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This Week May the Fourth Be With You movie night will host a screening of Star Wars at Russell High School. Movie starts at 6:30pm on Sat., May 4. Garage, Rummage, Plant and Bake Sale at the Russell United Church on May 3 and 4. See page 9 for details.

North Russell on OGS radar for shale gas site Pamela Pearson Villager Editor RUSSELL — On the coattail’s of April 22’s Earth Day, the news of a potential ‘fracking’ for shale gas in the area has come to light. The Ontario Geological Survey (OGS), part of the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines released a search and discovery article, The Shale Gas Potential for the Ordovician Shale Succession of Southern Ontario, indicating the Russell area as a drill site. Julia Bennett, Media Coordinator for the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines noted “The mandate of the Ontario Geological Survey is to document the geology of

Sisters are Friends for Life At the Friends for Life Cure Cancer Breakfast, Guest of Honour JosÊe Lefebvre, second from left, with her sisters Marise Lefebvre, Julie Emard and Roseline Savage. Lefebvre was selected as Guest of Honour to represent young women with breast cancer, after her own successful battle with the disease. She spoke of the importance of removing the stigma of breast cancer as a death sentence and promoted early detection and prevention. The sisters, who lost their mother CÊcile Lefebvre in 2004 to the disease, also lit a candle in her memory — a tradition at the breakfast. The event, held on April 26 at the Embrun Community Centre, was attended by almost 400 people, raising a total of $33, 423 through ticket sales and PJ Pearson Photo donations. Ontario and communicate this information to the public. This means the OGS maps and samples a range of rocks, including black shale, to comprehensively document Ontario’s geology. Ordovician shale rocks in Ontario were recognized and documented as early as 1916, by the Geological Survey of Canada.� But exploration for this

type of gas can be controversial because unlike conventional natural gas deposits, where natural gas is extracted easily through standard drilling practices, shale gas requires a hydraulic fracking process which injects highpressure fluids from water to a mixture of propane and butane to crack the rock, allowing the previously trapped gas pockets to be

drawn to the surface for recovery. With the approximate millions of litres of fluid needed with each drill, critics worry the end result could be potential ground water contamination amongst other environmental issues. Taggart-Miller Environmental Services recently pulled the North Russell Road quarry site out

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of the running for its Capital Region Resource Recovery Centre project because they determined its shale landscape was not as suited to the project as was the more claybased Boundary and Devine Roads site. Mayor J.P. St. Pierre, who was recently informed of the exploration, stated that until the township learns more, no comment can be forthcom-

ing. Louis PrĂŠvost, Director of Planning and Forestry of The United Counties of PrescottRussell also had no comment for The Villager at this time. Bennett provided information indicating that the location of the Russell sample site is approximately 7km north of the village and was taken in 1964. Continued on page 2

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Page 2 The Villager May 1, 2013

Russell Fire Department

Flashing green lights – be aware

As the population of Russell grows it has become apparent that many people do not know about the flashing green lights that volunteer firefighters use in their vehicles. Volunteer fire departments, like ours in Russell, rely on people who have other careers to respond to calls. Our firefighters do not man the station the way that full-time departments do. When someone calls 9-1-1 the information is given to our dispatch station which is located in Hawkesbury, the dispatch office then puts out a page. Each firefighter carries a pager that gives us information related to the call. It is at this point that we are required to travel to the fire hall to get the equipment and trucks required to deal with the situation. Each firefighter responds to the fire hall in their own vehicle which is equipped with a flashing green light. The green light is simply a way for the public to know that this person is a firefighter and that they are responding to an

emergency situation. We ask that if you see a vehicle responding with the green light flashing please pull over immediately and let them pass. Obviously the quicker we get to the hall the quicker we can respond to the situation. You might also notice that sometimes a vehicle will be using the flashing green light but will not be travelling to the fire hall. Depending on the situation there will often be some vehicles traveling directly to the scene as opposed to the fire hall. The fire chief almost always responds directly to the scene in his own vehicle, this way he can size up the situation and relay this information to the responding firefighters so that they can prepare a game plan on route. The flashing green lights are an important part of our emergency operating procedures and with the public’s cooperation they can be very effective in keeping response times down, especially as the village grows and traffic increases.

Shale drill site Continued from the front “This core is preserved in Ontario’s Oil, Gas and Salt Resources Library in London, and was examined and sampled by the OGS as part of the province-wide study of Ordivician shales and associated gases. At present, shale gas is not being extracted anywhere in Ontario and there are no before the proposals Ministry of Natural Resources requesting approval to explore for shale gas or for the use of hydraulic high-volume

fracturing.” continuing that “at this time there is no indication that Ontario hosts economic reserves of shale. This area remains important to the study because the geologic formations are known to be organic–rich and may be sources of gas in this region. Analysis of samples from the Russell core is ongoing as the study continues.” Bennet also noted that until a full felid study has been concluded, only the preliminary findings are available. To view the study visit http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/documents/2012/50730otis/ndx_ otis.pdf.

Lions help replenish shelves

On the morning of April 27, the Russell Lions, assisted by Scouts and other youth volunteers, collected food items for the Good Neighbours Food Bank. Over 1400 items were collected and delivered to the Russell Township food bank as well as $160 in cash donations, proving once again the people of Russell to be good neighbours. This food drive is an annual event for the Russell Lions Club and is now held in the spring to replenish the food bank’s shelves after the winter season. Thank you to all who donated and helped in this project. The Russell Lions Club is fulfilling it’s motto “We Serve”. Courtesy Photo

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May 11 - 12 9 am - 4 pm May 13 - 16 9 am - 8 pm This week’s Russell Fire Department Fire Safety Column is brought to you by RFD Firefighter Greg Bols.

Emergency Preparedness Week The Township of Russell and the Ontario Provincial Police are partnering up during the Emergency Preparedness Week to help promote senior’s safety. This year, the campaign focuses on ensuring seniors and older adults are getting the message about being prepared. While they have the ability to help themselves and others, seniors can, sometimes, be more vulnerable during emergencies. With the help of Emergency Management Ontario, we have developed resources to help them and their families ensure they are well prepared. From May 6 to 10, presentations will be conducted to a variety of senior’s associations and groups alike. Furthermore, a Public Information Session will be held at the Russell Township Municipal Hall on Wed. May 8 starting at 7 p.m. For more information, please contact Mrs. Millie Bourdeau, Director of Safety and Public Enforcement/CEMC at 613-443-3066, ext. 2320.

Incidents

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In the week of April 22, 2013 to April 29, 2013, Russell County Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) responded to 264 occurrences. Among those occurrences OPP responded to 14 collisions, 21 alarms, five domestic disputes and one impaired driver. As a result 19 persons were charged with various offences. Trespass EMBRUN — On April 23 OPP Constable Luc

Turgeon responded to a suspicious vehicle incident on St. Albert Road in Embrun. At that location it was reported that a vehicle was on the complainant’s property and the occupant of the vehicle was attempting to steal some electric wires. The vehicle left the scene prior to police arrival but was located a short time later by police. Clint Frappier, 40 of Cornwall, will have to appear in court on the charges of trespass and prowling near the dwelling of a house and possession of break-in instruments. Shoplift/Theft EMBRUN —  OPP Constable Pam Como responded to a theft incident at the Independent Grocer’s on Notre-Dame Street in Embrun on April 25. At that location the staff at the store witnessed two persons exit the store with a full basket of food without paying for the merchandise. The two suspects were identified and later arrested by police. Both Nancy M. Cote, 36 of Casselman and the accompanying 17 year old male, will have to appear in court to answer to the charges of theft under shoplifting Arson ROCKLAND — On April 28, OPP Constable David Abuwa responded to a fire incident at St. Patrick School on Heritage Street in Rockland. Close to 6 a.m. unknown person(s) broke into a shed behind the school, removing property that belonged to the Day Care and set it on fire underneath a structure behind the school. The small fire destroyed the Day Care property. Anyone who might have information for this crime is asked to contact Constable David Abuwa at the Rockland OPP office at 613-446-5124.

