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Villager October 17 pg 01_Villager May 26 pg 01 12-10-16 5:42 PM Page 1

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A shot for health services in Ontario RUSSELL - As we enter into Ontario’s 13th year of the offering free and publiclyfunded flu shot, Premier Dalton McGuinty announced that some heath services, tradtionally provided by doctors or nurses, can now be done by pharmacists. The flu shot is amongst them. “Expanding the role of highly-trained pharmacists is part of the McGuinty government’s Action Plan for Health Care (APHC). The plan is suppose to gives Ontarians better access to family doctors, nurse practitioners and other healthcare providers, to ensure that health care dollars are spent most efficiently,� stated in a release from MPP Grant Crack’s office. The APHC was release earlier this year. In addition, pharmacists can now renew or adapt prescriptions, prescribe medica-

tion to help people quit smoking; provide asthma inhaler or inject insulin demonstrations and offer better support with chronic disease monitoring. Deb Matthews, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care said “We are maximizing the services provided by pharmacists so that Ontarians can receive the care they need safely, quickly and closer to home. Pharmacists are highly-trained and trusted health providers. It’s time that we benefit fully from all the services they can provide.� McGuinty noted that this expansion of delivery, also a recommendation in the Drummond Report, will provide better access and strengthen the health care system and, “It is another way we are ensuring universal health care is there for our children and grandchildren.� Continued on page 7

Nothing but can

The Prescott-Russell Basketball Association held their seventh annual wheel chair basketball tournament on Oct. 13-14, to raise donations for the food bank. The two-day event saw 23 teams, aged five and up, take part. The event is run by Craig Salmon and with help from his assistant coaches. The Association was pleased to see many new kids turn out to participate in the event. Here, Sam Peters puts up a shot for his team as teammate Scott Roos looks on and Micah D’Brox, right, and Dominic Gott attempt to make the stop for purple. Matte photo

Impact of McGuinty’s resignation felt locally Pamela Pearson Villager Staff Ontario Premier Dalton McGuinty’s surprise resignation from office on Monday night has reverberated across the province and GlengarryPrescott-Russell. On the afternoon of Oct. 15, the Liberal premier called a special caucus meeting to

take place at 6 p.m. that same day. According to local Grit MPP Grant Crack, “There were speculations as to what was happening, but certainly I was not expecting it to be two-fold,� he said, referring to both McGuinty’s resignation as liberal leader and premier, but his request that the

Lieutenant-Governor prorogue the Legislature as well — suspending the provincial house at a time of continuing fallout over the cancellation of two power plants and an ongoing battle with organized labour over legislated wage freezes. “It is time for the next Liberal Premier of Ontario,� McGuinty said dur-

ing his broadcast remarks, voice breaking as he sat on the stage before the caucus. “It is time for renewal.� Asking the Liberal party president to organize a leadership convention as soon as possible, McGuinty said he would remain as MPP of his Ottawa South riding until the next general election. Crack beleives that McGuinty has made these moves in the “best interest for himself personally and professionally, as he has had a challenging past year helping

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Ontarions move forward over.� Crack also commented on how proud he is to be part of this government team and supports its initiatives. When asked if he thought there would be anyone stepping up to the leadership podium anytime soon, the MPP stated that he did not know of anyone specific, but suggested all three parties should to take the time to regroup and consult with their constituents for feedback about their needs and move forward “to do the

business Ontarions elected us to do.� Regarding speculation that McGuinty’s resignation may lead to a spring election, Crack said, “We need to work with the opposition right now to ensure a good, solid budget is tabled and passed in the spring - to work on the behalf of the people of Ontario.� He also stated, “Everyone needs to take a number of days to absorb the impact of this event, be responsible, respectful and celebrate the accomplishments.�

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Villager October 17 pg 02_Villager May 26 pg 02 12-10-16 3:49 PM Page 1

Page 2 The Villager October 17, 2012

Russell Fire Department

Stovetop fires The Office of the Fire Marshal (OFM) conducted a survey from Aug. 1, 2005 to July 31, 2006 dealing solely with the issue of stovetop fires. During this 12 month period 1,244 fires were stovetop reported in Ontario. The data from these fires was analyzed in order for strategies to be developed therefore assisting in reducing the number of incidents. Some of the trends found in this survey established obvious problems with how people in Ontario are conducting themselves in the kitchen. Cooking fires were the ignition source in 27 per cent of all the preventable residential fires. This is the number one cause in Ontario. Heating is the second cause and occurs in 14 per cent of all preventable residential fires, half the total of cooking fires. In 69 per cent of the fires it was reported that cooking pots and utensils left unattended was the key factor contributing to the ignition or spread of a fire. This is the one cause of ignition that is most preventable. The second key factor was a burner being left on, this was a factor in five per cent of the fires reported. The difference in percentage paints a very clear picture as to what problem has to be addressed first. Oil or grease was the object or substance first ignited in 50 per cent of the fires reported. Other food items were the igni-

tion source in 28 per cent of the fires. Once again an obvious trend is easily defined. One hundred and six of the 1, 244 fires reported injuries resulting in 205 people injured. Fortyfive of the injuries were caused by the person attempting to move or lift the pot from the stove. Forty-four of the injuries were the result of people attempting to extinguish the fire with water. During this period there were seven deaths associated with stovetop fires. The information gathered by the OFM in this survey is invaluable to Fire Departments and the OFM in assessing the problems associated with stovetop fires and how we should address this matter. As can be seen by the injuries and deaths caused by this type of fire this is an issue that must be dealt with sooner rather than later. One factor with cooking fires is that children who receive more fire education than adults are not a factor in cooking fires, so the message has to be delivered to and accepted by adults. Adults, unfortunately, are often a more difficult group to reach when dealing with fire prevention matters, however strategies will be developed to do so. One thing that is certain is that the saying about “too many cooks in the kitchen” obviously doesn’t apply here in Ontario, where the current data proves there obviously aren’t enough.

This week’s Russell Fire Department Fire Safety Column is brought to you by RFD volunteer Lt. Bruce Woolsey.

A field trip…quite literally

Children, parents, teachers, and friends of the Metcalfe Cooperative Nursery School enjoyed a hayride at the Log Cabin Apple Orchard in Osgoode at the end of September. This was the school’s first field trip of the year and according to all, the apples were delicious. Courtesy photo

Free curbside exchange this Saturday Russell Township and the Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC) encourage all residents to participate in “Free Household Exchange Day” to be held Sat., Oct. 20 from 8 a.m. to 5 pm.. Mark any household

items or treasures you may have with a “free” sign and put out at the curb side. This is a great way to recycle, purge, and get rid of unwanted or unused items. It also saves these items from going to the landfill.

Lions calendar winners

Recepients of the October 2012 Russell Lions Calendar Draw are:

Darquise Charron, Scott Tomlinson, Nathan Fowler, Karen Martin Robert Craig, Lil Rankin, Don Melkert and Ron Hubbard who won $25 each. $50 winners include Wendy Achtereeckte and Gloria Huh-Dykstra and the big winner of $100 is Madeline Chabot.

Correction The Editor: Upon reading last week’s Castor Country column Overstuffed praise for garden, I noticed that Tom credited the Russell Horticultural Society volunteers with providing the hanging baskets in the Village. I would like to make note that the Russell Village Women’s Institute has been providing and looking after the 40 hanging baskets and 13 ground planters for the past 11 years, not the Horticultural Society. Funds in the amount of $6,000 per year are raised for our “Keep Russell Blooming” Project. On behalf of our Branch members, I would also like to thank The Russell Horticultural Society for all the terrific work they have done throughout the Village over the years, and we will be supporting them for the Children’s Reading Garden as well as any future projects they undertake. Thank you. Mary Inglis Secretary-Treasurer Russell Village Women’s Institute

One person’s trash is another’s treasure. This is a winwin situation. At the end of the day, items should be removed as they will not be picked up by township. Please donate to a charity. We hope more residents in the township will participate in this event this year. Please have respect for property and do not take anything

that is not marked. Take a drive around and hopefully, you will find that treasure that you have been looking for. I’ll be looking for garden tools. NOTE: TAKE Congratulations go out to Dennis O’Grady who is celebrating 25 years as General Manager of South Nation Conservation. TAKE NOTE: Visit the Third World Bazaar at Manotick Station. It runs every Friday, Saturday and Sunday until Nov. 16. There are colourful handcrafted goods from around the world. Visit www.thirdworldbazaar.ca.

METCALFE FARMERS’ MARKET SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20TH, 2012 8 A.M. – NOON

LAST DAY OF THE SEASON

Enjoy a cup of hot cider compliments of the market along with a great assortment of crafts, baking and produce. Kids corner.

FREE ADMISSION & PARKING METCALFE FAIRGROUNDS

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR THE

Christmas Shows NOVEMBER 17 AND DECEMBER 8

at the Greely Legion on Mitch Owens Road


Villager October 17 pg 03_Villager May 26 pg 03 12-10-16 3:50 PM Page 1

The Villager October 17, 2012 Page 3

Sosnowsky, Patrick StSpeagle, Alexandre Jacques, Brandon Stewart, Celeste St-Jean, Ryan Switzer, Kaitlyn Thacker, Shauna Thomas, Joshua Thompson, Jacob TooheyCarignan, Francesco Triventi, Bryan Van Rens, Samuel Villeneuve, Breanne Wall, Chelsea Willcott, Savanna Willerton, Kayne Williams, Melissa Williamson , Erich Winges, Charles Wright, Hayley Young, Jessie Young. Several awards were also given out to deserving students. In the Outstanding Catholic And Community Leadership award category, the following The Ontario include: L i e u t e n a n t - G o v e r n o r ’s Community Volunteer Award who’s recipient was Vanessa Large. Large also shared the Township of Russell Community Involvement Award with Melissa Williamson. Richard James received the Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Bursary, the Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, The Russell Knights of Columbus Award and the Pat Fogarty AwardOntario Catholic Student Award. Various community awards and bursaries were given to the follwing students for their hard work, both in and out of the school: Scotiabank Bursary, Russell - Kristyn Lee Lackey; Roxborough Bus Lines Ltd. Bursary - Kayne Williams; Maheu Inc. Bursary - John Rayson; Compass Group Canada/Chartwells Dining Service Bursary and the Russell Medical Centre BursarySarah Facette; Menard Graduate Prize - Jordynn D’Angelo and Annemarie Nault; Triple C Counselling Award -Austin Desormeaux; Russell IDA Pharmacy Science Bursary Shauna Thomas; Dr. Darrell Menard Applied Health Sciences Bursary - Jordynn D’Angelo; Russell Association of the Performing Arts Fine Arts Bursary Jessie Young; Prescott-Russell Basketball Association Bursary Melissa Williamson; Russell Branch - Royal Canadian Legion Bursary Jordan Heuvelmans; PrescottRussell International Plowing Match and Rural Expo Bursary - Meaghan Hall Russell and District Horticultural Society Bursary - Meaghan Hall and Breanne Wall; Glenn P. Cowan Bursary - Kelsey Hanes; Desjardins Caisse Populaire Award - Ashley Buell; Campbell and Sabourin LLP/SLR Bursary - A n n e m a r i e

