Page 1

Russell Einbinder Amherst College (203) 770-4669 reinbinder16@amherst.edu


TABLE OF CONTENTS p. 4

BARCELONA PAVILION PROJECT • Designed an Architectural Research Facility for the Barcelona Pavilion site in Madrid, Spain • Utilized 2D and 3D digital software to create diagrams, plans, sections, and renderings

p. 12

THE WHITNEY PROJECT AT THE INSTITUTE • Researched and documented Marcel Breuer’s Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City • Proposed design transformations for the Whitney through diagrams and models

p. 20

WRITING SAMPLE 1: VIRGIL IN SHAKESPEARE • Essay written for the english class “Shakespeare,” exploring the expressive qualities of Shakespeare’s Hamlet

p. 22

SOLAR CLOCK//CALENDAR DESIGN + BUILD • Analyzed sun path diagrams and shadow properties to develop a solar clock//calendar • Built a 34”x42” solar clock//calendar out of wood; accurately functions in South Hadley, MA

p. 30

EARLY CHILD EDUCATION SCHOOLHOUSES • Studied sun path diagrams and psychometric charts to design for thermal comfort • Created schoolhouses for two locations; adapted design based on climatic concerns

p. 42

WRITING SAMPLE 2: THE EXPERIENCING BODY • Essay for the architectural studies class “Cityscapes,” evaluating the statement that, “the body in motion is the city’s best architectural critic”

p. 44

OSTRE ANLAEG PARK PAVILION • Designed pavilion for Ostre Anlaeg park in Copenhagen, Denmark • Presented project board, physical models, and process booklet at review and exhibition

p. 52

INTERPRETIVE WORKS • Compilation of hand and digital drawings from Spring 2014 to present • Each work features critical interpretation that analyzes a specific context or building


INTRODUCTION

Every building tells a story. The story might be about an historical architectural discourse,

a grand vision that was never realized, or maybe the story is about a single brick. This portfolio offers me the opportunity to display my stories. From pavilions to solar clocks, each project contains a narrative that, though it might be abbreviated, conveys a specific thought process that weaves itself throughout the entire booklet.

The main projects feature a four page spread: a cover image, an investigation of the

project’s context and my design concept, the design process, and final project images. Except for the second spread of precedent and site images, all drawings and images are my own that I created through Rhino, Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and by hand.

Dispersed between these projects are two writing samples, one on Hamlet and the other on

Wim Wenders’ film Wings of Desire (1987). The two essays seek to show my writing skills and ability to perform critical textual analysis across different mediums. Both are very architectural - while one analyzes how syntax, diction, and rhythm can create meaning, the other examines how moving bodies can experience and critique the city.

With every project, I want to reveal my creative process. I want to show how I develop

my design concept and why I make different design decisions. I believe there should be a critical reason substantiated in architectural discourse and human experience that determines why buildings look the way they do. Collectively, these drawings and images reflect my ability to analyze a site, develop an original and appropriate design that emerges from the site’s context, and present a cohesive narrative.


INTERMEDIATE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN STUDIO STUDIO CRITIC: THOM LONG AMHERST COLLEGE FALL 2014


BARCELONA PAVILION PROJECT


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Mies van der Rohe designed the Barcelona Pavilion as the German Pavilion for the 1929

International Exposition in Barcelona. The Pavilion’s free plan represents a vision for a “thresholdless� world in 1929, as interior and exterior spaces seamlessly blend together. Today, however, the world doesn't seem as simple and cohesive as it may have to Mies. While technology has given us the ability to do so much, we are also aware of how complex and chaotic the world can be. We find ourselves in a state of tension, both limited and limitless, helpless and omnipotent.

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Mies considered the Pavilion to be a work of art and placed it upon a travertine plinth. Treating the Pavilion like a sculpture, I move and rotate it to the quad, leaving its design untouched.