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The Villager May 1, 2013 Page 3

A 4-H Club not to be forgotten Kaitlin Blenkarn Special To The Villager Taking part in 4-H is a great opportunity for hands on learning. There are many different clubs you can join, for example there is Dairy (calf), Scrapbooking, Milk and Woodworking, as well as the current club I am taking, the Vet club. This club is perfect for those who want to become a vet, farmer, or you just love animals and want to learn more about them and their health. Half of our meetings were held at the Navan Vet Clinic, where four vets: Jean Cyr, Jenn Hubbard, David Douglas, and Russ Campbell introduced us to many different things such

as tools, animals health, and bacteria. The other half were at local farms - Versteeg family, the Oeschger Family, and the Murray family. Before joining the club I was nervous, because, I was worried about possibly seeing the insides of animals or operations on animals. However, I went to the first meeting at the Navan Vet Clinic and loved it. The vets were super nice and helped us understand the topics being taught. One of the meetings was out of this world. There was a cow which had a plug/funnel on her side. The vet pulled out the plug and we could stick our hands in the cow’s stomach, we were wearing giant plastic gloves

of course, and felt the rumen - the first of four stomachs of the cow. You may be thinking this cow was asleep or dead but no she was standing and eating, she could not feel a thing. This club gave me a chance to do incredible things that not many people can say they’ve done or even seen. That’s one of the reasons why I love this club so much. I’m only 13 and I’ve already felt the inside of a cow’s stomach, listened to a calf’s heart, seen a ultrasound on a pregnant cow and much, much more. How many people do you know that can say that they have done this? I love 4-H and think it’s an amazing club. I would definitely recommend 4-H

Future vets?

Kaitlin Blenkarn, top right, and her fellow Russell County 4-H Vet Club Courtesy Photo members visiting the Navan Veterinary Clinic. to anyone. I would like to give a big thank you to the families who hosted the meetings on their farms, the

vets from the Navan Vet Clinic and last but not least the leaders Joanne Nyentap and Wilma Baas.

This year is the 4-H’s 100th anniversary. For more information, visit www.4hontario.ca.

LCBO employees ready for strike action TORONTO – While a strike by OPSEU LCBO workers would certainly be an inconvenience, it will not necessarily stem the flow of the bubbly for rural Ontario, thanks to the number of “agency stores” in the area. After only 17 hours of bargaining, the union representing the employees requested a “no-board” report. The report is a letter from the Ministry of Labour stating that a Conciliation Board will not be appointed and once issued, gives the union 17 days before it will be in a legal strike position. In a press release on the LCBO website, LCBO President and CEO Bob

Peter said this was not an unusual move by the union and does not mean a strike is imminent. Peter said he felt confident that an agreement would be reached by the two sides in the dispute. In the meantime, the unionized employees say they are prepared to walk off the job if an agreement cannot be reached. Representing more than 7,000 LCBO workers, the union said it filed an application with the Ministry of Labour for a May 17 strike deadline, just in time for what is known across Canada as the May 2-4 weekend and the first long

weekend of the summer season. The employees’ contract ended on March 31 and in April 95 per cent voted in favour of a strike mandate. While the strike would affect the LCBO stores, the “Agency” stores located in many small hamlets are unaffected by the strike in that they are not employees of the LCBO, but independent business owners. However, as agency stores, their stock is supplied by a “mother” store and it is possible that they can only remain open as long as they have stock unless the LCBO arranges to have stock delivered directly to the agency

Zumbathon charity event for Brain Matters RUSSELL — Local zumba fitness instructors Leanne McLean and Aleksandra Erdelyi, along with other guest instructors are holding a two hour zumbathon charity event on Sat. May 25 from 1 p.m. to 3 pm. St. Thomas Aquinas CHS will be the scene of

the latest Latin-inspired dance-fitness program which blends hot international music with contagious steps to form a lively fitness party The event is to help Justin McKenna offset the costs of required treatments and rehabilitation costs involved with the

consequences of his traumatic brain injury after a 2007 accident. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door and can be ordered by contacting zumbawithleanne@hotmail.com, alekserdelyi@gmail.com or Donna Mota at donnalee.mota@gmail.com.

Scotiabank matches dance proceeds Russell Scotiabank employees Suzanne Bolduc, left, and Lynne Rochon present Russell Kin President Doug Anthony with a cheque for $2,000 in support of the Rock-Kin the Night Away 50's/60's dance held in February. The presentation was made April 11. Courtesy Photo

store. So while the LCBO’s management is confident an agreement will be reached in time, OPSEU President Warren Thomas said in a release that the union has no choice but to prepare for the possibility of a walkout.

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Page 4 The Villager May 1, 2013

1-866-307-3541 FAX: 613-448-3260

& Opinion EDITORIAL

thevillager.editor@gmail.com

7 King St., P.O. Box 368 Chesterville, Ont. K0C 1H0

EDITORIAL CASTORCountry Information that could save lives

The electronic documentation of health information allows for better use and management of patient health details which can be shared safely and securely between healthcare organizations, in turn making the delivery of health care more effective and efficient. Last week the Ottawa Public Health suspended almost a thousand high school students because of improper immunization records. The 20 day suspension came into effect after proof of up-to-date immunization records were not provided to the health unit. Students, who are not the ones responsible for their records, have once again been made a pawn in the red tape of policy. Upper Canada District School Board parents have also received letters from the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU) stating that if immunization information is not provided, their child would also be suspended from school. Ironically most of the immunizations the youth get once they reach school age are the ones delivered by the EOHU in the schools. They rely on a slip of paper to communicate that information home to the parents, via the child. Many may ask what the point of suspending a student who has already been in the classroom is, and how much of a risk they pose to the rest of the school. And they might be right, if their child is in the minority that ‘herd protection’ defends from exposure, but what happens when the majority are not protected and they then become the problem? The problem is that it has come down to penalizing the students, by harming their educational progress, for the untidy record keeping of parents and/or healthcare providers. It is not a high expectation for citizens to keep their health records organized and up-to-date, however it can be challenging if one moves frequently or a clinic closes and files do not move efficiently. We share e-books, and enjoy secure online shopping and banking – why can’t our practitioners implement a secure online electronic summary of our own health records? If children are not legally responsible for their health care decisions, how are they legally expected to manage their records, or to understand the long term significance of a 3”x4” notification card? Naturally, hit the parents where it counts, by making them lose time at work while trying to get an appointment when none are available for months. Electronic records, from birth, would save significant parental stress (even for those who do manage the notes), and save lost workplace productivity. The suspension of high school students speaks to an issue of record keeping and enrollment. They don’t go to kindergarten without their infant immunizations. Theirs is an issue of the subsequent booster shots, most of which are administered by the health units. Record management is the issue here, not the youth unfairly suspended for the sins of a system that does not work well. A heath record is living document that tells the story of the patient and facilitates each encounter they have with health professionals involved in their care. So why, with the technology available today, can this information not be accessible from anywhere, as long as permission is given to do so. Why is it harming the economy and the education of thousands across the country? The reduction of miscommunication about everything from family history to childhood immunizations would improve the continuity and quality of care in so many ways. Pamela J Pearson

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Publisher’s Liability for Error The publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The publisher’s liability for other errors or

By Tom Van Dusen

Nazis occupy pub Every now and then over the past few years, I’ve wandered into the Russell House Pub and it looks like a movie set. That’s because it is a movie set… at least for a day. One time the bar was teaming with cowboys and dance hall girls. Not the ones that usually frequent the place, especially on pool night… these were pretend ones making a Western. They were filming a scene in “Hell at my Heels” starring Russell’s own Jurgen Vollrath as the villainous Big Ben Peters. Director Brett Kelly loved the Old West ambiance provided by the Russell House, with hardly any alterations needed to make it fit into the script. When the movie was released at the Mayfair Theatre in Ottawa, I was there. Later, Russell House owners Edna and Terry Robinson staged a Spaghetti Western Night and showed the movie in the pub. I was there for that event too. Another time the pub was crawling with possible zombies, not the ones we’re all familiar with, but the cast of “Eddie: The Sleepwalking Cannibal”. Director Boris Rodriguez loved the moody atmosphere of the Russell House, claiming it was tailor made for the scene he shot there. I’ve never seen “Eddie” To Editor: As if our provincial health system isn’t in a big enough mess, our wonderful Liberal government has seen fit to make it worse by ordering us to use fluorescent bulbs as of Jan. 1/14, a little over eight months away. How have they made it worse???  Check out the Health Canada website, http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ about what occurs if you happen to break one of these bulbs. Here’s the gist of it. Remove people and pets from the room but before you leave the room, open up windows and doors to ventilate the room for 15 mins. before starting to clean, to remove the deadly mercury vapours. Don’t use a vacuum as it will spread the mercury vapours and contaminate your vacuum.  Scoop up pieces with stiff paper - don’t use a broom.  Use duct tape to pick up small pieces and powder. Place in glass container with a