Nault; Algonquin College Entrance Award - Austin Mann and Samuel Villeneuve; St. Lawrence College Board of Governors Award -Jennifer Cross; CUPE Local 4154 Award - Vanessa Large; Kin Club Of Russell Bursary - Prairie Groves; Angelo’s Restaurant Bursary - Austin Mann and Samuel Villeneuve; Cooperative Agricole d’Embrun Ltee - Breanne Wall; Retired Teachers of PrescottRussell Award - Ashley Buell; Education Pathway Award - Kristyn Lee Lackey; CHAM Driving School Bursary - Molly and Victoria Foley Sheldrick; Environmental Stewardship Bursary: Breanne Wall; Health Studies Award - Victoria Sheldrick; Glengarry Mutual Insurance Co Bursary - Jennifer Cross, Jordyn D’Angelo, Sarah Facette, Hannah Fraser and Vanessa Large; Valoris for Children and Adults of Prescott-Russell Bursary - Kayla Neville; Ontario English Catholic Teachers’ Association Bursary - Hannah Fraser and John Rayson; EXIT Realty Bursary - Molly Foley Other awards included the Striving for Success Award, sponsored by Larry Lacelle for the graduating student who demonstrates commitment towards attaining learning goals and demonstrates outstanding leadership in extracurricular and community endeavours. Brittany Ridge was the recipient. The Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario (CDSBEO) University Bursary was awarded to two students progressing to university, Alexandra Moore and Erich Winges, who have demonstrated Christian values, teamwork, commitment and perseverance in achieving academic goals. Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario (CDSBEO) College Bursary recipients were Kelsey Hanes and Meaghan Hall; Trustee Bursary - Danielle Erdelyi; the St. Thomas Aquinas Student Ambassador Award, sponsored by Tyler Lovenuk, STA Alumni, Class of 2009, was awarded to Danielle Erdelyi and the St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School Student Council Leadership Bursary went to Prairie Groves; Danielle Erdelyi and Alexandra Moore received the School Involvement Leadership Bursary. Specialist High Skills Major – The Environment Award was given to Meaghan Hall and Breanne Wall. Recipients Kelsey Hanes and Mitchell Brown

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RUSSELL - St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School (STA) held its sixth commencement ceremonies for its 2011-12 graduating students, on the evening of Oct. 5, at the school. Families and friends, came together in celebration, as graduates returned to the STA halls to commemorate the occasion of receiving their Ontario Secondary School Diplomas. Graduates include: Avery Adamyk, Brandon Aspeck, Jeremy Backs, Robert Ballantyne, Philip Baril, Dartagnan Bean, Chase Beaudry, Kayleigh BenoitHinz, Danielle Bergeron, Kaitlyn Brasseur, Kayla B r a y , R y a n Mitchell Britton, Brown, Ashley Buell, Chandra Burke, Brenna Carriere, Megan Shelby Chamberlain, Chambers, Magaret Colledge, Kyle CowanLafferty, Brian Jennifer Cross, Coyne, Dominic Crouzat, Jordynn D’Angelo, Jessica DelCorvo, Austin Desormeaux, Julien Desormeaux, Brittany Doyle, Rebecca Eby, Natasha Emond, Danielle Erdelyi, Rachel Erdos, Sarah Facette, William Fetzer, Corey Fitzpatrick, Molly Foley, Hannah Fraser, Jonah Gagnon, Brandon Gaines, Kyle Gaw, Quinton Gill , Audrey Gingras, Prairie Groves, Aimee Guindon, Shelby Habets, Cole Hagedorn, Jesse Hall, Meaghan Hall, Kelsey Hanes, Damon Harju, Jordan Heuvelmans, James Hill, Richard Murray James, Joshua Jaquemet, Cody Jenkins, Shane Kelly, Julia Kempcke, Jordan Kerr, Dylan Killoran, Kristyn Lackey, Alexander Lacoursiere ,Patrick Laflamme,Ethan Lamirande, Alexander Lamoure, Zacharie Laneville, Gordon LaPierre, Vanessa Large, Katherine Leblanc, Ian Loggie, Austin Mann, David Marsland, Patrick Martin, Mayora McCarthy, Jason McKenny, Ian McPhee, John Austin Miller, Lucas Miller, L i n d s e y Mitchell, Alexandra Moore, Tyler Moore, Annemarie Nault, Kayla Neville , Collin O’Connor, Adam O’Reilly,Anthony Orsoli, Michael Palus, Brandon Papple, Aaron Paulin, Jeffrey Pepin, Dylan Pereira, Julia Pizzamiglio, Jeremy Plummer, John Rayson, Marco Reitano, Derek Richardson, Brittany Ridge, Joseph Robinson, Philippe Rochon,Mandi Ross, Devin Rousson, Christopher Rozon, Cody Salmon, Lucas Schan, Selena Shane, Victoria Sheldrick, Jaime Sheridan, Dylan

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Book, Music and Lyrics by Richard O’Brien

Oct 31, Nov 1, 2, 3 8 pm Russell High School 982 North Russell Road, Russell, ON

Youth Night – Oct 31st

Mature Subject Matter

STA 2011-12 graduates

received the Colin Hood OFSAA School Sport Award is named after retired OFSAA Executive Director Colin Hood. During his time at OFSAA (19922004), The Colin Hood Award is given out annually to one graduating male, one graduating female, and one coach in every school in the province who, throughout their high school career, have been committed to the success of school sport at their school and within their Association. The R.J. McCarthy Bursary was awarded to Annemarie Nault and Shauna Thomas, who both demonstrated dedication to academic success, extracurricular activities and community service consistently throughout the school high school and the Richard James Award of Excellence went to Danielle Erdelyi for maintaining high academic standing throughout high school and has been involved in many school activities; community volunteerism; has demonstrated leadership, a willingness to help others; is respectful of the opinions of his/her peer group, the STA faculty, administration, staff and community members; and has continuously displayed Christian values. Congratulations to all graduated students and good luck in all your new ventures.

Directed by: Diane Meagher – Musical Director: Ann Cloutier Technical Director: Dave Laramee

TICKETS: Youth Night $15 with Student ID $20 all other nights For tickets or information call 613-445-3657 or see RAPA’s Facebook page Tickets also available in Russell: Pronto, Foodland, Village Paws and Embrun: Pierre & Fils


Villager October 17 pg 04_Layout 1 12-10-16 2:31 PM Page 1

The Villager October 17, 2012 Page 4

1-866-307-3541 FAX: 613-448-3260

& Opinion EDITORIAL

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7 King St., P.O. Box 368 Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0

EDITORIAL Window dressing or essential? This year the number of small businesses across Canada, with at least one employee on the payroll, has reached nearly 1.2 million. According to Industry Canada, between 2002 and 2007, an average of 104,000 new small businesses started employing 5.1 million or 48.3 per cent of the total workforce. So are they the backbone of the economy or just a small but important part? When you realize that they contribute one-third of Canada’s Gross Domestic Product you get a better idea. This is an important metric to recognize, as the GDP represents the market value goods and services created, produced and sold by a country’s total population. In this case, all that work, creating or selling, means employment. Looking at the local businesses in our region, it is not hard to see that most fall into the category of small. There are necessary big players who bring economies of scale and variety, and they are the franchised branches of major chains, like Giant Tiger, Shoppers, Tim Horton’s and the Dodge and Ford dealerships. However, the vast majority of people in our community, who are employed in the community, are working for businesses which are independent. The vast majority, including the Co-op establishments, are locally managed with their product and service selections locally decided upon. Small businesses have always played a role in rural life. The days of farmers keeping their own seeds are long gone; even egg production has become a victim of efficiencies in production, delivery, quality, safety. But the general store, the lawyer, and the doctor (Or was he a barber?) have always been mainstays, and they exist today in one form or another. Many small businesses once dealt exclusively in barter, now frowned upon as it is hard to tax, but it was the essential means to trade goods or services. Value was based upon prior performance and quality. You knew your trading partner, and you negotiated your best price. Small businesses made our community a smarter place, where everyone knew the value of things. Today we live in a world of money, where the price is simply what you pay. Selection has improved, but branding has taken over and we make decisions about where to shop not on the basis of our relationships but of the perceived value for a dollar. Small businesses allow flexibility, the hallmark of the rural community. They fill the niche markets deemed unprofitable by larger retailers. They are competitive for this reason too – the larger retailers have to maintain appearances and profit margins. Thus they pop up and fade away as the times change. The family business may have started as a farm, and over time evolved an equipment repair sideline, but upon retirement and sale of the land, a child or employee may spin that business off in its own right. Times change, but local services are always needed. Small businesses are essential, and are not window dressing. They grow, and they shrink, they find success, and they fail. They are a fact of life, no different than the weather and the crops around us. So think locally and do what you can to support them. Pamela J Pearson

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To walk again Five years after a rural road collision consigned student Justin McKenna to a wheelchair, his ultimate goal remains what it has been throughout those years. In a recent email exchange, his ultra supportive mother Suzanne used capital letters for emphasis in restating the goal… or maybe she was yelling at me! “TO WALK AGAIN,” Suzanne reminded me forcefully in explaining that her son never quits, never lets his eye stray from the ball, nor do those around him… just in case I had somehow forgotten. I hadn’t nor has anybody else in and around Russell who knows the Justin McKenna story… pretty well everybody. For those who don’t, here it is in a nutshell: Justin was a popular St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic High School senior when he was involved in a collision with a car while riding an ATV near his home. The crash almost killed him. It was touch-and-go for days and many observers believe it was the barrage of payers offered by the congregation of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Catholic Church, along with Justin’s own determination, that pulled him through. At the time, Father John Whyte was the church pastor and chief instigator of that non-stop payer blast. In an interesting part of the story, Father Whyte has remained close by ever since, supporting Justin – literally – physically and emotionally. I’ve been in social situations where Justin commands the room and the good father plays the sidekick. As soon as he could, Justin began a relentless daily program of neurophysiotherapy with the previously stated ultimate goal in mind. While there has been much improvement in his

condition from a point when he could only communicate through his eyes and by lifting a finger, that goal still eludes him. Going for the goal is an expensive pursuit, only part of which is covered by insurance. There are the rehabilitation sessions, daily transportation, and full-time assistant Richard Theriault, just to name some of the costlier items. “Ultimately, Justin must pay,” Suzanne said, this time is lower case letters, indicating she accepted the situation as a basic fact of life. That means Suzanne and husband Gerry must pay and, while they both work, it’s a financial burden that would crush most of us. That’s where “Brain Matters” comes in, the fundraiser devised by Justin, family and friends to help him help himself while raising awareness about the long-lasting impact of severe brain trauma. The fundraiser involves dinner, speeches from Justin and guests, videos, live and silent auctions, and music from powerhouse cover band Sticks ‘n Stones, featuring one of Justin’s staunchest supporters and former St. Thomas student Samantha Timmins as a lead singer. “He’s by far the hardest working person I know,” Sam says of her pal. The first Brain Matters was held at Anderson Links Golf Club and last year’s event shifted to the larger Russell Community Centre. Together, they raised about $50,000. Still growing, the third annual edition coming up this Saturday was relocated to the Embrun Recreation Centre seating 300, the biggest hall in Russell Township. If things keep going the way they have been, BM might have to move to an Ottawa facility next year, Sam said, which wouldn’t be a bad thing when one considers the increased awareness a city venue could generate.