THE FREE PLAN EVOLUTION

Free Plan

Pavilion PAVILION

The Grid THE GRID

To design the Research Facility, I begin with the

I neatly stack concrete slabs to create a vertical

concept of the Pavilion's free plan.

Modernist grid that offers a limitless amount of horizontal free plans. 8


A new Architectural Research Facility that features a library, social space, and exhibition space will rest on the Pavilion’s former plot.

Evolution

Fragmented Spaces FRAGMENTED SPACES

Translation TRANSLATION

I then build another structure that

Combined together, the grid and fragments form

deconstructs the grid by stacking and splicing

a structure that morphs into a series of

together boxed fragments.

fragmented continuities. 9


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30 ft

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up up

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dn up

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dn up

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This fragmented architecture offers circulation possibilities that break through the conventional horizontal/vertical free plan, creating unique visual connections through the architectural disjunctions that define the structure.

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NY INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN STUDIES STUDIO CRITICS: JULIAN PALACIO, BRIAN HOLLAND NEW YORK CITY SUMMER 2014


INSTITUTE WHITNEY PROJECT


The Whitney + Brownstone Property

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The Met

Museum Mile

The Whitney

The Frick

Upper East Side Historic District

MOMA

Expanding Museums

The Whitney

The Whitney Museum of American Art has a complex history of insufficient gallery space and failed

expansions. Built in 1966, Marcel Breuer's Madison Avenue Whitney Museum was an avant-garde structure that sought to redefine the museum experience, from the gallery space to its iconic facade. The Whitney has finally found a new home in New York City’s meat packing district and the Breuer building will temporarily house the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s modern collection until 2023, but after that the fate of the former Whitney is unknown. Given its location among other museums, I propose that the future of the site maintains its rich cultural identity as a home for American art. I envision a Whitney that never was: an avant-garde art museum for emerging American artists that expands into the adjacent brownstones.

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THE NEW MUSEUM

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

Public Museum Space

THE “OLD” WHITNEY

Non-Public Museum Space

0’

30’

An avant-garde institution must push the status quo, so I develop a design concept that seeks to blur the boundaries between conventional “public” and “non-public” museum spaces. 16


CONVENTIONAL APPROACH

INTERWEAVING

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

By breaking through the Breuer’s hard architectural elements, these models and drawings create an interwoven architecture that enables the public to see, learn, and appreciate all aspects of art production and viewership. 17


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Together, the drawings and models offer a series of design strategies that address how we can architecturally reinvigorate this soon to be abandoned cultural icon.