and neither have the Robinsons. Has anybody out there had the pleasure? Edna and Terry hope to get a copy from Rodriguez at some point so they can hold a showing in the pub with a matching meal. What foods go with zombies other than blood pudding that I once sampled in either Austria or Germany? Speaking of which… Last Sunday I strolled into the Russell House and Nazis were storming through it. Not the usual Nazis… I’m joking, of course! Edna would never let your garden variety Nazi into the pub. I’ve got to say that, even though I knew they were actors in a new production shooting at the Russell House, seeing a bunch of guys walking around in grey and black shirts with swastikas on their arms was somewhat intimidating. It’s the latest movie to rely on the pub for a crucial scene, “The Scarecrow Club”. The plot – and stop me if you’ve imagined this before – revolves around Nazis taking over Ontario and the ensuing effort to vanquish them. It’s being mounted by Kanata-based Eagle Wolf Productions and directed by Richard Groen. Like the directors that have gone before him, Groen complimented the Russell House on its “great décor”, claiming it was perfect for a scene where the

heroes in his movie confront the villains. Not only does the pub work as a movie backdrop, but there’s plenty of room for setup and equipment, and Edna and Terry double as crew caterers as well as hosts. “They’ll certainly be getting a thank you credit on the completed film,” Groen said. Do you detect a pattern here? Whether its cowboys, zombies or Nazis, the Russell House seems to fill the bill in terms of the required look and atmosphere. Groen said he’ll recommend the location to others making movies in and around Ottawa. These aren’t Hollywoodstyle, big budget productions! They’re mom-andpop moviemakers with a passion for the art form. “The Scarecrow Club” has a mere $5,000 budget, partly provided by Groen’s dad Aren who survived WWII in Nazi occupied Holland. Most of the money is going to equipment and advertising, with the cast and crew totalling close to 20 working for free in hopes the project will lead to other opportunities. One of those cast members is none other than Vollrath who directed Groen to the Russell House as a potential location. Other scenes will be filmed on Vollrath’s acreage. Making the movie, Aren said, is bringing back some memories better forgotten. However, he observed, it

LETTERS Editor to the

tight fitting lid to prevent release of the deadly mercury vapours.  Dispose of the container outside the building AND AWAY FROM CHILDREN.  Take to hazardous waste disposal asap.  Don’t put in your household trash. Isn’t this just beautiful. We are being compelled to use these bulbs by the Liberal government further endangering peoples lives and Mr. Crack and his friends are not going to change a thing.  I don’t know about you, but fluorescents will not be used, just the good old tried and true incandescents or the new LEDs.  Our health is more important than some  ridiculous legislation.  Some say the law is an ass.  What about the people  who passed this law? Need I say more. Are you going to do any-

omissions in connection with any advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement.

thing to repeal this legislation, Mr. Crack? If what the Liberals are doing hasn’t make you sick with all the lying and billions in spending, I sure hope the fluorescents don’t do it for you. Ted Smith Russell

To Editor: Although the local hockey minor hockey seasons have come to an end, those of us in the NHL are all still battling it out for playoff spots. It’s still too early to know which teams will make the playoffs, but I wanted to remind local hockey fans of a way to extend their season! On July 6, I’m hosting the third annual Carkinator Car and Moto Rally with some of my fellow NHLers. You’ll

must always be remembered that destructive groups such as the Nazis are a minority in any culture, the modern equivalent being Islamic terrorists. Richard grew up with his dad’s recollections, some of which filtered into the script he wrote for what he described as a political thriller. It’s a “what if” scenario, as in what if the remote concept for most of Nazi occupation suddenly became a fact of life in modern Ontario. The full-length feature follows a short produced by the Groens called “A Lesson Learned”. It’s based on an actual event that occurred during WWII involving a German officer who risks his own wellbeing to help a Dutch family. What might be next in the Russell House’s moviemaking career? “I don’t know but I’m open to offers,” said Edna who loves being involved in the movie business, even at the shoestring level. “We’re due for a comedy?,” Terry suggested as a break from all the movie bad guys frequenting the pub. Continued on page 5 spend a day celebrating the hockey greats raised right here in your communities, get to meet some of my friends, participate in my hockey-themed car rally (with pit stop hockey/trivia challenges!), earn great prizes, and enjoy a BBQ after-party with worldrenowned hockey historian Liam Maguire – all while raising funds to support your hospital, Winchester District Memorial Hospital! I may play for the New York Islanders hockey club now, but my home is still in Eastern Ontario. That’s why it’s important to me to continue to support my hometown hospital. Register your team online now at www.carkinator.ca and get your friends and families to pledge you. Cheers to hockey and our hospital! Matt Carkner Winchester

All layouts and composition of advertisements produced by the employees of Etcetera Publications (Chesterville) Inc. are protected by copyright vested in the publisher of The Russell Villager.


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The Villager May 1, 2013 Page 5

Cindy Saucier Special to The Villager RUSSELL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Trees For Tomorrow is thrilled to invite the community to a tree planting day on May 4 at noon (rain or shine) at the Russell Landfill Site on Ste. Catherine St. There will be people directing you where to go and the Scouts will be offering a barbeque for volunteers as well as the 1,000 trees that will be planted that day. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget your shovel, gloves, boots and pail. Russell Scout leader Greg McGinnis sits on this committee and is organizing the day. South Nation Conservation has been busy planting 8,000 trees at the

allocated 25 acres. This initiative started when South Nation Conservation raised the flag in the first place and presented their concerns about tree coverage in Russell Township. They provided their expertise, foresters and manpower. Steve Hunter, Kat Watson, Mike Petryk, and Josee Brizard and foresters are to be commended. Township donated the first $1,600 to get the tree project going. Tree Canada President Michael Rosen Richard Walker, and Communication specialist,   attended the April 23 cheque presentation at

Pub hosts new diners

Russell Township and $500 was donated to the project. Richard Walker has been assisting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trees for Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? and is a Russell resident. Russell Township Mayor J.P. St. Pierre and Councillor and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trees for Tomorrowâ&#x20AC;? member,   Eric Bazinet, were both present. Russell Township and the United Counties of PrescottRussell presented the group with another donation of $600. Trees for Tomorrow members are a diverse group with various backgrounds including scientists, and environmentalists arborists, gardeners, and just concerned citizens. The Russell and District Horticultural Society has also assisted, offered their expertise, and attended meetings.

Ann Jackson, teacher at St. Thomas Aquinas, is motivating her students and they are orchestrating the May 14 tree planting event at 10 a.m. Helping her will be Joyce Chartrand from Riviere de Castor in Embrun and along with her students they will be transported to the site for free by Roxborough Bus Lines.   The Richelieu Club will provide lunch for the students. This is true spirit of the community and the environment! TAKE NOTE: If you are organizing a community event, put a recycling program into place. Therefore, recyclable materials will not end up in our landfill site which we are hoping to preserve. Planting trees at the site will help to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Greenâ&#x20AC;? the area. 

GOT A SPORTING EVENT?

LET THE SPORTS EDITOR KNOW! 613-448-2321, ext. 110 chestervillerecord@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @dcmatte

Thank You

Words cannot express how truly thankful we are for everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support & thoughtfulness. Your gestures gave us strength to help endure our loss. We wish we could thank you all individually but judging by the overwhelming turnout during his Celebration of Life, it would take us the rest of our lifetime and then some!

Area gets a Earth Day lessons Left, Ă&#x2030;cole publique Rivière Castor Grade 6 students FĂŠlicitĂŠe CĂ´tĂŠ and Jasmine BerniquĂŠ, fill another bag during an Earth Day cleanup on April 22. Below, At the April 18 Russell Sparks meeting at Russell Public School, Sparks worked on their Earth Week activities and tree badge. Courtesy Photos

Being remembered in such a nice way means a lot more than words can say! With much appreciation, Melanie, Liz and all the family of Gerry Leroux

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From left, Ottawa based actors Brennan Martin, Vincent Valentino and Ryan Palmer are seen here filming a restaurant scene at the Russell House Pub on April 28. The Scarecrow Club hopes to be released in the fall.