“Moving out of Russell perhaps would mean we’re expanding to reach a new population of brain injury learners which is really exciting.” After organizing three big events, awareness of the hard work being expended by Justin and his loyal troops is already deservedly high. At the recent Brain Injury Association of Canada conference in Ottawa, Justin was co-awarded the 2012 Debbie and Trevor Greene Award recognizing extraordinary contributions in advancing awareness of acquired brain injuries. While BM 3 was almost sold out the last time I talked to Suzanne, there may still be a few $40 tickets left this week. It starts at 5 p.m. with a REAL (Suzanne’s capitals) homemade meal. Then come the speakers, auction including chocolate cheesecake made by Justin, and funky dance tunes from Stick ‘n Stones. Sam will also sing a song written for the man of the hour while he was still in hospital. Co-MC this year along with Justin is Mark Hatfield, a former CFL and NFL player now an Ottawa firefighter who has experience with brain injury through sports-related concussion. Another highlight will be a video showing a day in Justin’s life dealing with severe brain injury. It’s “all for the love of our good boy Justin”, Suzanne wrote, using italic letters instead of capitals indicating, I guess, a softer, gentler, more reflective tone.

No more major EO landfills needed The Editor: About 25 years ago, Russell Township opposed a landfill (known as Site 10) that was proposed by the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton (RMOC) at Boundary Rd. and Devine Rd. in the Township of Cumberland (now part of the City of Ottawa). Although the proposed dump was just beyond the limits of Russell Township, the Township Council at that time believed that such an undertaking would have adverse effects on some of

LETTERS Editor to the

its residents. Consequently Russell Township hired the consulting firm Environmental and Technological Research Associates (ETRA) to keep it informed and to act on its behalf at the RMOC Waste Management Task Force. Significantly the location of the formerly proposed Site 10 is at the same location as Taggart-Miller’s new second option for their

omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.

proposed landfill, the CRRRC, referred to as the Boundary Road Site. The Township’s Environmental Advisory Committee has a special Subcommittee commenting on the CRRRC Terms of Reference and was told recently by the Mayor to restrict their comments to the North Russell Site as if the second option (outside the Township) was of no

real concern to them or the people living here. Would they be happy to see a landfill at this second site? Since the Township was given extra time (until Nov. 2) by the MOE to respond to the Terms of Reference, I think they should include issues related to this new site as well. No more major landfills are required in Eastern Ontario! Harry Baker 208 Forced Rd. Russell, ON,

All layouts and composition of advertisements produced by the employees of Etcetera Publications (Chesterville) Inc. are protected by copyright vested in the publisher of The Russell Villager.


Villager October 17 pg 05_Villager May 26 pg 05 12-10-16 4:52 PM Page 1

The Villager October 17, 2012 Page 5

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Candidates must be available at all times foor road patrol, snow removal and ice control operations on the municipal roads. Candidates must possess a DZ driver’s licence.

DEADLINE FOR APPLLYING YING : BY OCTOBER 26TH, 2012, BEFORE 4:00 PM. The Ecoonomic Devveelopmentt, Parks aar and Reccrea e tion Department is currently seeking for o a motivated individual for for the following position: n:

A AD ADMINISTRA ATIVE ASSISTTANT AN ANT

The candidate will be responsible to provide administrative support to the Director while demonstrating experience working in a fast paced multi-tasked environment, and have excellent knowledge of various computer softwares. The candidate will also be responsible in the writing, translating and editing of correspondence and/report for the department. The ideal candidate has experience in a municipal administration setting. Furthermore, The position requires participation to various committees that take place in the evening and act as recording secretary including transcribing of council meeting minutes. SKILLS COMPETENCIES AND KNOWLEDGE: t Ability to work under pressure, set priorities and meet t Excellent proficiency in French and English grammarr, work o ddemands and public complaints. punctuation and spelling is required; LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS: Excellent proficiency in t Knowledge of office soffttware, including Access, understanding, speaking, reading and writing of both Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and Outlook; French and English. t Post secondary education in administration or equivalent would be an asset; t Minimum of 5 years of work experience in an COMPENSAATION:The salaryy,, based on 35 hours per week, is between $44,690 and $55,867 per year together administration field; package. A detailed job t Excellent administrative and organizational skills with an excellent benefit b pack and ability to coordinate projects; description is available upon request.

Scout Apple Day

2nd Russell Scouts were out for their annual Apple Day fundraiser on Oct. 13, but this year it had a new twist. Instead of going door-to-door, the group set up a one-stop-shop station at Barry’s Home Hardware. Over the course of the day, members from each level not only sold apples, but also raised awareness of upcoming fundraisers, such as Scout Popcorn and the Bottle DEADLINE FOR APPLYING: OCTOBER 23RD, 2012, BEFORE 4:00 PM. Drive/E-recycling collection taking place this Sat., Oct. 20. Funds from the H TO APPLLYY drive will go to those Scouts attending the Canadian Scout Jamboree 2013 #HOW Those interested in the above mentioned positions are invited to submit their resume in Word or PDF (CJ’13), in Sylvan Lake, Alberta, next summer. forma o t, clearly identifying the position which they are applying for to: Mrs. Debbie Guillemette, by fax at PJ Pearson Photo

Fall is heating up at RHS Shannon Hoag Russell High Student Special to the Villager RUSSELL - Russell High School (RHS) is anything but quiet. On any given day, at any time, there is almost always something going on. There is Band, Nerd Club, Cooking Club, Student Council, the GSA, sports and tons of trips! And, of course, there are classes going on as well. Recently, RHS held a Terry Fox Run to support cancer research. The whole school got involved! Students were separated into their houses - Exigo, Animus, Cura or Erubesco and participated in a variety of activities. Eamon Colvin

commented, “It was great to see the whole school come together with enthusiasm!” As well as becoming home to the grade sevens, RHS has become a new home to several international exchange students as well. Currently, there are four students from China as well as one student from Colombia and one student from Brazil. Daniela Velez, the student from Colombia, says, “I have been having a good experience, my English is much better, the people are so nice! I hope to meet a lot of people.” The fall sports are also in full swing - cross country running, soccer and basketball are keeping us active

outside the classroom, including a pep rally held at the girls’ first home basketball game. “I was so impressed and proud of our team’s effort in both games. They left it all on the court during the first game against STA,” says Rachel Hayton, a player on the team, “We were victorious and continued to beat Embrun High School in our second game. “I’m looking forward to playing the rest of the season with such a phenomenal team.” RHS is just getting started. Throughout the year, there will be many more events, activities and sports to look forward to!

613-443-1042, by email personnel@r p @ @russell.ca or in person at the town hall offices 717, Notre-Dame Street, Embrun before their respec p tive deadlines.

The Township of Russell in collaboration with the Environmental Advisory committee, invite all residents to clean-up their attics and recycle their old stuff!

t t t t t t

t t t

$5,000 from Scotiabank

Scotiabank in Russell, as part of their matching funds through its Team Scotia Community Program, donated $5,000 to local Terry Fox Run Site 82 organizers on Oct. 5. The 32nd Embrun - Russell joint event took place on Sept. 16. From left are Marilyn Milton, Lynne Rochon, Suzanne Bolduc, Cindy Saucier, Karyn Pascoe and Colin Sanders. Missing from photo is Lisa Roy-Lapenseè. Saucier Photo

Sort and set all your treasures on the curbside (CDs, DVD’s, books, old furniture, small appliances, kitchen gadgets, unwanted giffts ts, etc); Identify them as “FREE” ffor or the treasure hunters; At the end of the day, bring any uncollected items back to your home; Respect other people’s property; don’t walk on their lawn and gardens; Take only the treasures marked “FREE”at the curb; Don’t discard previously picked-up treasures on another person’s property. This is not garbage collection day! Curbside Exchange Day is on Saturday, October 20 between 8am until 5pm only Please pick up the uncollected items at the end of the day or bring them to a local charitable organisation such as the good will store (613-443-5833) INFORMATION: MANON BABIN 613-443-5078

# Your special collection for household appliances and bulky items greater than 23 kg (50 lbs) will be the week of October 22 to the 26, 2012, on the same day as your garbage and blue box collection. To ensure your item is collected, please follo follow these 4 easy steps: 1. You must call Manon Babin at 613-443-5078 by October 19 to confirm your address and the item to be picked up. 2. You will need a licensed specialist to remove any refrigerant (Freon) in your appliance beffore discarding it. The specialist must affix a tag on the unit. 3. Each item must have a $10.00 tag that can be purchased at the municipal office or you may use five of your regular garbage tags for 2011 or 2012. 4.Plac Place items at the curb for 7:00 a.m. on your regular collection day. PPour our lire ce contenu en franç français, ais, SVP visitez notre site Internet ou lire la copie du Reflet de cette semaine.

WWW.RUSSELL.CA


Villager October 17 pg 06_Villager May 26 pg 06 12-10-16 4:46 PM Page 1

Page 6 The Villager October 17, 2012

Please join me at my OPEN HOUSE at 129 TWEED CRES., RUSSELL

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21ST FROM 2 - 4 P.M. Come see this amazing property at the great new price of $329,900 I look forward to seeing you there!

At the Ontario Paramedic Association of Chiefs gala, held Oct. 4, eight paramedics from the Department of Emergency Services of the United Counties of Prescott and Russell were recognized for their exemplary service to the county. From left are UCPR Emergency Services Director Michel Chrétien, Marc-André Périard, Gilles Lacroix, UCPR Warden François St-Amour, Alfred Baaklini, Major General Richard Rohmer, Jeff Warnock, Daniel Lacelles, Denis Dalrymple, and Louis Rathier. Courtesy Photo

PR paramedics honoured for outstanding service OTTAWA – Eight paramedics from the Department of Emergency Services of the United Counties of Prescott and Russell have been recognized for their exemplary service and were honoured during the Ontario Paramedic Association of Chiefs (OAPC) gala in Ottawa, on Oct. 4. Emergency Services Director Michel Chrétien and Administrative Deputy Chief Gilles Lacroix were each awarded with a medal bar, to be affixed to their previously received

Emergency Medical Services Exemplary Service Medal of the Governor General of Canada. Deputy Chief of Operations Louis Rathier, Administrative Deputy Chief Marc-André Periard, and paramedics Alfred Baaklini, Denis Dalrymple, Daniel Lacelles and Jeff Warnock were each decorated with the Emergency Medical Services Exemplary Service Medal of the Governor General of Canada. “I am extremely proud of our paramedics, their hard

work and their dedication to the people of Prescott and Russell, as much those who were recognized by the OAPC as all the men and women who serve or have served with zeal and efficiency,” Mr. Chrétien said that evening. Created on July 7, 1994, the Emergency Medical Services Exemplary Service Medal recognizes professionals who, in the provision of pre-hospital emergency medical services to the public, have performed their duties in an exemplary manner, one characterized

by good conduct. Recipients must have completed 20 years of exemplary service, including 10 years in the performance of duties involving potential risk. “I am consistently impressed with the level of service extended by this department and the tenacity of our paramedics, notably in light of our vast, rural territory,” stated François StAmour, Warden of the United Counties of Prescott and Russell. “These eight employees are exceptionally deserving of this national honour.”

