Issuu on Google+

Rural Bulletin

Rural Women New Zealand - informing New Zealand each month

March 2011

www.ruralwomen.org.nz

Rural Women New Zealand Rural Women New Zealand members are opening their homes to people affected by the Christchurch Earthquake. The scheme is co-ordinated from national office, so contact N Holt on 0800 256 467, or email noeline.holt@ruralwomen.org.nz if you need a break. Donations for travelling expenses have also been requested to help people take up Rural Women New Zealand accommodation offers (our bank account number is 06 0501 0778590 00 – please identify your contribution as an earthquake donation when you make your online donation). Rural Women New Zealand is also distributing money for neighbourhood events in urban, suburban, and rural areas of Christchurch. $250 is available for each event, which could be anything from a community barbeque, a pot luck dinner, a family picnic day, to bringing in a guest speaker - whatever seems appropriate for the people involved. To request funds for a neighbourhood event, tel N Holt, Executive Officer, Rural Women New Zealand on 0800 256 467 or email noeline.holt@ruralwomen.org.nz. Donations received by Rural Women New Zealand since the September earthquake have been earmarked for counselling services for Canterbury people.

Access Homehealth Our Access Homehealth office is up and running at 100 Carlyle Street Sydenham, Christchurch. Access is also housing Healthcare New Zealand, whose office has gone. Support is being restored for the clients these companies assist on a daily basis, and 1740 high-needs clients have already been contacted, either by phone or face to face visit. All providers are meeting on a daily basis to assess needs. If any elderly or disabled person in Christchurch needs help in their home, contact Access Homehealth (0800 284 663).


Christchurch Earthquake Information Things you can do to help yourself and help with the city’s recovery effort include: stick to routine and keep your children in a routine; limit the amount of news coverage you and your children are watching; continue to do things that give you pleasure; and find practical ways to help Christchurch people – donate, or help with fundraising efforts for the earthquake appeal; People affected by the quake can call the Government’s earthquake helpline for advice. The helpline will run 24 hours a day. The number is 0800 779 997; Information on the Civil Defence response to the quake is available at canterburyearthquake.org.nz; NZers concerned about the wellbeing of friends and relatives in Christchurch should call 0800 REDCROSS (0800 733 276). Red Cross will be able to tell them if they have registered with Civil Defence. Contact Red Cross before reporting friends and relatives missing; If you are still looking for someone or have information about someone go to the Google Person Finder at http://christchurch-2011.person-finder.appspot.com/; for enquiries for Iwi, Maori, and Pacific support go to Te Runanga O Ngaitahu, 0800 524 8248, www. ngaitahu.iwi.nz, and to Te Puni Kokiri, 0800 875 839 or 027 600 9412; Migrants and Refugees: you can call the settlement support helpline 0800 776 948, (0800 SSNZ4U) Settlement Support New Zealand provides support, advice and links to the services that new migrants need; Language Line interpreting service is available on the Government Helpline 0800 779 997; Immigration NZ is issuing automatic six month extensions to foreign nationals on a student, visitor or work visa that cannot be processed because of the earthquake (if you’re affected by the earthquake and you have an immigration query please call the Immigration Contact Centre on 0508 55 88 55 between 7am and 7pm seven days a week); You can contact the following marae for assistance: Tuahiwi Marae, 215 Tuahiwi Rd, Tuahiwi (offering accommodation, showers, food); Rehua Marae, 797 Springfield Rd, Saint Albans (information about food and whanau support); Rapaki Marae, Rapaki Rd, Lyttelton (accommodation, showers, food). A number of marae outside of Christchurch are also offering accommodation and support. For more information about these contact 0800 KAITAHU (0800 524 8248) during the day, text 021 714 659 at night, or visit www.ngaitahu.iwi.nz; Civil Defence payments can be made for essential items such as food, clothing and bedding at the Work and Income sites open at Ashburton, Hornby, Rangioa, Kaiapoi and Riccarton; Displaced homeowners: Temporary Accommodation Service/Financial Assistance. Financial assistance for $180 a week (one-person household), $275 a week (two-person household), and $330 a week (three+ person households) is available for homeowners who had to/will have to leave their homes for a period longer than their insurance covers, while repairs take place. Call the Canterbury Earthquake Temporary Accommodation Service on 0800 673 227 or visit: http://www.quakeaccommodation.govt.nz; The Earthquake Commission’s (EQC’s) insurance covers emergency repairs around safety, weathertightness and habitability, i.e, for damage to sewerage and water systems, holes in roofs and dam-


aged chimneys etc. If you require emergency repairs, call EQC on 0800 DAMAGE (0800 326 243). Homeowners with general house insurance are automatically covered by EQC’s natural disaster insurance. EQC claimants have up to 3 months from the date of the event to lodge a claim: so the last day for claiming is 22 May 2011; An initial earthquake support package for employers and employees has been set up. It includes the Earthquake Support Subsidy to help Christchurch-based employers keep paying wages and the Earthquake Job Loss Cover is for employees who may not have a job to go back to. It is not available to Government employees (who will continue to get paid), or businesses which are headquartered outside Christchurch (though there could be special exceptions). People can apply online, over the phone or they can come into Work and Income, but they will need their IRD number and a bank account number to speed the process. There are seven Work and Income offices open in Christchurch: Ashburton Community Link, cnr Cass and Moore Streets; Hornby Service Centre, 25 Shands Road; Rangiora Service Centre, cnr Good and Blake Streets; Riccarton Service Centre, 76 Riccarton Road; Kaiapoi Community Link, 77 Hilton Street; Shirley Service Centre, 203-205 Hills Road; and Linwood Community Link, 154 Aldwins Road. To apply online go to: www.workandincome.govt.nz. To apply by phone call: 0800 779997; Funding will also be available to NGOs to provide more fulltime co-ordinators and case managers for Victim Support, Relationship Services, and Salvation Army to provide the right services to people who need it; For support and advice and understanding about coping in a disaster go to the links at http://www. mentalhealth.org.nz/page/895-news+coping-in-a-disaster; Relationship Services counsellors are available to help people through a freephone earthquake crisis telephone counselling service on 0800 RELATE number – 0800 735 283, or the national office number (04) 472 8798. For face to face counselling call 0800 RELATE number – 0800 735 283 or visit their website, www.relate.org.nz; People planning to visit New Zealand can see updates at Tourism New Zealand (www.tourismnewzealand.com); and People enquiring from outside New Zealand should call +64 7 850 2199.

Donations Currently, cash donations are preferred over offers to volunteer or give materials/equipment (when local authorities have a good idea of what is needed in Christchurch in terms of goods and volunteers they will make a public announcement). You can make cash donations through: Donations to the international Christchurch Earthquake Appeal at www.christchurchearthquakeappeal.govt.nz; Red Cross - visit www.redcross.org.nz/donate Salvation Army (state that it goes to Canterbury Earthquake Appeal) 0800 53 00 00; Rural Women NZ at 04 473 5524 or email noeline.holt@ruralwomen.org.nz;


Rotary’s World Community Service at http://www.rotary.org.nz/information.cfm?ID=1340; Any ANZ Bank branch: Account number 01-1839-0188939-00; Any National Bank branch: Account number 06-0869-0548507-00; Any Westpac Bank branch: Account number 03-0207-0617331-00; Any ASB Bank branch: Account number 12-3205-0146808-00; Any BNZ Bank branch: Account number 02-0500-0982004-000; Any Kiwibank branch: Account number: 38-9009-0759479-00;

Telecom, Vodafone and 2 Degrees mobile customers can text chch to 933 to make an automatic $3 donation; and A Mayoral Fund has been set up to accept donations to Christchurch citizens: BNZ bank account: 020800-0849758-000. The Christchurch SPCA has opened a Pet Emergency Earthquake Fund. You can donate money via the website http://www.spcacanterbury.org.nz/ or to the Westpac account 030802 0586429 00. Donate old analogue phones to the people of Christchurch via your nearest Telecom store. A list of the stores is at http://find.telecom.co.nz/.


Consultation  Changes to Road User Charges? ..........................................3  Telecommunications: Broadband/TSO Bill ............................3  Publicising ERMA’s Applications ...........................................3  Other ERMA Consultations ................................................3  Electricity/Gas/Airport Levies .................................................4  Fewer Business Regulations? ...............................................4  Information Supplied by Kiwisaver Providers ......................... 4  Protecting NZ Plants, Animals, Habitats….............................4  … & Protecting Kermadecs/Subantarctic Islands ..................4  Dairy Legislation Consultation ...............................................5  Setting Rents for Pastoral Leases .........................................5  Food: FSANZ Applications.....................................................5  Draft Standards for Comment ................................................5  Border Inspection of Vehicles ................................................5  Peka Peka to Otaki Expressway ............................................5  Classifying State Highways....................................................6  Trust Law: Law Commission .................................................. 6  Pharmac’s “Exceptional Circumstances” ...............................6  Carrying Cargo – Stowage & Securing .................................. 6  Pumping Concrete: Guide......................................................6  Marketing Management Diploma: NZQA Review ..................6 

… NZ Cancer Registry Upgrade … ..................................... 14  …& Anticancer “Stealth” Drug Development ....................... 14  Civil Defence Info for Blind .................................................. 15  Alcohol Available for Consumption - 2010 .......................... 15  What Makes Us Happy ....................................................... 15  Sex, Sleep, Alcohol or Friends? .......................................... 15  UN Disabilities Convention & Ombudsmen ......................... 15  Behaviour Services: Options Explored ................................ 15 

Rural 

Housing/Building 

Farming Looks OK .................................................................7  Farm Prices, Sales Up ...........................................................7  Getting Into the Paddock .......................................................7  Preventing Quad Bike Accidents ........................................... 7  Farm Workers & Employment Law ........................................8  Hunting Permits Now On-line.................................................8  Dung Beetles Approved for Release ......................................8  Taranaki Fencing/Planting Gets Award..................................8  Fieldays Coming Up ..............................................................8 

State House Sales .............................................................. 18  Social Housing: First HIF Grant........................................... 18 

Environment  New UN Sustainability Scheme .............................................9  New Environment Action Council ........................................... 9  Coral Reefs Under Pressure… ..............................................9  … & Climate Change-Induced Migration?..............................9  NZ’s Air: Dioxin Decrease ......................................................9  Wool Insulation on World Stage ...........................................10  Road Cones from Recycled Plastic .....................................10  NZer Wins Rare Bird Competition ........................................10 

Tourism  World’s Most Romantic Destinations ...................................10  Namibia, Costa Rica - & NZ .................................................10  More Tourists Spending Less .............................................. 10  Dec 2010 Arrivals and Departures… ...................................10  …& Guest Nights .................................................................11 

Health & Welfare  Welfare Working Group Recommendations.........................11  Glossary of Welfare Terms ...............................................12  Sallies’ Report on Social Progress .......................................12  Global Food Supply Update .................................................12  UN: Substance Abuse Report ..............................................13  Food/Water Safety during Emergencies…...........................13  …“Getting Stronger” After Disaster… .................................. 13  … & Earthquake Commission: Backgrounder......................13  NZ Immunisation Rates Up… ..............................................14  … But Watch Out for Measles .............................................14  Cancer Information Helpine…..............................................14 

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Education/Training  Claiming School Fees/Donations ........................................ 16  Certificate/Diploma Qualifications: Review .......................... 16  Learn Sign Language .......................................................... 16  More Study at Tertiary Level ............................................... 16  Starship-School Phone Swap ............................................. 16  Employment Law/Holidays Act: Changes ........................... 16  Wages on Sleepover Shifts ................................................. 17  Most Competitive Occupations… ........................................ 17  … & Most Sought After Employees ..................................... 17  Overused Terms on Your CV .............................................. 17  Tips for “Refuelling” Every Day ........................................... 17 

Transport & Travel  Kiwis Love Their SUVs........................................................ 18 

Justice / The Law  Budget Day: 19 May............................................................ 18  Repealing 31 Acts in One Go .............................................. 18  Serco: Private Prison Manager ........................................... 18 

Parliament  Cabinet Portfolios Reallocated ............................................ 19 

Public Service/Local Authorities  Community & Voluntary Sector Office Moves ..................... 19  Readable Performance Reports? ........................................ 19  Payroll Giving: $1.4 Million Donated ................................... 19  COGS Election Nominations Open ..................................... 19  Registering as a Charity ...................................................... 20 

Business  NZ: a Most Entrepreneurial Country.................................... 20  Manufacturing Expands in January ..................................... 20  Wet Weather Dampens January Sales ............................... 20  Migrant Entrepreneurs ........................................................ 20  It’s Common Sense ............................................................. 20 

Money Matters�� NZ’s Economic Performance: Report .................................. 21  World Food Prices Up… ..................................................... 21  …NZ Food Prices Up… ...................................................... 21  …Producer Prices Up … ..................................................... 21  …& Electronic Card Spending Up ....................................... 22  More Goods Imported ......................................................... 22  Wage Rates Up 1.7%.......................................................... 22  …& Benefit Increase on 1 April ........................................... 22  Service Industries: January Figures .................................... 22 

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 1


Savings Working Group Recommendations ........................22  Rewards from Credit Cards? Hmmm ...................................23  $300 Million for 100 Companies ..........................................23 

Internet/ICT  Comparing Global Broadband Rollouts ...............................23  Rural Broadband: Telecom/Vodafone… ..............................23  … & Broadband: Connecting Communities .........................24  Free Internet Access – OK!..................................................24  Video Gaming on TV ...........................................................24  China: Biggest ICT Exporter ................................................24  A Handful of Sites .............................................................24 

Arts & Culture  2011 Kapa Haka Champs ....................................................25  Reservoir Hill: International Award Finalist ..........................25  Kiwi Film Rating “Excellent” .................................................25  Hindi Radio Station Goes Live… ......................................... 25  … & Celebrating NZ’s Many Languages ..............................25  A Different TVNZ 7 Channel ................................................26  2010 Word of the Year: “Austerity” ...................................... 26  When Insults Had Class.......................................................26 

Some Funding/Awards/Opportunities.................................. 31  Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011 ........................... 31  China Trade Awards ........................................................ 31  Accessing the Arts: The Big “A” Awards .......................... 32  Supporting Local Parents through the Local Initiatives Fund (LIF) ................................................................................. 32  Women in Science: UNESCO Awards............................. 32  Frozen Funds Charitable Trust ........................................ 32  The UNESCO Contestable Activities Fund: NZ Projects . 32  2011 NZ Ewe Hogget Competition .................................. 32  Lottery Environment and Heritage ................................... 32  Lottery Outdoor Safety..................................................... 32  2011 Project Management Awards .................................. 32  National Fieldays No. 8 Wire National Art Award 2011.... 33  Hauora Maori Scholarships (HMS) 2011 ......................... 33  Farming to Succeed 2011 ................................................ 33  Governance Training for Cooperatives ............................ 33  Rita Angus Artist’s Residency 2011. ................................ 33  Small Communities: Drinking Water Subsidy Scheme .... 33  Appointments ...................................................................... 33 

Fish & Ships  Shellfish Toxins: Coromandel & BoP ...................................26  NZ Made Americas Cup Boats ............................................27 

Science/Technology  Batteries Made of Tropical Fruits? ....................................... 27  Plants: Where are the Birds? ............................................... 27  Scientists Find Part of Pink Terraces ...................................27 

General  2011 Census: Not 8 March .................................................. 27  NIWA’s Weather Forecast ...................................................28  NZers: How Many? How Old? .............................................28  Household & Population Projections ................................28  Older is Not Always Wiser? ................................................. 28  Ethnic Diversity at Work .......................................................28  HRC: Race Relations Survey/Complaints ............................29  Race Relations Day…..........................................................29  …Neighbours Day… ............................................................29  … & Children’s Day .............................................................29  Oz Women: Changing Roles? .............................................29  People We Trust ..................................................................29  Some Conferences/Events ..................................................29  Philanthropy Conference 2011 .........................................29  WOMAD ...........................................................................29  Monitoring and Evaluation Workshops ............................. 30  Diversity Counts ...............................................................30  Local Government Conferences/workshops ..................... 30  Wildfoods Hokitika ............................................................30  2nd AsiaPacific Outgames ...............................................30  Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) 2011 conference ... 30  NZ Coalition to End Homelessness Conference .............. 30  National Not-for-Profit Sector Conference ........................31  NZ Land Treatment Collective Annual Conference .......... 31  NZBIO Conference ...........................................................31  Exploring the Whanau Ora Policy for Pacific Health .........31  Large Herds Dairy Conference ......................................... 31  Great Coromandel Coastal Clean-up ............................... 31  NZ Community Economic Development Network Conference .......................................................................31  10th Annual Maori Legal Forum .......................................31 

2 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Consultation Changes to Road User Charges? A Road User Charges (RUC) Bill has been introduced into Parliament. RUC is a tax that is paid by owners of all vehicles over 3.5 tonnes and all diesel vehicles used on the road. There are around 580,000 RUC-paying vehicles in NZ. The new Bill provides for: •

a permanent road user charge, so the same kinds of vehicles with equal carrying capacity will normally pay the same road user charges at all times, regardless of actual loads;

all vehicles operating above normal weight limits having to pay additional road user charges by purchasing an additional licence;

purchase of time licences to go (affects only a small group of operators): instead, there would be changes to the annual vehicle licence fees paid;

an assessment system (with checks and balances) for assessing unpaid road user charges;

supporting the setting up of the Government’s telecommunications policy programme are in Supplementary Order Paper 204. Submissions close on 11 March 2011. Two copies go to the Finance and Expenditure Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0250/latest/DLM3387314.ht ml. For more on Telecommunications Service Obligations, see http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/StandardSummary____296.aspx

Publicising ERMA’s Applications The Environmental Risk Management Authority (ERMA NZ) is calling for comments on a proposed new way of letting the public know about the applications it receives (the aim is to make its public notification process more effective and less costly). Under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act, public notification is required for (exceptions relate to rapid assessment and qualifying organisms): •

conditionally releasing a new organism;

rules for electronic RUC management systems;

importing a new organism for release under section 34;

new rules to make sure the RUC rules are complied with, including transport service operators creating and maintaining records; and

releasing a new organism from containment under section 34;

the responsibility for collecting RUC to be transferred to the NZ Transport Agency (NZTA).

field testing a genetically modified organism under section 40;

importing, releasing or using a hazardous substance/new organism in an emergency under section 47; and

issuing, amending, or revoking a group standard under section 96B.