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Russell High actors bring home awards Sam Van Dusen Russell High School Special To The Villager Recently I, and 19 other Russell High School students, had the honour to take part in the Sears Drama Festival in Cornwall. Competeting at the regional level, the cast of eight actors included Marlee Burton, Andrew Curran, Jake Morris, Victoria Bowen, Stephen Morgan, Kathleen Reiche, Eamon Colvin and myself. I also took on the role of assistant director to director Quinten McKinley. RHS teacher Kevin Kennedy was the producer and student Rachel Hayton was Stage Manager. The play presented was called Drift. McKinley, Burton and I read through many scripts before choosing Drift. In the past we had a tendency of presenting comedies so this year we decided to change it up and choose a drama. Another big selling point of this type of production is the fact that it has a large cast allowing us to take full advantage of the talent at RHS. Three auditions were held for those interested in

taking part in our production, and as it turned out, we had just the right amount of people audition for the play so we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to make any cuts. It was also a positive that those who did audition were extremely talented. Most of our cast consisted of Dramafest veterans, although there were three new performance participants to Dramafest â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kelsea Mann, Eamon Colvin and Kathleen Reiche As an audience member you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be able to tell the difference between alumni and a new participant, as everyone performed at a top notch level. All in all it took around three months to have our play fully prepped for the big presentation in Cornwall. It was really amazing watching the group come together and put on such an amazing show. Stage crew member Liam Tuck said â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was hard work, but it was worthwhile to see everything come together in the end.â&#x20AC;? When asked about her experience at Dramafest, another stage crew member Kathleen Tuck stated â&#x20AC;&#x153;It

was a great experience to be a part of the play, to see how everything was put together so effectively, it was a lot of fun.â&#x20AC;? At the regional showcase in Cornwall, there is no first, second or third place. Two plays move on from there to participate in provincials. Unfortunately our play is not moving forward. However we did receive

three honorary awards; an acting award of merit presented to the entire ensemble; an award of excellence for set design and an award of excellence for directing. As my time in high school is now coming to an end, I am thrilled to have been part of Dramafest and highly recommend the experience to all those who have the chance to take part.





 





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Seeing multiples

Beginning with Twin Day on April 29, Russell High School students from left, Cody Lavictoire, Sam Van Dusen, Liam Cooke and Zach Holland celebrate Spirit Week at the school. Courtesy Photo

Maurice Chartrand 175 Hamilton Rd, Russell ON 613-851-4880 mchart@xplornet.com




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ƵƉĂŶĚĚŽǁŶŚŝůůƐ͘ZĞŵĂŝŶĂůĞƌƚĂƚĂůůƟŵĞƐ ǁŚĞŶƵƐŝŶŐƉƵďůŝĐƌŽĂĚǁĂLJƐ͘ Defensive Driving ŽŝŶŐ ĞǀĞƌLJƚŚŝŶŐ LJŽƵ ĐĂŶ ƚŽ ĂŶƟĐŝƉĂƚĞ ƉƌŽďůĞŵƐ ĂŶĚ ŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞ LJŽƵƌ ǀŝƐŝďŝůŝƚLJ ŝƐ ĐƌŝƟĐĂůƚŽƚŚĞƐĂĨĞŽƉĞƌĂƟŽŶŽĨĨĂƌŵǀĞŚŝĐůĞƐ ŽŶƉƵďůŝĐƌŽĂĚƐ͗ ͻ ůǁĂLJƐ ƉůĂĐĞ Ă ƐůŽǁ ŵŽǀŝŶŐ ǀĞŚŝĐůĞ ƌĞŇĞĐƚŽƌ ŽŶ ĂŶLJ ĞƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚ ƚŚĂƚ ƚƌĂǀĞůƐ ƐůŽǁĞƌƚŚĂŶƚŚĞƐƉĞĞĚůŝŵŝƚ ͻ<ĞĞƉƚŚĞ^DsƌĞŇĞĐƚŽƌĞŵďůĞŵĐůĞĂŶ͕ĂŶĚ ƌĞƉůĂĐĞŝƚǁŚĞŶŝƚƐƚĂƌƚƐƚŽĨĂĚĞ ͻŽŶƐŝĚĞƌŝŶƐƚĂůůŝŶŐŵŝƌƌŽƌƐƚŽŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞLJŽƵƌ ǀŝĞǁŽĨƚŚĞƌŽĂĚĂƌŽƵŶĚLJŽƵ ͻ DĂŬĞ ƐƵƌĞ LJŽƵƌ ůŽĂĚ ĚŽĞƐŶ͛ƚ ŽďƐĐƵƌĞ ƚŚĞ ůŝŐŚƚƐ͕ ŵŝƌ��ŽƌƐ ĂŶĚ ǁĂƌŶŝŶŐ ƐŝŐŶƐ ŽŶ LJŽƵƌ ƚƌĂĐƚŽƌ ͻ DĂƌŬ ƚŚĞ ĞĚŐĞƐ ŽĨ LJŽƵƌ ƚƌĂĐƚŽƌ ĂŶĚ ĞƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚǁŝƚŚƌĞŇĞĐƟǀĞƚĂƉĞŽƌƌĞŇĞĐƚŽƌƐ ͻ <ĞĞƉ Ăůů ǀĞŚŝĐůĞ ůŝŐŚƚƐ ŽŶ ĂŶĚ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ʹ ƚƵƌŶƐŝŐŶĂůƐ͕ŚĞĂĚůŝŐŚƚƐĂŶĚƚĂŝůůŝŐŚƚƐ ͻ WƌŽǀŝĚĞ ĞdžƚƌĂ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ ƚŽ ŵĂŬĞ ŝƚ ĂƐ ŽďǀŝŽƵƐĂƐƉŽƐƐŝďůĞĨŽƌŵŽƚŽƌŝƐƚƐƚŽŬŶŽǁ LJŽƵ ĂƌĞ ƚŚĞƌĞ͗ ǁĂƌŶŝŶŐ ůŝŐŚƚƐ͕ ŇĂƐŚŝŶŐ ĂŵďĞƌůŝŐŚƚƐĂŶĚĞLJĞͲůĞǀĞůƐŝŐŶĂůƐ Đ ͻ/ĨƉŽƐƐŝďůĞ͕ĂǀŽŝĚƌŽĂĚƐĚƵƌŝŶŐƉĞĂŬƚƌĂĸ ƟŵĞƐ͕ĂŌĞƌĚĂƌŬ͕ŽƌĚƵƌŝŶŐďĂĚǁĞĂƚŚĞƌ ͻ/ĨƚƌĂǀĞůůŝŶŐŐƌĞĂƚĚŝƐƚĂŶĐĞƐ͕ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌƵƐŝŶŐ ĞƐĐŽƌƚ ǀĞŚŝĐůĞƐ ŝŶ ĨƌŽŶƚ ĂŶĚ ďĞŚŝŶĚ LJŽƵ͕ ĞƋƵŝƉƉĞĚǁŝƚŚŇĂƐŚŝŶŐLJĞůůŽǁůŝŐŚƚƐ ͻĞĞdžƚƌĂͲĂǁĂƌĞǁŚĞŶŵĂŬŝŶŐůĞŌƚƵƌŶƐƚŽ ĞŶƐƵƌĞƚŚĂƚŶŽďŽĚLJŝƐƚƌLJŝŶŐƚŽƉĂƐƐ ͻ ŽŶ͛ƚ ƚĂŬĞ ĐŚĂŶĐĞƐ ǁŚĞŶ ƉƵůůŝŶŐ ŽŶƚŽ Ă ƌŽĂĚʹŝĨLJŽƵƌǀŝĞǁŽĨƚŚĞƌŽĂĚŝƐŽďƐƚƌƵĐƚĞĚ͕ ĂƐƐƵŵĞƚŚĂƚŽƚŚĞƌǀĞŚŝĐůĞƐĂƌĞƚƌĂǀĞůůŝŶŐĂƚ ƚŚĞƐƉĞĞĚůŝŵŝƚĂŶĚďĞĞdžƚƌĂͲĐĂƵƟŽƵƐ - www.gfo.ca/RoadSafety.aspx

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CORN‡SOYBEANS‡CEREALS FORAGE‡FERTILIZER

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Box 189 Embrun, ON K0A 1W0 Tel: 613-443-2833 Fax: 613-443-1820 Fertilizer Petroleum Garage Feed

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Elevators Independent Rona Pharmacy

613-443-2190 613-443-3064 613-443-7662 613-443-2357


Villager May 1 pg 07_Villager May 26 pg 07 13-04-30 3:56 PM Page 1

The Villager May 1, 2013 Page 7

6th annual breakfast tickled pink with support

Lighting a candle in memory

Claude Lapointe owner of Marlin Travel in Russell’s Shirley Sullivan, a breast cancer Embrun and sponsor of the Friends for Life breakfast enjoy a tasty breakfast with Embrun survivor of 28 years, lights a candle in memory of dentist Jean Dignard at the April 26 event which those who are no longer with us and to bring light saw all ages come out in support of the pink and hope that a cure will be found for cancer. ribbon campaign.