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VIRGIL IN SHAKESPEARE Frank Kermode notes in the Wadsworth introduction to Shakespeare’s Hamlet that, “Hamlet clearly works on a different level from any other play of its kind, and indeed from any preceding play of Shakespeare’s” (1183). Kermode’s remark refers to the “metaphysical and psychological speculation” that the play engages in, along with the notion that there is a “remaking of Everyman in Hamlet’s image” (1183). While this is certainly true, I believe that Kermode’s words hold true for a specific moment in the play as well – the player’s speech in act 2.2. Upon the arrival of Polonius and the players, Hamlet asks one of the actors to recite Pyrrhus’ murder of Priam from Aeneas’ tale to Dido. Hamlet begins the speech and the player continues at Hamlet’s request. Together, the two characters project a violent story of passion and gore that achieves a lofty rhetoric through the use of tone, rhythm, diction, and syntax. Hamlet’s part of the speech establishes the expressive quality of the passage’s language as fragmented, dense, and highly descriptive. In the first two lines of his recitation (lines 452 and 453) there are three commas, two acting as caesuras and one at the end of 452, blocking a quick transition to the following line. These commas create a short rhythm in the passage that divide the verse into clauses. Note that Pyrrhus, a soldier, is titled “The rugged Pyrrhus.” The rhythm in these lines, then, is in fact rugged (broken in parts as opposed to punctuation free and flowing) and creates a military tone (the commas divide the first line and a half into regimented equal parts, each two and a half feet). Shakespeare utilizes dark diction to describe Pyrrhus and the scene. “Black” in 453 refers to both Pyrrhus’ “sable arms” and the “night,” the horse is “ominous,” and Pyrrhus’ complexion is “dread,” “black,” and “dismal.” The words “heraldy” and “gules” then punctuate this darkness with the image of red blood. The red blood imagery is pervasive, and quickly overwhelms the scene. The phrase “head to foot” and the diction of “total” and “horridly” begin the bloody invasion, and the rhythmic conjunction of “fathers, mothers, daughters, sons” heightens the bloody sensation with each successive word. This black and red imagery serves to orient the audience in the dramatic situation of “Aeneas’ tale.” As the story goes, the Greeks built a wooden horse to present to the Trojans as a peace offering. The horse, however, was hollow and filled with Greek soldiers. The Trojans unknowingly brought the horse inside their gates, and upon nightfall the Greek soldiers emerged from the horse, opened the city gates for the Greek army, and sacked the city of Troy. The dark imagery expresses Pyrrhus’ experience of lying “couched in th’ ominous horse,” and the bloody red captures the horrific amount of bloodshed that occurred immediately after Pyrrhus and the rest of the soldiers surfaced from the horse. The word “Now” marks the transition from black to red and thus marks the transition from horse to battle. “Roasted in wrath and fire,” combined with “’o’er-sized with coagulate gore” and “eyes like carbuncles” produce a vivid image of Pyrrhus as he tears through the “parching streets.” I can see him now. A small flame flickers on the edge of his armor, which is caked in blood. His eyes are open wide with a wild look as the flame, still flickering, seems to glow with the wrath he brings. Shakespeare describes Pyrrhus as “hellish.” “Hellish” is the perfect word for the description as it successfully embodies the expressive quality of these lines, along with the tone of the imagery. Pyrrhus is a devil-like character, hell bent and wreaking havoc. The player’s part begins with a description of Priam’s defense. Priam swings his sword but his mark is short. Shakespeare summarizes this act in “striking too short at Greeks” and expresses the act through rhythm. A period disrupts line 469 after “Greeks” and similar breaks occur throughout the next four lines, with caesuras and line-ending commas in 469 through 472. These breaks thus create a shortening rhythm, like Priam’s sword, and produce a series of fragments that seem to stop the recitation just as Priam’s life is about to end. Shakespeare counters this rhythm with the flowing eloquence of 473 and 474 as he describes Priam’s last effort. The alliteration of “w” in “with,” “whiff,” and “wind” whisk on the words towards Priam’s fatal finish, emphasized in the “f’s” of “fell,” “father,” and “falls.” The beauty of these lines, in contrast to the rough brevity of the preceding ones, create a tone of sorrow, as this marks the perceived moment of the death of a king. Then something interesting occurs. Shakespeare personifies Ilium (Troy) and describes it as feeling the “blow” of Priam’s collapse. This “blow” produces a chain reaction, in which Ilium then “stoops to his [Pyrrhus’] base” and “Takes prisoner Pyrrhus’ ear” through “a hideous crash.” Priam’s body touches the ground, which sends vibrations through Ilium that result in some sound that is so terrible that it captivates the attention of Pyrrhus’ ear. The “hideous crash” continues to immobilize Pyrrhus’ ear as it affects his sword. Just as his sword seems to “stick” in mid air, so does the diction. The apostrophes in “seem’d i’ th’” provide 20