Submissions close on 24 March 2011. Make a submission online or send two copies to the Transport and Industrial Relations Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0261/latest/DLM3394830.ht ml

Telecommunications: Broadband/TSO Bill The Telecommunications (TSO), Broadband and Other Matters) Amendment Bill deals with the provision of broadband services in NZ. It covers (amongst other things): •

the Ultra-fast Broadband (UFB) Initiative: a competitive tender programme to develop fibre-to-the-premises broadband networks connecting 75% of NZ households;

the Rural Broadband Initiative (the RBI): a competitive tender programme to set up broadband networks in nonurban areas of NZ; and

the Telecommunications Service Obligations (TSO) reforms: these affect the regulations that enable telecommunications services to be made available to supplement the services that are commercially available.

Additional amendments relating to access rights, the structural separation of Telecom NZ, and other amendments

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Essentially, the new way involves using the ERMA NZ website for all aspects of public notification. Submissions close on 4 April 2011.They go to ERMA NZ, PO Box 131, Wellington 6140, email owen.cox@ermanz.govt.nz. More is at http://www.ermanz.govt.nz/Publications/Disc-Doc-notification-Feb-2011.pdf

Other ERMA Consultations The Environmental Risk Management Authority (ERMA) is also consulting on: •

ERMA200692: the future use of the fungicide quintozene, due to information that the only formulated product containing this active ingredient (Terraclor 75 WP) has dioxin impurities; and

ERMA200399: a proposal to phase out the use of the insecticides acephate and methamidophos, organophosphates that are used on crops such as avocados, citrus, boysenberries, potatoes, onions, sweetcorn, tomatoes, and brassicas.

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 3


Submissions on both close 16 March 2011.Use the online submission form – accessible through http://www.ermanz.govt.nz/consultations/Pages/default.aspx - or send submissions to ERMA NZ, PO Box 131, Wellington 6140

Closing date for submissions is 11 March 2011. Email them to investment@med.govt.nz or post them to KiwiSaver Periodic Reporting Regulations, Investment Law Team, Ministry of Economic Development, PO Box 1473, Wellington. The paper is at http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/76023/Periodic%20Disclosure%20for%20KiwiS aver%20Schemes%20Discussion%20Document.pdf

Electricity/Gas/Airport Levies A discussion paper outlines proposed increases to the funding the Commerce Commission receives for managing regulations relating to “natural monopolies” – i.e., electricity lines businesses (including Transpower), gas pipelines, and some services of major international airports. The funding comes from levies paid by the business that are being regulated. The paper also sets out the potential costs and benefits of not increasing the funding. Submissions close on 7 March 2011. Email them to levy.consultation@med.govt.nz, or post them to Commerce Act Levies Consultation, PO Box 1473, Wellington 6140. The discussion paper is at http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45674.aspx

Fewer Business Regulations? Public submissions are invited on a Regulatory Reform Bill. The Bill makes changes to several Acts to get rid of business compliance requirements now seen as unnecessary/too costly. Affected Acts include the Agricultural and Veterinary Medicines Act 1997; Animal Products Act 1999; Companies Act 1993; Conservation Act 1987; Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993; Fisheries Act 1996; Friendly Societies and Credit Unions Act 1982; Radiocommunications Act 1989; Registered Architects Act 2005; Statistics Act 1975; Takeovers Act 1993; Unit Trusts Act 1960; Takeovers Code; the Takeovers Act 1993; and Wine Act 2003. Submissions close on 1 April 2011. You can make a submission online or you can send two copies to the Commerce Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0269/5.0/versions.aspx

Information Supplied by Kiwisaver Providers A discussion paper called “Periodic Disclosure for KiwiSaver Schemes” proposes regulations under the Financial Markets (Regulators and KiwiSaver) Bill. Retail KiwiSaver scheme providers would have to publish quarterly reports covering their fees and charges; performance and returns; portfolio holdings; and conflicts of interest and fund manager terms.

4 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Protecting NZ Plants, Animals, Habitats… The Ministry for the Environment (MfE) is currently consulting on a National Policy Statement (NPS) on indigenous biodiversity. Indigenous biodiversity refers to the number of native species, the genetic variation within each species, and the variety and quality of native habitats (e.g., wetlands and lowland native forests) in NZ. The NPS sets out how local councils should protect biodiversity in rare and threatened habitats on private land while recognising the rights and responsibilities of landowners and the interests of Maori. The NPS contains a list of criteria for identifying areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous animals that have been recognised as being rare and/or threatened at a national level. Regional policy statements notified after the NPS is released will need to include these criteria, along with ways of identifying any other areas of indigenous vegetation or habitats of indigenous animals that the council considers significant. Submissions close on 2 May 2011. You can fill in the online submission form, email a separate submission to biodiversity@mfe.govt.nz or mail one to Biodiversity NPS, PO Box 10362, Wellington 6143. For more (including information on consultation meetings being held around the country up until 5 April 2011) go to http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/biodiversity/indigenousbiodiversity/index.html

… & Protecting Kermadecs/Subantarctic Islands A regional coastal plan has been prepared for the Kermadec and Subantarctic Islands. The main threats to these island groups are from biosecurity breaches and oil spills. However, they are so remote and in such rough seas that responding to either of these is very challenging. Given their significant natural values, a focus on prevention is suggested. Submissions close on 31 March 2011. Make one online or send your submission to: Proposed regional coastal plan: Kermadec and Subantarctic islands, Department of Conservation, PO Box 10 420, Wellington 6143, Attn: S Hucker, email offshoreislandsrcp@doc.govt.nz. More is at http://www.doc.govt.nz/getting-involved/consultations/current/proposedregional-coastal-plan-kermadec-and-subantarctic-islands/

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Dairy Legislation Consultation

Application A1050 – Acyltransferase as a Processing Aid (Enzyme) (18 March 2011);

The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) is consulting on amendments to the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act (DIRA) following the Fonterra proposal that there be share trading between farmers. The proposal would introduce a new system where suppliers trade their co-operative shares amongst themselves, rather than Fonterra issuing and redeeming the shares. This would change the way farmers enter and exit Fonterra, and that requires amendments to the DIRA to make sure the dairy industry stays competitive. It has also been suggested that Fonterra’s proposed new shareholders’ fund should have a minimum $500 million to $900 million to support a viable market in securities for the co-operative’s 11,000 farmers.

Application A1049 – Food derived from Herbicidetolerant, High Oleic Acid Soybean Line MON87705 (28 March 2011); and

Application A1046– Food derived from Herbicidetolerant Soybean Line DAS-68416-4:2nd Assessment (28 March 2011).

Submissions close on 7 March 2011. They go to Regulation & Competition Team, Sector Performance Policy, MAF, PO Box 2526, Wellington 6140, email dairyconsultation@maf.govt.nz. More is at http://www.maf.govt.nz/newsresources/consultations.aspx

Lodge submissions electronically through the FSANZ website using the “Lodge a submission” or email them to submissions@foodstandards.gov.au. More is at http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/foodstandards/changingthecode/documentsfo rpublicco868.cfm

Draft Standards for Comment Three new draft standards open for comment are (closing dates are in brackets): •

Setting Rents for Pastoral Leases

DRDIACOMPLIANCEGUIDE: a guide for compliance agencies in New Zealand (28 April 2011);

A Crown Pastoral Land (Rent for Pastoral Leases) Amendment Bill proposes a new way of setting rents for Crown pastoral leases, that:

DR3566.2: self-drilling screws for building and construction industries Part 2: Corrosion resistance (14 April 2011); and

DZHB3604: Timber-Framed Buildings Handbook: Excerpts from NZS 3604:2011 (16 March 2011).

assesses how productive each pastoral lease is as a farming operation; then

uses information about farm earnings to estimate the value of its production.

A new dispute resolution system is also proposed: disputes about the way rents are calculated would be resolved through mediation between assessors; or, if that is not successful, a determination by an independent expert. Submissions close on 25 March 2011. They can be made online, or send two copies to the Primary Production Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0262/latest/DLM3404603.ht ml?search=ts_bill_crown_resel&p=1&sr=1

Food: FSANZ Applications Food Standards Australia NZ (FSANZ) is consulting on a number of changes to the Food Standards Code. Applications currently being considered include two applications for approval to use food from genetically modified soy bean lines — one which is herbicide tolerant and the other with an improved fatty acid content; and an application to use Advantame as a high intensity sweetener in a range of beverages and as a table top sugar substitute (closing dates for applications are in brackets): •

More is at http://www.standards.co.nz/webshop/?action=basicShopSearch&mod=search&SearchBox1_txtShopName=&s elStatus=DRAFT&catalog=NZ

Border Inspection of Vehicles The NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) is looking for comment on options for vehicle border inspection following the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) intention to withdraw from carrying out these inspections in mid 2011. NZTA proposes to appoint NZ-registered organisations to provide vehicles border inspection services both in NZ and offshore. Submissions close on 11 March 2011. Email them toorder.inspection@nzta.govt.nz or send them to D Hutchinson, National Manager Vehicles, NZ Transport Agency, Private Bag 6995, Wellington

Peka Peka to Otaki Expressway NZTA is seeking feedback on proposals for the Peka Peka to Otaki Expressway including location of interchanges and connections with local roads.

Application A1034 – Advantame as a High Intensity Sweetener (15 March 2011);

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 5


Submissions close on 18 March 2011. Fill in the comments form provided, and post it to Peka Peka to Otaki Expressway Consultation, PO Box 12003, Thorndon, Wellington 6144. More is at http://www.nzta.govt.nz/consultation/peka-peka-otaki-expressway/index.html

DHBs from applying for approval to fund community treatments under $500 are also features of the proposal. Consultation closes on 25 March 2011. Send your comments to B Wigodsky, PO Box 10-254, Wellington 6143, email: ecreview@pharmac.govt.nz. More is at http://www.pharmac.govt.nz/ecreview

Classifying State Highways NZTA is also consulting on its proposed classification of state highways. Submissions close on 31 March 2011. Either use the online form, or send your comments to classification@nzta.govt.nz, or to State highway classification, NZ Transport Agency, Private Bag 6995, 44 Victoria Street, Wellington 6141. More is at http://www.nzta.govt.nz/consultation/classification-system/index.html

Trust Law: Law Commission The Law Commission is seeking information about how trusts are used in NZ. Trusts seem to be very popular here compared to other countries; around one in every 18 people in NZ has a trust. In its issues paper (the second of three in its review of trusts), “Some Issues with the use of Trusts in NZ” the Commission looks at the reasons why people have established family trusts and raises the question of whether there are some purposes for which trusts should not be used.

Carrying Cargo – Stowage & Securing It is essential that vehicles carrying cargo on board roll-on, roll-off ships are secured. If a vehicle moves when the ship rolls or pitches, it can be a real hazard to people, other cargo, and to the ship itself. The current rules can’t currently be applied to semi-trailers (which make up about 60% of the heavy goods vehicles carried on NZ ferries), and a proposed amendment to these rules would make sure they did apply to them. Submissions close on 1 April 2011. You can submit online, or send you submission to Maritime New Zealand, Attention: Rules Coordinator, PO Box 27-006, Wellington 6141. More is at http://www.maritimenz.govt.nz/Consultation/Part24B/default.asp

The paper also examines the law surrounding trusts and how the Courts and case law have dealt with the use of trusts. Then, it raises some options relating to legislation that “looks through” trusts, and covers what happens if a trust is found to be potentially invalid.

Pumping Concrete: Guide

Comments and submissions on this paper close on 31 March 2011. Email these to trusts@lawcom.govt.nz or post to Law Commission, P O Box 2590, Wellington 6011. You can access a copy of the issues paper at http://www.lawcom.govt.nz/project/review-lawtrusts?quicktabs_23=issues_paper

managing the hazards of conducting concrete pours on construction sites;

safe planning and work set-up; and

concrete pumping equipment inspection and maintenance.

Pharmac’s “Exceptional Circumstances” PHARMAC is proposing changes to its Exceptional Circumstances policy. Currently the three exceptional circumstances schemes provide pharmaceutical funding consideration for patients in rare or unusual medical situations, where there are cost-savings to hospitals, and for cancer patients in certain circumstances. The proposed new single scheme aims to provide fairer and wider consideration for more patients to receive funded access to pharmaceuticals not considered for listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule. PHARMAC says a clearer application process, better information about decisions, and a trial of an exemption for

6 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Department of Labour has a new Good Practice Guide “Pumping Concrete” (which was developed with the Concrete Pumping Association of NZ). The guide offers information about:

Submissions close on 16 March 2011. Email them to nikki.jensen@dol.govt.nz, or send them to Consultation on Pumping Concrete Good Practice Guide, Department of Labour, PO Box 3705, Wellington 6011. More, including a link to a feedback form, is at http://www.dol.govt.nz/consultation/pumpingconcrete/index.asp

Marketing Management Diploma: NZQA Review The NZ Qualifications Authority (NZQA) is seeking feedback on all NZ Diploma in Business (NZDipBus) marketing, management and human resources prescriptions, with limited, technical reviews being held between March and June 2011.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Feedback is accepted until 25 March 2011. More is at http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/about-us/consultations-and-reviews/nzdipbusmarketing-and-management/

Rural Farming Looks OK According to Beef and Lamb’s Economic Service’s latest midseason update: •

there have been increases in offshore prices, despite drawn out recoveries from the recession in North America and the EU;

indications are that lamb prices will remain strong and stable for some time to come;

19.3 million head of lamb is expected to be exported, down 7.7% on last season – but prices are making up for a shortfall in supply because of a difficult spring.

2.17 million head of cattle will be processed this season, down 3.5% from 2009-10;

there is more demand for wool, and wool prices are predicted to improve 40% for the year ended June 2011 – the highest wool price since the 1989-90 season;

export price increases are being moderated by the continuing strength of the NZ dollar, but lamb, mutton, beef and wool prices are all up on last season;

farmers have been keeping a tight rein on farm spending, which is estimated to be up just 2.2% on last year (less than the 3.1% increase in prices paid for farm inputs, such as fertiliser and cartage); and

an average before tax profit for a sheep or beef farmer this year could well be around $65,000 - the highest in some time, but still well below the levels seen in 2005.