A celebration of life Above, Guest of Honour Josée Lefebvre is surrounded by the Friends for Life team members Ginette Rivet, Marie-Claire Ivanski, Diane Bourdeau, Nicole Gosselin-Seguin and Lorraine Dicaire at the 6th annual Cure Cancer Breakfast launching the team into 2013’s fundraising for CIBC’s Run for the Cure.

LOOKING VERY FORWARD TO SERVING EVERYONE FOR OUR 2ND YEAR!

RUSSELL, ONTARIO

Ivanski honoured Friends for Life team captain Marie-Claire Ivanski, left, receives a bouquet of flowers from her fellow teammates Lorraine Dicaire, Ginette Rivet, Nicole Gosselin-Seguin and Diane Bourdeau for all the work she has done organizing not just the breakfast which raised over $33,000 this year, but for other events such as the Victorian Tea. Ivanski was also recently nominated for the Jeannette Hawke Volunteer Leadership Award which recognizes volunteer excellence and commitment toward the advancement of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation’s goal of creating a future without breast cancer. PJ Pearson Photos

Ru Russell usssse elll Agricultur Agricultural Agr A c tur ura ra all So Society oc o ociety ccie ety e ty yy usse cu Russell Agricultural Society Agric cultur Société So S ocié é été té éa ag agricole grri rc co ole d de R Ru Russell usssse ell

WE MAKE TAXES PAINLE$$

INSTANT CASH BACK, MAXIMUM REFUND GUARANTEE! YEAR ROUND AUDIT ASSISTANCE Now once again open full time, please call 613-445-1616 or visit the office for hours of operation. 92B MILL STREET, RUSSELL, ON. Site of former Warner public library. PLEASE CALL 613-445-1616 Ask for Chris, Dave, Heidi, Jocelyn or Robert (Our Farm Tax Specialist)

TO BENEFIT THE WINCHESTER DISTRICT MEMORIAL HOSPITAL FOUNDATION Join us on

Saturday, July 6 for the

3rd Annual Carkinator Car & Moto Rally hosted by Matt Carkner Register online today at

www.carkinator.ca and your $50 registration fee goes toward your $500 fundraising goal (minimum to participate). You can have up to six people on your team, whether it be in a car or on three motorcycles! Event Master of Ceremonies,

“Angry Al” Armstrong

yRegister toda ly there are on spots left!!

will be joined by special guest, hockey historian

Liam Maguire

35

to get you through the Rally Afterparty & BBQ

There are awesome PRIZES too!!

$50 $5 $ 50 p pe per err ti tticket icke cket (reserved ((rre esse errv ved d seating) sse ea attiin ng) g) http://www.russellfair.com h p / w.RussellF w ww w ww w.RussellF .R Russsel ell llF llFa ll Fair F air ir.c .com com com www.RussellFair.com orr 613.445.4161 o 61 6 13 3.44 3. 44 45. 5.4 41 6 61 445 416 Billets Bil Bi illllleetts 50 $ chacun cch hacccu ha un (places (pl ((p pllaacccees réservées) rééésseerrvées) vées) éees) s) www.RussellFair.com ww w ww.RussellF .R Russ ussssell ellF llF Fair air ir.com .c co c om 613.445.4161 ou o u6 13 1 3.44 445 45 5.4 161 613 4161

If your team has raised the most money, you’ll win a box at a 2013-2014 Ottawa Senators game, with limousine service for 12! That’s a value of $2,500! If you have raised the most funds individually between all participants, you will win a trip for two to Long Island, New York to see the New York Islanders! (Prize includes air travel, rental car, New York Islanders game and post-game tour of Islanders dressing room, two nights’ accommodation, restaurant dinner and $500 spending money) - WOW, another $2,500 value!

Thank you to our many generous area sponsors!!

wdmh.on.ca/foundation • facebook.com/wdmhfoundation PLATINUM SPONSORS

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GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS LOUIS’ RESTAURANT

BRONZE SPONSORS RUSSELL RUS SELL

D&J MOTORS LTD.

WILLIS KERR CONTRACTING LTD.


Villager May 1 pg 08_Villager May 26 pg 08 13-04-30 1:42 PM Page 1

Page 8 The Villager May 1, 2013

Deadline 3 p.m. Monday

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Vehicles For Sale Credit problem? In-house finance is easy. Just apply on-line and become pre-approved. For clean, low mileage vehicles: www.car-o-line.com or call Car-o-line Autos @ 1-877820-5598 or 613-448-2488. ctfc USED BOOKS For serious readers. Open Sunday 1 - 5 p.m. at 4037 County Rd. 7, Elma. 613-448-3787. stf

FOR RENT 2 & 3 Bedroom rental units available in Embrun and Russell region. Please call 613-443-3575 for more info. 37tfc CONDO FOR RENT Beautiful two plus one bedroom ground floor condominium apartment for rent in the heart of Russell. Open concept living/dining areas, kitchen with island, hardwood and tile throughout. Four piece bathroom with soaker tub, heated floors, air conditioning and more! For pictures and more info: https://sites.google.com/site/4 4secondaveunit2/. $1350 per month. Call 613-496-0046. 43

AA MEETINGS Russell, Mondays at 8 p.m. at Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Catholic Church and Saturdays at 8 p.m. at Russell United Church, Mill Street, Russell. For info call 613-237-6000 or 613-821-3017. Sept 12

GUY-In memory of Mitchell John Guy (Jan. 22, 2003Apr. 30, 2005). Mitchell... Deep in our hearts you will always stay, Loved and missed every day. Mommy, Daddy, Mikyla and Kaden 41

SERVICES Gerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Custom Built Kitchens Custom Woodwork Since 1976 613-552-2034 or fax 613-445-6631 Kitchens, vanities, counter tops, (re)finishing. Free estimates, design service available. Mike Hiemstra. mike@gerryscustom kitchens.com. 52c

FOR RENT FOR RENT-RUSSELL 2 bedroom, lower level of bungalow. Spacious, clean, quiet. $950 plus hydro. Includes gas fireplace, 5 appliances, patio and one parking spot. No dogs/no smoking please. Call 613445-1213. 42

VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER NOW! Organizations or individuals who have tasks which could be done by students looking for their volunteer hours, are welcome to advertise in this space free of charge for TWO (2) weeks. Call The Villager at 1-866-307-3541 with your requests. tfc The Township of Russell Public Library is looking for adult volunteers to help move boxes of books on the afternoon of May 17th. For further information call Helene at 613-445-5331.

COMING EVENTS CLOTHING SALE St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church. All items $1. Sat. May 25 from 9am to 1 pm. Donations of GENTLY used items accepted at St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church, 9-3 on Wednesday, 9-12 on Sunday. 42-2

LOST/FOUND The wrong glasses were picked up at the Barber Shop, Russell around April 6. Please return them and get yours. 613-445-1464.

ARMSTRONG - In loving memory of my dear husband, Gordon Armstrong (May 11, 2012), Glenn Harten (May 6, 1977) and son Douglas Harten (July 18, 2011). Nothing can ever take the love, the heart holds dear. Fond memories linger every day. Remembrance keeps them near. Marian and family 41-1

Ă&#x20AC; LOUER / FOR RENT: EMBRUN App. 2 c. Ă  coucher, inclus poĂŞle, rĂŠfrigĂŠrateur, ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ͲÇ&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ć?Ć?Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2022;ÍŹÍ&#x2022;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĆľÄ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĆľÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ƾčÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Disponible 1er Juin 2013.