momentary gaps that don’t break the rhythm of the line, but seem to make the words stick to the tongue as one recites them. Shakespeare then ingrains this motionless picture of Pyrrhus with the phrase “painted tyrant,” as if the narrative of the story suddenly stops and a portrait of Pyrrhus appears. Shakespeare completely freezes this image in line 482 with the end phrase “Did nothing.” The two-word line succinctly pauses the story and the recitation, creating a tone of astonishment that teems with feelings of disgust for Pyrrhus’ actions. This is a beautiful moment in Shakespeare. A silence ensues, as Shakespeare strings together a group of “s” words in lines 483 to 485 that include “silence,” “still,” and “speechless.” This “silence,” though, is larger than the immobile Pyrrhus. It extends to “the heavens,” “the bold winds,” and “the orb below.” These images create an awe-struck tone. He ends this quietness with the phrase “As hush as death,” a chilling notion, and moves to the ominous word “dreadful” that foretells the inevitable fall of Pyrrhus’ sword. He uses lofty imagery again, this time to describe the force and ferocity of Pyrrhus’ blow, citing it as carrying a lack of remorse equivalent to “the Cyclops’ hammers” falling “On Mars’s armor forg’d for proof eterne” (489-490). As the sword stopped with “Did nothing,” a four word short line in 492 signals the freeing of its movement with “Now falls on Priam.” The brief line leaves a tone of anguish. A king has just died. The fall of Priam marks a release of emotion, expressed in bursts with the doubling of “out, out,” and the emphatic exclamation point following Fortune. The anguish from above thus turns to anger, and Shakespeare attributes this outrage to fate. He orders the gods to “take away her [Fortune’s] power and bowl her “down the hill of heaven.” After the initial spurting of rage in line 493, the emotions flows naturally, as no caesuras block its culmination in “as low as to the fiends.’” The gory, hellish Pyrrhus that emerges from the streets of Troy ends in an irate rebuking of fate. This recitation of “Aeneas’ tale to Dido” originates from Virgil’s Aeneid and is of particular interest to me because I have read and translated the Aeneid from Latin to English. A quick glance at a translation of this very scene in Virgil’s text reveals that this passage is not a direct translation of the Aeneid. Shakespeare does not have Hamlet and the player recite a translation that preserves the details of the original (many details are different or missing, like Pyrrhus’ description as golden), nor does he follow its narrative structure (he combines the sacking of the city with Pyrrhus’ massacre in the castle, two events that each take up hundreds of lines). But I vividly remember reading about how Pyrrhus slew Priam. I remember the goriness, passion, and riveting nature of the scene, and I find a similar experience with Shakespeare. While Shakespeare might not adhere to the Latin, he produces an account that translates the rough events from the Aeneid into a lively sequence that works through a complex assortment of tone, rhythm, and diction that culminates in a pocket of Troy within the play of Hamlet. That Shakespeare was able to depict such a rich story is truly remarkable. Hamlet: If it live in your memory, begin at this line... “The rugged Pyrrhus, he whose sable arms, Black as his purpose, did the night resemble When he lay couched in th’ ominous horse, Hath now this dread and black complexion smear’d With heraldy more dismal: head to foot Now is he total gules, horridly trick’d With blood of fathers, mothers, daughters, sons, Bak’d and impasted with the parching streets, That lend a tyrannous and a damned light To their lord’s murther. Roasted in wrath and fire, And thus o’er-sized with coagulate gore, With eyes like carbuncles, the hellish Pyrrhus Old grandsire Priam seeks.” So proceed you. Polonius: ‘Fore G-d, my lord, well spoken, with good accent and good discretion. [1.] Player: “Anon he finds him Striking too short at Greeks. His antique sword, Rebellious to his arm, lies where it falls, Repugnant to command. Unequal match’d, Pyrrhus at Priam drives, in rage strikes wide, But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword Th’ unnerved father falls. [Then senseless Ilium,]

Seeming to feel this blow, with flaming top Stoops to his base, and with a hideous crash Takes prisoner Pyrrhus’ ear; for lo his sword, Which was declining on the milky head Of reverent Priam, seem’d i’ th’ air to stick. So as a painted tyrant Pyrrhus stood [And,] like a neutral to his will and matter, Did nothing. But as we often see, against some storm, A silence in the heavens, the rack stand still, The bold winds speechless, and the orb below As hush as death, anon the dreadful thunder Doth rend the region; so after Pyrrhus’ pause, A roused vengeance sets him new a-work, And never did the Cyclops’ hammers fall On Mars’s armor forg’d for proof eterne With less remorse than Pyrrhus’ bleeding sword Now falls on Priam. Out, out, thou strumpet Fortune! All you gods, In general synod take away her power! Break all the spokes and [fellies] from her wheel, And bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven As low as to the fiends!”