Farm Prices, Sales Up According to the latest Real Estate Institute of NZ (REINZ) Rural Market statistics, the average farm sale price increased to $1,135,000 from $1,000,000 for the three months to January 2010. A total of 209 farms sold during this time compared with 208 in the same period a year ago. Grazing properties accounted for the largest number of sales, with 92 changing hands. There were 46 dairy farm sales, up on the 33 in the same period a year ago. Interest has been shown in all kinds of rural properties, with recent sales including dairy support blocks, sheep and beef grazing properties, vineyards, and other horticultural units. Compared to the three months to the end of January 2010, there have been average price increases over the year from $561,000 to $640,000 in Northland, $612,500 to $890,000 in Manawatu/Whanganui, $907,269 to $1,850,000 in Nelson,

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

$440,000 to $2,725,000 in West Coast, $1,555,000 to $1,815,500 in Canterbury, $730,000 to $1,449,500 in Otago, and from $875,000 to $2,683,068 in Southland. But compared to January 2010, median farm sale prices at the end of last month were down in the Auckland district from $1,085,000 to $827,500, Waikato from $1,600,000 to $1,500,000, Bay of Plenty from $1,175,000 to $867,500, Gisborne from $665,148 to $585,000, Hawkes Bay from $1,175,000 to $1,060,000, Taranaki from $2,800,000 to $2,400,000, and Wellington from $650,000 to $525,000. The average selling price for a lifestyle property in the three months to January 2010 was $440,000, slightly down from the previous three months of $445,000. A total of 985 lifestyle properties were sold in the three months to January 2011 compared with 1,089 in the three months to December 2010; well up on the 876 sold in the three months to January 2009 but down on the 1,213 sold in the three months to January 2010.

Getting Into the Paddock Federated Farmers Farm Days offer people and families the opportunity to get onto the paddock to discover what farmers do, and also take a look at the technical aspects of modern farm management. The day is part fun, part educational but 100% based on the NZ farm system. Venues open on 13 March include: Northland (Whangarei); Auckland (Papakura); Waikato; Rotorua/Taupo (Rotorua); Manawatu/Rangitikei (Palmerston North); Wellington/Wairarapa (Pauatahanui);Nelson; North Canterbury (Christchurch); South Canterbury (Timaru); and Otago (Balclutha). For Bay of Plenty the farm day is being held on 20 March at Te Puke. For locations (a google maps function is available) and contact details of the farms open for visits go to http://www.farmday.org.nz/page68.html There is also a weather guide for each farm.

Preventing Quad Bike Accidents New safety guidelines have been released for farmers, their employees and contractors after consultation with the agriculture industry. To manage the hazards of quad bikes and avoid injury: •

wear a helmet;

ensure riders are trained and experienced;

choose the right vehicle for the job; and

don’t let kids ride adult quad bikes.

Farmers need to follow these safety steps or risk prosecution under the Health and Safety in Employment Act, as farms are workplaces, and farmers have a duty under the Act to keep their workers safe.

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 7


On average, 850 people are injured each year riding quad bikes on farms. Five die. Guidelines for the Safe Use of Quad Bikes on Farms is available online at: http://www.osh.govt.nz/publications/booklets/safe-use-quad-bikes/

Farm Workers & Employment Law Department of Labour (DoL) figures show the Department received 371 allegations of minimum employment standards being breached from farm workers in 2010 (compared with 216 in 2006). The main areas of complaint were around annual or public holidays (55%) and minimum wage entitlements (23%). More than half the complaints were resolved. More than one third were not pursued because they were either withdrawn, are not proceeding or were not substantiated, and between 6-7% were continuing. The Bay of Plenty had no complaints last year, but 58 in 2006. Napier complaints increased from 17 to 47 last year. In Nelson complaints rose from 24 in 2006 to 66 last year. Hamilton (includes Rotorua and Taupo) increased from 61 to 72 last year. Whangarei had the best figures, with two complaints recorded in 2006 and just five last year, while Palmerston North, which includes New Plymouth's figures, more than halved its complaint numbers to 11.

Dung Beetles Approved for Release The Environmental Risk Management Authority (ERMZ NZ) has approved the import and release of 11 species of dung beetle to manage livestock dung in NZ pastures. Dung beetles process dung by burying it, then using it as a food source and breeding site. To read the full decision, go to: http://www.ermanz.govt.nz/find/WebResults.aspx?search=erma200599&submit .x=34&submit.y=15

Taranaki Fencing/Planting Gets Award The international scale of Taranaki' Council’s streamside fencing and planting programme has won a global Excellence Award for Land and Resource Management at the Geospatial World Forum in Hyderabad, India. The award recognises the role of computer-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in the council's riparian (streamside) management programme. The Council developed GIS tools to help its staff prepare riparian protection plans for farms as part of a programme to have every waterway fenced and planted to prevent stock fouling waterways and to filter pasture run-off. There were 173 nominations for the award.

Hunting Permits Now On-line The Department of Conservation’s (DOC) new National (online) Hunting Permit System means people can now go online at any time and apply for a hunting permit on conservation land anywhere in the country. The system also clarifies the process and brings consistency between conservancies, allowing one permit to be issued for multiple areas in the country. It will also allow DOC to capture information on hunter activities that will help to target infrastructure funding where it is most needed. The permit is emailed out to the applicant along with updates on track closures and other management activities that may affect hunting in that specific area. All permits will be valid for four months. A current firearms licence is required to validate a permit to hunt on public conservation lands.

More is at http://www.trc.govt.nz/taranaki-plants-itself-on-world-stage/

Fieldays Coming Up They include: •

Northland Field Day: 3-5 March. More is at www.northlandfielddays.co.nz

Central Districts Field Day: 17-19 March. More is at www.farmonline.co.nz/events/cdfielddays

Lincoln Field Day: 30March- 1 April. More is at www.siafd.co.nz

Mystery Creek (National Fieldays): 15-18 June. More is at www.fieldays.co.nz

More is at http://www.doc.govt.nz/about-doc/news/media-releases/huntingpermits-now-online/

8 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Environment

More is at http://unep.org/Documents.Multilingual/Default.asp?DocumentID=659&ArticleI D=6914&l=en

New UN Sustainability Scheme The United Nations has launched a program encouraging corporations to share knowledge on sustainability, called Global Compact LEAD. Participating companies include Intel, Nestle, Coca-Cola, Siemens, Royal Dutch Shell, Tata Steel, Total, and Unilever. Amongst other things, participating companies commit themselves to aligning their operations and strategies with ten universally accepted principles in the areas of human rights, labour, the environment, and anticorruption. More is at http://www.unglobalcompact.org/HowToParticipate/Lead

New Environment Action Council The recently-established Stewardship Action Council is a USbased non-profit organisation working to improve social and environmental performance. Its aim is to foster sustainable business practices, and its members include representatives from the academic, government, non-government, investment and industrial and services sectors. It provides, among other things, a program organisations can use to improve their social and environmental performance, a learning network for sharing best practice, and a forum to establish contacts and collaborative opportunities with similar organisations. More is at http://www.stewardshipaction.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1

Coral Reefs Under Pressure… A recent report, “Reefs at Risk Revisited” suggests that around 75 percent of the world’s coral reefs are threatened by local human activity, including over-fishing, coastal development and pollution, and global pressures such as climate change, warming seas and rising ocean acidification. If the threats to the reefs are not dealt with, says the report, more than 90 percent of them will be threatened by 2030 and nearly all reefs will be at risk by 2050. More than 275 million people live in the direct vicinity of coral reefs, and for more than 100 countries and territories, coral reefs protect 150,000 kilometres of shorelines, helping defend coastal communities and infrastructure against storms and erosion. They also help ensure stable food supplies, promote recovery from coral bleaching, and act as a magnet for tourist dollars.

… & Climate Change-Induced Migration? An Asian Development Bank (ADB) report suggests that Governments in Asia and the Pacific need to prepare for a large increase in climate-induced migration in coming years, with typhoons, cyclones, floods and drought forcing more people to migrate. The report highlights extreme weather in Malaysia, Pakistan, the People's Republic of China, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka that caused temporary or longer term dislocation of millions in the past year. In many places, those least capable of coping with severe weather and environmental degradation will be compelled to move with few assets to an uncertain future. Those who stay in their communities will struggle to maintain the livelihoods in risk-prone settings. On the positive side, the report says that if properly managed, climate-induced migration could actually assist human adaptation, creating new opportunities for dislocated populations in less vulnerable environments. The report is at http://www.adb.org/Media/Articles/2011/13473-asian-climateschanges/default.asp?p=naromain

NZ’s Air: Dioxin Decrease A new report by the Environment Ministry on dioxin emissions shows the amount being emitted to atmosphere has halved in the last 10 years, due to regulations controlling burning at landfills and waste incinerators. and toughened vehicle emission standards The reduction in dioxin released in the air is backed up by measurements in people and food. Dioxin levels in breast milk dropped 40% over the 10 year period to 2010 to one of the lowest levels internationally. Studies show that NZ’s dioxin levels in food are between half and one-fifth that of Europe and North America and well below World Health Organisation standards. The report also identifies challenges in measuring sources of dioxin, and revises a number of earlier estimates based on more comprehensive data. The report is at:http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/hazardous/dioxinemissions-inventory-feb11.html

The report includes many recommendations to better protect and manage reefs, including through marine protected areas.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 9


Wool Insulation on World Stage Wool insulation may be common in NZ, but for a team taking a solar powered house to the US Department of Energy’s prestigious global design competition (the Solar Decathlon), this ”novel” approach will definitely need explaining (as wool insulation is virtually unknown in the US). A team of Victoria University students will be designing, building, and operating an attractive, affordable, net zero energy house, powered entirely from solar energy (and featuring four layers of wool insulation, giving the house nearly three times greater efficiency than the NZ building codes require).

Road Cones from Recycled Plastic Christchurch-based Alto Packaging has received $42,000 from the Waste Minimisation Fund to design and develop technology that uses recycled plastic resin to make road cones. It is expected the recycled road cones will be available from June this year. One of NZ’s largest roading contractors Fulton Hogan plans to use the cones. The Waste Minimisation Fund supports projects that promote or achieve waste minimisation through increasing reuse, recovery and recycling and decreasing waste to landfill. More is at http://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/new-initiative-produces-roadcones-recycled-plastic

NZer Wins Rare Bird Competition A photo of a kakapo, taken by a DOC ranger, has picked up first prize in the “Worlds Rarest Birds” international competition, organised to highlight the problem facing 500 or so species which are either rare or declining. It was organised by BirdLife International, which will produce a book based on the images later on this year. The picture was of Sinbad - the 12 year old son of veteran kakapo Richard Henry, who died earlier this year.

Mykonos, Greece; 4. Kruger National Park, South Africa; and 5. Mauritius. Read more at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/CU1102/S00017/adventureworld-reveals-worlds-most-romantic-destinations.htm

Namibia, Costa Rica - & NZ NZ has been named the third “Top Country'” in the world in this year's Wanderlust Travel Awards. It received an overall satisfaction score of 96.13% from international visitors who voted in the awards. Namibia was in top spot and Costa Rica came second. Wanderlust said on its website that it was Namibia's sense of drama and accessibility that won it top spot, and that this “mix of drama and accessibility surely accounts, too, for runnersup Costa Rica and NZ - destinations where the natural world pulls out all the stops, but creature comforts are never far away." Other NZ mentions in this year's awards were Air NZ, which finished third in the Top Airline category, and the TranzAlpine train journey, which took seventh in the Top Rail Journey category. Wanderlust has a circulation of more than 30,000. More is at http://www.wanderlust.co.uk/magazine/awards/wanderlust-travelawards/wanderlust-travel-awards-2011---winners-announced

More Tourists Spending Less More tourists came to NZ in 2010, but they spent 10% less than in the previous year, according to the latest International Visitor Survey from the Ministry of Economic Development (MED). International tourist numbers reached 2,525,000 in the year to December 2010 (up 67,000 or 2.7%) but spending declined NZ$619 million to NZ$5.6 billion. The increase in international visitors was mainly due to higher numbers of Australian tourists. There was also a significant increase in Asian tourists. Read more at www.tourismresearch.govt.nz/ivs

Tourism World’s Most Romantic Destinations Adventure World has come up with their pick of the world’s top five most romantic holiday destinations – the best places on the planet to get couples in the mood for love. They are: 1. Zighy Bay, Oman; 2. Samode Palace, Rajasthan, India; 3.

10 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Dec 2010 Arrivals and Departures… In December 2010 compared with December 2009: •

visitor arrivals (345,700) were up 1%, with more visitors arriving from Australia (up 4,500) and China (up 2,500), but fewer arriving from the United Kingdom (down 3,600) and the United States (down 2,200);

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


NZ residents left on 206,000 overseas trips, up 12%, taking more trips to Australia (up 6,900) and the Philippines (up 1,600); and

taking into account seasonal differences, permanent and long-term arrivals exceeded departures by 800 in December 2010.

More is at http://www.statistics.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/population/Migration/IntTravelAn dMigration_MRDec10.aspx

Health & Welfare Welfare Working Group Recommendations The Welfare Working Group has made 43 recommendations about how to reduce long-term welfare dependency for people of working age. They include: •

people who enter the system who can work having to take all reasonable steps to secure paid work, and supported to find paid work;

reducing the number of welfare recipients by 100,000 by 2021;

Of the four accommodation types, the largest decreases in guest nights were for motels (down 4.8%) and holiday parks (down 4.9%). Hotels had the only increase in December, mostly due to more domestic guest nights in Auckland.

taking steps to lift Maori education, training and employment outcomes, including developing partnerships with Maori leadership (31% of working age Maori are on welfare);

While motels, backpacker accommodation, and holiday parks often had fewer guest nights in 2010 than in 2009, hotels were up in every month, with 13 consecutive monthly increases.

explicitly considering the potential impacts on the wellbeing of children (222,000 children are growing up in benefit dependent households), and focusing on at-risk jobless households and whanau as a high priority;

government agencies – particularly in education and health and welfare – and communities working together to prevent welfare dependency/intervene earlier than is currently the case – especially education and health/mental health agencies;

using new ways of delivering services to people at risk of long-term welfare dependency, and measuring the effect of these services; and

focusing more on community-based solutions (including for Maori, Pacific people, migrants, refugees, and young people), including contracting not-for-profit and private sector providers.

…& Guest Nights Statistics NZ (SNZ) says the number of nights international guests spent in NZ was down 5.6% in December 2010 compared with December 2009, and was the main reason total gusts nights fell by 2.4%. Domestic guest nights rose 0.3%.

All regions except Auckland and Wellington had fewer guest nights in December 2010 than in December 2009. The main regional movements were: •

Bay of Plenty, down 27,000 (7.8%);

Auckland, up 25,000 (5.0%);

Canterbury, down 18,000 (3.5%); and

West Coast, down 15,000 (11.1%).

For the 2010 year, total guest nights rose 0.7% compared with 2009. International and domestic guest nights rose, as did hotel guest nights, while motel, backpacker, and holiday park guest nights fell. The Accommodation Survey records guests staying in hotels, motels, backpacker accommodation, and holiday parks in NZ each month.

The WWG also recommends the establishment of: •

one work-focused welfare payment to replace all existing categories of benefit - called Jobseeker Support. People on Jobseeker Support would be either jobseekers, transitioning to work, or receiving long-term support; and

setting up an agency called Employment and Support NZ, which will be responsible for the new approach. It will work with more people than currently, including people that the welfare system has previously not worked with.