Russell House has served up $12,000 to WDMH RUSSELL - The Russell House Pub, located on Mill Street in Russell, is proud to have been serving area residents for over 150 years. Edna and Terry Robinson, the Pub’s owners for over 20 years, are as much a fixture in Russell as their pub and are very committed to the communities they serve, hosting numerous fundraising events benefitting organizations and families in need. “In our line of work, we have the capacity to help,” Edna shared. “It’s really just our way of giving back.” As a result of this perspective, the Robinsons have hosted many golf tournaments, Trivia Nights, and other unique fundraising events both at their establishment and elsewhere. Their most recent undertaking, an annual golf tournament held at Cedar Glen Golf Course on Aug. 13,

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Christina Enright, middle, of the Winchester District Memorial Hospital Foundation, receives an $1,100 donation from Edna and Terry Robinson of the Russell House Pub.

Courtesy photo

raised $1,100 for the WDMH Foundation, bringing the total that the Robinsons have raised for

the hospital to over $12,000. Dozens of golfers helped to make this year fun and

fruitful, proving how great things can be done when people come together for a good cause.

ADVERTISE YOUR HEALTH RELATED ORGANIZATION IN THIS SPACE!


Villager October 17 pg 01B (07)_Villager May 26 pg 03 12-10-15 3:24 PM Page 1

Chantal Bouwers Photo

Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012 Page 1B

Chantal Bouwers Photo

2012 FALL HOME IMPROVEMENT

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Villager October 17 pg 02B (08)_Villager May 26 pg 02 12-10-15 3:27 PM Page 1

Page 2B Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012

Protecting wood surfaces against winter wear As the heat of the summer winds down and eventually gives way to fall rains, now is the perfect time to start thinking about applying a weatherproofing stain to your deck, fence and siding, to protect against the onslaught of the elements from the upcoming harshness of a Canadian winter. Contrary to popular belief, experts say the late summer or early fall is an ideal time to apply a protective stain to your exterior wood surfaces. According to Eric Lundquist, Director of Marketing for Stain & Specialty Products at Behr Process Corporation, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a lot of people are not aware that the spring is not the best time to apply stain to wood surfaces such as a wood deck. You have to give your surfaces the time to properly dry and recover from the excess humidity left by the ice and snow.â&#x20AC;? So to rejuvenate and protect this winter season, take advantage of a sunny afternoon to give wood surfaces a much needed face-lift. Find the quality products and advice to help you exe-

cute your task. Manufacturers, such as Behr Paints, are now making it easier for consumers to find

information and tips on wood staining projects with new in-store exterior wood

care resource centres. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In The Home Depot, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find the newlyredesigned Behr Exterior

Wood Care Centre which simplifies the task of restoring, beautifying and protect-

ing decks and other surfaces by focusing on three steps: preparation, colour selection and the staining and finishing itself,â&#x20AC;? explained Lundquist. The interactive shopping experience includes an easyto-navigate monitor that lets users scroll through detailed product pages, inspirational imagery, application videos and frequently asked questions. Users can bring the vision of their ideal outdoor space to life by digitally colourizing a pre-set image of their surface with any stain or finish using WoodSmart by Behr. The manufacturer has also enhanced its suite of exterior wood care, stain and finish products to make it easier for consumers. Its premium line includes solid colour, semi-transparent and transparent weatherproofing wood stains and finishes utilizing a penetrating advanced 100 per cent acrylic resin formulated to protect decks, siding and fences year-round. - News Canada

Updates to make your neighbours green with envy Whether or not we want to admit it, we all want our home to look its best and be the envy of the neighbourhood. But if you think that keeping up with the Joneses comes with a big price tag, you can think again. With a little elbow grease and creativity, your property can be the talk of the town. Good First Impression Your home canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look great if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it, so updating outdoor lighting is a great first step to achieving the best looking house on the block. Chances are your exterior porch lights or street lamp may be rusty or faded. Now, you can bring new life to your lighting with a single can of spray paint. Innovative products like the new Krylon Dual Paint and Primer is a one-step solution to easily transform any light fixture. Its unique

formula primes the surface for adhesion, durability and coverage, while delivering a high-quality finish. Best of all, Dual is now available in specialty finishes, such as hammered and metallic, that are perfect for adding an extra dose of style. Are you still looking for more illumination? Adding decorative lanterns to walkways or porches is an easy and inexpensive way to add charm and light, while adding some extra security. Often find these pieces can be found at yard sales, thrift stores or dollar stores, simply painted in a matching hammered or metallic finish giving a bright and stylish look. Quick Colour The front door is a focal point of your home â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially with the added lighting youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve updated â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so be sure that your doors and

shutters are a vivid shade. If they have been dulled by years of sun and weather, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to update with paint. For metal doors and shutters, a variety of spray or bucket paints in your favourite hue can be applied, however, for plastic shutters, a special paint for plastic is an ideal choice as it will bond without the need for priming or sanding. A Tidy and Neat Yard No matter what the size of your front yard, a well manicured lawn is important to boosting your curb appeal. Simple one-weekend tasks like edging, trimming bushes and removing unsightly weeds can make a huge difference without a lot of work or cost. As the winter approaches, clean the gardens, add new mulch and place a light of ropes around some ever-

greens for an extra pop of colour for the upcoming white wonderland. Fill in the Blanks The final task to a great looking home that will have your neighbours lusting, is to repair or replace any elements that have deteriorated over time. Walk around the perimeter of your home to check for cracks in bricks or concrete, stains on the driveway or sidewalks, and loose shutters or downspouts. Sprucing up these basics will not only make a big difference to the exterior appearance, but protect your home from damages in the future. Now, with all the home decorating and hard work complete, your neighbours will be green with envy at your beautiful home and be trying to keep up with you. - News Canada

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Villager October 17 pg 03B (09)_Villager May 26 pg 03 12-10-15 3:29 PM Page 1

Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012 Page 3B

Star rating also applies to houses When most people hear the words Energy Star, they usually think about the rating of energy-efficient appliances. But, did you know that a newly built home can also be qualified as Energy Star? In 2005, Natural Resources Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency developed the Energy Star for New Homes initiative in support of the Government of Canada’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Energy Star for New Homes promotes homes that are approximately 20 per cent more energy efficient

than a typical home. Each region has its own star ratings, dependent upon environment. Qualified homes are constructed by builders participating in this national initiative and these builders work with qualified energy advisors to incorporate energy efficient features into the design of their new homes. A qualified new home also reduces greenhouse gas emissions by approximately three tonnes per year. Typical features of an Energy Star qualified home include higher levels of insulation; high-performance windows, patio doors,

and skylights heat recovery ventilator mechanical system; and more efficient Energy Star heating, hot water and air conditioning systems, including new window designs, such as the Energy Star approved Super Magic® windows from Nuden Vinyl Products, of Ottawa. n older home can also become more energy efficant, if this seasons home improvement includes replacing old windows with the new. According to Nuden, the Super Magic® windows, can save you up to 25 per cent in energy savings becasue they offer Super A glass with low emission and argon gas educe energy transfer; ease of opening and closing for maintence and is airtight to eliminate

drafts. The window can also be frosted or grilled in a varuety of styles, to match the home decor, with the Terkar Formula Frame - a unique vinyl more durable than PVC. With Canadians spending an average of $1,147, annually just to use electricity in their home, imagine your total electrical costs after 30 years, it makes financial sense to choose a home that delivers energy savings over the long run. When you see the Energy Star label on a house, you know that it is an energy efficient home with lower energy demand. More Energy Star information can be found at www.newhomes.nrc.gc.ca

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Make the “better safe than sorry” call before digging Trying to squeeze in as many outdoor projects as possible while the weather is good? Whether you’re planting a tree, changing your landscape or building a deck, if the job includes digging it also requires contacting Ontario One Call. There’s a network of natural gas pipes, telephone, hydro and television wires, as well as water and sewer connections buried underground. That’s why it’s the law to call before you dig. Homeowners and contractors must locate buried natural gas pipes before anyone puts a shovel in the ground. If you dig without locates, you could hurt yourself or others. You could also face expensive restoration costs and potential legal action. Ontario One Call is a free service, offered on behalf of its member utilities, including Enbridge Gas Distribution. Please call at least one week before you plan to dig. A locator will visit your property to locate and mark underground lines, and provide a sketch of any lines in your work area. You can contact Ontario One Call at www.on1call.com or 1-800-400-2255. They will ask for project details and will then contact member utilities for you. Remember, there may be other calls you need to make separately as currently not all utilities participate in Ontario One Call. However, in June 2012, the Ontario Underground Infrastructure Notification System Act received Royal Assent which will make it law for underground utilities to participate in a new mandatory “One Call” system. Ontario’s single, province-wide ‘One Call’ system will be the first in Canada and a safety enhancement that will help homeowners protect themselves and others from the dangers of digging without locates. Learn more at www.enbridgegas.com - News Canada

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Villager October 17 pg 04B (10)_Villager May 26 pg 04 12-10-15 3:29 PM Page 1

Page 4B Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012

General tips for pool winterization Once those cool fall nights roll around, we stop thinking about swimming and pool maintance in favour of hockey and hot drinks. But to enjoy the pool for many years to come it is very important to shut it down properly. A poorly closed pool can result in big hassles in the spring due to cracked plumbing, broken equipment and swamp-like water. Call in the professionals if you don’t know how or don’t have the time to do it properly, as closing the pool properly will help to avoid unnecessary expenses in the spring. There are a few basic rules and include balancing the water chemistry, removing leaves and other debris, brushing the walls, and vacuuming to get rid of any scum line or algae from around the sides as leaving will create a green slug to deal with when the cover is pulled off. Most closing kits will include a winterizing shock, algaecide and stain and scale inhibitor. These should be added while the pump is still running to ensure a good circulation of chemicals through out the system. You don’t want to drain your pool completely over the winter, as the water in the pool keeps the vinyl liner in place and prevents creases or wrinkles. If your pool is fiberglass or concrete, draining it completely could cause it to crack or even rise up out of the ground., but some must be drained to  12 to 18 inches below the skimmer opening or just below the return lines,

so water will not enter the skimmer over the winter. Return lines should also be plug with winterizing plugs after you have blown the water out of them, as not to freeze, or disconnect them. It is also very important to drain the water from your pump, filter and plumbing.  Pool heaters vary from solar to natural gas or propane. If you are unfamiliar with how to winterize your heater, follow the steps given by the manufacturer or contact the professionals. Some general general tips for a gas or propane heaters include shutting off the gas valve that supplies the heater.  For heaters with a standing pilot, make sure that you turn the pilot off.  Some heaters will have drain plugs that you can remove to let the water out of the grid. Others will require you to take off the unions and blow air through lines using the pressure side of your shop vac. Either way, you want to make sure that there is no water left in the grid that could freeze over the winter.  If your heater is electronic ignition, turn off or disconnect the power supply.  Remove the pressure switch to let water out and leave unplugged. While you do not need to cover your heater or bring it indoors over the winter, putting a tarp over it will offer protection from the elements. Protect your equipment and chemicals by not leaving outside over the winter,  including  a cold shed or garage. It is best to dis-

pose of any liquid products such as algaecide or liquid chlorine at the end of the season as they usually expire by the time spring rolls around. If your liquid products do freeze, dispose of them immediately, as they will be useless and may burst. This is also a good time to pack up your patio furniture and any loose deck items if you haven’t done so already. This will prevent them from blowing into the pool and damaging the cover. Placin the winter cover on  and  any water bags, is the second to last step. The cover  should be in good repair with no holes or tears, as even the smallest hole can allow dirty water and debris to seep into the pool, resulting in algae and discolouration. If water bags are used, the entire perimeter of the pool should be covered without gaps, thus preventing wind damage. and should be filled half to three quarters to allow for expansion.   If you have a snap-in winter cover that fits into a track on your coping, make sure that it fits in snugly and securely. Use liner lock in the track to tighten any loose areas.  Lastly, secure the pool area against possible winter accidents with children or pets and relax knowing that the correct steps have been taken to make the   pool less work and more fun in the spring. It also will save money in pool repairs from any damage such as staining, scaling, and cracked plumbing.