452

456

460

465

470

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475

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485

490

495


INTERMEDIATE ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDIO STUDIO CRITIC: NAOMI DARLING MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE SPRING 2015


SOLAR CLOCK // CALENDAR


North Space East Portal

Alpha East Tunnel

Crater’s Eye Plaza Sun|Moon Chamber

North Moon Space

Crater’s Eye

Roden Crater

Macchu Picchu

Calculated Shadow Silhouettes

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South Space


Precedent solar projects, like James Turrell’s volcanic sculpture Roden Crater and the solar clock at

Macchu Picchu, use striking features of the local landscape as inspiration for large scale solar calendars that can tell the time of day and year for significant solar events. The Pioneer Valley, my local landscape, inspired my design for a solar clock//calendar that tells the time of day in South Hadley, Massachussetts, for the summer and winter solstices, along with the date of the studio review. Depending on the time of day and your position on earth, the azimuth and angle of elevation of the sun changes to cast different shadow lengths. By studying a sun chart for South Hadley, MA, I extracted these two variables to calculate the shadow silhouettes on an hourly basis from 8am to 4pm for the dates of the two solstices and the studio review. I then created a clock-topography from these shadows by interrupting the shadow path with wood figures that intersect the undulating mountain range line from an image of the Pioneer Valley.

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SITE PLAN Solar 9am

an

SOLAR 11AM PLAN Solar 11am

Site Plan 2pm

12pm

11am

10am

1pm 3pm

9am 12pm 8am

10am

11am

2pm

1pm

9am

3pm 4pm

8am

4pm

10am

11am

12pm 1pm

9am

2pm

3pm

8am

4pm Nomen

0’

6”

1’

0’

lated Section Summer Solstice

Review

6”

1’

6”

1’

Winter Solstice

Shadow Envelope (the nomen’s shadow)

Shadow Envelope

0’

onometric Diagram Nomen

Nomen

When the sun’s rays hit an object on the earth’s

The shadow envelope becomes visible if a figure

surface, the collision creates a shadow envelope that

interrupts the path of the the shadow, producing a

extends from the hit object across the ground.

shadow topography.

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0’

6”

1’


0’

SOLAR 11AM ISOLATED SECTION

Axonometric Diagram

0’

0’

6”

SOLAR 11AM AXONOMETRIC

6”

1’

6”

1’

0’

0’

1’

6”

6”

1’

1’

Nomen Infinite Potential Envelopes

For any given shadow envelope, an infinite number of

By twisting the shadow topography figure,

objects can interrupt and catch a shadow from different

we can express the full extent of the width of

angles, depending on the orientation and width of its face.

each shadow envelope.

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0’

6”

1’

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The scale of the clock and choice of wood reflect the enormity and longevity of monumental solar clocks. Collectively, the shadow markers possess a scultpure-like quality that transforms the individual figures into a terrain of its own.