The Welfare Working Group report is available at: http://ips.ac.nz/WelfareWorkingGroup/Index.html

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 11


Glossary of Welfare Terms Abatement rate – The rate at which a person’s benefit or payment is reduced for each dollar of income received, including earnings in paid work. For example, an abatement rate of 30 cents means that every dollar earned in paid work reduces the payment received by 30 cents. Actuarial funding – a statistical way of calculating the cost of a particular activity or risk, and the funding to cover that cost. Disabled people – people with impairments that experience disadvantage in participating in life roles and meaningful activity within society. Effective marginal tax rates – this is the proportion of additional earned income that is lost from the abatement of benefits, tax credits and income tax when a person’s earnings increase by one dollar. Financial incentive to take up paid work – the amount of additional income that a person receives from working compared to not working (which depends on the wage rate available to them). Income management – happens when the day-to-day management of a person’s income is controlled by a third party. This can also involve the use of payment cards which are programmed for use only on essential items. Long-term costs (forward liability) – the expected costs associated with a person being in the welfare system over their working life. Long-term dependency – people who have been in the welfare system for six or more consecutive months. Main benefit – includes payments under the current system, including Unemployment Benefit, Sickness Benefit, Invalid’s Benefit, Domestic Purposes Benefit, Emergency Maintenance Allowance, Widow’s Benefit, Emergency and Hardship Benefits, and Independent Youth Benefit. Main benefits are the first step in income support. Passported benefits – passported benefits are paid to people when they are not working and may be continued when they move into work. These payments are usually provided for the initial period in work, for example 13, 26 or 52 weeks. Second tier payments – these payments provide ongoing assistance for specific ongoing costs, e.g., Accommodation Supplement, Disability Allowance, Child Disability Allowance and Childcare Assistance. Second and third tier payments are also referred to as Supplementary Assistance. Third tier payments – In the current system, these one-off or temporary payments provide assistance for hardship and include Temporary Additional Support, Special Needs Grants, Advance Payment of Benefit and Recoverable Assistance Payment. Welfare system –the current system is generally referred as the benefit system and the proposed system as the welfare system. The welfare system covers social services, including health, education and other social services

12 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Work ability assessment – identifying the barriers a person faces when obtaining employment, including physical impairments, skills and childcare responsibilities.

Sallies’ Report on Social Progress The Salvation Army's fourth State of the Nation report suggests that NZ's social progress in recent has halted. Called “Stalled”, the report examines the social policy areas of child welfare, work and incomes, housing, crime and punishment, and social hazards - such as gambling, alcohol and drugs. The report identifies a growing number of children living in workless households, continuing education disadvantage to Maori children, a housing shortage in Auckland, high youth unemployment, and the record number of people in prison. It says gains like an improvement in academic achievement at secondary schools and a decline in gaming machine numbers are overshadowed by child poverty rates climbing back to 2006 levels and violence against children and youth unemployment rates as high as five years ago. The Salvation Army says that although governments need to be fiscally responsible in the wake of the recession, the longterm social and financial costs of letting a large proportion of the nation languish and suffer need to be taken into account. “Stalled” is at http://www.salvationarmy.org.nz/uploads/Stalled.pdf

Global Food Supply Update The UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, and the Department for International Development have released a joint report looking at the increasing pressures on the global food system and the challenges that will need to be addressed if global food supply systems are to work. The “Global Food & Farming Futures Report” outlines five main challenges: •

balancing demand and supply so food supplies are affordable;

making sure food prices are stable enough to protect vulnerable populations from any instability (for example, political events) that does occur;

having global access to food – enough production to meet global demand doesn’t necessarily mean food supplies are secure;

producing more while lessening the effects of climate change – given that UN forecasts show global agricultural production will have to increase by 70% by 2050 to match demand from 9 billion people; and

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


maintaining biodiversity* and ecosystem* services.

* biodiversity refers to the plant and animal life in a particular habitat, or in the world as a whole. An ecosystem refers to the way all those animals and plants and their environment function as a unit.

always wash and dry your hands before preparing or eating food – if water is in short supply keep some in a bowl with disinfectant or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer;

eat perishable foods first, non-perishables last – meat, bread and fruit first then canned and packaged foods last;

if you have no power avoid unnecessary opening of fridge or freezer doors;

foods that have been defrosted should not be re-frozen;

if you think or suspect that food is not safe, throw it out; and

don’t use food in cans if they have been punctured or have damage to seams.

Access the full report at http://www.bis.gov.uk/foresight/ourwork/projects/current-projects/global-food-and-farming-futures/reports-andpublications

UN: Substance Abuse Report The UN report – “The Atlas on substance abuse: Resources for the prevention and treatment of substance use disorders” – includes information collected from 147 countries, and has a particular focus on low- and middle-income countries. It describes the resources available in different parts of the world to reduce substance abuse, and notes some gaps in service delivery. Among its findings: many more people suffer from alcohol use disorders compared to drug use disorders, and both types of disorder are more common in men than women. Alcohol and illicit drug use account for 5.4% of the world’s annual disease burden, with tobacco responsible for 3.7%. In some Eastern and Central European nations, up to 16% of populations suffer from alcohol use disorders, compared to 10% in some countries in the Americas and South-East Asia, and 13% in some Western Pacific nations.

…“Getting Stronger” After Disaster… A new NZ “resilience support” board game called “Getting Stronger” has been developed by Skylight* for 8-14 year olds who have experienced tough life situations/disasters. “Getting Stronger” is designed to help children and young people talk about difficult situations in their lives, thoughts and feelings they have about them, and ideas for managing and keeping safe. *Skylight is a not for profit NGO that supports all ages through significant life change, loss, trauma, and grief. More is at http://www.skylight.org.nz/New+board+game+media+release

More is at http://www.who.int/substance_abuse/publications/Media/en/

Food/Water Safety during Emergencies… Always boil water for drinking if a “boil water” notice is in force. If you can’t boil it, use purifying tablets or household bleach to make it safe to use. Add ten drops (1/4 teaspoon) of household bleach per 2 litres of water and leave for 30 minutes. Once boiled, cover and store in a clean container. Re-boil the water if it is not used within 24 hours. Boiled or purified water can also be used for: •

washing food that will not be cooked, salad, fruit, etc;

cleaning cutlery and crockery;

cleaning work surfaces and equipment -chopping boards etc;

brushing your teeth and other personal hygiene; and

cleaning water storage containers.

With food: •

keep food simple – eat cooked food rather than salads;

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

… & Earthquake Commission: Backgrounder The Earthquake Commission (EQC) was established in 1945 to provide earthquake and war damage cover for purchasers of fire insurance. Later on, cover for other natural disasters was included and, later still, cover for war damage was dropped. EQC is Government-owned. It collects premiums from insured people for the Natural Disaster Fund. The fund is backed up by “reinsurance*” from overseas groups and a Government Guarantee, which ensures that EQC will always be able to meet its obligations. It pays out on claims from New Zealand residential property owners for damage caused by earthquake, natural landslip, volcanic eruption, hydrothermal activity, and tsunami; in the case of residential land, a storm or flood; or fire caused by any of these. When there is a major disaster, EQC works through its Catastrophe Response Programme (CRP), which sets out how EQC will cope with getting the extra resources that will be required. The CRP also provides for an alternative operations site, and additional staff and equipment.

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 13


* Reinsurance is insurance purchased by insurers from other insurers to cover and loss the insurer would experience in case of a disaster. The third party insurer pays the insurance company once a payment has been made to the original policyholder:

The service provides a guarantee of confidentiality. The cancer nurses are non-judgmental, and respect individual caller’s needs and the right for callers to make informed choices. They endorse the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi.

The Commissions website is at http://www.eqc.govt.nz/

The Cancer Information Helpline 0800 CANCER (226 237)

NZ Immunisation Rates Up…

… NZ Cancer Registry Upgrade …

The number of Kiwi children fully immunised by their second birthday has risen from 73% in 2007 to just over 88%, and the number of Maori children who are fully immunised at the age of two has jumped nearly 14% to 85% in the past two years. Immunisation among Pacific children has also increased nearly 14%, to 91%. Immunisation is important providing individual protection, and it also provides protection in the wider population by reducing the incidence of diseases which stops them spreading to vulnerable people.

… But Watch Out for Measles The Ministry of Health is advising the public to watch out for the symptoms of measles following recent cases in Auckland and other cities. Most of the recent cases have originated from international travel, or from contact with returning travellers. Measles is a serious illness, and one out of every ten people who catch it will need to be hospitalised. Children and adults with measles often feel very sick. The symptoms to watch out for are: •

at first, a fever, runny nose, and sore red eyes, then

after a few days, a red blotchy rash which lasts for up to one week. The rash usually starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body.

If you detect any of those symptoms please phone your GP or call Healthline (toll-free) on 0800 611-116 for free health advice. It is important to call first because measles is easily transmitted from one person to another through the air. Phoning ahead helps to ensure people with measles do not end up sitting in a waiting room, potentially spreading the illness to others. Healthline uses Language Line Monday to Friday, 9am to 6pm, so when you call during these hours, the nurse or call handler can usually arrange for an interpreter. Outside these hours, Healthline uses other interpreting services as far as possible.

Cancer Information Helpine…

The Cancer Registry is to be upgraded and will provide NZspecific data on the incidence, treatment trends, and outcomes of cancers. Extensive information relating to the 20,000 new cases of cancer occurring each year will then be able to be entered into the database. Currently this information is not available, and researchers have to obtain data from other countries. NZ is unique in that it has significant Maori and Pacific Island populations, but until now researchers have not known much about the effects of cancer on these groups. With the upgraded registry, trends such as moves from surgery to radiation treatment, can be monitored in real time. Health planners will see the trends as they happen, and that will mean resources will be able to be planned for earlier (rather than waiting for shortages/lengthening waiting times to indicate that they are needed).

…& Anticancer “Stealth” Drug Development The first of a new class of anti-cancer drugs designed in NZ, PR 509, is to be clinically developed in the United States. PR509 will be developed for non-small cell lung cancer, and is also likely to be evaluated in other cancers such as gastric, breast, and pancreatic cancer. It is a new “prodrug”, which selectively targets low-oxygen (hypoxic) conditions found in many tumours and acts against a wide variety of cancer types. It only becomes active once it reaches the tumour, as it hides in an inactive form until hypoxia arises. By preventing toxicity in healthy cells, and staying in cancerous cells a longer time, along with its slow release within the cancerous tissue, more of the PR509 drug goes into a tumour than is possible with standard chemotherapy drugs. The development of the drug follows agreement between Proacta Incorporated and Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd for collaborative research, development and commercialisation.

All calls to the Cancer Information Helpline are answered in confidence by experienced cancer nurses who can provide current information about all types of cancer, cancer treatments, clinical trials, research, coping and finding support, reducing cancer risk, and complementary and alternative therapies.

14 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Civil Defence Info for Blind

Sex, Sleep, Alcohol or Friends?

An interactive, electronic resource, “Get ready now so you can get through” has been developed for the blind and partially sighted community,” It comes from the Ministry of Civil Defence and the Royal NZ Foundation of the Blind (RNZFB) and offers information on the types of hazards that can happen in NZ, and what to do to be better prepared.

Which would you rather give up? That’s what Research NZ asked 500 people last month as part of a monthly survey of attitudes and opinions.

The resource can be used with “DAISY” readers*, e-text and electronic braille readers, which are already being used by people who are blind or partially sighted.

73% would consider giving up alcohol for more than a month, with men more likely to consider doing this than women;

92% of men said they would choose to give up sex over alcohol, compared with 80% of women;

young people (aged 15 to 34) prize sex and their cellphones much more than do people aged over 55.

* DAISY is free software developed internationally by blindness organisations. It is used on DAISY CD players and computers. More is at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1102/S00149/civil-defenceinformation-for-the-blind-community.htm

Most people put their mates ahead of alcohol and valued a good night’s sleep, a roll in the hay, and time in front of the telly or on the internet. Results of the poll included:

More is at http://febfast.org.nz/pdf/Media%20release%20%20FebFast%20welcomes%20poll%20results%20-%206%20February.pdf

Alcohol Available for Consumption - 2010 The amount of alcohol available for consumption rose 0.6% to 474 million litres in 2010. The volume of wine available for consumption was up 7.3 million litres (7.7%), and spirits and spirit-based drinks were up 2.4 million litres (3.5%). Although beer remains the most popular alcoholic beverage in NZ, volumes fell 6.8 million litres (2.2%) in 2010. Note: Alcohol statistics are not a measure of actual consumption, but of how much alcohol is available for consumption. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/industry_sectors/alcohol_and_tobacc o_availability/alcohol-available-for-consumption_MRYeDec10.aspx

What Makes Us Happy An open access online journal devoted to the study of human wellbeing has been launched to help people worldwide better understand what makes us flourish and thrive. It has an editorial team of 50 or so researchers from Australasia, Europe, North America, and Asia, whose job it is to break down traditional academic and publishing barriers by making the research that can change the world for the better easily available to those who will benefit most from it. The journal covers a variety of disciplines, including research from the field of positive psychology, which looks at what is going right with people rather than what is going wrong - their strengths, levels of engagement and happiness. The first edition of the journal is at www.internationaljournalofwellbeing.org

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

UN Disabilities Convention & Ombudsmen The Ombudsmen are to independently monitor and report on NZ’s observance of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Currently, the Ombudsmen investigate complaints from the public about state sector agencies relating to the Convention; and use their own powers to investigate state sector agencies’ actions in relation to the Convention. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities affirms that persons with disabilities have the right to live a life equal to that of any other person. Its Article 33 says that states should establish a plan for implementing the Convention, and have an independent organisation "promote, protect and monitor" the way they do this.

Behaviour Services: Options Explored The Ministry of Health has contracted Split Ridge Associates Ltd (SRA) to develop options for providing behaviour services for people with an intellectual disability who have challenging behaviour, and also people with Autism Spectrum Disorder with challenging behaviour. SRA is currently consulting consumer groups, providers and the Ministry refine service models. It will be making recommendations about risks, and benefits, and costs of behaviour services to the Ministry of Health in June this year. More is at http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/indexmh/disability-keyprojectsbehavioursupport

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 15


Education/Training

More Study at Tertiary Level

Claiming School Fees/Donations

The number of 18-25 year olds studying at tertiary level has increased quite a bit since 2008, according to Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) figures. TEC says the number of Equivalent Full Time Students (EFTS) aged 18-25 years in formal tertiary study increased by 15,648 (13.5%) between 2008 and 2010.

Parents completing an IRD Tax Return can claim back a proportion of the state school fees they have paid, with the following payments qualifying for the donation rebate: •

payment of fees to state-funded schools, as long as the payments go into the school's general fund; and

donations to state schools (including integrated schools), schools approved as charities for tax purposes, school boards of trustees or parent-teacher associations.

The number of 15-24 year olds who are NEET (Not in Education Employment or Training) has fallen from 10.5% to 9.8%, with 13,200 additional young people in the education system compared to the previous year. NEET statistics showed 6,900 more 15-24 year olds engaged in formal tertiary study than one year ago. More is at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA1102/S00062/more-young-peopleengaged-in-tertiary-study.htm

Rebate Claim Forms (IR 526) can be obtained from www.ird.govt.nz or by phoning 0800 257 773

Starship-School Phone Swap Certificate/Diploma Qualifications: Review The NZ Qualifications Authority (NZQA) is beginning a review of levels 1-6 certificate and diploma qualifications to make sure they are appropriate, comprehensive and fit the needs of any particular sector. Reviews, being carried out from 2011-2014, have to include education providers and industry representatives. Provisional timeframes for each review will be posted by NZQA on the Schedule of Reviews and confirmed with relevant qualification developers. There are around 4,000 qualifications listed as currently available on the New Zealand Qualifications Framework (NZQF). Developers should email NZQA at nzqfquestions@nzqa.govt.nz accepting the proposed times for the 2011 reviews or suggesting an alternative review time before 31 March 2011. For reviews scheduled for 2012 onwards they can contact NZQA if they wish to bring their review forward. More is at http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/studying-in-new-zealand/nzqf/reviews-of-qualifications/

Starship Foundation and mobile phone recycler Folamh have invited NZ schools to collect as many mobile phones as they can to fundraise for Starship’s Air Ambulance Service, which airlifts children with life threatening medical conditions to Starship Hospital. Based on the number of phones a school collects, it can “cash them in” for such things as Promethean ActivBoard interactive whiteboards, laptops, books, handycams, sports gear and cameras. For 55 mobile phones, a school can get a digital camera. There is no limit to the number of schools that can participate and there is no end-date to the campaign. Nearly 300 schools across the country have become part of the Starship-School Phone Swap. Schools can sign up for the programme at www.starship.org.nz/schoolphoneswap

Employment Learn Sign Language A new website called “Thumbs Up! An Introduction to NZ Sign Language” is aimed at Year 7 and 8 students in Englishmedium schools working at curriculum levels 1 and 2. It’s part of the Learning Languages Series, which is designed for teachers and students who are new to language learning is aimed a t helping people learn – and teach – sign language. NZSL sits alongside English and Maori as an official language in NZ and is used by around 29,000 Kiwis. Find Thumbs up! at www.nzsl.tki.org.nz

16 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Employment Law/Holidays Act: Changes A number of employment law and Holidays Act changes come into force on 1 April. The main changes to the Holidays Act include employees being able to cash in a maximum of one week of annual holidays; and being able to transfer public holidays to another working day. The main change to the Employment Relations Act extends 90 day trial periods to all employers. Changes to the personal grievance provisions include consent having to be given before a union can access a workplace; confirmation that communication with employees

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


can occur during collective bargaining; employers being required to retain employment agreements; and the role and powers of labour inspectors being extended. A change now in force is that during an annual “closedown” period that includes public holidays (e.g., at Christmas/New Year) an employee is entitled to be paid for the public holidays if it was otherwise going to be working day for him/her. A change effective from 1 July 2011 requires employers to retain a signed copy of an individual’s employment agreement or current signed copy of the terms and conditions. Employees are entitled to a copy of their agreement if they request one. More is at http://ers.govt.nz/updates/

… & Most Sought After Employees SEEK also named the top five most sought after employees for January as: •

Government/Defence – Government;

Engineering – Civil/Structural Engineering;

Healthcare & Medical – Psychology, Counselling & Social Work;

Information & Communications Technology – Consultants; and

Trades & Services – Automotive Trades.