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Villager October 17 pg 05B (11)_Villager May 26 pg 05 12-10-15 3:30 PM Page 1

Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012 Page 5B

This, that and the other done right! Pamela Pearson Villager Staff RUSSELL - A Russell based general contracting company for the past twelve years, This & That Home Renovations has completed a variety of projects from bookcases to bathrooms, in both the commercial and residential sectors. Owner Mark Savage, began his career track in the late 1980’s when he apprenticed with Litton Systems Canada via the College of Humber Applied Arts and Technology Industrial Instrumentation Technician Program, in Toronto. As a result of working in this manufacturing environment of plant maintenance and stationary engineering, Savage developed a varied skill set, allowing him to move into commercial construction and property maintenance. It is this which ultimately brought Savage to the Eastern Ontario area in 1990.

Moving ahead a decade Savage, along with wife Anne Turcotte, decided to go out on their own Turcotte herself is an entrepreneur with her business, Dip and Dab Interior Painting. This & That offers clients from Kingston to Ottawa room makeovers, kitchen and bath renovations, window and door replacements, electrical, plumbing and can build fieldstone fireplaces, install or replace drywall, flooring, garage doors, decks, retaining walls and fences. Along with all that, and in partnership with Architectural Technician Alice Kelleher of Kelleher Design, Savage and his workshop are capable of creating and building custom millwork. He states “It is not the scale of the job, but the job itself that can be the greatest challenge. It is this that I enjoy the most.” Recently, Savage has taken on his own apprentice, Justin Macklin, a stu-

dent of Algonquin’s College’s Building Technician program which helps students to find entry-level employment in a variety if the construction industries including framing/formwork, door and window installation, interior or exterior finishing, junior estimator, assistant project management. The program is also known to be of value to those seeking a carpentry apprenticeship. The federally incorporated company has recently completed a basement finishing project, which included the installation of a new powder room ; a fire egress and the building of a legal basement bedroom. A couple current projects include mill working some new kitchen cabinets and a library unit. It is generally known that most homeowners, at one time will hire someone for repairs or renovations. Savage offers up some tips for those looking to do some home improvements - items that he discusses

From left: Mark Savage and Justin Macklin of This & That Home PJ Pearson Photo Renovations. with his clients: • Do you carry liability insurance? If they don’t carry any, it might be a flag that something isn’t right. • Ask for references that you can visit for both recent jobs and completed warranty work.   • Show, with pictures or

driving around the neighbourhood, the potential contractor an idea of what you are thinking in regards to style and scale of the project. This allows them to better determine if they understand the overall scope of the job. • Ask to visit a current work site. If the site is

clean, organized and safe, it is usually a good sign that the contractor is as well. This & That Home Renovations website is currently under construction, but the crew can be reached at 613-445-1146 / 613-880-4721 or email: ThisAndThatHomeRenova tions@rogers.com.

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Villager October 17 pg 06B (12)_Villager May 26 pg 06 12-10-15 3:39 PM Page 1

Page 6B Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012

Modern baths go high-tech Once upon a time, the bathroom was just a place to address your physical needs and practise your personal hygiene. But advances in technology are making our homes more efficient, but when it comes to technology, and this is one area that is often overlooked. “People often don’t think of the bathroom as a space where you can incorporate technology because so much of what we do there is routine,” says Delta Faucet tech expert, Marc Saltzman. “But with technology moving forward so quickly, it now touches every part of our lives, every member of the household, and every room in the home - the bathroom included. Indeed, new products with smart solutions make bathroom activities more efficient, accessible, and even less costly, such as technology that can greatly reduce the amount of water used at the sink.” A hands-free faucet not only saves water, it can also save time and reduce bathroom mess. Imagine your morning without having to struggle to turn on the water while your hands were covered in shaving cream? At deltafaucet.ca, take a look at the new Addison lavatory faucet as one example. It functions with an advanced, hands-free feature called, Touch2O.xt; electronic toothbrushes have come a long way in recent years. Today’s models feature added technology and timers that let you know when it’s time to change sides, ensuring your teeth are minty fresh and clean; self-cleaning electric razors save you time and mess and make the chore of shaving that much easier. A high-tech shower system with customized usersettings can help you achieve the perfect shower conditions with the press of a button. Even a simple bathroom fan timer switch can make you conscious of time spent in the shower and help save water every morning. All these time-saving tools and tips to help you make the most of your bathroom time, and nothing is better than that on an early Monday morning. -News Canada

Seasonal Trends Like fashion, interior design trends change with the seasons. Each month, different colours and patterns become the new “it” look, inspiring us to overhaul our home décor. Choose multi-functional products with hidden techand beautiful nology design to create a modern feel. Think televisions hidden in cabinets, speakers mounted behind the wall, and sleek kitchen faucets with a hidden sprayer. Technology that seamlessly blends into a space will always feel new. Consider incorporating accessories in shades such as clean green, saffron, ocean blue, and magenta to create a soothing atmosphere that will never feel tired. Adding sleek pieces in a colour that you’ll always love – rather than a

trendy colour – will make it your style, not to mention wallet-friendly. Update fabrics to those that feature timeless geometric designs, overlapping layers, or stripes. All of these can instantly make a home more contemporary without a large investment. Sleek and simple architectural details add maximum design impact and can become the focal point in any room. Take a Sunday drive through the fall colours to an estate auction to find pieces of furniture, with glass or painted wood, and materials like coloured acrylic, fibreglass, and chrome to add something different mirrors, Updating faucets or light fixtures can play a huge role in making your place look more modern. A small, and

inexpensive way to freshen the look of cabinets is to change its hardware. Nothing dates a space like clutter. Organize and store - or even neatly display - magazines, newspapers, and books. Electronic cords should be off the floor and not visible to keep your room looking neat and clean. Keeping up with the latest looks can be challenging, not to mention expensive. That’s why it’s important to remember that keeping your home décor modern isn’t so much about buying trendy furniture as it is about being practical. Investing in timeless pieces, suited to your lifestyle and taste, can create a calm living environment. -with files from News Canada


Villager October 17 pg 07B (13)_Villager May 26 pg 07 12-10-15 3:34 PM Page 1

Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012 Page 7B

Winterizing the garden A well-maintained garden can add curb appeal to your property and increase the value of your home. This is true of every season. When frost is in the forecast, it’s time to get your garden ready for winter. A fresh layer of mulch or new plants will require some extra attention. Winterizing will help to also maintain curb appeal throughout the winter and decrease your spring workload. Once the ground has frozen gardeners can pre-

pare their garden by spreading a six inch layer of winter mulch, as mulching prevents soil erosion and protects any remaining plants from extreme changes in temperature. Spreading mulch too early may encourage rodents to nest in the soil. Continue watering freshly planted shrubs and plants. While plants enter a state of hibernation in the winter, watering right up until the first frost is crucial for any new additions to your garden.

Roses also need special care and there isn’t just one way to winterize them. How your rosebush fares in winter, depends on a number of factors - the weather, the plant’s location in the garden and, of course, the type of rose. Some varieties are more naturally hardy than others so, check with your nursery or horticaltural society if you aren’t sure . If there’s a graft on your rose bush, it’s a newer variety and probably not hardy. Cold weather can also

cause winter burn on fruit trees. When the tree is not able to absorb moisture from the frozen ground, it causes dehydration therefore burning the tree causing it to start the decaying processing of any remaining leaves and bark, branches and shoots - eventually killing it. Winterizing in the late autumn will protect the trees before the cold weather sets in, but is also early enough that the tree will benefit from good weather and sun. Pruning the tree in the

spring will limit growth and susceptibility during the winter, but do not prune trees that are less than one year old. Also, reduce the amount of fertilization in the late fall, using only half of what you would normally. Begin watering the plants less throughout the fall by wetting the soil until it is slightly moist rather than completely soaked. Cover the ground roots with mulch to prevent them from getting too cold and wrap the tree trunk with winterizing cloths to prevent it from becoming too cold or being damaged by the wind. Resist the urge to cut

back all your perennials. Some may lose their aesthetic appeal over the winter but there are several that maintain their beauty. Ornamental grasses, for example, provide texture in your garden during the winter months. Garden ponds are another item to take care of before freezing temperatures set in, as it will ensure not only the fish and plant life will survive, but so will the plumbing. Remember, with the right preparation, even a winter garden can create a beauty of it own. -News Canada

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Villager October 17 pg 08B (14)_Villager May 26 pg 08 12-10-15 3:36 PM Page 1

Page 8B Fall Home Improvement October 17, 2012

Glass & Marble Wall Tiles IN STOCK - REG. $20.95 SQ. FT. Special $14.95 sq. ft. 8 styles to choose from - While quantities last

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TRP Preventing window heat loss easily done READY MIX LTD. The kid’s teeth are chattering, the dog and cat are huddled together for warmth, and your feet are so cold that your spouse won’t come near you in bed. How can it possibly be this cold inside when the thermostat is set at 22 degrees? A likely answer could be that you’re losing heat from your windows and doors. Preventing heat loss only takes a small amount of time and materials to find and fix the problem and the rewarded could be 10-fold. First, detect the draft. Air leaks can be detected in a variety of ways from shining a light through spaces

around windows to look for gaps or cracks in the seams and molding. Holding a lit candle, barbecue lighter, or piece of tissue paper near the window seam, at a safe distance, move it along the length and width of the seam. If the flame or tissue flickers, there’s most likely an air leak. Next step is to seal the draft with latex caulking by removing any loose, peeling or broken caulk for a clean application of a new sealant. Seal window leaks with a fresh application of latex caulk and run a damp sponge along the seam to remove any excess. Another alternative is to

replace the weather-stripping located on the top and bottom of window sashes. Clean the areas where the weather-stripping will be applied, cut a piece of weather-stripping to the length of the sash, peel off the stripe tape and press the sticky side against the bottom of the sash. If your windows are old, or the draft persists despite following these steps, consider purchasing a Shrink and Seal Window Kit, available at most hardware stores. The clear film shrinks to fit your window, is easily installed with a hair dryer, and is barely detectable to the naked eye. - News Canada

