book is complete. A teen who is trying to find her way farther, Her fruitless attempts result in cold tears, A day? A week? A month or more later, Before she knows it she’s sprinted the years. An elder looks back and can see not much farther, The memoirs of a child are black as the night, Wasted, the good ones, on old age and temper, Were not so much as worth the fight.

Dinosaur Comics

I never could deny, my sensitive feelings I long so badly to hold her, and find a deeper meaning But I was only 16, I just gotta let things roll Brush myself off and take things as they go But I’m not gonna sit around and let her hurt me Memories so deeply scaring make me not want to be Tossing and turning, I’m dying in my sleep Through the cracks in the walls her poison will seep Am I cursed to dream every night of only you? Is a love so young and complicated impossible to come true? Why are we forbidden, and why did I fall? I don’t know why I was so stupid, I’m poundin’ my head against the wall So I ask just one thing, and one thing alone Let this be the night that I finally take you home Baby hold my hand and in the fields we can soar And I will give you all my love you won’t need to ask for more I know you don’t wanna hear this But it’s commin’ from me My feelings are unlimited and my love is forever free I know I’m poisoned baby Yeah I know she made me ill But I promise I won’t leave you again And make you climb that hill You know I would ride so far just to be alone Were it not for this disease with you I would stay at home Never forget my name sweet heart, never forget Because you know that losing you is something I will always regret Always regret…

SUDOKU & CROSSWORD Rutgers Observer

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Across 1- Dadaist Jean; 4- Jewelled crown worn by women; 9- Start of something big?; 14- Beverage commonly drunk in England; 15- Tall tales; 16- Bellowing; 17- Occurring every eight years; 19- Leases; 20Lobster state; 21- Roof overhangs; 23- Small blemish; 24- Donkeys; 27Former Fords; 30- Congenital displacement of an organ; 32- Emeritus: Abbr.; 33- Propeller; 37- Woody vine; 39- Tiny plant part; 40- One playing alone; 42- ___ Gay; 43- River in SE Georgia; 44- It may be picked; 45- Competition; 48- Soviet news service; 50- Jagged parts; 51- Travel on water; 55- Wearies; 57- Prevention dose; 58- All together; 60- Toxemia; 64- Birthplace of Muhammad; 65- Eat away; 66- Golfer Ernie; 67- Brown and white Eurasian falcon; 68- Agnew’s old boss; 69Caustic stuff; Down 1- Hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, e.g.; 2- Summarize; 3- Courtyard; 4- Actress Daly; 5- Author Fleming; 6- Jackie’s second; 7- Genetic material; 8- Out, in bed; 9- Sportscaster Albert; 10- Staggering; 11Oblige; 12- Deserter; 13- Hosp. areas; 18- Med. specialty; 22- ___ see it...; 24- Area of 4840 square yards; 25- Editor’s mark; 26- Farm female; 28- Compact; 29- Declare; 30- Acclaim; 31- Alleviate; 33- Ain’t right?; 34- Ancient region of Asia Minor; 35- Rhizome; 36- Letters on a Cardinal’s cap; 38- Charged particle; 40- Had the mic, say; 41- Is in the red; 43- Madrid Mrs.; 46- Sugar suffix; 47- Unobserved; 49- From that time; 51- Dine; 52- First name in photography; 53- With no emotion; 54- Buy alternative; 56- Back; 57- Augury; 58- Early hrs.; 59- Large body of water; 61- Dernier ___; 62- Bagel topper; 63- “Much ___ About Nothing”, play by Shakespeare; Crossword from bestcrosswords.com, Sudoku from sudoku-puzzles.net


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MLB offseason (in a nutshell)

Giants surge over Redskins By Yaroslav Imshenetsky

G

Sports Writer

iants could’ve easily played without a quarterback in the game against Washington, as their two running backs and defensive players did all the dirty work and got New York an easy victory. Brandon Jacobs and Ahmad Bradshaw turned Sunday’s meeting with the Redskins into a rout, rushing for all four touchdowns and 200 yards in a 31-7 victory.

plays, too. And we did walk away with a pretty convincing win.” Things started well immediately for New York as Danny Ware went 37 yards with the opening kickoff. Jacobs, who finished with 103 yards on only eight carries, then shed two tacklers to surge down the left side for 39 yards. Moments later, he was dancing in the end zone following his TD run. Soon after, running mate Bradshaw scored on a 4-yard run for a 14-0 edge. Working behind a jumbled offensive line due to injuries, Bradshaw also had a 10-yard burst to make it 21-0 at halftime. Washington showed signs of hope, as London Fletcher intercepted Eli Manning’s underthrown pass in the end zone on first down from the Redskins 4, but couldn’t move the ball and was killed by turnovers.

Celebrates a sack against Donovan McNabb.