More is at http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/4630326/New-job-ads-hittwo-year-high

Wages on Sleepover Shifts The Court of Appeal has ruled that disability support workers are working when doing overnight sleepover shifts and should be paid the adult hourly minimum wage for the shift. Legal action was launched by the Service and Food Workers Union (SFWU) and the Public Service Association (PSA) in 2007. They argued that sleepover shifts are “work” as defined in the Minimum Wage Act so workers should be paid the adult minimum wage of $12.75 an hour for the shift. In 2009 the Employment Court ruled that being required to stay on the employer’s premises throughout the night to support people with intellectual disabilities was work and should attract the adult minimum wage. Workers’ responsibilities on a sleepover shift as “weighty” and “critical to the business of the employer”. IHC appealed the Employment Court decision to the Court of Appeal.

Most Competitive Occupations… According to the SEEK New Job Ads series for January 2011, January’s top five most competitive occupations were: •

Hospitality & Tourism – Waiting Staff;

Call Centre/Customer Service – Call Centre Operator;

Information & Communications Technology – Help Desk & IT Support;

Retail & Consumer Products – Retail Sales Assistant; and

Administration – Receptionists.

Overused Terms on Your CV One of the ways you can make your CV stand out from the crowd is to avoid using common buzzwords such as "innovative," "team player" and "results-oriented." These (and other) terms are now overused, and have lost their impact. LinkedIn, a US networking website for professionals recently analysed millions of member profiles and compiled a list of the 40 most commonly used phrases in them. They are (in alphabetical order): best-in-breed, best-in-class, bottom lineoriented, client-focused, creative thinker, cutting edge, detailoriented, driven professional, dynamic, entrepreneurial, evangelist, extensive experience, fast-paced, go-to person, goal oriented, guru, highly skilled, innovative, motivated, multitasker, out-of-the-box, perfectionist, proactive, problem solver, proven track record, quality-driven, quick learner, results-oriented, road warrior, seasoned professional, selfstarter, skill set, strategic thinker, strong work ethic, team player, tiger team, trustworthy, value add (added), works well under pressure, and works well with others. The organisation says it’s better to list specific achievements: instead of “extensive experience” in sales, noting e.g., that you've worked in sales for 10 years, hit your quota the last 12 quarters, and name specific deals you've closed. More is at http://www.aarp.org/work/job-hunting/info-012011/ask_sid_resume_tips.html

Tips for “Refuelling” Every Day Human beings aren't meant to operate like computers - at high speeds, continuously, for long periods of time. We're designed to be rhythmic, and to intermittently renew. Here are six strategies to help: •

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

make sufficient sleep your highest priority;

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 17


take a renewal break at least every ninety minutes;

keep a running list of everything — literally everything — that you want or need to do;

run up your heart rate or take a nap in the early afternoon;

practice appreciation — and savouring; and

develop a transition ritual for between work and home.

Read more at http://blogs.hbr.org/schwartz/2010/12/six-ways-to-refuel-yourenergy.html

Housing/Building State House Sales Since 2008 Housing NZ Corporation (HNZC) has sold a number of high value (worth more than $700,000) state houses, and the $19 million return will go towards purchasing more properties. Based on an average cost of $425,000 for a four-bedroom home and section in Mangere it could buy around 45 new homes. The Corporation has 186 properties valued at over $700,000 in its portfolio. Some of these will be retained because they house community organisations, and others redeveloped. State houses in areas where there is no longer demand for this type of housing will also be sold, and the proceeds reinvested in areas where they are needed most.

Social Housing: First HIF Grant Auckland based social housing provider, Community of Refuge Trust (CORT) has received the first grant – of $1 million - from the $20 million in Housing NZ’s Housing Innovation Fund (HIF).

Transport & Travel Kiwis Love Their SUVs Despite the rising cost of fuel, Kiwis seem more committed to the idea of an SUV (sports utility vehicle) as their personal choice for transport than ever before, says the Motor Trade Association (MTA). Analysis of the new car market over the last five years shows owners have taken to SUVs in steadily increasing numbers during that time, to the point where they now sit just behind small cars as the largest segment in the market. Sales in 2010 alone totalled almost 11,500 units. Similar trends are occurring overseas.

Justice / The Law Budget Day: 19 May Budget 2011 is to be delivered on19 May. The Government says it will reduce new operating spending to around $800 million to $900 million a year, from the current allowance of $1.1 billion, and prioritise new spending on health and education.

Repealing 31 Acts in One Go The recently introduced Regulatory Reform (Repeals) Bill repeals 31 Acts that have been identified as “spent” meaning they no longer have any actual effect, or have very limited effect, and are out of date. Another feature of this Bill is that it provides a quick and easy way of collectively repealing spent Acts (without this Bill, the spent Acts may sit in the statute books indefinitely). Read more about the Bill at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0249/latest/DLM3387101.ht ml

The HIF was set up to foster collaboration between Government and community organisations to provide more housing for NZers on low to moderate incomes, or with special housing needs. CORT will match the $1 million with $1 million of its own money to provide ten one-bedroom affordable rental homes in the Tamaki area. It will build eight new homes and buy two existing properties for people who experience mental illness. Currently 16 further projects, including four Maori Demonstration Partnership funded projects, are being developed into funding proposals. It is expected that they will be presented to Housing NZ for approval by June this year.

Serco: Private Prison Manager Global services management company Serco has been selected to manage the Mt Eden/Auckland Central Remand Prison (ACRP) for six years from August 2011. Serco will have to comply with all relevant NZ legislation and international obligations, and prisoners will still have the right to raise issues of concern with the Office of the Ombudsmen or Corrections Chief Executive.

More is at http://auckland.scoop.co.nz/2011/02/first-hif-recipient-of-2011announced/

18 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Parliament

The report is at http://www.oag.govt.nz/2011/central-government

Cabinet Portfolios Reallocated Several Cabinet portfolios have been reallocated to allow Gerry Brownlee to work fulltime as Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister: Maurice Williamson has been appointed as Associate Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery; and Simon Power becomes Acting Leader of the House, David Carter the Acting Minister for Economic Development, and Hekia Parata the Acting Minister of Energy and Resources. An Ad Hoc Cabinet Committee on Canterbury Earthquake Recovery, chaired by the Minister, will meet regularly, and the Minister will also will work closely with Civil Defence Minister John Carter and National Civil Defence Director John Hamilton.

Not-For-Profits Payroll Giving: $1.4 Million Donated NZ’s payroll giving scheme (where workers donate to charities directly from their pay) saw $1.4 million go to NZ charities in its first year. In December 2010 more than 1400 workers donated nearly $200,000 to charities and in return got immediate tax credits back of about $66,000.

Public Service/Local Authorities Community & Voluntary Sector Office Moves The Office for the Community and Voluntary Sector (OCVS) has moved from the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) to the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA). OCVS will be based in the new Policy, Regulatory & Ethnic Affairs branch (PREA) at Level 10, 46 Waring Taylor Street, Wellington , tel 04 495 7200, email ocvs@dia.govt.nz. The new postal address is: Office for the Community and Voluntary Sector, PO Box 805, Wellington 6140. Website urls are the same: www.ocvs.govt.nz, www.goodpracticeparticipate.govt.nz, or www.goodpracticefunding.govt.nz

Readable Performance Reports? Public Service organisations have to report on performance against plans they’ve developed to show they are delivering services effectively and efficiently. The Auditor-General's latest publication is a discussion paper which describes the reporting of three public service organisations - Career Services, Ministry of Economic Development, and NZ Customs Service - that received a "good" grade from OAG auditors for their service performance and systems information. The OAG says all three described their business challenges and their day-today operations in reports that are easily understood by a wide range of readers.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Numbers in the scheme vary from month to month, and in November were at over 1700. Payroll giving is available to all employers who file their Employer Monthly Schedules to Inland Revenue electronically and is voluntary. The schedules provide Inland Revenue with details of employees’ gross earnings, PAYE payments and other deductions. More is at http://www.ird.govt.nz/news-updates/like-to-know-payroll-givingupdates.html

COGS Election Nominations Open Nominations for committee members to sit on their local Community Organisation Grants Scheme (COGS) have opened. COGS support is often the lifeblood of many community organisations in NZ. Last year more than $14 million was distributed to more than 4,000 non-profit and voluntary groups. COGS registered organisations may nominate a candidate from their area for the elections. If your organisation didn't apply for a COGS grant in 2010, you can still register for the elections at http://www.dia.govt.nz/diawebsite.nsf/wpg_URL/ServicesCommunity-Funding-COGS-Local-Distribution-Committee-Election2011?OpenDocument

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 19


Registering as a Charity SPARC, the Department of Internal Affairs, Inland Revenue, the Companies Office and the Charities Commission have jointly produced an information sheet to help sport and recreation organisations who are considering applying to register as a charity. The factsheet explains when sport and recreation organisations are considered to be charitable. It also provides guidance on the benefits and obligations for charities registered with the Charities Commission, and how to apply for registration. The information is at: http://www.charities.govt.nz/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=0KEfZKeW%2bwk%3d&t abid=92

Business NZ: a Most Entrepreneurial Country New Zealand has begun the 2011 year as one of the most entrepreneurial countries on the planet - "an entrepreneurial powerhouse," according to The Economist. The World Bank ranked this country first for starting a business in 2010 and Forbes pegged New Zealand at third on its new "Best Countries for Business" list in 2010, up two notches from the year before. New Zealand has more than 470,000 small businesses and is seen as one of the most innovative, creative, technologically advanced ,and internationally competitive countries in the world. A recent study by The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation found that job growth in the US is now driven primarily by start-up companies, and many people are taking a closer look at why New Zealand has been so successful in fostering an entrepreneurial culture. More is at http://www.nzte.govt.nz/press-room/NZTE-PressReleases/Pages/New-Zealand-emerges-as-an-entrepreneurialpowerhouse.aspx

Manufacturing Expands in January Manufacturing in January 2011 saw the fourth consecutive month of expansion, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI). The seasonally adjusted PMI for January stood at 53.7, up slightly from 53.2 in December (a PMI reading above 50.0 indicates that manufacturing is generally expanding; below 50.0 that it is declining). All five indices - production (52.8), employment

20 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

(52.8), new orders (56.6), finished stocks (50.7) and deliveries (52.4) were all in expansion for the third consecutive month. More is at http://www.businessnz.org.nz/file/2026/PMI%20Main%20Release.pdf

Wet Weather Dampens January Sales Spending across the Paymark network in January 2011 was slow, with the figures showing NZ’s annual growth at 3.2% for the month – below the 3.9% annual growth rate reported for December, and the slowest since August 2010. People are continuing to use their own money, with debit spending up 4% on January 2010 and credit card use down 0.6%. The weaker figures appear to be a combination of wet weather and a general economic step-back. The wildest day weather-wise, 23 January, had the biggest impact on sales, with Kiwis spending 1.9% less than on the same trading day in 2010. This equates to a drop in value of approximately $5 million (for the 14 days prior to the storm, the nationwide growth rate in spending averaged 4.1%). More is at https://www.paymark.co.nz/cms_display.php?sn=126&st=&pg=3970

Migrant Entrepreneurs Ethnic developments like Auckland's Asian-style Northcote Shopping Centre add to a city's cultural diversity but are not well understood by mainstream policymakers, according to Massey University researchers. The researchers say these developments indicate a high level of immigrant entrepreneurship and ethnic retail, food and cultural activity, and create a distinct “sub-economy” that is quite different from the rest of NZ. For more details: http://integrationofimmigrants.massey.ac.nz/

It’s Common Sense Practical intelligence, or common sense, is key to success in business, according to a new study that highlights the importance of hands-on experience and learning by doing. Researchers from American University in Washington D.C. and the University of Maryland found that entrepreneurs who learn from experience and experiment have an edge over those who acquire knowledge through reading and observation. Read more at http://www.american.edu/media/news/20110103_Practical_Intelligence_Key_to _Entrepreneurial_Success.cfm

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Money Matters NZ’s Economic Performance: Report A recent report compares NZ’s economic performance to other Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. It also has chapters on Australia (our most important trading partner) and Auckland (which plays an important role in generating and attracting businesses, skills and innovation). Some of the main findings are: •

we currently sit in third place in the OECD in the UN Human Development Index (that focuses on life expectancy, education, and income);

we are 10th in the Environmental Performance Index (EPI) 2010 (that focuses on outcomes across a core set of environmental issues); and

the income gap between NZ and the richer OECD countries is reasonably large.

The full report is at www.med.govt.nz/indicators

vegetable prices accounted for half of the 1.8% increase in food prices in January this year. Fruit and vegetables increased 7.4%. Vegetable prices, which have been above levels usually recorded at this time of year, rose 7.2%. Grocery food prices rose 0.9% fish prices rose 1.7%. In the year to January 2011, food prices rose 3.8%, including a 2.2% increase in October, when goods and services tax (GST) rose. The most significant contributors were grocery food (up 3.9%) and fruit and vegetables (up 8.1%), with higher prices for milk, cheese, and eggs (up 8.9%) and vegetables (up 10.2%). More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/prices_indexes/ FoodPriceIndex_HOTPJan11.aspx

…Producer Prices Up … The producers price index (CPI) measures changes in prices received by producers (these are the output prices), and changes in the costs of production, excluding labour and depreciation costs (these are input prices). The main influences on the outputs price - which was up 0.2% in the December 2010 quarter - were the:

World Food Prices Up… The UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), which measures monthly changes in international prices of a basket of food, said monthly food prices moved to a record high in January 2011 due to higher global prices of cereal, sugar, and vegetable oils. FAO says high food prices are a big concern, especially for low-income, food - deficit countries that could face problems in financing food imports, and also for poor households which spend a large share of their income on food. Prices rose for the seventh month in a row to 231 points. The figure is the highest level registered since 1990 when the agency started monitoring prices. Some of the reasons for the price rises include: political turmoil in some countries, the weakening dollar, bad weather, and a strike at Argentina's ports (affecting shipments of soybeans and corn). More is at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703652104576121852134742 690.html?mod=dist_smartbrief

…NZ Food Prices Up…

1.7% rise for wholesale trade, reflecting higher wool and metal prices;

4.4% rise for livestock and cropping farming, reflecting higher prices for wool, sheep, and lamb;

4.3% rise for dairy cattle farming, reflecting higher farmgate milk prices; and

6.1% fall for dairy product manufacturing, reflecting lower milk powder and cheese prices.