LAIDLAW CARRIERS VAN DIVISION requires experienced AZ licensed drivers to run the U.S. Premium mileage rate. Home weekly. New equipment. Also hiring Owner Operators. 1-800-263-8267 AZ DRIVERS - CANADA/U.S. Runs. Single, Team & Regional. G r e a t P a y & B e n e f i t s . Yo u r H o m e Ti m e I s O u r P r i o r i t y. CALL TODAY TOLL-FREE 1-800665-2803. DRIVERS WANTED: Terrific career Opportunity with outstanding growth potential to learn how to locate rail defects. No Rail Experience Needed!! Extensive paid travel, meal allowance, 4 weeks vacation and benefits package. Skills Needed Ability to travel 3 months at a time, Valid License with air brake endorsement. Compensation based on prior driving experience. Apply at www.sperryrail.com under careers, keyword Driver. DO NOT FILL IN CITY OR STATE

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FIREARMS WANTED FOR JUNE 22nd, 2013 AUCTION: Rifles, Shotguns, Handguns. As Estate Specialists WE manage sale of registered / unregistered firearms. Contact Paul, Switzerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auction: Toll-Free 1-800694-2609, info@switzersauction.com or www.switzersauction.com.

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BUSINESS SERVICES Are you applying for or have you been denied Canada Pension Plan disability benefits? Do not proceed alone. Call Allison Schmidt 1-877-793-3222 www.dcac.ca

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Villager May 1 pg 09_Villager May 26 pg 09 13-04-30 1:46 PM Page 1

The Villager May 1, 2013 Page 9

Deadline 3 p.m. Monday

VILLAGERClassifieds

1-866307-3541

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PETS PROFESSIONAL PETSITTING DogWalking Quality care for your pets and home while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re away. Mid-day exercise or medication while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at work. PETSANDHOME SERVICES Bonded,Insured Colleen Petry 613-445-3480 cpetry@magma.ca www.petsandhomeservices .vpweb.ca 10ctfc

Employment Opportunity

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Community Calendar

GcldY`e^ The Community Calendar is made possible through For All Your the support of these contributing businesses Part & â&#x20AC;˘ContactInformationforThe Villager: Accessories Needs Suzanne PichĂŠ FORADSANDADMINISTRATION contact us toll free at 1-866-307-3541 or by fax at Owner and your Host Michel SĂŠguin prop. 613-448-3260 or email us at: adsrussellvillager@gmail.com (613) 781-B Notre-Dame 613-445-1835 FORTHEVILLAGEREDITOR email us at: thevillager.editor@gmail.com contact@oldetowneesthetics.com www.oldetowneesthetics.com Embrun, ON K0A 1W1 443-1116 â&#x20AC;˘ASpringCraftShow will be held at the Russell Curling Club on May 4 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more info, including being a vendor, please contact Sandra Neilson at sandra@urbancountry.ca, call 613-445-4555 or drop into Urban Country at 1115 Concession Street Russell. Basement Framing & Finishing â&#x20AC;˘Russell United Church is holding a Garage/Rummage/Plant/BakeSale in the church hall on Crown Mouldings May 3 and May 4. Gently used, nearly-new, in season clothing, books, toys, household items, etc. will be sold at give-away prices. We will have plants for your garden and home made baked Decks & Sheds goods for sale as well. Please come out and see what we have and take home some treasures Door & Trim Upgrades to enjoy. All are welcome. â&#x20AC;˘MaytheFourthBeWithYoumovienight will host a screening of Star Wars at the Russell High School. Doors will open at 5:45 p.m., with the movie scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m. Costumes, concessions and admission is free but donations to the Good Neighbours Food Bank will be collected. For more information, please check out www.rcsc-cscr.ca. M`ccX^\M\k\i`eXip â&#x20AC;˘Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s55+Club Euchre every Saturday night at Russell Meadows Retirement in Russell. 7:30 :c`e`Z p.m. start. Shuffleboard every Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m. at the arena. Exercise classes every Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Russell Arena. Bridge and Euchre every Tuesday 1 p.m. at The Meadows. Ilk_@im`e^#;%M%D% â&#x20AC;˘TheRussellRun - The fourth annual Russell Run is scheduled for Sat. May 11. Visit www.rcsccscr.ca for more info. 1108 Concession Street Russell â&#x20AC;˘St.Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sAnglicanChurchACWBazaarandLuncheon, Sat. May 11 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. â&#x20AC;˘Provincial Service Officers Visit - The PSO will be visiting Branch #372 in Russell the week of 613-445-5622 May 27, 2013. If you would like to make an appointment please call Jim McCurdy, Branch # 372 Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Veterans/Seniors Service Officer at 613-445-3562 prior to May 16. Please leave a message if no answer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; your call will be returned. â&#x20AC;˘NoticeofAnnualandElectionMeetingatBranch#372LTHmemorial,RoyalCanadian +#300'*/($P * Garden Rejuvenation Legion, Russell on May 16, 2013 in the upstairs hall at 24 Legion lane at 7 p.m. Following that, * Garden Maintenance * Consultations Âł5HURRÂżQJLVRXUVSHFLDOW\´ * Container Gardening the Election for all positions on the Executive Board will be held. All members in good standing are invited to attend and participate. Members interested in serving on the executive may commu- $VSKDOW6KLQJOHVÂ&#x2021;0HWDO5RRIVÂ&#x2021;5HSDLUV Erin VanGilst 613-535-9942 9LQ\O $OXPLQXP6LGLQJÂ&#x2021;6RIÂżW )DVFLD Horticulturist & Landscape Technician nicate such to Pat Mackay-Jones, branch Secretary at 613-445-1599 no later than May 10. Nominations from the floor will be accepted. erin@gardensbycreateit.com Free Estimates Af_eE`Z_fccj www.gardensbycreateit.com â&#x20AC;˘MetcalfeCooperativeNurserySchoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sAnnualSpringGIANTGarageSale on Fri. May 10, 4 -(*$++,$*)'.#Iljj\cc=Xo1-(*$++,$-+*/ to 8 pm and Sat., May 11, 8 am-1pm at the Metcalfe Fairgrounds - Agricultural Hall . Toys, clothes, baby equipment and household goods. Call 821-3196 or visit www.mcnskids.org for more info. ALE RIMINAL AW â&#x20AC;˘RussellMinorHockeyAssociationAGMMonday May 27th, 2013 at the Legion Hall. 7:30pm. Board Positions for odd years (2013): VP Competitive, Secretary, Treasurer, Director of Discipline, Risk & Safety, Ice Convenor, Director of Initiation Players and Director of Communications. Also B.Sc., B.C.L., LL.B. vacant is the Director of Special Events and GHA Convenor Call 613-445-0248 for more information or visit our website at www.eteamz.com/RMHA/ Steve Bakker 25 Years Experience Metcalfe, ON 613-821-3267 â&#x20AC;˘TheRussellHorticulturalSocietyTriviaNightis on June 1 at 7 p.m. at the Russell House to 2WWDZD2IĂ&#x20AC;FH /¡2ULJQDO2IĂ&#x20AC;FH bakkercrest@xplornet.com raise funds for the Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fantasy Reading Garden at the Russell Library. Contact Connie (613) 695-4253 (613) 675-0990 ZZZK\JUDGHURRĂ&#x20AC;QJFRP_ Johnston 613-445-3587 to enter your team. Email john.hclo@me.com

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Villager May 1 pg 10_Villager May 26 pg 10 13-04-30 1:02 PM Page 1

Page 10 The Villager May 1, 2013

E-mail your information p sports dit .editor ill r..editor@gmail.com th thevillager t thevillager.editor@gmail.com to

ts porrts Sports ERSp VILLAGER

Panthers already looking towards 2013-14 Darren Matte Villager Sports EMBRUN— For the first time since the spring of 2008, the Embrun Panthers did not hoist the National Capital Junior Hockey League’s championship trophy at the end of the season. The Panthers were eliminated in seven games at the hands of the eventual champions, the Cumberland Bandits, in the league semifinals. “It was a disappointment for sure. We have set a standard here and we didn’t reach it. You can’t win them all, I guess,” said Associate Coach and General Manager Jay Campbell. The team had a good season, but because of the remarkable regular season that the St. Isidore Eagles put together and the new leaguerule that granted division winners one of the top two seeds, the Panthers were essentially locked into third place by the middle of the season. Campbell did admit that knowing their fate so early did lead to some inconsistencies. Still, he found positives from the season. “We were the most disciplined team, but did lack that consistency, specifically defensively. We didn’t accomplish what we wanted with our defense. We didn’t lose too many one-goal games, which means we were too far down in our losses.” Having won four championships in a row, Campbell

says that there was pressure on the team, but it came from within and not outside the organization. “We put pressure on ourselves. I don’t think there was any externally just internal. I think there would have been more pressure if we had made it to the finals against St. Isidore because of the redemption factor that they were looking for.” The playoffs for the Panthers began with a series against the La Peche Predators, a series that surprised some when it went to six games. “The fact that it did go to six games meant we had injuries that lingered for the next round. We really didn’t want to play them because we knew they could score at will. After they took the series lead (2-1), we smartened up and installed a defensive system, which turned the series around.” The Panthers went on to win that series and then moved on to face the Cumberland Bandits, where Embrun lost a 3-1 series lead and fell in seven games. “Their goalie (Eric Goneau) really stood on his head. The momentum of the series really turned in game five. After losing that one we were really flat on home ice in game six. I just felt they got the bounces. We were very close, one bounce here or there and we had it. It hurt a little more to see Cumberland win the finals so easily, I just didn’t have

