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2014 WORK SAMPLES

RUSSELL FLEMING


THE WYETH LOFTS An adaptive re-use and historic restoration project of two buildings previously occupied by the former St. John’s School of historical Cambridge, MA into forty four LEED Platinum residential units. Innovative mechanical systems, a photovoltaic array and environmentally preferable materials were used extensively throughout the project to attain LEED certification. I participated in all phases of design and construction including the development of marketing materials such as renderings, brand development, and diagrams. Currently the project is near 100% complete, with one building completely occupied and operational, and the other finishing within the upcoming weeks.


SUSTAINABILITY Setting a lofty goal of LEED Platinum status and achieving it was no light task. During design phases we thoroughly modeled the energy consumption and tuned each aspect of the building to net over a 50% energy savings from ASHRAE standards. We carried our care of efficiency into the building materials using ultra sustainable products wherever possible. Extensive air and sound testing was conducted to make sure each unit operated at its maximum potential.

A

CUSTOM WINDOWS

B

THERMAL INSULATION

C

ENERGY STAR APPLIANCES

D

ENERGY STAR ROOF

E

AIR/SOUND SEPARATION

F

RAINWATER HARVESTING

G

HIGH PERFORMANCE LIGHTING

H

RENEWABLE ENERGY

I

HEAT RECOVERY VENTILATION


UNIT SYSTEMS Maximizing efficiency of the building meant maximizing square footage. To do this we developed three archetypes of spaces: the courtyard, floor through, and loft. With the calculated shifting of floor plates we were essentially able to develop four floors within the space normally suited for three. The undulation of floor plates was equally able to emphasize the hierarchy of space through the building, allowing 1-2 times the height in active living spaces and single in more secluded, private zones.


Lofts

Floor Through

Courtyards


SOUTHIE EXHIBITION Southie Exhibition is a hybrid exhibition, art, and work space located in South Boston’s near forgotten industrial warehouse districts. It’s location has exceptional views of the Harbor, Downtown, and is in close proximity to multiple public transit options. The design of the exhibition space captures the qualities of Boston’s newly developed love of adaptive reuse and flexibility of space by employing pragmatic floor plans that easily accommodate the programmatic mix of industrial, retail, office and food service. However, this tight logic is broken where circulation and program mesh into rotating masses distinguishing use and location of space dependant on need. This simple play of adaptive circulation drive the organization by allowing endless possibilities of spatial configuration.


The development of the axis in relative space. Vertical, horizontal, and rotational pieces combine to make the flexible forms spread throughout the exhibition hall.


AXIAL SPACE To develop truly flexible space each axis must be considered malleable. The main masses of the exhibition hall are able to be configured horizontally, vertically, and circularly. Generating the ability to vertically depress or rise dependant on need, slide from one area to another, or rotate to be as open or private as required. These features also allow for the “storage� of spaces for later use, or multiple functions at one time with ease.


ADAMS HOUSE Situated in the Green Mountain range of Northern Vermont, the Adams house was developed as a rural retreat space for all four varying New England seasons. Implementing passive house theory and design, we created an ultra-efficient home capable of extreme energy efficiency and thermal comfort. The natural vernacular of the site surroundings were of vital importance to the success of the project. Following the sustainable design intent, the multitude of timber species found on site, being cleared during site development, will be milled to create the necessary linear board feet to complete the project.


SELECTION Site selection was critical to the performance of the Adams house. Strong mountain winds, harsh winter and summer conditions, and the intent of not compromising view and light conditions. We developed multiple wall systems tuned to each facade, and studied orientation to stand up against the differing conditions, all while meeting the expectations of a maximum efficiency project.

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RF Work Samples 2014