The main influences on the inputs price - up 0.9% in the December 2010 quarter - were the: •

3.3% rise for wholesale trade, reflecting higher prices for gas condensate and imported crude oil;

3.4% rise for dairy product manufacturing, reflecting higher farm-gate milk prices; and

1% rise in agriculture, forestry, and fishing, reflecting higher livestock sheep prices.

Together, the wholesale trade index, the dairy product manufacturing index, and the agriculture, forestry, and fishing index contributed about 70% of the overall 0.9% rise for the inputs index in the December 2010 quarter. Read more at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/prices_indexes/ ProducersPriceIndex_HOTPDec10qtr.aspx

Food prices rose 1.8% in the January 2011 month following falls in food prices of 0.8% in December and 0.6% in November 2010. Statistics NZ says that food prices usually rise in January, and that the seasonal increase in fruit and

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 21


…& Electronic Card Spending Up Electronic card* spending was up 2.2% in January 2011 (taking into account seasonal differences). This follows a decrease of 1.2% in December 2010, and is the largest increase in five years. All industries recorded increases in January 2011. The value of electronic card transactions in the retail industries was up 2.4% in January 2011 and that’s the largest increase since January 2006 (there was a 0.8% decrease in value in December 2010). *covers debit, credit, and charge card transactions with NZbased merchants. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/businesses/business_characteristics/ ElectronicCardTransactions_HOTPJan11.aspx

More Goods Imported The total value of goods imported in January 2011 increased $396 million (14%) from January 2010, to $3.3 billion. The total value of goods exported for the month was up $136 million (4.3%) from January 2010, to $3.3 billion. In January 2011, the trade balance was a small surplus of $11 million or 0.3% of the value of exports. The annual trade balance for the year ended January 2011 was a surplus of $865 million (2.0% of exports) - the first surplus for the year ended January since 2002. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/industry_sectors/imports_and_export s/OverseasMerchandiseTrade_MRJan11.aspx

Wage Rates Up 1.7%... Salary and wage rates, including overtime, grew 1.7% in the year to the December 2010 quarter, according to Statistics NZ. This follows 1.6% increases in both the years to the September 2010 and June 2010 quarters. Salary and wage rates for the private sector increased 1.9% in the year to the December 2010 quarter. This is the largest increase since a 2.0% increase in the year to the September 2009 quarter. Public sector rates rose 1.4% in the year to the December 2010 quarter. Average total hourly earnings increased 1.9%, up from a 1.3% increase in the September 2010 year. Private sector average total hourly earnings increased 1.8%. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/prices_indexes/ LabourCostIndexSalaryandWageRates_HOTPDec10qtr.aspx

22 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

…& Benefit Increase on 1 April Main benefits, Superannuation and Student Allowance rates will all increase by 3.75% from 1 April 2011 to reflect increases to the Consumer Price Index. Married rates will increase by 6.85%, to make sure that married rates continue to equal 66% of the average net wage. The rate paid to couples receiving NZ Superannuation will rise by just over $22 a week. More about the increases is at http://www.workandincome.govt.nz/individuals/forms-and-brochures/benefitrates-april-2011.html

Service Industries: January Figures The BusinessNZ Performance of Services Index (PSI) for January 2011 was down 1.3 points from December, and down from 55.2 for the 2010 January month. A PSI reading above 50.0 indicates that the service sector is generally expanding; below 50.0 that it is declining. The average PSI value for 2009 was 48.8, while for 2010 it was 53.2.

Savings Working Group Recommendations The Government's Savings Working Group’s final report says urgent action is needed to lift savings by at least $3 billion to $5 billion, or 2% - 3% of gross domestic product, a year to rebalance NZ’s economy. The Group’s views include (among other things): •

the government cutting inflation-adjusted spending every year for the next 30 to keep debt at sustainable levels;

increasing GST;

lowering tax rates;

KiwiSaver being extended (though not compulsory);

reducing the number of default KiwiSaver providers;

employers not offering pay increases to compensate non-members for not receiving KiwiSaver benefits;

extending KiwiSaver-style incentives to other saving schemes where contributions are locked in;

investors having the option of converting some of their lump-sum pensions into an income stream;

the Government issuing inflation-indexed bonds;

charging a low rate of interest on student loans;

Government considering sales of assets to reduce national debt; and

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


having “a sharp increase” in government productivity to reduce the fiscal deficit, with annual performance improvements of 2% for the next five years, and 1% gains after that.

to be rolled out. It then ranked countries against each other, with NZ coming in 10th, behind countries such as Sweden, Estonia, France, Japan, South Korea and one place below Australia. It came in ahead of the United Kingdom and Germany.

More is at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/BU1102/S00006/tax-reformessential-to-lift-savings-175-gst-mooted-swg.htm

The cost of the broadband scheme to NZ taxpayers (per household connected) is about 30 percent less than in Australia, with the NZ Government planning to spend 2.2% of annual revenue on ultra-fast broadband compared to Australia's 7.6%.

Rewards from Credit Cards? Hmmm

NZ plans to extend fibre to 75% of the country are well below Australia's target of 93% and South Korea's 95%. Its goal of offering speeds of 100 megabits per second was the same as France, Sweden and Estonia.

Consumer NZ is warning against using credit cards to get reward points. It spent $25,000 dollars over two years on credit cards and paid them off monthly, in order to see what reward scheme offered the best return. For those who regularly pay off their outstanding debt there are some rewards, but not many - and 13 of the cards went into negative value by the time fees were taken into consideration. The top amount of money Consumer could get on a card was $182 worth of flying. It says that people on average shouldn't really use those cards as a reason to buy something or for points.

$300 Million for 100 Companies The NZ Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF) has invested $123 million into 100 seed and start-up companies since it started in 2002. Combining private investment, those 100 companies have received $308 million of venture and angel investment capital. Of the 100 companies: 79 are exporting; 29 have received investment from offshore investors; 23 emerged from either universities or Crown Research Institutes; and 19 have been part of business incubators. Auckland is home to 53 of the companies, with Christchurch hosting 16. Nine have been sold and 7 have been written off or liquidated. Twenty-eight of the investments were into seed stage enterprises, 56 were into start-up companies, 15 into early expansion companies, and 1 company at the expansion stage.

Internet/ICT Comparing Global Broadband Rollouts

The Economist Intelligence Unit's ranking of proposed broadband builds: 1: South Korea; 2: Japan; 3: Singapore; 4= Sweden; 4= Finland; 5: Estonia; 6: France; 7: Spain; 8: Denmark; 9: Australia; 10= NZ; 10= USA; 11: Italy; 12: United Kingdom; 13: Germany; 14: Greece

Rural Broadband: Telecom/Vodafone… The government is negotiating with Telecom and Vodafone for provision of extended broadband services in rural NZ. The two companies submitted a joint proposal to the $285 million Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) tender, which will improve access to faster broadband for rural customers. The proposal involves an extension of Telecom’s fibre network to deliver fixed wireless and fixed wire broadband to 252,000 customers in rural NZ, and the construction of 154 fibre-connected cell phone towers to enable fixed wireless broadband to rural customers, as well as improved mobile coverage, and the direct connection of 719 rural schools to fibre networks. At the moment, about 20% of customers in rural NZ can access speeds of at least 5 Mbps, and this will rise to 86% of rural households and businesses, with 95% of rural schools receiving ultra-fast connection. As well, more rural customers living on the fibre routes may be able to get fibre-to-the-door. The rollout is due to be completed by 2016. Open access rules will be included in any contract, with other providers who have not been successful in the tender able to provide services. The system will also support new technologies like 4G. Unsuccessful tender parties are now encouraged to start working with Telecom and Vodafone to look at ways to further improve solutions for rural NZ. More is at www.med.govt.nz/rural-broadband

A London research group, The Economist Intelligence Unit, has compared broadband rollouts around the world, measuring projected speed, coverage, market competition and the level that internet investment would strain other public funds. It also looked at how long it would take for fibre

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 23


… & Broadband: Connecting Communities Connecting Communities is an independent review (by Huawei Australia) of the impact of broadband on communities in Britain and its implications for Australia. The report focuses on digital inclusion, and how ever-faster broadband is improving public service outcomes and the relationship between citizens and governments. It identifies the following benefits of faster broadband for UK communities: •

with tele-care 1.7 million elderly people are able to stay in their communities and lead independent lives making huge savings and strengthening family cohesion;

older, disabled, the isolated report improved well being from tele-care, speaking to long-lost friends and family on Skype, and getting involved in communities online;

tele-conferencing and related home-working are already reducing emissions and congestion – and supporting greater community involvement;

in education, results have improved by two grades and hard to reach kids have been switched on, especially if they had access to broadband at home and school; and

public service efficiencies: these include, for example: digitisation of X rays (saving money and lives); in Wales 22 local authorities, and all public services, sharing one network (saving millions); NHC (National Health Service) Choices, a Facebook for health advice got 20 million hits in the severe 2010 winter (saving the NHS £44 million); public servants and politicians having to be more responsive, more immediately, because of the instant interactivity of fast broadband (empowering people too busy, too private or too remote to go to meetings).

The report concludes that as bandwidth and speed increase these kinds of benefits will also increase. Connecting communities is at http://www.huawei.com.au/connectingcommunities/

Free Internet Access – OK! A just-released 2010 evaluation of The Aotearoa People's Network Kaharoha (APNK), which provides free access to broadband internet services to more than 130 libraries and three marae, says the scheme is having a big effect in enhancing the financial, employment, educational and social opportunities for users, while also significantly boosting library membership and usage. Findings include: •

users report benefits in terms of finding jobs (44% of users), financial use (41%), increasing computer literacy (47%), accessing local council services (39%) and in education-related activities (30%);

24 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

the scheme provides internet access for Maori training and employment where none existed before;

more than two-thirds of respondents saw it as an essential part of the library/marae;

library membership has increased by an average 30% at participating libraries, with increased numbers from traditionally hard-to-reach groups; and

many respondents (42% of users) reported that they did not have other forms of access to the internet.

The evaluation report is at http://www.natlib.govt.nz/about-us/news/8-feb-2011apnk-proves-worth

Video Gaming on TV TVNZ has formed a partnership with Ginx TV, global operator of video gaming channels, for access to Ginx gaming content for new youth channel U, which launches this month (13 March 2011). U will offer the first dedicated strand of gaming content on free to air television in NZ, catering for people who want to learn more about games, trial games and experience new games in a broadcast environment. Video gaming is becoming increasingly popular but until now hasn't had much in the way of mainstream exposure.

China: Biggest ICT Exporter More than a third of the world’s information and communications technology (ICT) exports now originate from mainland China and its special administrative region of Hong Kong. Asia accounted for 66.3% of global ICT exports in 2009. The US tops the list of ICT importers, followed by China and Hong Kong. Among major importers, declines of more than 35% were registered by Finland, Ireland, Portugal, Russia, and Spain in 2009. India, on the other hand, experienced a rapid increase in ICT goods imports, moving from 28th to 17th in the global ranking of importers. More information is at http://www.unctad.org/Templates/webflyer.asp?docid=14417&intItemID=1528&l ang=1

A Handful of Sites A November 2010 survey of US small businesses looked at the social media sites were deemed to be the most useful (in order the top four were: Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn). See more at http://smallbiztrends.com/2011/01/which-social-media-sitemost-beneficial%e2%80%99.html

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Clothes, posture, words, even your tone of voice, are among the 12 factors that determine how you are perceived the first time someone meets you, according to a slide show at http://www.businessinsider.com/20-ways-to-nail-a-good-firstimpression-2010-12#.(Listening skills and background research also can help you improve your first impression, but jokes can be risky.) A list of key dates relating to NZ’s national secondary qualifications is on the NZ Qualification Authority’s website at http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/about-us/events/2011-key-dates-fornational-secondary-qualifications/. The list includes the main Ministry of Education dates as well. 16 Tips to improve your blog can be found at http://www.networksolutions.com/smallbusiness/2011/01/thescience-of-blogging-16-tips-to-improve-your-blog/ A guide to fishing vessel stability is at http://www.maritimenz.govt.nz/Publications-andforms/Commercial-operations/Shipping-safety/VesselStability-Guidelines-A4.pdf . It comes from Maritime NZ. An article about making business meetings more productive can be found at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/BU1011/S00614/how-tomake-sure-your-meetings-arent-time-wasters.htm A smartphone application called "Barcoo" lets shoppers scan products' bar codes in order to receive a full briefing on the ethical, social and environmental habits of the brand in question, according to an article at http://www.guardian.co.uk/sustainable-business/mobile-appbrand-green-credentials. Barcoo is available for the iPhone, Android devices, Nokia, Samsung, and other smartphones. If you want information about any - or all – of the thousands for community organisations in NZ and the services they provide, go to the NZ citizens Advice Bureau’s vamped-up website at http://www.cab.org.nz/Pages/home.aspx. the site also offers information about legal rights and responsibilities. A Virtual Bureau with live chat access will be available at the same address soon. A list of job seekers’ most common (and unusual) interview mistakes can be found at http://www.theworkbuzz.com/career-advice/job-seekersmost-common-and-unusual-interview-mistakes/

Arts & Culture 2011 Kapa Haka Champs Rotorua based Te Matarae i Orehu has taken the world title of Kapa Haka Champions 2011 at Te Matatini o Te Ra Festival/the Gisborne Kapa Haka Festival. The winners come from Rotorua, which will be the next region to host the biennial festival in 2013. They competed with 41 other teams from Australia and NZ for the title.

Reservoir Hill: International Award Finalist TVNZ's online drama “Reservoir Hil” has been announced as a finalist at the New York Film and Television Awards for best online entertainment programme. The awards, which will be held in Las Vegas on 12 April this year, are promoted as recognising the "World's Best Work" in news, sports, documentary, information, and entertainment programming. Reservoir Hill was selected from 35 entries, and is one of five finalists from NZ.

Kiwi Film Rating “Excellent” Empire magazine, self-described as “the biggest movie magazine in the world”, has awarded a kiwi film “The Insatiable Moon” four stars - pushing it into the “excellent“ category. The film was produced by Mike Riddell and directed by his partner Rosemary (who has a day job as a District Court Judge), and was shot on a budget of $340,000. The film opens in London of 4 March at the Empire Cinema in Leicester Square, before touring the UK. Riddell describes the opening as one more step in the journey of “the little film that could”.

Hindi Radio Station Goes Live… 5Tunz Communications Limited’s new radio station "Humm FM 106.2" goes live this month with around the clock programming. Its aim is to contribute to the Hindi music scene in Auckland and have an online presence with Hindi radios worldwide. The station will present diverse forms of musical expression and promote and facilitate events that feature both local and international artists. It will also include newsbreaks, interviews, and special features which will change over a period of time, based on listener feedback.

… & Celebrating NZ’s Many Languages English Language Partners and Community Languages Association of NZ (CLANZ) have published a poster and a bookmark featuring greetings in 29 languages (including our official languages of English, Maori, and NZ Sign). The bookmark encourages people to use their mother tongue and get others to have a go at saying “hello” in another language. The resources will be available in community locations and in schools and workplaces throughout NZ. For copies contact: sundev@paradise.net.nz or grace.bassett@englishlanguage.org.nz

Over 25,000 people attended the four days of the festival.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 25


A Different TVNZ 7 Channel TVNZ has re-launched its public service channel TVNZ 7, which offers advertising-free programming, with the aim of fostering learning, discussion and debate. The channel will screen pre-school content, factual programmes, news and current affairs shows, documentary series, arts programmes and one-off specials. It will continue to be public funded until the end of June 2012.

2010 Word of the Year: “Austerity” Indicative of the tough economic and political events of 2010, "austerity" ranked as the word of the year, topping the list of the most searched words on Merriam-Webster.com. "Austerity" - defined as "enforced or extreme economy" - was the most looked-up term throughout the year but particularly when Europe's debt crisis gained attention in the spring. "Ebullient" came eighth on the list based on its popularity in October as the rescue of 33 trapped Chilean miners was broadcast worldwide. For the record the top 10 were: 1. Austerity; 2. pragmatic; 3. moratorium; 4. socialism; 5. bigot; 6. doppelganger; 7. shellacking; 8. ebullient; 9. dissident; and 10. furtive. Read more at http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101220/ap_on_re_us/us_word_of_the_year

When Insults Had Class

"I am enclosing two tickets to the first night of my new play; bring a friend.... if you have one." - George Bernard Shaw to Winston Churchill

"Cannot possibly attend first night, will attend second.... if there is one." - Winston Churchill, in response.