Home heating alternatives As the chilly weather begins to descend upon us, energy-conscious Canadian homeowners are trying to find ways to stay warm without raising their home heating costs, and nearly two-thirds say they would likely invest in a quality heating system that was more expensive upfront if it saved them money in the long run, according to the Beautiful Heat survey, an online study of 1,003 Canadian homeowners. Many homeowners with traditional heating systems are becoming more energy conscious and are going to great lengths to avoid rising heating costs. Almost threequarters of respondents said they like to keep warm while watching their energy consumption, with 43 per cent adjusting their thermostat and a surprising 30 per cent wearing layers to keep warm. Experts say there is a whole other way to stay warm and comfortable with-

out putting on a sweater. “Radiant heat uses water’s own natural heat retention to spread warmth around the home, creating a warm uniform heat in every room,” says Hans Kircher, a heating ambassador for Beautiful Heat. “As a radiant system delivers a consistent even heat, homeowners can set their thermostats lower than with forced air systems, resulting in less energy usage and lower annual heating bills. It is the ideal choice for energy-conscious homeowners.” Unlike forced air, which forces hot air through intrusive ducts and vents into a cold space, a radiant heat system is engineered to bring uniform, even heat to every corner of every room through warm water flowing through a network of tubes in floors, walls and baseboards. As water is a natural heat-storage medium and able to hold almost 3,500

times more heat than air, a radiant system needs less energy to maintain the optimum temperature as it distributes heat around the home. Although a radiant system requires a greater upfront investment than traditional forced air heating systems, it provides numerous benefits. In addition to using less energy, radiant heat’s zone controls enable homeowners to lower the temperature in lower traffic areas of the home, thus saving energy and reducing heating costs. By eliminating the need for fans, blowers and vents, radiant heat provides a cleaner and healthier indoor air environment. And its ductless system gives homeowners flexible design options and clean lines uninterrupted by vents or registers, so furniture can be placed wherever homeowners choose. - News Canada

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Villager October 17 pg 07 (15)_Villager May 26 pg 07 12-10-16 5:43 PM Page 1

The Villager October 17, 2012 Page 7

Cannamore

Robin Graves, the local gravedigger in the Spooky Village at Canamore Orchards roams the streets, willing to help any visiting souls who are looking for their final resting place. Cannamore Orchards has their annual Spooky Wagon Ride and other Hallowe'en festivities each Friday, Saturday and Sunday leading up to Hallowe'en, including Monday, Oct. 29 and Tuesday, Oct. 30. Matte photo

Home Center improves community with trees

Long a ‘go-to’ place for home improvement projects, Crysler Home Center repaid the favour with a community improvement. The business successfully landed a $2,500 corporate grant from Home Hardware, which is working in conjunction with non-profit entity Trees Canada to green up communities through the planting of trees. In this case, 21 hardwoods were planted at Crysler Community Park on Oct. 5. From left, North Stormont Recreational Director Alex Gibson, Crysler Home Center Owner Claude Quesnel, Crysler Community Centre President (and store employee) Pierre Thibeault, Crysler Citizens’ Committee President Mike Lapp, North Stormont Mayor Dennis Fife, Councillor Tammy McRae and Jim Hendry of the Ministry of Natural Resources and acting on behalf of Trees Canada. Baker Photo

Scotiabank's Suzanne Bolduc, left, and Peg Marchessault, right, present Russell Soccer Club president Nanno Habets with a cheque for $3,700 as part of the bank's Team Scotia Community Program. This represents the matchable portion of proceeds raised at our mini tournament BBQ. Since the program's inception, Russell’s Scotiabank has contributed close to Seen here are Cambridge Public School students participating in the $25,000 to the soccer club with the bulk of the funding allocated to the now 2012 Terry Fox National School Run Day on Sept.27. Students from across completed Field of Dreams. Courtesy Photo the Upper Canada District School Board participated in the event to support cancer research. Courtesy Photo

Health Services Continued from the front In a release from the Ontario Pharmacists Association (OPA), they advise that this announcement will be only a “first step for pharmacists to deliver efficient and effective care and applaud McGuinty and Matthews for their leadership and support.” The OPA has also initi-

ated the new Injection and Immunization Certificate Program this month and acknowledged it’s regulatory body, the Ontario College of Pharmacists, stating “Together, we will ensure Ontarians receive top quality healthcare that is easily accessible.” Yesterday, Oct. 16, was the start date of the Eastern counties flu immunization clinics throughout the Eastern counties. Dr. Paul Roumeliotis, EOHU Medical Officer of Health is quoted “You need to get the flu shot every

year to be protected because the viruses that cause the flu do change frequently,” and continues that it can cause serious illness and even cause death in some. “The best protection against the flu is the vaccine. It’s free, safe and available for everyone aged six months and older.” At the time of publicatio, local pharmacy owners and the EOHU were unavailable for comment when asked for their reaction to the expansion of pharmacists services.

Justin McKenna, is seen here with Mark Hatfield, one of the guest speakers at the 3rd annual Brain Matters fundraiser. The event will take place on Oct. 20 at the Embrun Community Centre and include guest speakers Heather Counsell and Jason Harps. For more information visit www.thebrainmatters.ca. Courtesy Photo


Villager October 17 pg 08 (16)_Villager May 26 pg 08 12-10-16 2:31 PM Page 1

Page 8 The Villager October 17, 2012

Deadline 3 p.m. Monday

VILLAGERClassifieds

1-866307-3541

adsrussellvillager@gmail.com

AUCTION

COMING eveNTS

vOlUNTeerS

fOr reNT

AUCTION SAle Of PrOPerTy, HOUSeHOld fUrNITUre, GlASSwAre ANd MISCellANeOUS ITeMS

UNDERSTANDING AND COPING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS This free presentation for both adults and youth is being conducted by National Alliance on Mental Illness. Saturday, October 20th from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. St. Thomas Aquinas High School, 1211 S. Russell Rd., Hosted by Russell Village Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Institute. For info Linda 613-793-0305. 13-1

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED The Heart & Stroke Foundation is looking for community minded individuals in our area who would like to help out with their February Heart Month Campaign. Volunteers are needed for leadership positions as well as door-to-door canvassers. This is a great way to get involved in your community and to meet your neighbours. If you are interested please give Trudy Watt a call at 613938-8933. Heart disease and stroke are the leading cause of death in Canada so put your heart into it and help make a difference. n/c RURAL FAMILY CONNECTONS Volunteer board members needed to plan/execute fundraising events and for committee work (marketing, finance and web). Call 613821-2899 for more info. tfc

CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT Semi-detached ground floor condominium apartment in he heart of Russell Village. Built in 2010 by Donnelly Homes, this unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modified floor plan is open and spacious. This is great for a starter home or those seeking a place to retire in a quiet neighborhood. This location is perfect for easy access to local shopping, dining, entertainment, and schools! to Go https://sites.google.com/site/ 44secondaveunit2/home for more info or call 613-496-0046. 15-4 CONDO 2 bedroom condo in Russell available immediately. Fridge, stove, dishwasher, garage parking included. No pets, no smoking. To inquire call 613-445-3524. 16 APARTMENT Newly renovated one bedroom apartment located in Metcalfe off Bank St. $725/month heat/hydro included. Single occupancy. No pets. Coin laundry on site. Call 613-774-5632 13 APARTMENT Charming and beautifully renovated 2 bedroom apartment, Kenmore. Pristine condition. Refinished original hardwood floors, new windows and gas furnace. Comes with new fridge, stove, washer, dryer, two decks and two outside parking spots. Immediate occupancy. $1185.00 plus heat and hydro. For more details, contact 614-736-7807 15

112 Phair Court in the Village of Russell, Ont. SUNdAy, OCTOber 28 AT 11:00 AM (Property sells at 2:00 pm) Moving to a retirement home the following will be offered for sale: Beautiful approx 1200 sq ft high ranch house w/ attached garage situated on a spacious lot on a nice quiet court. This exceptionally clean home features 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, eat-in kitchen, dining room, living room, a gorgeous sun room and finished basement. Outside it boasts a fenced backyard with maple trees, a deck off the sunroom and a nicely landscaped front yard with an interlocking brick walkway, paved laneway and a beautiful red maple tree. It is on municipal water and sewer and is heated with gas. Close to schools, churches, community centre, curling rink and the downtown core of the village. It is a very easy 25 minute commute to Ottawa. In move-in condition this is an opportunity not to miss! Terms of Sale on Property: Property will be auctioned at 2:00 pm. It will be subject to a reasonable reserve bid. $10,000 down (by certified cheque or bank draft) on day of sale with balance due on closing. Home inspections are the responsibility of potential buyers and must be completed prior to the auction sale. For more information contact the auctioneers. See www.theauctionfever.com. for pictures. Also selling on October 28 starting at 11:00 am: Gibbard mahogany double bed, dresser w/ mirror and 2 night tables; beautiful Gibbard server; solid mahogany oval coffee table and 2 round end tables; walnut buffet; occasional drum table; 2 Queen Anne chairs; 2 matching striped La-z-boy chairs; La-z-boy upholstered rocker; wooden bedroom set; nest of tables; bookcase; light coloured chesterfield and loveseat; wooden kitchen table and 2 chairs; white wicker chair; some pictures and paintings; 3 piece glass and marble bedroom lamps; 6 place setting of Royal Albert "Heirloom" china including extras like a teapot, cream & sugar, platter and gravy boat; china cups and saucers; Carnival berry bowl and nappies; gold rimmed jug and glasses; some pinwheel crystal; milk glass sugar bowl; pedestal cake plate; crystal butter dish and bowl; assorted dog and other ornaments; tablecloths; wooden TV tables; everyday dishes; some small kitchen appliances; pots and pans; pie plates; dehumidifier; binoculars; Toro 6 hp self-propelled push mower-like new; wheelbarrow; snow shovels; ladder; pruner; treadmill, exercise bike; other assorted items. Terms of Sale - Cash or Cheque with Proper Id. Prop: Mrs. Lois Girouard AUCTIONeerS JAMeS ANd HIll AUCTION ServICe lTd. Stewart James 613-445-3269 Carson Hill 613-821-2946 Refreshments available. Owners and Auctioneers not responsible for accidents.