Russell Minor Broomball Awards Russell Minor Broomball held their annual awards banquet at St-Thomas Aquinas on April 13. After a season of Saturday night Broomball in Russell, starting in October all the way to the play-offs and parents’ games in March, it was a great season. The year was a success with two Sprout teams (ages 5–8), three Peewee teams (ages 9-11) and six Bantam/Midget teams (ages 12-15). The Canadian Broomball Association’s new program for the younger age groups, Lace up to the Top, gave kids a chance to show off their skills that they had learned to receive “tags”, similar to badges, to put on their laces. The organization also had “Your hardest shot” this year for the older kids and Yanick Gignac won with his shot being 103 km per hour. All of the players and coaches  attended the

Annual  Finch Youth Broomball tournament in January. Many of the players participated in Provincials, in Barrie, in February, bringing home 10 out of 13 possible  medals. An all-time record for Eastern Ontario Broomball clubs. Volunteers are the core to any organizations and this year Russell Minor Broomball lost two amazing volunteers who will be moving on as their sons have graduated to higher leagues. Geoff and Janet Corry were key players in the organization and were recognized at the banquet. Every year at the banquet the organization gives out awards for our Most Sportsmanlike player (MSP) and Most Improved Player (MIP) for each team, and overall for the division we give out Most Team Effort (MTE) boy and girl. This year little broomball sticks

the heart to go watch,” added Campbell. Even though they came up short, Campbell is able to take away experiences for the team, so they continue to move in the right direction. “We are only losing two guys to graduation and could have 15 back. Going to a game seven is a big experience. Now all of our players have either gone to a game seven or have won a championship, which is great head-

ing into next year.” However, the two losses will be big ones. Captain Charles Antoine Labonté and alternate Francis Legault will be leaving. Labonté led the team in goals (25) and points (52). Legault had 15 goals and 39 points. “These two easily had the standout performances of the season. By losing them, we will have to find guys who can score.” The standout performances were not limited to the veterans, Campbell talked about other players who performed well for the team. “Eric Garrioch became a dominant force and won the league’s Most Improved

Player Award. Francis Lafond became a talented forward. He was a guy we didn’t know much about when he came into camp. During the playoffs, Phil Eberley became a big surprise with his play in net and Dexter MacMillan was great (Seven goals, 18 points, leading the team).” The Panthers could also have some tough decisions to make next season. They have eight players eligible to return who will be overagers and only four cards, five of the overagers are defensemen. Even though this year was a disappointment,

Or call 1-866-307-3541 Fax: 613-448-3260 Campbell knows the team is on solid footing heading forward. “I can’t think of anything I would have done differently. We played our four lines, six defensemen and both goalies like we always try. The guys showed growth over the course of the season. We will evaluate who comes back and make the appropriate moves. We will be looking for a bit of grit in the offseason as well as scoring.” The Panthers will have a pair of offseason events and then open up camp in the fall where they will look to get their name back on top of the league.

Charles-Antoine Labonté, left, and Francis Legault, right, are the two graduating players from this year’s Embrun Panthers. They will be big losses for the team, as they were the top two scorers during the regular season. Labonté led the team with 25 goals and 52 points, Legault finished the season with 15 goals and 39 points. Matte photos

were used as trophies. This year’s winners are Sprouts: Blue Bombers: Camy Bérubé (MSP), Connor Godda-Toonen (MIP); Red Bulls: Mathis Cayer (MSP), Marika Castonguay (MIP); Ronan Foster and Kathryn Larocque (MTE); Peewees: Whip Shots: Charles Fortin (MSP), Erik Lafrance (MIP); Ice Kids: Morgan Foster

(MSP), Allyson Harvey (MIP); Titans: Loic HarveyBoudreault (MSP), Samuel Cayer (MIP); Top Scorer: Justin Matthews and Jaime Burnett, Elliot Labbé and Élianne Gignac (MTE); Bantam/Midget Big Dogs: Ryan Hamson (MSP), Félix Leclerc (MIP); Golddiggers: Benoit Fortier (MSP), Nick Goodwin (MIP); Defenders:

Maddy Leavitt (MSP), Kaitlin Blenkarn (MIP); Mustangs: Carlee Coburn (MSP), Edward Larocque (MIP); TNT: Jacob Lemery (MSP), Sean Lemore (MIP); IceBreakers: Bradon Robinson (MSP), Adam Richard (MIP); Top Scorer: Kyle Como and Jasmine Leclerc, Zach Lapointe and Emily Zandbelt (MTE); Top

Goalie: Stéfanie Gormon; Broomball Spirit Award: two recipients received this award: Jasmine Leclerc and Brock Corry. Russell Minor Broomball is always looking for new players. If interested, registration is on Sept. 2-3. For more information please call Helena Lanthier at 613-4450391

The Russell Minor Broomball association held their year-end awards on April 13 at St, Thomas Aquinas. Here the winners pose with their awards. Front row, from left: Mathis Cayer, Camy Bérubé, Ronan Foster, Emily Zandbelt, Elliot Labbé, Kathryn Larocque, Elianne Gignac, Stephanie Gormon; Middle row: Marika Castonguay, Erik Lafrance, Jaime Burnett, Justin Matthews, Edward Larocque, Ryan Hamson, Adam Richard, Carlee Coburn, Jasmine Leclerc, Zach Lapointe, Kaitlin Blendarn; Back row: Samuel Cayer, Félix Leclerc, Nick Goodwin, Morgan Foster, Allyson Harvey, Brock Corry, Maddie Leavitt, Sean Lemore, Kyle Como, Jacob Lemery, Benoit Fortier and Bradon Robinson. Courtesy photo


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The Villager May 1, 2013 Page 11

Ravens travel long distance for final preseason tune up NIAGARA FALLS— In their quest to be the best rugby team in the area, the St. Thomas Aquinas Ravens travelled all the way to Niagara Falls this past week to take part in a tournament hosted by Lakeshore Catholic High School. The event saw the Ravens take on numerous teams from southern Ontario and even one not so far from home in Sacred Heart from Stittsville. It was a three-day event that ran from April 24th to the 26th. The tournament was even more special for one of the Ravens coaches, Nick Longval, as it was held at his

old high school. Many of the schools in the tournament were AAA or AAAA, meaning every game was a tough test for the AA Ravens. While the squad failed to win a game, coach Penny Longval was pleased that her team held their own. “Our game against Sacred Heart was fantastic! Sacred Heart only won 12-7!! Nick and I were so pleased with our players-especially since the majority of our roster was made up of grade 9 and 10, rookie players. Amy Beekers, Sydney Landry, Maddy Biggs played very well - as did Bianca Moore

and Alicia BrindAmour.” Biggs scored the scored lone try in the game for St. Thomas and Brooke Morningstar added the kick for an additional two points. The Ravens opened up their regular season yesterday (April 30) in Vankleek Hill. They return to Russell tomorrow (May 2) where they will play at Russell High against the Timberwolves, who are back in the league after a one-year hiatus. Kickoff is set for 1 p.m. See next week’s Villager for full recaps of the Ravens and T-Wolves games.

Eastern Ontario’s chapter of the Ontario Seniors’ Games received a grant from the Trillium Foundation for $37,300 to help support the 55+ Eastern Regional Games which are being held this August in SD&G. Shown here are Marilyn McMahon-Ayerst, representing MPP Jim McDonell, George Baker, 55+ Eastern Ontario Regional Games organizer, Raymond Lacroix, Trillium Foundation and Cornwall Mayor Bob Kilger. Baker photo.