"I feel so miserable without you; it's almost like having you here." - Stephen Bishop

"He is a self-made man and worships his creator." - John Bright

"I've just learned about his illness. Let's hope it's nothing trivial." - Irvin S. Cobb

"He is not only dull himself; he is the cause of dullness in others." - Samuel Johnson

"He is simply a shiver looking for a spine to run up." Paul Keating

"In order to avoid being called a flirt, she always yielded easily." - Charles, Count Talleyrand

"He loves nature in spite of what it did to him." - Forrest Tucker

"Why do you sit there looking like an envelope without any address on it?" - Mark Twain

"His mother should have thrown him away and kept the stork." - Mae West

"Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go." - Oscar Wilde

"He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts... for support rather than illumination." - Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

"I've had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn't it." - Groucho Marx

These insults are from an era before the English language got boiled down to four letter words. •

A member of Parliament to Disraeli: "Sir, you will either die on the gallows or of some unspeakable disease." "That depends, Sir," said Disraeli, "whether I embrace your policies or your mistress."

"He had delusions of adequacy." - Walter Kerr

"He has all the virtues I dislike and none of the vices I admire." - Winston Churchill

"I have never killed a man, but I have read many obituaries with great pleasure." Clarence Darrow

"He has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary." - William Faulkner (about Ernest Hemingway)

"Thank you for sending me a copy of your book; I'll waste no time reading it." - Moses Hadas

"I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying I approved of it." - Mark Twain

It now includes the coastline from Tairua (including Tairua Harbour) south, including Opoutere, Onemana, Whangamata, and Whiritoa, east along the Bay of Plenty coastline from Waihi Beach, including Tauranga Harbour and along the coast to Pukehina Beach ending south of Pukehina at Rogers Road.

"He has no enemies, but is intensely disliked by his friends." - Oscar Wilde

The warning covers all bi-valve shellfish including mussels, pipi, tuatua, cockles, oysters, scallops as well as catseyes

26 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Fish & Ships Shellfish Toxins: Coromandel & BoP A health warning advising against collecting and consuming shellfish along much of the Coromandel and Bay of Plenty coastline remains in place, though the areas involved have been reduced.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


and kina (sea urchin). Paua, crayfish and crabs can still be taken but as always, the gut should be removed before cooking. Eating shellfish affected by the paralytic shellfish toxin can cause numbness and tingling around the mouth, face or extremities; difficulty swallowing or breathing; dizziness; double vision; and in severe cases, paralysis and respiratory failure. Symptoms usually occur within 12 hours of a person consuming affected shellfish. Anyone suffering illness after eating shellfish should seek medical attention immediately. For all health warning updates across the Bay of Plenty and Lakes districts call 0800 221 555. Further information is available at www.toiteorapublichealth.govt.nz

NZ Made Americas Cup Boats The next class of America’s Cup catamarans will be built in Auckland, with the America’s Cup management awarding the contract for up to 10 AC45 catamarans to a company of Warkworth boat builders. The catamarans will be used in the America’s Cup World Series starting later this year.

Science/Technology Batteries Made of Tropical Fruits? Get a whiff of success: durian skins can be used to make the components of electric batteries. Malaysian engineers are harnessing the country's biodiversity to find alternative raw materials for high-tech electronic products such as electric vehicle batteries. They have discovered that bamboo, coconut shells and durian fruit skins can be converted into an activated form of carbon used to make the components of electric batteries known as “supercapacitors”. Activated carbon is normally made from coal but now researchers say it could be sourced from a natural, renewable source, providing income to rural people.

mainland because the birds that used to pollinate it have largely disappeared. Gloxinia is a bird-pollinated shrub that grows in native forests throughout the upper half of the North Island. It has orange flowers that are visited by three NZ birds – tui, bellbirds and stitchbirds, and, more recently, by native silvereyes. Bird species are declining worldwide, raising concerns that the ecological services they provide, such as pollination and seed dispersal, may fail. NZ has lost 49% of its land bird species - raising concerns about whether bird pollination and dispersal are adequate. The researchers’ findings were based on studies at three island nature reserves (Little Barrier and Tiritiri Matangi near Auckland and Lady Alice near Whangarei) and five adjacent mainland sites (two near Auckland and three near Whangarei). These found that mainland plants, where only silvereyes (which usually get nectar from the flowers without pollinating) and some tui are present, were poorly pollinated compared with the plants on the island locations where tui, bellbird and stitchbird remained abundant. The poor pollination reduced seed production on the mainland by 84%, and there were 55% fewer juvenile plants per adult plant on the mainland. The researchers’ paper is online at www.sciencemag.org/journals

Scientists Find Part of Pink Terraces Part of the Pink Terraces have been found at the bottom of Lake Rotomahana near Rotorua, during a joint NZ-American project to map the lake floor and investigate the large geothermal system under the lake. The Pink and White Terraces, known worldwide as the Eighth Wonder of the World, were destroyed and vanished in the eruption of Mt Tarawera on 10 June 1886. Information collected by two autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) clearly show crescent-shaped terraced structures in about 60m of water where the Pink Terraces were located before 1886. They are covered by brownish lake sediment. The rest of the Pink Terraces were either destroyed during the eruption, or are still concealed, and there was no sign of the larger White Terraces in the part of the lake that matched their location before 1886.

More is at http://www.scidev.net/en/news/malay-scientists-use-tropical-fruits-tomake-batteries.html

General Plants: Where are the Birds? A study carried out by four University of Canterbury researchers, working the University of Auckland, has found that the NZ shrub Gloxinia, was slowly declining on the

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

2011 Census: Not 8 March The 2011 Census* due to take place on 8 March 2011 has been postponed following the Christchurch Earthquake. SNZ says that if it had gone ahead, the information gathered

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 27


would probably be inaccurate, because it was an inappropriate time to be collecting information from people. This year will be the third time the census has been cancelled. The first was in 1931 due to the Depression and the second in 1941 during World War 2. About eight million census forms and internet access codes have been delivered to nearly two million households around the country. *The Census is the official count of how many people and dwellings there are in NZ, and the results determine how billions of dollars of government funding is spent in the community. Census data is used to make decisions about everything from schools and hospitals to public transport and recreational facilities. Councils, businesses, iwi and community groups are among the many organisations that use census data. On census day everyone in NZ has to complete a form or have one completed - including children and babies. When the Census does go ahead you will be able to complete your forms either online or on paper, in English or Maori. Following the Census some people with disabilities will be asked to also complete a more detailed questionnaire - the Disability Survey. For more information about the census, go to www.census.govt.nz or for more information about the Disability Survey, go to http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/health/disabilities/2011-disabilitysurvey.aspx

NIWA’s Weather Forecast Early autumn temperatures (February to April) are likely to be above average in all regions, except in the east of the both Islands where average or above average temperatures are equally likely. Seasonal rainfall is likely to be normal or above normal in all North Island regions, and near normal in all South Island regions. Soil moisture levels and river flows during February– April are likely to be above normal in all North Island regions, normal or below normal on the east coast of the South Island, and near normal elsewhere in the South Island. The seasonal outlook states that mean sea level pressures are likely to be below normal to the north of NZ, with weaker westerlies across the country. Tropical cyclone activity is likely to be near- or above-normal this season (through to May 2011). The risk of an ex-tropical cyclone passing close to NZ is slightly above the long-term average. On average, at least one ex-tropical cyclone passes within 500km of NZ in 9 out of 10 cyclone seasons.

NZers: How Many? How Old? The estimated resident population of NZ was 4,393,500 at 31 December 2010. The population increased by 46,300 (1.1%) in the December 2010 year; natural increase (the excess of births over deaths) and net migration contributed 35,800 and 10,500, respectively. That’s less than the 55,600 (1.3%) increase in 2009.

28 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Statistics NZ also says that the age composition of NZ's population has changed over the past decade. There were more children in the population at 31 December 2000 with 23% of the population aged 0–14 years, compared with 20% at 31 December 2010. The population aged 65 years and over grew from 12% of the population to 13% one decade later.

Household & Population Projections All 16 regional council areas of NZ are projected to have more households in 2031 than in 2006. By comparison, the population of three regional council areas – Gisborne, West Coast, and Southland – is projected to be smaller in 2031. By 2031, 35 of all households in NZ will be in the Auckland region, up from 30 in 2006. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/people_and_communities/Families/S ubnationalFamilyandHouseholdProjections_MR06-31up-date.aspx

Older is Not Always Wiser? Older people have more difficulty detecting the social gaffes of others and this is due to an age-related decline in their emotion perception skills, new University of Otago research suggests. Researchers compared the ability of older and younger adults to distinguish socially appropriate from inappropriate behaviour in the UK sitcom “The Office”. Previous Otago research has also shown that over 60-yearolds are worse at recognising anger, sadness and often fear, on the faces of others and are also not as good at detecting dangerous faces as younger people are. The findings are seen as important because being unable to make distinctions between socially appropriate and inappropriate behaviour could affect social relationships, and contribute to social isolation. Read more at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE1102/S00005/older-is-notalways-wiser-when-it-comes-to-social-gaffes.htm

Ethnic Diversity at Work A new guidebook called "Riding the Wave" from the Office of Ethnic Affairs offers tips on tapping into local migrant talent – a resource that opens doors to export markets. “Riding the Wave” aims to give employers practical advice on how to make the most of NZ’s increasing workplace diversity. The guide points out that having staff from all sorts of ethnic backgrounds on its own isn’t enough, and that diversity has to be backed by company leaders and managed well to become an organisational strength. For hard copies contact the Office of Ethnic Affairs at ethnic.affairs@dia.govt.nz

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


HRC: Race Relations Survey/Complaints

Oz Women: Changing Roles?

The Human Rights Commission’s (HRC’s) annual survey of racial discrimination and harassment indicates that in 2010 77% of NZers considered that Asians are discriminated against more than any other group - up from 75% in 2009, and 74% in 2008.

51% of women under 30 can cook a roast (compared with 82% of baby boomers);

23% of Generation Y women can grow a plant;

54% can hem a garment; and

The Commission received 543 complaints and enquiries on race-related matters last year, around a third of all complaints made. The most common area of complaint related to employment and pre-employment, accounting for more than a third of complaints. Complaints related to poor treatment, harassment, bias in pre-employment, and the use of languages other than English in the workplace.

40% can drive a manual car.

More is at http://www.hrc.co.nz/wpcontent/uploads/2011/02/RRR_Discrimination_chapter.pdf

Race Relations Day… The theme for Race Relations Day 2011 is “People in Harmony”. Each year 21 March is observed around the globe as the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. The date recalls the tragic loss of life at Sharpeville in South Africa in 1960, and is dedicated by the United Nations to the achievement of the goals of the Convention for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. NZ signed the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination on 25 October 1966 and ratified it on 22 November 1972. For more, Including festivals and events dedicated to the day go to http://www.hrc.co.nz/race-relations/race-relations-day/race-relations-day-2011/

According to a recent Australian study:

The results fit with a recent survey that found Australian men from Generation Y are more comfortable changing a nappy than changing a car tyre. The researchers say women today tend be busier, juggling more roles, and are quite prepared to compromise a bit of the homemade just to save some time. They also have a lot more disposable income compared with their mums and their grandmothers, so buying a cake mix or lamingtons ready made is not a big deal. But Gen Y women are also taking on other tasks previously done by men: more than 70 percent of women under 30 say they often take out the bins, 77% mow the lawn and 70% wash the car.

People We Trust A “Mood of The Nation” HorizonPoll has found Kiwis most trust ambulance officers (89.8%), fire fighters (82.1%), nurses (79.9%), and doctors (71.2%). The most distrusted organisations or occupations are finance companies (55.5%), telemarketers (54.2%), used car sales people (51.1%) and Members of Parliament (49.4%). See how your organisation type fared at www.horizonpoll.co.nz

…Neighbours Day… The aim of Neighbours Day Aotearoa, being held on 26-27 March, is to get to know your neighbours, then, starting with the people you live nearest to, work with them to help turn communities into healthy, fun and vibrant places to live. Find out more and register your interest at www.neighboursday.org.nz.

… & Children’s Day Thousands of children will receive hugs and love from the adults in their lives when we celebrate the 11th National Children's Day on Sunday 6 March. More is at http://www.childrensday.org.nz/

Some Conferences/Events Philanthropy Conference 2011 Called “Through the Looking Glass”, this conference is being held from 6-7 April 2011 at Te Papa, Wellington. Organisers say that at the heart of every philanthropist and grantmaker is the desire to make an impact - to build the social capital of our communities and our country. For more information go to http://www.giving.org.nz/conference2011/about

WOMAD WOMAD (World of Music Arts and Dance) – three days of music – is being held in Brooklands Park & TSB Bowl, New Plymouth, Taranaki from 18-20 March 2011.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 29


More is at http://www.womad.co.nz/tickets.htm?gclid=CM2uoPhhqcCFQEGbAodkBtKeA

Monitoring and Evaluation Workshops These workshops are being held in Auckland on 21 March and in Wellington on 22 March 2011. The aim is to help organisations assess their current monitoring and evaluation processes. Venues are Mercy Spirituality Centre (Auckland) and School of Public Health (Wellington). More is at http://www.developmentaction.co.nz/assets/M-and-E-informationsheet.pdf

Diversity Counts Called “Exploring diversity for the common good”, this forum will discuss issues about NZ’s growing ethnic diversity: how multiculturalism is shaping the political, economic and social landscape, and the importance of ethnic responsiveness. It is being held on 1-2 April 2011 at Alexandra Park, Green Lane West, Epsom, Auckland (a Wellington forum is scheduled for May). More is at http://www.ethnicaffairs.govt.nz/oeawebsite.nsf/wpg_URL/WhatsHappening-Message-Board-Ethnic-Affairs-Days-2011-Diversity-Counts-1stand-2nd-April-Auckland?OpenDocument

Inaugural 2011 ALGIM GIS Symposium: The first local government GIS symposium is on 21, 22 March 2011, at James Cook Hotel, Wellington. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/ALGIM_GIS_Sy mposium___22_March.aspx: Smart Government NZ 2011: 17-18 March 2011, James Cook Hotel, Wellington. “Doing more with less will require us to become smarter and more innovative and will require that we take a more citizen-centric view of government service delivery”. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/Smart_Govern ment_NZ_2011_18_March.aspx

Wildfoods Hokitika When you go down to the Wildfoods Festival in Hokitika on 12 March 2011, you'd better go in disguise: this year’s theme is “Where the Wild Foods Are” and patrons are expected to be indistinguishable from the dishes on the menu. The festival is now established firmly among the top 300 unmissable festivals in the whole world, as rated by Frommers Travel Guides. Among the new foods this year are: free tastings of weka, along with tastings of pukeko, kaio (sea tulip) shots, raw and cooked scorpions, and less adventurous treats like venison chilli and garlic sea cucumber. More is at http://www.wildfoods.co.nz/index.cfm/1,51,0,0,html

Local Government Conferences/workshops

2nd AsiaPacific Outgames

Local Govt Asset Management Conference: 6-7 April 2011, Rendezvous Hotel, Auckland. Theme is “Transforming cities, systems and methods – understanding the new situations and the new challenges”. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/LG_Asset_Man agement_Conference_7_April.aspx

This event is being held in Wellington from 12-19 March 2011. The programme provides a week of sports competition, cultural events, shows and go parties, and also a human rights conference programme with national and international speakers.