Donovan McNabb, who in the past had much success against the Giants as the Eagles QB, wasn’t a factor in his first appearance against the Giants as a Redskin. He Eli Manning went 15 of 25 with 161 yards. wasn’t helped by drops from his receivers and the tricky wind, which always has been a factor in the Meadowlands, “I guess you can say all of that hard work is finally whether in Giants Stadium or the new structure that opened paying off,” said the Giants DE Jason Pierre-Paul on his this year. The second half was ruled by the Big Blue defense, two sacks and defensive performance today, “Coaches tell me, ‘Just go out there and make plays.’ That is what I was which forced Redskins’ 6 turnovers. McNabb was sacked able to do today. We wanted to get after McNabb today. four times, threw two interceptions, and Washington lost And I think we did a really good job doing that. We brought four fumbles. Devin Thomas also blocked a punt. The Giants are now 8-4 and tied with Eagles for a lot of pressure and I felt we had a complete game today versus their run and pass.We were also able to force a lot of the first place in the NFC East. They will play the turnovers. And that is the name of our game. We would have Minnesota Vikings on Sunday. liked to have had the shutout, but they are going to make

Devils continue to struggle, drop two in thier division

By Camilo Brun

I

Sport Editor

f you’re currently a Met fan you can safely say, “Thank you Washington.” The temptation for the Mets to spend any more money on anything is currently off the table—for now. Sandy Alderson, general manager of the Mets, mocked the Nationals, saying, “It makes some of our contracts look pretty good. That’s a long time and a lot of money. I thought they were trying to reduce the deficit in Washington, D.C.” After the Nationals signed Jayson Werth to a seven-year, $126 million contract tons of eye brows were raised. In Alerson’s eyes a year of off-season savings may be a little smarter, than the luxurious move the National’s made (a move that will ultimately drive up salaries around the league). “We’ve actually signed two minorleague players, so officially I’m off the hook,” Alderson said. “I was trying to be a little bit humorous, but I don’t think you should expect us to come back with the high-profile trophy [player].” Signing the former World Series winner to a seven-year contract worth $18 million per year through 2017— would make him 38. If you’re talking baseball, only five players 38 or older had double-digit home runs in 2010: Jim Thome, Jorge Posada, Raul Ibanez, Jim Edmonds, and Chipper Jones. But Werth is nowhere near 38 yet, and he is walking into Washington D.C. without the bat of Adam Dunn, who signed with the White Sox. “They lost Adam Dunn and replaced him with Jayson Werth,” Alderson said. “I’m sure they feel they are better today than they were at the end of last season. They may be, but they did lose Adam Dunn, so that somewhat offsets the benefit they will get from Jayson.” The two main worries Alderson has right now are pitching and possibly ditching the $18.5 million owed to Carlos Beltran in the final year of his contract. But Alderson would not comment on the move. “At least at [the high-end] part of the market, we are interested onlookers,” Alderson said. The Phillies are still considered the team to be in the National League East, and the Braves upgraded with the acquisition of Dan Uggla from Florida—where the Mets stand in all of this is still up to them, and how strong their bankroll will be when the summer trade deadline rolls around next year.