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INTERMEDIATE ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN STUDIO STUDIO CRITIC: NAOMI DARLING MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE SPRING 2015


EARLY CHILD EDUCATION SCHOOLHOUSES


Precedent Study - BIG Tojhus’s push/pull concept

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Design Design Concept Concept

PRESCHOOL BUILDING DETERMINED BY THE Determined ETHIOPIAN PreschoolPreschool Building BuildingGOVERNMENT Determined by by

the Ethiopian the Ethiopian Government Government

PRESCHOOL OPTIMIZED FOR THERMAL COMFORT AND NATURAL PLAY Preschool Preschool Optimized Optimized for fo

Thermal Comfort Thermal and Comfort Natural andPlay Natura

Imagine1Day is a nonprofit orgranization that works with the Ethiopian people and government

to build standardized schoolhouses for rural Ethiopian communities. The organization recently built an Early Child Education (ECE) Schoolhouse for children ages 5-6, but found that they were not, “utilizing the classrooms and the outdoor environment in a way that most optimally encourages natural play.” Given Imagine1Day’s recent ECE experience, I sought to design an ECE schoolhouse that incorporates “natural play” into its architecture while also offering a thermally comfortable environment for the children. I utilized a design strategy of “pushing” and “pulling” the walls and roofs of the 22’ x 26’ x 9’6” government-defined schoolhouse to provide a more thermally comfortable structure for the children to inhabit. While the project focuses on creating an ECE schoolhouse for Imagine1Day, the studio assignment features a second phase in which we use the design concept from Ethiopia and adapt the building to the unique climatic conditions of a second location. I chose my hometown, Roxbury, Connecticut.

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RAINY SEASON

Rainy Season Psychometric Chart

Dry Season Psychometric Chart

Seasonal Temperature Fluctuation from 8am to 4pm

DRY SEASON

8am

E

W • Orient Building on East/West Axis

• Place Door on Northeast corner and play zone on North and East walls

• Tilt and extend roof to add shade for entrance and play zone

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• Angle the walls to reduce and increase surface exposure to the sun


SITE 1

Tigray Sun Chart

• Tigray is located in a mountainous region of Ethiopia that features dry and hot weather from June to September and intense rain from February to May • Due to its location near the equator, the sun is high overhead during the day and switches its direction of illumination twice a year (from North to South) as the earth revolves around the sun Dec 21

Aug 22 / Apr 20

Jun 21

Temperature Vectors

4pm

• Add “buffer” walls to absorb direct sunlight

• Insert skylight to bounce in noon light • Insert low large windows to let in morning light • Insert high, thin windows to let in afternoon sun and reduce exposure to late day heat 35

• Step up ground on North and East walls (both interior and exterior) to create a playful landscape through the windows


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SITE 1: TIGRAY, ETHIOPIA

0’

37

5’

10’

15’


WINTER

Winter Psychometric Chart

Summer Psychometric Chart

Seasonal Temperature Fluctuation from 8am to 4pm

SUMMER

8am E

W

• Orient Building on East/West Axis • Place door and play zone on North side

• Bend building to increase • Rotate East and West walls sun exposure on South wall southward to further increase building sun exposure

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• Move volume of East and West pointed sides to middle section of the North wall to create a winter vestibule


SITE 2

Roxbury Sun Chart

• Roxbury is located in a rural region of New England that features cold winters from October to April and hot/humid summers from May to September • Due to its northern location, the sun always comes from the south and its elevation is higher in the summer months

Dec 21

Aug 22 / Apr 20

Jun 21

Temperature Vectors

4pm

• Lower roof on school house to trap heat from rising in cold months • Raise roof in vestibule and insert low interior skylight

• Insert upper windows on South vestibule wall to bounce light in off the North wall and through the inner skylight • Insert large South windows to let in the winter sun • Insert play zone along vestibuleschoolhouse axis for natural play in cold months 39

• Extend roof over South wall to shade windows from high summer sun • Extend and pitch vestibule roof over the North side to let rain and snow fall to the sides of the entrance


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SITE 2: ROXBURY, CONNECTICUT

0’

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5’

10’

15’


