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BC WILDLIFE FEDERATION BRAND GUIDE 2017


The purpose of this booklet is to provide guidelines to designers, copy writers and printers on how to represent the BCWF brand.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Brand Essence 4 About the Logo 5 Logo Usage 6 Typography7 Colours8 Usage Rules 9 Photography11 Patterns14 Applications16

Table of Contents – BCWF Brand Guide

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BRAND ESSENCE What is the company about?

The British Columbia Wildlife Federation is a non-profit organization,

founded in 1951, that specializes in promoting awareness and protection of British Columbia’s environment for future generations. It is BC’s largest and oldest conservation organization with over 50 thousand members involved in spreading their message and goal. They fund many conservation programs and projects using donations given by members and supporters.

Their brand is relaxing, optimistic and natural. This should reflect on

any design presented by them. For example, a BCWF advertisement should draw viewers’ attention in a calm manner while promoting awareness of nature. Some elements that can contribute to that can include bright colours, an optimistic message and a relaxing imagery in the background.

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BCWF Brand Guide – Brand Essence


ABOUT THE LOGO How was it designed?

The previous logo for BCWF.

The new logo design.

This brand new logo was designed to represent the province and its

environment more than the previous design. It also retains its message in colour, symbolism and shape. The BCWF wanted to remain relevant and decided on a new logo that would make them stand out over the other organizations dedicated to protecting wildlife like the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

The old design, as seen on the left, represented the mountains and river

in green and blue respectively. These elements represent BC’s landscape from the Fraser River to the Rocky Mountains. The colours also reflect on the nature of the province as well with green as the land and blue for the water.

Then, the main shape of the new design, seen on the right, represents the

dogwood flower with the Steller’s jay, peeking out of the center. These elements are significant because they represent BC’s national symbols while retaining the natural colours from the previous logo. This emblem is a significant improvement over the previous design because not only does it continue the company’s goal but it also represents their province more and stands out among other wildlife conservation groups.

About the Logo – BCWF Brand Guide

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LOGO USAGE What are its limits?

The clear space is identified by the length of the inner circle in the logo between the dotted lines. Keep graphic elements out of that space to avoid conflict.

The minimum size should be one 1”

by one inches while maintaining proportions and legibility.

1”

The grayscale colour scheme is available for printing in black and white.

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BCWF Brand Guide – Logo Usage


TYPOGRAPHY What fonts can I use?

Headers

Optima Bold ABCDEF abcdef 1234 Helvetica Bold ABCDEF abcdef 1234

Size: 18pt Leading: 20pt

Subheads

Optima Italic ABCDEF abcdef 1234

Size: 12pt Leading: 14pt

Body

Optima Regular ABCDEF abcdef 1234

Size: 9pt Leading: 14pt

The main typeface used is Optima. However, there are three different

weights that were also used for this family. These three are Regular, Italic and Bold. Another acceptable typeface to use is Helvetica. This family is, however, restricted to only headers. It may be used over Optima Bold as a header font to create variety in typography.

Typography – BCWF Brand Guide

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COLOURS

What colours are in the logo?

CMYK = 85, 50, 0, 0

CMYK = 52, 43, 41, 6

RGB = 27, 117, 188

RGB = 128, 130, 133

Pantone = 7461 C

Pantone = 430 C

Hex = 1b75bb

Hex = 808284

CMYK = 86, 17, 100, 3

CMYK = 68, 62, 58, 46

RGB = 0, 148, 71

RGB = 66, 65, 66

Pantone = 347 C

Pantone = 446 C

Hex = 009447

Hex = 414042

CMYK = 90, 33, 98, 26

CMYK = 75, 68, 67, 90

RGB = 0, 105, 56

RGB = 0, 0, 0

Pantone = 349 C

Pantone = 412 U

Hex = 006837

Hex = 000000

The main colours used represent nature, including water and land. The

petals are coloured blue to represent how water takes up more space on the Earth’s surface than land. The grays and black are seen only on the Steller’s jay bird which features these colours in real life.

The grayscale colour, refer to Logo Usage, may also be used for black and

white printing. If that is such case, refer to only the colour swatches on the right.

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BCWF Brand Guide – Colours


USAGE RULES

How to improperly use the logo.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

1. Do not squish or stretch the logo.

5. Do not stylize the logo.

2. Do not recolour the logo in any way.

(Ex: Drop shadow, inner glow, etc.)

3. Do not change the typeface.

6. Do not rotate the logo in any degree.

4. Do not add texture to the logo.

Usage Rules – BCWF Brand Guide

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7.

8.

9.

10.

This design is just right! Keep proportions and the design the way they are. It maintains the brand’s message and values.

7. Do not add graphics to the logo or within the white space. 8. Do not add gradients. Printing will be more difficult with it. 9. Do not remove any elements. It ruins the message. 10. Do not outline the logo or try to recreate it in any way.

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BCWF Brand Guide – Usage Rules


PHOTOGRAPHY

What images can be applied behind the logo?

A deer after taking a swim.

A red fox.

A mother bear with her two cubs.

A moose.

Pod of orca whales.

The Fraser River.

To promote the BCWF to the public, the organization will allow photography images to be added with the brand. There are also rules that apply to adding them. These images should: – Be colourful. – Feature scenery or wildlife native to British Columbia. (No domesticated animals) – Be relaxing to look at. (No sense of negative feelings like violence) – Have a balanced contrast so the logo is legible when applied.

Photography – BCWF Brand Guide

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These photos are not acceptable.

This is not colourful.

This species is not native to BC.

This is a domesticated species in BC.

The scene does not look relaxing.

This is not in Canada.

This is an urban area of BC, not natural.

The image may be too dark for legibility.

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BCWF Brand Guide – Photography


Examples of images being used correctly.

Photography – BCWF Brand Guide

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PATTERNS

Another background option with the design.

This pattern design features the repetition of dogwood flowers used for the logo.

Besides photography, there are patterns that can be used as a background

to compliment the logo design. It may be used as a background over photography. However, the logo has to be arranged over any flower in the pattern and it must completely cover it.

This pattern, as seen above, is the only one available right now. There will

be more patterns such as different colours of the available pattern as well as more unique backgrounds.

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BCWF Brand Guide – Patterns


An example of using a pattern background.

The logo applied over another flower in the pattern.

The improper use of a pattern background.

Patterns – BCWF Brand Guide

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APPLICATIONS

How the design should look on merchandise

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BCWF Brand Guide – Applications


Stationery

Business card

Applications – BCWF Brand Guide

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Sign

Apple devices

Flag

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BCWF Brand Guide – Applications


Copyright © 2017 Designed by: Russell Jang

bcwf.net


BC Wildlife Federation Brand Guide 2017