T

Arnott scored the lone goal for the Devils. Jeter “We were just kind of looking around,” Devils forward he headlines, comments, and media sideshows can finally fter the win against their Atlantic division Patrik Elias said. “When you play a quick team like that, stop in New York. Their prodirivals, the Flyers, the Devils hoped to keep their they get on you. We were flat. That’s the bottom line.” Richard, who also had an assist, deflected a slap shot gal son Derek Jeter signed a winning streak going while hosting the Montreal from just inside the blue line by Chris Pronger, giving the three-year, $51 million contract with an Canadiens. interesting option created by the club Brian Gionta and Lars Eller scored in the first two Flyers a 3-2 lead at 3:37 of the final period. on the fourth year. Jeter will earn $17 million in 2011, 2012 and 2013. There is a player option for the fourth year that if Jeter picks up is worth $8 million. The guaranteed part of the deal includes a $3 million buyout if the option is nixed. According to SI.com’s Jon Heyman, the incentives are based on finishes in the MVP, Silver Slugger, and Gold Glove voting. If you say that Jeter isn’t worth the $17 million he will be paid in the next three to four years, you may be right. This isn’t completely unheard of with the Yankees, their most recent example may Jason Giambi who was grossly overpaid. By the time 2008 rolled around Giambi was just as useless to the Yankees as he was to the steroid debate (inflammatory statement, I know). Former teammates Scott Gomez, left, and Patrick Elias, right, led their teams in shots. If and when Jeter leaves the Yankees the options are wide open. It’ll The Devils pulled to 4-3 when Patrik Elias scored on a be next to impossible for the Florida minutes of the game, Carey Price made 27 saves and the power play with a two-man advantage with 44 seconds left. Marlins to pay Hanley Ramirez. Canadiens beat the Devils 5-1 on Thursday night. Don’t ask Ramirez though, his Montreal made New Jersey pay for the win the Carter added an empty-net goal with 2 seconds remaining. Ilya Kovalchuk and Travis Zajac also scored for the answer was entirely way too politically Canadiens let slip away earlier in the season. Canadiens had a perfect game featuring a lot of their power offense. Devils, and Jamie Langenbrunner had two assists. New correct. Althgouh the Marlins have Jersey has lost three of four, with the only win during that given him everything to surge as a Unlike the Devils, who were never in the contest. “They outplayed us in every aspect of the game,” New stretch coming in a 2-1 shootout against the Flyers last complete baseball player, but business Jersey coach John MacLean said. “They were prepared to Saturday. The Devils have also lost five straight on the road. is business—just ask Mark Teixeira. “It’s definitely a tough loss,” Devils coach MacLean “What can I say? In this game, play. We weren’t.” New Jersey had seemingly pulled out of its early season said. “We had a couple of breakdowns and we tried to get you never know. I think the Yankees organization’s got a lot of respect for funk, winning three of four coming in and four straight at back in it. It just was not enough.” The Devils are now 8-16-2, and the hopes of a playoff- (Jeter), like he does for the Yankees, home. This loss was a step in the wrong direction. Tom Pyatt, Scott Gomez and Benoit Pouliot also scored making miracle are fading away. Until the Devils get a good so they gonna get it done,” Ramirez to help Montreal rebound a night after blowing a two-goal, winning streak going, the Rock will continue to be filled said. “I think it’s good for Derek, end his career in the Yankee uniform. He third-period lead in a 4-3 home loss to Edmonton. Jason with boos from the fans in the red. deserves it.”

A

By Yaroslav Imshenetsky Staff Writer


R-N Sports

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Lady Raiders undefeated in Coach Morris’ tenth year By Camilo Brun

U

Sports Editor

ndefeated in seven games must mean something to the New Jersey Athletic Conference coaches poll. After being ranked fourth in the North Division of the NJAC, the Lady Raiders had plenty to prove when the season opened up on November 15th, against Medgar Evers College. The Raiders punished Evers with a 94-38 win. The 90-plus points scored by the Raiders is the highest opening day scoring binge in school history. Junior guard Jared Tactuk poured in 21 points to lead five Rutgers-Newark players in double-figures in a the season-opener. Four days later the Lady Raiders headed to the UMass Boston Tip-Off Classic, in Boston, Massachusetts. The Raiders first defeated Drew University 75-68, and competed against the University of Massachusetts (Boston), for the championship game. Tournament MVP Jared Tactuk netted 13 of her game-high 18 points during the decisive 17-0 second half run to as the Raiders beat UMass. The victory marks Rutgers-Newark’s first on-the-road regular-season tournament championship since December of 2002 when the Raiders claimed the Baruch Holiday Tournament, and the 3-0

record is the best in the 10-year tenure of head coach Kevin Morris. The Raiders then played two matches before opening up within the NJAC. First the Raiders defeated CCNY 84-47 at the Golden Dome. Sophomore guard Kristen Venning led the balanced effort with 11 points, nine rebounds, five steals and four assists. Freshman forward Jasmine Daniels had a team-high 13 points, eight rebounds, two assists and two blocked shots. The Lady Raiders then hosted Madonna University of Michigan, and beat them 70-56. Down by six points with 14:37 to go, the Raiders outscored Madonna 33-13 down the stretch. Tactuk netted 11 of her team-high 19 points in the second half. The turn of the month led the Raiders into familiar NJCU territory. The Raiders beat the Gothic Knights 72-50. Reserve freshman point guard ShaQuanna Marshall had 19 points, five steals, six rebounds and four assists to pace the Raiders over NJCU. NJCU’s highscoring freshman forward Maria Suarez was limited to just seven points, but she contributed a game-high nine rebounds, four steals and three assists. NJAC rival The College of New Jersey next challenged the undefeated Raiders. The TCNJ Lions were ranked second in the Southern Division, and the dark horse of the conference. The Raiders defeated the Lions 60-56. Senior forward

Jaleesa Coleman scored 13 of her gamehigh 19 points in the second half as the Raiders made a 25-9 run over the final 11:34, to erase a 12-point deficit.

NJAC All-rookie ShaQuanna Marshall

The Raiders next host Hunter College on December 8th. The Raiders will look to NJAC Rookie of the week ShaQuanna Marshall, to provide offense as Rutgers-Newark looks to extend their longest undefeated streak in school history.