The Experiencing Body and Architectural Criticism The assertion that “the body in motion is the city’s best architectural critic” presents an ambiguous definition of the body and architectural criticism. How exactly can we define “the body in motion,” and what makes a body in motion an architectural critic of the city? In Wim Wenders’ film, Wings of Desire (1987), we witness the articulation of these very concepts. Through a close analysis of the film we can form a nuanced definition of the city’s best architectural critic as a body that moves through and experiences it. Wings of Desire poses a contradictory perception of the “body in motion” as an architectural critic in its presentation of angels. The film, set in Berlin in the late 1980s before the fall of the Berlin Wall, depicts the existence of two angels as they drift through the cityscape of Berlin. To the film viewer, the angels are the ultimate bodies in motion – they constantly move through different locations in Berlin, including the streets, the subway, the bus, the deserted land adjacent to the wall, the library, the bombed bunker film set, and even above the rooftops via their wings (images 1-7). Indeed, Wenders composes much of the film around observing the angels as they move through the city. In this way, the angels are architectural critics. Their movement through the city positions them as experts of the city’s architectural composition. The angels even confirm their critical understanding of architecture as Damiel and Cassiel, the two angels featured in the film, discuss Berlin as a palimpsest. Within the film’s diegesis, however, the angels are not bodies at all. Except for the children, the people of Berlin are completely oblivious to their existence, and cannot see, hear, smell, or touch them. The angels, too, exhibit a sensorial unawareness and weightlessness – they cannot touch, smell, taste, or see color, and they do not have bodily weight. Peter Falk’s conversation and handshake with Damian at the coffee shack, along with the Damiel’s footprints within the guarded area of the wall, confirms this dynamic (images 8,9). This sensorial unawareness thus presents the angels as figural apparitions that lack all the qualities that define a body’s existence. As architectural critics, they simply move through the city without experiencing its senses. In this way, Wings of Desire defines “the body in motion” as simply a body in motion. Here, the body in motion is not the city’s best architectural critic, but an impaired one. The angels’ inability to see, touch, hear, and smell the city limits the body in motion as an architectural critic incapable of perceiving the sensations that bring the city to life. Damiel’s decision to transform himself from an angel into a mortal human demonstrates the necessity for the architectural critic to experience the sensations of the city. After his conversation with Cassiel about the city as a palimpsest, Damiel exclaims: “I want to transform what my timeless downward look has taught me and learn to bear a harsh sight, a brusque shout, a sour smell” (Wings of Desire 1:04:30 – 1:04:41). Damiel’s desire to experience the senses of the city captures the essence of what the body in motion (as defined by the film) lacks. Immediately after his conversion into a human, Wenders depicts Damiel walking down the street. He smiles as he strolls through the city for the first time and reacts to the taste of his own blood (image 10). He exclaims to himself: “Now I’m starting to understand” (Wings of Desire 1:33:36). Damiel finally begins to comprehend what it means to be in the city through the activation of his senses. By seeing the colors of the images on the Berlin wall and tasting the blood that defines man’s mortality, Damiel becomes an architectural critic of the city that can move through and perceive all elements of the city’s composition, from the image of a building to the smell of the fresh air around it. While Wings of Desire depicts the fictional distinction between the moving, unfeeling bodies of angels and the experiencing body of a city’s inhabitant, the film engages in a broader narrative about the significance of sensorial experience in relation to the body as an architectural critic of the city. In many ways, the angels are like architects - they move through and view the city from spectacular perspectives (like an architect twirling around a 3D city model on the computer) as they desperately try to improve the lives of Berlin’s inhabitants, yet they are unable to understand and remedy the city’s depression. They are outsiders, trying to fix a problem that can only be understood by feeling, experiencing, and living life in the city. Moreover, this notion of sensorial experience seems to weave itself through numerous texts on the metropolis, from Sasaki’s conception of tactility in relation to visuality, to Debray’s critique of Venice as a lifeless city, and even to the motion picture constructions of Ruttman’s Berlin: Symphony of a Great City and Vertov’s Man with a Camera, as both attempt to capture the experience of daily life in a city. Through this framework of experiential movement, then, we can add nuance to the statement that “the body in motion is the city’s best architectural critic” and generate new meanings for living in and analyzing the city. To form a critical understanding of the city, we must do more than simply look at images or read fantastical stories about its composition. We must walk through it, touch the buildings, taste its food, and hear the sounds of city life as it pulsates through our bodies. 42