Driving and Enabling Internal Communications: two-day seminar: 19-20 March 2011, Wellington; 28-29 March 2011, Auckland. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/Driving_and_En abling_Internal_Comunications_29_Mar.aspx Strategic Shared Service Environments: 29-30 March 2011, Duxton Hotel, Wellington. Looks at ways the public sector can cut costs by making better use of shared services. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/Strategic_Share d_Service_Environments__29_Mar.aspx Taming Place Making Tigers: “The Art of Place Making & Creating Resilient Cities”, in Christchurch on 1-2 March 2011, in Wellington on 7-8 March, and in Auckland on 11-12 March. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/Creative_Comm unities_Tigers_Mar_11.aspx David Facilitating for Results: 15–16 March 2011, Wellington. For people who want to improve the way they run workshops, meetings and consultation. More is at http://www.localgovt.co.nz/site/LGOL/Events/Facilitating_for_ Results__10_Mar.aspx

30 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

More is at http://www.wellingtonoutgames.com/home

Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) 2011 conference The National Conference of Community Housing Aotearoa “Doorways to Community Housing” - will be held at Lincoln Green, West Auckland on 22-23 March 2011. More is at http://communityhousing.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CHAConference-flyer.pdf

NZ Coalition to End Homelessness Conference The fifth conference of the NZ coalition to end homelessness will be held on 24 March 2011 at Te Mahurehure Conference Centre, 73 Premier Ave, Pt Chevalier, Auckland in Auckland. More is at http://nzceh.onlinegroups.net/about/Conference/

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


National Not-for-Profit Sector Conference This year's conference, called “Passion Plus – skills to help you change the world” will be held on 17-18 March 2011 at the Waipuna Conference Centre in Auckland.

More is at http://www.sustainablecoastlines.org/Kia_Ora/Sustainable_Coastlines___Event s___Great_Coromandel_Coastal_Clean-up.html

More is at http://growevents.co.nz/nfp-conference/

NZ Community Economic Development Network Conference

NZ Land Treatment Collective Annual Conference

The NZ Community Economic Development Conference 2011 will be held on 18-20 April 2011 at the Trusts Stadium, Henderson. The theme of the conference is “Making it happen: from possibility to profitability”.

This conference - "Winds of Change: Land treatment in challenging times" - is being held on 23-25 March 2011 in Palmerston North.

More is at http://www.ced.org.nz

More is at www.waternz.org.nz/nzltc_conference.html

NZBIO Conference The NZBIO conference is being held from 21-23 March 2011 at the Sky\City Convention Centre. It showcases the NZ life sciences sector, attracting delegates from around the world and from all aspects of the life sciences industry. This year’s theme is “Enabling Successful Bio Enterprise”. More is at http://www.nzbio2011.co.nz/home

Exploring the Whanau Ora Policy for Pacific Health This event is being held on 15 March 2011, 9.30am – 3.30pm, at Mungavin Hall, 41 Mungavin Avenue, Porirua East. It explores opportunities and challenges that the Whanau Ora Policy might bring to Pacific health promoters and Pacific health and social service providers. Register online at http://www.hpforum.org.nz/explorin-the-whanau-ora-policyfor-pacific-health-promotion.html

Large Herds Dairy Conference The 2011 NZ Dairy Business Conference is being held from 4-7 April 2011 at the Rotorua Energy Events Centre. Its theme is “2020 Vision.”

10th Annual Maori Legal Forum This is being held at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. on 27-28 April 2011. The aim of this hui is to provide insights and knowledge from leading experts and practitioners and create a neutral forum where iwi, central and local government, academics and researchers, lawyers and everyone else with an interest in progressing Maori interests can exchange views. More is at http://www.conferenz.co.nz/conferences/maori-legal-forum

Some Funding/Awards/Opportunities Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011 Entries are now open for the Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011. This award enabling rural women to showcase their business, is open to all women running small ruralbased businesses years (those employing up to 10 staff) which have been operating for at least two years. Past entrants are welcome to re-enter. Cash prizes are offered to North & South Island winners, and to the overall winner of the award. Cash prizes are offered to a North Island winner, a South Island winner, and the Supreme Winner.

More is at www.nzlargeherds.co.nz

The award is sponsored by Access, Telecom and Rural Women NZ., with the winners being announced in May 2011 at the Rural Women NZ National Conference in Auckland.

Great Coromandel Coastal Clean-up

Entries close on 18 March 2011. More is at http://www.ruralwomen.org.nz/InformationSheet2011medres.pdf.pdf

This event is being held from 1-3 April 2011. Auckland school children, and Coromandel schools, organisations and boaties will clean up Coromandel beaches and the nearby islands and their beaches. Volunteers who don't have access to a boat will be able to crew on one of the team boats by meeting in Coromandel Town.

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

China Trade Awards New Zealand businesses doing business with China are invited to enter the Cathay Pacific NZ China Trade Awards 2011. There are six award categories: a Supreme Prize Award; Business Excellence Award; Best Importer or Exporter with China Award; Doing Business in China/Investor in China Award; Best Logistics Strategy for China Award; and

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 31


Best Use of Hong Kong by a NZ Company for its Business Award. Applications close on 15 April 2011. Application forms are available at www.nzctaawards.co.nz and, for the Hong Kong award, www.hongkong.org.nz

Accessing the Arts: The Big “A” Awards Arts Access Aotearoa is seeking nominations to its Big “A” Awards 2011. There are five award categories: the Creative Space Award; the Community Partnership Award, the Prison Arts Leadership Award; the Winton and Margaret Bear Young Artist Award; and the Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award. For more information go to http://www.artsaccess.org.nz , tel 04 802 4349, or email: community@artsaccess.org.nz

Supporting Local Parents through the Local Initiatives Fund (LIF) The SKIP* Local Initiatives Fund supports local communities to explore new ways to increase the use of positive parenting by parents and whanau of children aged 0-5. Successful applicants will be developing and trying new ways to get parenting messages to those who may not otherwise hear them. *SKIP: Strategies for Kids, information for Parents. Applications close on 25 March 2011 for winter grants (these are up to 12 months and 3 years grants). For more about the LIF, contact A Sarty at andrea.sarty001@msd.govt.nz or A Jones at alan.jones020@msd.govt.nz. More about SKIP is at http://www.skip.org.nz/

Women in Science: UNESCO Awards The NZ National Commission for UNESCO is calling for nominations for the 2012 L'OREAL - UNESCO Awards for "Women In Science" dedicated to the Life Sciences. Five women researchers who have made an outstanding contribution to scientific advancement in the life sciences will be awarded one of five USD$100,000 awards.

Applications close on 31 March 2011. More is at http://www.publictrust.co.nz/grants-and-scholarships/how-do-i-findone/grants/frozen-funds-charitable-trust.html

The UNESCO Contestable Activities Fund: NZ Projects The UNESCO Contestable Activities Fund or UCAF is available for NZ projects that engage with two or more of UNESCO's programme areas of: education; natural sciences; social & human sciences; culture; communications & information. Successful projects will advance the National Commission's objectives as outlined in its strategic plan. 2010-2011 is the UN International Year of Youth and in support of the year, applications that will benefit young people will get priority. Applications close on 30 April 2011. More is at http://www.unesco.org.nz/index.php/news-/47-news-priority-areas/197-ucaffund-opens

2011 NZ Ewe Hogget Competition This competition is administered by the NZ Sheepbreeders Association. On offer is in excess of $20,000 in prize money and products. Entries close on 21 March 2011. More is at http://www.nzsheep.co.nz/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,print,0&cntnt01article id=8&cntnt01showtemplate=false&cntnt01returnid=15

Lottery Environment and Heritage This committee makes grants for projects that promote, protect and conserve NZ's natural, physical and cultural heritage. Note that new versions of the Lottery Environment and Heritage Information Sheet, Grant Application Form and Grant Application Guide are available. Applications close on 18 March 2011. For more information go to http://www.cdgo.govt.nz/available-grants/downloads.aspx#ApplicationType_7 or call 0800 824824, or email GrantsOnline@dia.govt

Applications close on 25 March 2011. More is at http://www.unesco.org.nz/index.php/news-/37-news/202-call-for-nominationsfor-women-in-science

Lottery Outdoor Safety

Frozen Funds Charitable Trust

This committee provides funding to major outdoor safety and water safety groups, including their branches and affiliates, and other national and regional groups that have outdoor safety or water safety as their main purpose.

Frozen Funds Charitable Trust provides grants of up to $10,000 for projects run by, and for, people who use mental health or intellectual disability services. 2011 applications are for innovative projects that support, health and wellbeing, enabling people with mental health and intellectual disabilities to flourish, e.g., peer support, building inclusive communities, building friendships, and improving health outcomes for individuals.

Applications close on 20 April 2011. For more information go to http://www.cdgo.govt.nz/available-grants/downloads.aspx#ApplicationType_15 or call 0800 824824 or email GrantsOnline@dia.govt

2011 Project Management Awards Applications are open for the third Project Management Awards from the Project Management Institute of NZ (PMINZ). This year there are six awards: for Project of the

32 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Year; Project Manager of the Year; Emerging Project Manager of the Year; Volunteer of the Year; Research Achievement; and Public Sector Project of the Year. Nominations close on 29 April 2011. More is at www.pminzconference.com/awards, or email awards.conf2011@pmi.org.nz

National Fieldays No. 8 Wire National Art Award 2011

technology and culture. Artists are encouraged to exhibit and talk about their work with the Wellington arts community. Applications close on 7 March 2011. More is at http://www.weltec.ac.nz/residency/Rita_Angus_Residency.html

Small Communities: Drinking Water Subsidy Scheme

The Fieldays No.8 Wire National Art Award, organised by Waikato Museum and ArtsPost Galleries and supported by NZ National Agricultural Fieldays, challenges artists to use their creativity and ingenuity to transform the difficult medium of no.8 wire into works of art. There is $4000 up for grabs for first place, $1500 for second place and $1000 for third place.

The Ministry of Health (MoH) has re-opened the drinking water subsidy scheme for communities of under 5,000 people, with $10 million is available for allocation each year until 2015. The scheme will pay up to 85% of costs (previously it was 95%) to communities with a “deprivation index” higher than 7 (deprivation index of 10 is the least socially and materially well off).

Entries close on 26 April 2011. More is at http://www.waikatomuseum.co.nz/page/pageid/2145867556

Applications close on 31 March 2011. More is at http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/indexmh/revised-criteria-drinking-water

Hauora Maori Scholarships (HMS) 2011 The purpose of the Hauora Maori Scholarships (HMS) is to provide financial assistance to students who are studying an NZQA accredited course in health and disability studies. Applications close on 8 April 2011. More is at www.maorihealth.govt.nz/moh.nsf/indexma/hauora-maori-scholarships.

Farming to Succeed 2011 Level 3 and above trainees can attend Agriculture ITO's free five-day Farming to workshops covering: successful business partnerships, career development, financial development, staged capital growth - asset management, time management, goal setting and motivation - business and personal, and managing stress. The North Island course will be held from 28 March-1 April, and the South Island course is from 11-15 April. More is at http://www.agricultureito.ac.nz/AboutUs/Farming-to-Succeed.jasc

Governance Training for Cooperatives The NZ Cooperatives Association (NZCoop) is hosting governance training for directors of cooperative and mutual businesses, or for boards, when they need it and where they want it. Seminars are arranged on two consecutive days or two days no more than three months apart. The next session for individual directors and potential board members is on 2425 March 2011 at the Brentwood Hotel, Wellington. For more email the NZCoop office at nzca@nz.coop or tel 04 384 4595

Rita Angus Artist’s Residency 2011. This residency (either one 26-week term for one artist or two 13-week terms for two artists) supports an artist to produce a new body of work that reflects upon the interplay between

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Appointments NZ’s next High Commissioner to Malaysia, resident in Kuala Lumpur and cross-accredited to Brunei Darussalam, will be David Pine. NZ’s next High Commissioner to the Cook Islands will be the Minister of Civil Defence, Hon John Carter. NZ’s first Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates (UAE), resident in Abu Dhabi, will be career diplomat Malcolm Millar. Christian Nathanial Whata has been appointed a Judge of the High Court. John Gordon Matthews has been appointed an Associate Judge of the High Court. Brigadier Tim Keating has been appointed NZ’s Chief of Army. John Billington QC has been appointed a Judge of the Court Martial Appeal Court. Associate Judge John Faire has been appointed a temporary Judge of the High Court. Southern District Health Board’s (DHB) new Kaiwhakahaere Hauora Maori (General Manager, Maori Health) is Donovan Clarke. Bruce Gordon has been elected as the new chair of Horizons Council. Chris Caddick is the new managing director of the Recording Industry Association of NZ. Dean Nikora has been appointed to the board of trustees of the Agricultural and Marketing Research and Development Trust (AGMARDT). Simon Allen has been appointed chair of the Financial Markets Authority. The Board of Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School has appointed Christian Penny as Director of the School. Artspace has announces the appointment of its incoming director Caterina Riva. Leon Black has been re-elected to the board of Beef & Lamb NZ, as has chair Mike Peterson. Diane Morcom has been appointed a member of the Remuneration Authority. Industry training organisation, ETITO, has appointed Garry Fissenden as its chief executive (ETITO develops qualifications and manages skills training arrangements for seven industries: ambulance, contact centre, financial services, electrotechnology, offender management, security and telecommunications).

Rural Bulletin March 2011- 33


34 - Rural Bulletin March 2011

Rural Women New Zealand, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


SUNSMART SCHOOLS As part of its Community Connections Programme, Telecom is helping the NZ Cancer Society teach New Zealand kids how to have fun - but be safe - in the sun. Telecom is donating more than 4,000 free sunhats to be distributed to low decile schools who sign up to the Cancer Society’s SunSmart schools programme. “Many Kiwis’ happiest childhood memories are of playing outside at school during hot sunny lunch times - on the jungle gym, round the sports field,” says Sponsorship Manager Alex Milne. “But being exposed to UVR levels of three and above for longer than 30 minutes is all it takes for a Kiwi kid to get sunburnt. And because children are at school when the UVR levels are at their peak, it’s really important that schools are able to provide a safe environment and educate kids about sun-safe behaviour.” Cancer Society’s Dr Jan Pearson says, “Schools nationwide that are signing up to the Cancer Society’s SunSmart schools accreditation programme are helping to reduce the risk of skin cancer. “But often we find low decile schools face financial barriers in ensuring their schools are sun-safe, and sometimes even in just ensuring the children have proper sunhats. Sunburn is a big concern because it is linked to the deadliest form of skin cancer, melanoma” Ms Pearson says. About 350 Kiwis die from skin cancer every year, and New Zealand has the highest melanoma rate in the world. “The good thing is that it is largely preventable,” says Ms Pearson. “We recommend that between 11am and 4pm when the sun is at its strongest, students slip into protective clothing like shirts with collars and longer sleeves, slap on a broad-brimmed hat or cap with flaps, slop on a broad spectrum SPF 30+ sunscreen and seek some shade.” Over its 5 year duration, Telecom’s Community Connections programme has supported over 1,000 charities to a total value of over $20 million.


!

er t n e e to

c n a h c Last

• • • •

Showcase your business and be a winner! Open to women running small rural-based businesses Entries close 18 March 2011 Entry forms and full information available on www.ruralwomen.org.nz

“Winning the South

Island prize in the RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Award last year has had a positive spin-off, especially increasing my local sales - I’m definitely busier because of it.”

! y a d o ter t

Tracey Robinson - Cosy Toes Ltd

n e y a l e d t ’ n Do

orted by

proudly supp


89 years young, and enjoy living at home In 2009, Janet Glue fractured her hip following a fall when she became entangled in the garden hose. She spent five days in hospital. The accident was a real setback for Janet who lives alone. However, with the help and encouragement of her support workers, Janet continues to enjoy her independence at home. “When my husband was sick I had help from two wonderful caregivers for some years. Then just after he died, little did I realise how soon I would need their help again. I have been lucky to have the same two caregivers who supported my husband. Both have been so helpful and caring and for this I am very grateful,” says Janet. When Janet was discharged from hospital she questioned how she would manage because she could not walk unaided. “My son told the hospital that I would not manage at his home because of the stairs. I was supplied with a bed loop, two walkers, and support worker visits of three times a week at my own home.” However, Janet’s support worker realised that she was not going to manage on this level of support, so twice-daily visits were arranged for the next eight days. Janet’s main goal was to walk down to the local grocers and she has achieved this with the help of her walking frame. “Once I got myself on track and with the help and encouragement from my Access caregivers the rest was my determination.” “I am ‘89 years young’ and continue to receive assistance with showering three times a week as I am often unsteady on my feet. This wonderful service sets me up for the day and supports my independence at home.”


Rural Bulletin March 2011