Ontario Senior Games quickly approaching The St. Thomas Aquinas girls rugby team travelled to Niagara Falls April 24-26 to compete in a preseason tournament. The tournament featured many AAA and AAAA schools and while the Ravens didn’t win a game, they held their own. Here, the team poses at the event, in the end zone. Front row, from left: Haylee McKenzie, Emily Hall, Rhianon Digweed, Meghan Shane, Sarah Bass, Ashley Dubois (lying on ground) Melissa Williamson, Maddy Blythe, Tamara Hamilton, Maddy Biggs, Destiny Ellsworth, Julia Guindon, Breana Strbann; back row: Coach Nick Longval Jessica Gill, Saphyrre Langlois, Olivia Nolan, Alicia BrindAmour, Brooke Morningstar, Shelby Aubot, Amy Beekers, Mia Conway, Kayla Bernier, Bianca Moore, Sydney Landry, Kaylee Hybrects and Coach Penny Longval. Courtesy photo

Cornwall Colts off to Fred Page cup after winning CCHL over Raiders CORNWALL— The Cornwall Colts are the 2013 CCHL champions after defeating the Nepean Raiders in a six-game series. The Colts finished the season third in the standings with 81 points, behind the Ottawa junior Senators (86 points) and Carleton Place Canadians (83 points). In the opening round of the playoffs, the Colts took out Brockville, four games to two and advanced to play the Robinson Division champion, Canadians. The second round was a close series that needed the full seven games. In the end, the Colts won the deciding game 2-1 to advance to the finals. Nepean, last year’s champions, knocked off

Pembroke with a sweep in the first round. In the second round, they too eliminated a top team beating the Junior Senators, who had the best regular-season record in the Yzerman Division and overall. It set up an exciting final between the Colts and Raiders. Cornwall took the series lead capturing the first two games. Nepean answered back with a win in game three, but Cornwall again went up by a pair of games after a game-four win on home ice. The Raiders staved off elimination with a win in game five, but ran out of gas as the Colts took game six in overtime 3-2 to win the series. A pair of Cornwall players led the playoffs in scoring. Michael Pontarelli fin-

ished with the league-lead of 15 goals and 11 assists for 26 points. Stephen Johnson was next with six goals and 12 assists for 18 points. Nepean’s top pointproducer was Corey Durocher with six goals, 11 assists and 17 points. Jordan Piccolino led the Colts, from the net, earning all 12 wins and posting a 2.97 goals against average and .916 save percentage along the way. Cornwall now advances to the Fred Page Cup May 1-5 in Truro, Nova Scotia. The Colts will join the hosts, Truro, Longueil, from the Quebec league and Summerside, from the Maritimes league to see who advances to the RBC Cup and a chance at the National Junior ‘A’ Championship.

Lois Ann Baker Villager Staff CORNWALL – The Ontario Senior Games Association - District 8 announced that they will be hosting the 55+ Eastern Ontario Regional Games this summer. The district, which includes Cornwall, SD&G and PrescottRussell, is expecting over 500 participants to the games which will be held on August 20. Qualifying games will be held throughout the summer for members of OSGA. There will be 12 events in the games, taking place in Cornwall, Long Sault and Alexandria. The events include five-pin bowling, euchre, bridge, cribbage, darts, shuffleboard, golf, pickleball, tennis, prediction walking and, new this year, carpet bowling. Districts expecting to send participants include Renfrew County, Kingston/Frontenac, North Lanark, Lanark-Leeds-

Grenville, Ottawa East and Ottawa West. At a press conference held Tues., April 23, District 8 was awarded a plaque from the Ontario Trillium Foundation in recognition of the $37,300 in grants the Foundation has given the district for equipment, administration and program experiences necessary to host the games. Raymond Lacroix, representative from the Trillium Foundation, said the Foundation was pleased to have been able to provide the funding as the games promote healthy and vibrant communities. “We are here as a Trillium Foundation to support you,” said Lacroix, “We recognize you and will help in any way we can.” Lacroix added that the Foundation was committed to investing in community based activities that promote healthy lifestyles. Cornwall Mayor Bob

Kilger was also on hand for the announcement and said Cornwall was proud to be a host community. MPP Jim McDonell was unable to attend and instead sent his executive assistant Marilyn McMahon-Ayerst with congratulations. Games organizer George Baker said that along with promoting a healthy lifestyle, hosting the games in the area will bring about long-term benefits including promotion of the area and tourist spending in the community. Baker said it would also lead to greater regional interaction and greater community recreational involvement by promoting an active lifestyle. Bringing their message to the younger generation, Baker said they are beginning a legacy program to the schools by having committee members visit schools to promote the lifestyle and teach the students how to play the games.

Cars in a mall

Joel Doiron’s Sportsman car was just one of many on display at the Cornwall Square Mall, April 9-14. The Cornwall Motor Speedway set up the display to promote their 2013 schedule, which kicks off on May 19 and features many area drivers. Lascelle photo


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Page 12 The Villager May 1, 2013

Castor swimming with mudcats and fishermen alike

Trophy winner for biggest mudcat Eight year old Everett Vidal took home second prize for biggest fish caught by a youth with a 560g mudcat at the 14th annual Poutmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fishing Derby on April 28. PJ Pearson Photos

Returning volunteer

Poutmaster volunteer for the 7th year, John Parrish holds a mudcat that was caught in the Castor River at the 14th annual tournament. This mudcat is approximately 340g - the average size of fish caught during the three day fishing event.

RUSSELLâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; With headquarters set up by the Centennial Pool in Russell, fishermen of all ages participated in the 14th annual Poutmasters Fishing Derby held along the banks of the Castor River April 26 to April 28. Hailey Lavergne won the biggest fish caught by youth category with a whopping 645g mudcat, followed by eight year old Everett Vidalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 560g fish and Dylan Pindur close behind with a 540g fish. Jeanine Beauchamp placed first in the adult category with a 675g fish. Alain Seguin was second with 640g and JeanMarc Seguin was not far behind with a 635g mudcat. This year, the event is a was a fundraiser for the Eastern Ontario branch of the Lung Association with over 330 people registered, catching and releasing 362 fish. Numbers are up quite a bit compared to 2012â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 228 registrants and 137 fish. Organizer Mike Leman believes this is because everyone is sick of winter and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect weather for fishing. Temperatures hit in the mid to high teens. Two draws were held for a canoe and a kayak - supplied by the Poutmasters team â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were won by the father and son team of Avery and Marc Gauthier. Leman thanks all volunteers, sponsors and participants, including the South Nation Conservation for coming out and supporting a great community event.

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Bracing yourself for the future Dr. Darrell Menard Special to The Villager Being physically active offers many health benefits but it also carries with it some risk of being injured. One of the most common injuries experienced by active people is a sprained ankle - an injury that is often dismissed as being minor in nature. Unfortunately, leaving your injured ankle to heal on its own without appropriate medical care can lead to long term problems that could potentially end a military career. Ankle sprains occur at an estimated rate of one per 10,000 persons/day. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a significant number given the short term and potential long-term disability that can result from this injury. Ankle sprains account for 1015% of all sport-related injuries and are responsible for 7-10% of all emergency room visits. Most of these injuries occur in people under the age of 35. The most common mechanism of injury for an ankle sprain is â&#x20AC;&#x153;rollingâ&#x20AC;? over the outside of your foot. This can occur in a variety of ways including: stepping into a hole on the

soccer field, attempting to change direction quickly playing tennis or jumping and landing on an opponentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foot in basketball. In each case the ligaments on the outside of the ankle are subjected to considerable stress and end up being damaged. As a general rule, once you have sprained your ankle it is easier to sprain your ankle in the future. This is especially true if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t properly rehabilitate your injured ankle. What should you do if you sprain an ankle? Immediately put ice on your ankle to reduce the swelling you experience and see your physician or physiotherapist as soon as possible. The longer you delay the more swollen your ankle will be and the harder it will be to assess the extent of the damage. Most ankle sprains donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require x-rays to determine if anything is broken. You may be prescribed an ankle brace and will often be referred to physiotherapy to help you restore your ankleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s range of motion, to strengthen your lower leg muscles and to regain your sense of balance.

Research shows that after an ankle sprain, wearing an ankle brace whenever you are active reduces your risk of re-injury. This is important because every time you injure your ankle you cause tissue damage and increase your chances of having future problems. It can take up to nine months for the tissue damage in your ankle to heal. You only need to wear the brace when you are doing things that put you at risk of another sprain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t include surfing the internet. The bottom line is that ankle sprains are injuries that can have long-term consequences. Treating them properly includes getting physiotherapy and protecting your ankle with a brace until it has completely healed. Exercise is medicine. You can sprain your ankle in a split second and pay the price for the rest of your life.

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The Villager-May, 1 2013