13-1

756 SQ. FT.

COMMERCIAL

SPACE FOR RENT 1000 Notre-Dame St.,

EMBRUN

CALL NORM 613-223-2925

ANNIVERSARY HARVEST SUPPER St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United Church, 38 Mill St., Russell. Monday, October 22, 2012. Fantastic Roast Beef by Desjardin. Sittings 5:00 and 6:30 p.m. Adults $15, Children $5 and under 5 years free. 13-1

NOTICeS AA MEETINGS Russell, Mondays at 8 p.m. at Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Catholic Church and Saturdays at 8 p.m. at Russell United Church, Mill Street, Russell. For info call 613-237-6000 or 613-821-3017. Sept 12

vOlUNTeerS VOLUNTEER NOW! Organizations or individuals who have tasks which could be done by students looking for their volunteer hours, are welcome to advertise in this space free of charge for TWO (2) weeks. Call The Villager at 1-866-307-3541 with your requests. tfc

fOr reNT Crysler One bedroom apartment in Crysler. Available August 1st. Ground floor, 2 appliances included. $675/month hydro-gas included. Call 613-987-2118. 51tfc APARTMENT 2 bedroom apartment on Stiver Street in Russell. Available immediately. Lower unit, 1030 sq. ft. Includes 4 appliances, gas fireplace, laminate floors, lots of storage space. Preferrably no pets and nonsmoking. Snow removal and lawn maintenance included. $975 per month plus hydro. For information please call 613-445-5492 or email lise.leblanc @sympatico.ca 14

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Â&#x2021;0RQVWHU %LQJR )ULHQGV IRU /LIH IXQGUDLVHU IRU WKH %UHDVW &DQFHU )RXQGDWLRQ RI &DQDGD October 23 at the Embrun Recreational Centre. Lots of prizes. Doors open at 6 p.m., but the games Basement Framing & Finishing begin at 7:30 p.m. For info contact Nicole Gosselin-Segin at 613-443-0020 or Diane Bourdeau. Crown Mouldings Â&#x2021;7KHSXEOLFDUHZHOFRPHWRDWWHQGWKH-XVWLQ0F.HQQD:KHHOFKDLU&KDOOHQJH - Friday, October Decks & Sheds 19 at St. Thomas Aquinas High School. First game starts 8:30 a.m with the STA Ravens taking Door & Trim Upgrades on the Embrun Cyclones. RHS Timberwolves play at 9:20 a.m. Â&#x2021;$QQLYHUVDU\+DUYHVW'LQQHU - St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United Church, 38 Mill St., Russell on Mon., Oct. 22. Fantastic roast beef by Dejardins. Sittings at 5 & 6:30 p.m. Adults $15; children $5.; under 5 FREE. Â&#x2021;UG $QQXDO %UDLQ 0DWWHUV to be held October 20 at the Embrun Recreation Centre. Justin 0F.HQQDDQG0DUN+DWÂżHOGDUHKRVWLQJWKHHYHQWZKLFKVWDUWVDWSP'LQQHU7LFNHWVPXVW be purchased in advance. Evening tickets, $20, available at the door at 7 p.m. Please contact: Donna Mota donna.mota@gmail.com or (613) 852-4327. Â&#x2021;5XVVHOO 9LOODJH :RPHQÂśV ,QVWLWXWH LV KRVWLQJ DQ LQIRUPDWLRQ VHVVLRQ RQ PHQWDO KHDOWK October, 20 from 10 a.m. to noon at St. Thomas Aquinas High School. Our guest speaker will be ÂĽSMCPropertyMaintenanceÂĽ Madeleine G. Bertrand Director, National Alliance On Mental Health - Ontario. For more info visit: Â&#x2021;6SULQJFOHDQXSVÂ&#x2021;$HUDWLQJÂ&#x2021;/DZQ&XWWLQJ www.namiontario.ca. WULPPLQJÂ&#x2021;)DOO&OHDQXSVÂ&#x2021;6QRZSORZLQJ UHPRYDOÂ&#x2021;:DONZD\VKRYHOLQJVDOW Â&#x2021;&\FORQH6TXDGURQ$LU&DGHW7DJ'D\)XQGUDLVHU will take place Oct. 19 to 21 in Embrun, Russell, 613-291-1161 Winchester and Greely. Please come out and support one the squadronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest fundraisers of the year. Daryle Ross Real Estate Ltd. Â&#x2021;5XVVHOO0HQ,Q%ODFN This fall on Sundays join Russell United Church (at 11 a.m.) and St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7163 Prakway Rd., Greely Anglican Church (at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.) as they will rid the world of Evil. Â&#x2021;7KH 5XVVHOO DQG 'LVWULFW +RUWLFXOWXUDO 6RFLHW\ is seeking your support for their project to build an enclosed Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reading Garden at Russell Public Library. The society has applied for funding from '$5</(5266%3+(%(G the Aviva Community Fund and need your help to win the funding. All you have to do is click on the www. %URNHU avivacommunityfund.org/ideas/acf13887DQGYRWHIRURXUSURMHFW9RWLQJIRUWKHÂżUVWURXQGLV2FWWR2FW Â&#x2021;5$3$ÂśV 7KH 5RFN\ +RUURU 6KRZ - Oct. 31, Nov. 1 to 3, starting at 8 p.m. at the Russell High Bus.: 613-821-2369 School. For tickets or more information please call 613-445-3657 or see RAPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page. Toll Free: 1-877-450-4401 Â&#x2021;5XVVHOOV&OXE(XFKUH every Saturday night at Russell Meadows Retirement in Russell. 7:30 SPVWDUW6KXIĂ&#x20AC;HERDUGHYHU\0RQGD\DQG7KXUVGD\DWSPDWWKHDUHQD([HUFLVHFODVVHVHYHU\ Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Russell Arena. Bridge and Euchre every Tuesday 1 pm at The Meadows. Â&#x2021;*RRG'RJ5HVFXHLVORRNLQJIRUFDULQJDQGORYLQJIDPLOLHV to foster or adopt small and large breed dogs. To inquire please call Nelly at 613-445-5405 or Monique at gooddogrescue@live.com. Visit our website for more information www.gooddogrescue.ca. Steve Bakker Metcalfe, ON 613-821-3267 Â&#x2021;'XPSWKH'XPS1RZ2XURIÂżFHORFDWHGDW&DVWRU6WUHHWLQ5XVVHOOLVRSHQIURPDPWR bakkercrest@xplornet.com noon Monday to Friday. Please visit us for information, petitions, and signs. Be sure to check our ZZZK\JUDGHURRĂ&#x20AC;QJFRP_ website at www.dumpthedumpnow.ca. 613-979-3837.

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Villager October 17 pg 10 (18)_Villager May 26 pg 10 12-10-16 3:44 PM Page 1

Page 10 The Villager October 17, 2012

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T-Wolves finish 1st in basketball regular season HAMMOND— The Russell High girls basketball team wrapped up their regular season with a pair of wins on Oct. 10 in Hammond. The results meant the Timberwolves finished the regular season in top spot and will now host the playoff tournament later today. The T-Wolves beat STFX 45-10 to open their day. They took a 16-7 lead into half time and never looked back. Chloe Park led the TWolves in scoring followed by Beth Hayton. Next, Russell played Embrun to finish off the round-robin play to determine final seeding for playoffs. Again, the T-Wolves took a big, 27-9 lead to half, and cruised past Embrun winning 49-22.This time is was Hayton as the team’s top scorer followed by Park.

Coach Laure Mitchell was pleased at the tempo her team set in the second half of their games. “ In both games, the girls brought more intensity in the second half, staying very strong on defense and playing hard right through to the end of the game. I’m very happy with the way they are playing, the way they encourage one another and their team spirit. As with this past tournament, we will continue to work hard on defense (it has been working well for us) and look for ways to include and improve on offensive plays.” The playoff tournament set for today, Oct. 17, will see St. Thomas, Vankleek Hill and Hawkesbury visit RHS with semi-finals in the morning and the championship in the afternoon.

STA football teams beat St. Joe’s CORNWALL— The St. Thomas junior and senior boys football teams travel to the perennial powerhouse St Joe’s Secondary School, in Cornwall on Oct. 12, looking to add more wins to their season totals. It would be no easy task as St. Joe’s is a AAA school, almost triple the size of STA. The Ravens not only battled their opponents but also harsh weather. It was a cold day with high winds and

bouts of snow. The junior boys found themselves tied at seven at the half. In the second, Kevin Lemore ripped off a touch down run and the junior Ravens took the game 14-7. The senior boys played solid defensive football in their game and were able to keep St Joe’s high-powered offence in check. Brina Lair and Brody Mitchell came up with time-

Beth Hayton had a pair of strong games for the RHS girls basketball team. She led the team in scoring in their 49-22 win over Embrun. The team finished the regular season in top spot and host the playoff tournament later today. Matte photo

ly interceptions on defense helping their offense with field position. Patrick O’Neil, Shane Kelly, Mike Cogan and Alex Lair were flying all over the field making big hits on defense and making it difficult for the St. Joe’s offense to establish anything. St. Thomas struck first, with a touchdown pass from Kyle Clowater to Connor Letts, but missed the extra point. Later, Clowater hit Justin Hubers for his second passing touchdown of the

day and then the Ravens converted a two-point conversion, a run by Lair. Clowater later hit a rouge and the Ravens took the game 15-8. Due to a short roster, some players found themselves playing ironman football, playing both sides of the ball, offense and defense. Of particular note, Kelly, Mike and Dan Cogan, Lair and Taylor Ryan all contributed to the Ravens offensive and defensive schemes.

T-Wolves miss RHS undefeated at out on playoffs second tourney HAMMOND— The Russell High girls soccer team was back on the pitch, Oct. 9, when they travelled to Hammond to take on the host team, St. Francis Xavier, and the team that beat them last year to qualify for EOSSAA, Le Relais. The Timberwolves already had a strong opening to their season with a win and a tie in their first tournament and this one would be even more important because it would determine the seeding for the playoffs, held yesterday at Russell High. The T-Wolves began the day against St. FX. It was an even first half with the teams heading to the break scoreless. In the second half, Carley McKinnon-

Humphreys got the TWolves on the board with her third goal of the season. Later, Julia Lewis found the net extending the lead to 20. That was all the T-Wolves needed as Russell hung on for the 2-0 win. In their second game, the T-Wolves battled Le Relais to 0-0 tie. Coach Emily Olmstead gave credit to her team’s mental toughness for the way they dealt with the schedule at the tournament. “The girls played extremely well, considering we played first and last game, so there was a huge gap in the day.” The girls played their playoff tournament yesterday at Russell High, see next week’s Villager for complete coverage.

CASSELMAN— The Russell High Timberwolves senior boys soccer team were in Casselman on Oct. 10 for their final tournament of the regular season. The T-Wolves were going to need a pair of wins to qualify for the playoffs, but it was not to be as they came up just short, despite a win and a draw. The T-Wolves first game was against Le Relais. Russell came out and played a very strong game. Justin Samuels was the offensive star of the game scoring three beautiful goals. Liam Dupelle scored on a nice header and Eamon Colvin scored on a great solo rush from the midfield as Russell won 5-1. The T-Wolves second game was against the host school, Casselman, who were in top spot in the east division. Russell controlled the play for most of the game. The weather started to play a big factor in the second half as a very strong wind was at Russell’s back. That resulted in numerous chances and there were a couple of wild scrambles in front of Casselman’s net, but Russell couldn’t put one in and the game ended in 0-0 draw. RHS finished in 10th place and failed to make the playoffs as only the top eight teams qualify. Coach Randy McPhee gave his thoughts on the end of the season for the T-Wolves. “We played our best soccer over the last three games with a close, hard-fought game against St. Thomas and the win and the tie on Wednesday. Its unfortunate that we didn’t make the playoffs since we had some momentum going and we could’ve been a factor in the final tournament, but I’m really proud of the team and the way the played throughout the season.”