Nets lose Harris and another set of games By Yaroslav Imshenetsky

T

Sports Writer

he Nets started their week off with a trip to Madison Square Garden. Amare Stoudemire scored 35 points as the Knicks broke open a close game right after New Jersey lost point guard Devin Harris to injury, beating the Nets 111-100 on Tuesday night. Harris limped to the lockeroom with a left knee injury after he was hurt on Chandler’s basket that snapped a 65all tie midway through the third quarter. That was part of a 14-2 spurt that gave the Knicks a 10-point lead, and they were never really challenged from there. “Oh man, a big game changer. Devin is a guy that we rely on heavily,” Nets coach Avery Johnson said. “In the sense it’s kind of like if they lose Stoudemire. On a lot of nights Devin’s been one of our top two players. It was tough to overcome it.” Brook Lopez scored a season-high 36 points for the Nets and Jordan Farmar had 17, trying to pick up the load after Harris was lost.

The team then went back home to host the Oklahoma City Thunder. And that game just wouldn’t end. It took three overtime quarters, but Russell Westbrook capped a 38-point, 15-rebound, nine-assist performance by scoring all of Oklahoma City’s 13 points in the third overtime, and the Thunder overcame the absence of an injured Kevin Durant with a 123-120 victory. Even though they were losing throughout, the Nets kept coming back, hitting three-pointers on the way. New Jersey had a final chance to tie it in the third OT as well, but Farmar’s crosscourt pass was stolen with a second to play and the clock went off without a final shot. “This is a game of waves and cycles,” Avery Johnson said. “This is probably the game of the year in the NBA, it’s just too bad we’re on the losing end. I told my guys that I’m awfully proud to be their coach.” Another long game was awaiting the Nets on Friday, as they played the Charlotte Bobcats. Without Harris and two nights after a triple-overtime loss to Oklahoma City, the Nets came out with little energy.

Stepehn Jackson scored 25 points and hit four straight free throws in the final 31 seconds of overtime as the Bobcats recovered from blowing a big lead to beat the weary New Jersey Nets 91-84 on Friday night. Travis Outlaw scored 21 points and hit two free throws to force OT and Charlotte native Anthony Morrow added 19 for the Nets, who were without injured Devin Harris and got little from Brook Lopez. New Jersey has now lost three straight, playing four OT periods in the last two games, and dropped to a record of 6-14. Coach Johnson knows the Nets won’t get better overnight. They tried to trade for Carmelo Anthony before the start of the season, but the Denver Nuggets decided to explore other options while still hoping to convince the All-Star forward to stay. Johnson can’t worry too much about what the future holds because he has too much to do in the present. “Right now, we’re totally internally focused,” he said. “That’s it. We have tunnel vision and it’s only on ourselves.”

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fully furnished

Raider Men 6-0 to start season By Thomas Hahn

T

Managing Editor

his year’s Rutgers-Newark Scarlet Raiders men’s basketball (6-0) team may go down as the best in school history. They started off the season hot by defeating Medgar Evars in overtime and by winning the John K. Adams Tip-Off Classic Championship. That is a two day tournament that takes place in the Golden Dome. R-N defeated both City Tech and FDU-Florham to capture the championship crown. In their first game following the tournament, the Raiders thrashed the City College of New York. The final score of that game was 95-63. That win was a total team effort. The high scorer for R-N was guard Greg Moore who had seventeen points in 25 minutes of play. The Raiders also got 42 points off the bench, including 16 from Christian Garcia. In addition to Moore and Garcia, Pedro Burgos (10 pts), Chris Diaz (13 pts), and Tyler Jones (12 pts) all scored in double figures. Jeremiah Rivers also had 9pts. Al’Don Muhammad also had a game high 13 assists to go along with 5pts and 5 rebounds. Their toughest contest of the season by far was on the road against New Jersey City University. The Raiders were outscored by NJCU 27-41 in the first half, but they rallied in the second half to send the game to overtime. One overtime was not enough to defeat NJAC rival NJCU, and neither was a second overtime. The Raiders were able to outlast their opponent in a third overtime period to come away with the 118-116 victory. Mohammad scored 31pts in that contest including a pair of free throws with 9 seconds left to break the 116 tie. NJCU called a timeout with 7 seconds left. On their ensuing possession, NJCU would miss a three point shot with no time left on the clock, and R-N would escape Jersey City with a win and a 5-0 record. This past Saturday, R-N defeated The College of New Jersey in the Golden Dome by a final score of 88-65. The Scarlet Raiders at 6-0 have the best record in the NJAC. Their 2-0 record within the NJAC ties them for the best record in that category with Montclair State, Kean University, and Richard Stockton. The NJAC portion of the schedule doesn’t really kick off until the New Year, but with the strong start R-N is off to things are looking good for the men’s basketball team.

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