1

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3

4

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DANISH INSTITUTE FOR STUDY ABROAD ARCHITECTURE STUDIO STUDIO CRITIC: SOREN AMSNAES COPENHAGEN SUMMER 2015


OSTRE ANLAEG PARK PAVILION


The National Gallery

The Hirschprung

Pavilion Site

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Ostre Anlaeg Park is home to both The National Gallery of Denmark and The Hirschprung Collection, yet

between the two museums lies one of the few areas of unused green space in Central Copenhagen. The project brief calls for a small Pavilion on the unused land across the pond from the National Gallery that will feature a gallery space for six Eckersberg graphics along with a cafe and seating area. Upon visiting the park with my studio, I was struck by the heaviness of the two museums in contrast to the unruly, tall trees of the overgrown plot. After walking the area we sat in the National Gallery and looked out at our site. Immediately I envisioned my building - a light Pavilion that rises with the trees, preserving the beauty of the unkept nature while engaging in an architectural dialogue with the neighboring museums. 47


SITE MAP 1

2

3 4 5

2

1

6

To achieve the desired height and lightness of the

The glass South facade enables visitors at both the

Pavilion (in contrast to the two other museums on

Pavilion and the Natural Gallery to sip their coffee

site) I designed a slim two story structure that

and look out across the pond at each other.

features a completely glass South facade.

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7


CIRCULATION SKETCHES

PAVILION

3

4

5

8 9

10

8

7

6

10

9

To keep natural light from damaging the artwork, I

An old tree rests in front of the Pavilion entrance

stepped the gallery space back from the South facade

on the North facade. Instead of simply paving

and completely enclosed it. I then cut into the bottom of

over the gap between the tree and building, I

the gallery block to allow sunshine to flood through the

designed a courtyard that uses the tree as a

rest of the Pavilion.

point of inspiration. 49


0

1

3

6m

50


In the gallery, light fixtures illuminate the graphics, which are complemented by the deep blue and burnt orange color of the walls. A wide staircase lies behind the gallery floor, providing an elevated seating area to enjoy the artwork.

51


INTERPRETIVE WORKS


Analytical sketches from Denmark, Sweden, and Finland

54


Plan and section of the Brunelleschi Chappelle Pazzi in Florence drawn on opposite sides of a paper. Oil was poured on the drawing, creating an overlay effect that reveals the symmetry of Renaissance architecture. 55


Interpretation of Breuer’s Lincoln Campus Center for The University of Massachusetts. As a center for campus activity, I portray Breuer’s brutalist structure as the compartmentalized heart of the school by revealing the “anatomical” make-up of the building through the various parts of a human heart. 56


High Northern Sun

Gallery 4 Floor to Ceiling Window Natural Light (Skylights)

Bright Diffuse Light in Central Circulation Void

Gallery 3 Natural Light (Skylights) Gallery 2 Bouncing Light

Gallery 1 Floor to Ceiling Window Auditorium

Meters 0

15

30

Analytical drawing of the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki depicting the intersection of building circulation, gallery space, and natural lighting. 57


Raster Art

Vector Art

3D Model 58


Translation of vector diagram into built form

Render from 3D Model

Interpretation of the diagram in UN Studio’s Mobius House through raster art, vector art, and 3D modeling. The images evolve from exploring the duality of movement and stillness in the diagrammatic form of the Mobius House to the tension between chaos and control that seems to lie beneath the ordering of the Mobius loop. 59

Russell Einbinder Portfolio  

architecture portfolio of undergraduate student work

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