Playoff bound!

Sarah Shewan led the St. Thomas senior Ravens basketball team with 22 points in a close 41-40 win over Embrun on Oct. 10 in Hammond. This was the second tournament for the senior girls team. The Ravens also beat St. Francis Xavier 3514 on the day. The wins helped the Ravens qualify for the playoff tournament later today at Russell High. The Ravens will take on Vankleek Hill. Matte photo

Ravens Keeper kept a pair of Clean sheets in the Ravens two wins on Oct. 10 in Casselman.

Matte photo

Ravens get win and draw, advance to finals tournament CASSELMAN— The St. Thomas senior boys soccer team travelled to Casselman to play in a league crossover tournament on Oct. 10. The Ravens took on a pair of opponents, Casselman and Plantagenet, and controlled the tempo in both games resulting in no goals being conceded by the Ravens. STA began the day by taking on number-one ranked Casselman, from the east, and drew 0-0. STA had a strong game keeping the ball in the opponents end most of the

game, but just could not find the net. In their second game, STA found their stride and rolled to a 6-0 victory over Plantagenet. Goal scorers were, Vincent Belle, who converted a header from a corner kick, Eric Smith, with a blast in the low corner outside the 18-yard box, and Cameron Hunt, who put in a rebound. Connor Letts, was the sniper of the game with three goals. The senior boys will play a finals tournament later today.


Villager October 17 pg 11 (19)_Villager May 26 pg 11 12-10-16 3:47 PM Page 1

The Villager October 17, 2012 Page 11

Jets win three in a row; Vikings struggle at Classic OTTAWA— In a reversal of fortunes after their first two games, the Metcalfe Jets posted an 8-5 victory, Oct. 9, while being outshot by their opponents. The Jets looked to carry that momentum into the EOJHL Fall Classic Oct. 13-14. Jets 8 Canadians 5 The Ottawa Junior Canadians peppered 50 shots at Jets goalie Eric Drouin, while the Metcalfe fired 32 at Ottawa net-minder Coady Edwards. Playing their third straight road game to open the EOJHL season, the Jets found scoring from seven different players, and converted on two of three power play chances. Metcalfe never trailed in the game, leading 3-1 after one period, thanks to goals by Jordan Malette, Brett Varrin and Bryan Dalrympie. It was 4-2 following the middle frame as Thomas Mansbridge added one midway through the period, while the Jets were on the man advantage, making it 4-2 at that point. Ottawa closed the gap to 6-5 in the third period, before Metcalfe responded with two more goals to seal the victory. David Kilrea, Matthew Chennette, Dawson Fisher, on the power play, and Dalrympie’s second lifted the Jets to the 8-5 win. Jets 6 Tikis 1 Metcalfe faced the Brockville Tikis in game one, at the Classic, played on Oct. 13. After building a 3-1 firstperiod lead, the Jets continued to bring the pressure on a young Brockville squad and scored three more unanswered goals to cruise to a 6-1 victory. The Jets outshot the Tikis 36-20 dominating the posi-

tional play for most of the match. Rookie Devon Docksteader led the Jets on the score sheet with two goals and an assist. Matt Sheehan, David Kilrea, Scott Flemming and Jordan Mallette rounded out the goal scoring. Ryan McLaughlin picked up the win between the pipes for Metcalfe while Brockville net-minder Nathan Peters suffered the loss. Jets 3 Vikings 2 (OT) Returning for the second game of the event, on Oct. 14, Metcalfe found themselves in a battle with the Casselman Vikings. While this game featured many good scoring chances, it was a much more physical game with aggressive fore-checking from the Vikings. Despite almost doubling Casselman on the shot clock (38-20), Vikings goaltender Alexandre Michaud played a solid game turning away the Jets snipers on many quality opportunities, especially during the first two periods. Casselman opened the scoring midway through the first period on a power-play goal by Luc Forget. Metcalfe responded before the end of the period on a shot from the slot by Docksteader after a nice feed from Derek Varrin. The Vikings scored the only goal of the second period, Jordan Baptiste 47 seconds in, and lead 2-1. The tension mounted in the third as the play remained tight and both teams faced several short-handed situations. The Jets added to the drama and tied the game with eight minutes left in the frame on an unassisted power-play goal by Matt Sheehan, sending the game to overtime.

RPS earn trio of 1st-place ribbons at PCPS meet

Over 40 Russell Public School cross-country runners joined 10 other schools in Vankleek Hill on October 5 for the PCPS Cross-Country Meet. Strong performances were put in by all participants, with three RPS runners taking home first place honors, above, Kate Thompson (9-10 girls) and Kristin Huisman, left, (7-8 girls). Jacob Hill (7-8 boys) also finished in first place.

Photos courtesy Peggy Carkner

With the game looking like it may end in a draw, Metcalfe brought the play into the Casselman zone with less than thirty seconds on the clock. After gaining possession of the puck, deep in the zone, Mansbridge fed the puck back to defenseman Marc Hough who was unprotected at the blue line. Hough released a quick short-side shot that handcuffed Michaud and secured the win for Metcalfe. Jets goaltender Drouin picked up the win kicking out 18 of 20 Vikings shots. The Jets were in Almonte last night and finally play their first game of the season in Metcalfe on Oct. 19 against Clarence. They will also host Gatineau on Oct. 21. Old Viking comes back to haunt former team Casselman’s other game this weekend was their first match of the Fall Classic against Arnprior where they met a familiar foe, goaltender Kyle Lamothe, who played for the Vikings for most of last season. Joel Adam put the Vikings up 1-0 with less than a minute to go in the first period, but that would be the end of their offence. Arnprior quickly answered seconds into the second period, then took the lead with 1:41 to go in the period. The Packers went on to add three unanswered third-period goals and took the win 5-1. Both power plays went 0-7 in the game. Casselman outshot Arnprior 36-18 in the loss. Phillippe Quesnel took the loss in the Vikings net, Lamothe earned the win for the Packers. Casselman hosts South Grenville on Oct. 18.

Metcalfe Jets forward Kyle Downey works the puck wide on Casselman defender Sylvain Quesnel during an inter-divisional EOJHL clash at the leagues annual Showcase Tournament this past Sunday in Arnprior. The Jets edged the Vikings 3-2 on an overtime goal with just 14 seconds to play. Courtesy photo

Panthers capsize Vikings; slashed by Cougars EMBRUN— The weekend started out as expected for the Embrun Panthers with a win at home on Oct. 12 against Papineauville. However, the Panthers were shocked on Oct. 13, when they were beaten by the then winless Cougars in Vankleek Hill. Panthers 5 Vikings 2 goals Short-handed proved to be the difference in this one as the two teams combined for three in the game. After a scoreless first period, the Vikings opened the scoring two minutes into the second. That lead last for 1:46 when the Panthers got it back, while Papineauville was on the advantage. Francis Legault scored unassisted to make it 1-1. The Panthers took the lead later in the frame when Ryan Kemp found the net from Eric Garrioch and Mathieu Gregoire. With just 1:15 to go in the period, Embrun

made it 3-1 when Charles Antoine Labonté scored, from Legault and Matt Eberley. In the third, Embrun extended the lead to 4-1 with their second short-handed goal of the game. Again, Legault found twine, this time from Labonté. Legault completed his hat trick, at even strength with 6:07 remaining, from Garrioch and Quinton Gill making it 5-1. The Vikings got one while shorthanded in the dying seconds, but this game went to the Panthers 5-2. Philip Eberley picked up the win in the Panthers net. Panthers 2 Cougars 5 It was a reversal of fortunes for the Panthers the next night in Vankleek Hill as the Cougars, who started the season 0-4, shocked the Panthers 5-2. The Panthers started strong with a goal midway through the first period by

Garrioch, from Kemp and Labonté, but were unable to maintain pressure. Vankleek Hill tied the game with five minutes left in the first and the teams went to the break deadlocked. The Cougars put up a pair of goals in the second to lead 3-1 after 40 minutes. Embrun made it 3-2 with a goal in the first minute of the third period, off the stick of Shawn Ennis, with assists going to Labonté and Francis Lafond. However, before they could get any closer, the Cougars added another two and earned their first win of the season 5-2. Eberley was back in the Panthers net, but took the loss. The Panthers remain second in their division behind St. Isidore, who have yet to lose this season. This week the Panthers host La Peche on Oct. 19 and then visit Rockland Oct. 21.

Midget B2’s open season with win RUSSELL— With no juvenile team in Russell this season Peter Kruys was looking to finally having a winter off after 44 years on the bench. That retirement lasted about three weeks. He read that the Russell Minor Hockey Association was icing five midget teams, but only had two coaches. So after some deliberation he decided to forsake the LayZ-Boy and get involved yet again. Kruys was assigned the midget B2 team and brought his sponsor of 19 years, Russell IDA Pharmacy, along for the ride. On Oct.11, the Russell IDA Warriors midget B2 team stepped on the ice at Barrett Arena for their first game, after only one practice. The home team, Leitrim Hawks B3, scored the game’s opening goal at 4:55 of the first period. The Warriors evened the score on the power play with 3:41 left in the second period when defenseman Josh Mann passed the puck across to Rory Friend, at the

side of the net. His first shot was blocked, but he quickly put the rebound into the net. Josh Kelly also earned an assist on the goal. In the third period, Steven Laramee put the Warriors ahead with another powerplay marker at 11:16 when he deked around the defense and had the opportunity to get three shots away on net and finally getting the puck over the line. Andrew Lamoure and Kelly picked up the assists. At the 7:20 mark, Laramee scored again when he tipped in a pass from Travis Smith, who was set up by Riley Mills. With just 47 seconds remaining in the game, Friend scored his second goal with Mills picking up his second assist and Scott Ryan his first. Moodie Young turned away 14 of the 15 shots he faced in the Warriors’ net, while his teammates directed 29 shots at his opponent. The team has a pair of games coming up this week, on Oct. 18 they are home to Lietrim and visit Orleans on Oct. 23.


Villager October 17 pg 12 (20)_Villager May 26pg 12 12-10-16 3:41 PM Page 1

Page 12 The Villager October 17, 2012

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HIS YEAR, SMALL BUSINESS

branches of the BDC in British Columbiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lower Fraser Valley, pooled their resources to organize business management training sessions during one special week targeted at entrepreneurs in the area. This initiative was a great success and resulted in the participation of all BDC branches across the province the following year. Finally, in 1981, the BDC launched Small Business Week on a national scale. Since then, this event has increased in popularity every year.

2012, TAKING OCTOBER 15 THROUGH TO THE 19, IS DEDICATED TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP. Every year for more than 30 years now, the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) organises this thematic week to pay tribute to Canadian entrepreneurs. Events are organized across the country through the Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s network of branches and its partners. Small Business Week was inaugurated in 1979 when WEEK

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The Villager-October 17, 2012  

Serving Russell Village and Township and Surrounding Areas Since 1984.

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