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Rural Bulletin

Rural Women New Zealand - informing New Zealand each month

February 2011

www.ruralwomen.org.nz

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Consultation Protecting Native Plants, Animals & Habitats .............................. 3 Telecommunications: Broadband/TSO Bill .................................. 3 Security Intelligence Service Bill ................................................. 3 2050: 50% Greenhouse Gas Reduction? .................................... 3 Red Meat Sector Strategy ........................................................... 3 Trust Law: Law Commission Review........................................... 4 Weathertight Homes Bill .............................................................. 4 Livestock Tracing (NAIT) Bill ....................................................... 4 Building Amendment Bill (No 3) .................................................. 4 Maori Affairs Bill .......................................................................... 4 Changing NZ’s Criminal Procedures ........................................... 5 Biosecurity Reform Bill ................................................................ 5 Tax Administration Bill ................................................................. 5 Exploring Offshore Petroleum Safely .......................................... 5 Historic Places Trust: Guides ...................................................... 5 Flight Training Safety Review...................................................... 6 Old Regulations: Going…Going… .............................................. 6 Protecting Lake Ellesmere: Proposal .......................................... 6 Pharmac’s “Exceptional Circumstances” ..................................... 6 NZ Sign Language Act Review ................................................... 6 Defence Science Review ............................................................ 6 Proposed Tuhua Mataitai Reserve .............................................. 7 LINZ Records: Retention/Disposal .............................................. 7 Border Inspection of Vehicles...................................................... 7 ERMA Consultations ................................................................... 7

Rural New Vision for Global Agriculture ................................................ 7 2011 Agriculture Outlook ............................................................. 8 Farm Safety: Watch It.................................................................. 8 UN: Rural Women Disadvantaged .............................................. 8 2010 Trade Barriers Report......................................................... 8 Wine Survey: Vintage 2010 … .................................................... 8 … & Wine Drinking: Ancient Art .................................................. 8 Wool Industry Research Group ................................................... 8 Meeting Malaysian Halal Requirements ...................................... 9 December Rural Property Figures ............................................... 9 Clearing Tree Weeds: ETS Exemptions ...................................... 9

Environment Emissions Trading Scheme Review ............................................ 9 Advisory Group on Green Growth ............................................... 9 Changes to Air Quality Standards ............................................... 9 Battling Fossil Fuel Subsidies ................................................... 10 Homeowners Wary of Sustainability? ........................................ 10 Get Ready for "Global Dimming"? ............................................. 10 Climate Change: Plant Shiny Crops? ........................................ 10 Swedish Environmental Innovations.......................................... 10 Protecting Lake Taupo: Agreement........................................... 10 Hakatere Conservation Park Extended ..................................... 11

Tourism Adventure Tourism: New Safety Rules...................................... 11 Where to Travel in 2011… ........................................................ 11 …& NZ’s Top 2010 Destinations ............................................... 11 Global Tourism Recovering ....................................................... 11

Health & Welfare Another Kind of ACC? ............................................................... 11 Display of Tobacco Products: Bill .............................................. 12 Pike River Tragedy: Royal Commission .................................... 12 Preventing Child Neglect: OCC Report ..................................... 12 Food Labelling Law: Report ...................................................... 12 Auditing Rest Homes................................................................. 13 Ambulance Call Centres: More Funding.................................... 13 NZ-Russia Adoption Process Agreed ........................................ 13 1 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

International Civil Defence Agreements .................................... 13 Kiwi Teeth in Better Condition ................................................... 13 Report Card on Human Rights .................................................. 13 Humanitarian Response: NZ Up There ..................................... 13 Australasian Disability Professionals: in NZ .............................. 14 WHO: Classifying Traditional Medicine ..................................... 14 ATMs for Vision Impaired .......................................................... 14 Asthma Studies: Participants Sought ........................................ 14

Education/Training Education Amendment Bill ........................................................ 14 Interim Visas for Overseas Students ......................................... 14 University/Polytech 2011 Funding… ......................................... 15 …& ITOs’ Educational Performance.......................................... 15 National Standards: Maori-medium Schools ............................. 15 Kiwi Students Performance Rated............................................. 15 Maori Language Teaching Resource: Award ............................ 15

Employment Promising Signs in Employment Market .................................... 15 Unemployment Rate: December Quarter .................................. 16 Supported Employment: New Partnership ................................ 16 Poker-faced Professions: The Downside .................................. 16 “Mythbusing” Older Workers ..................................................... 16

Housing/Building Building Consents Way Down ................................................... 16 Residential Property Market Update… ...................................... 17 …& Rental Vacancy Rates Double ........................................... 17

Energy Latest NZ Energy Figures ......................................................... 17 Energy Outlook 2010................................................................. 17 Electricity SOEs Swap Assets ................................................... 18 Combined Minerals Reviews Coming........................................ 18 Tauhara II Ready to Roll ........................................................... 18 New Wind Farms ....................................................................... 18 Taranaki: Underground Gas Storage ........................................ 18 2010 EECA Energy Efficiency Awards ...................................... 18 For Sale: Electricity Generation Plant........................................ 18

Transport & Travel “Give Way” Rules: About Turn .................................................. 19 New Motorcycle Safety Council ................................................. 19 A Lower Road Toll ..................................................................... 19 Taxi Security: Cameras & Communications .............................. 19 Air NZ & Virgin Blue: Cuddles ................................................... 19 Auckland-China Direct Flights ................................................... 19 Daily Commuting: International Study ....................................... 19 NZ Autocar: Car of the Year ...................................................... 19

Justice / The Law Cleaning Up Our Acts................................................................ 20 2010 Global Corruption Barometer............................................ 20 OPCAT Annual Report .............................................................. 20 Youth in Police Custody Review ............................................... 20 Police Report Released............................................................. 20 Electricity/Gas Complaints Information...................................... 20

Parliament 2011 Election Date .................................................................... 21 Constitutional Review/s ............................................................. 21 Electoral Referendum Bill Passed… ......................................... 21 …& New Electoral Finance Law ................................................ 21 Botany By-Election .................................................................... 21

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Public Service/Local Authorities

Some Paraprosdokian Sentences ............................................. 31

Ministry of Science & Innovation ............................................... 22 Archives, National Library, DIA Merger ..................................... 22 Scientific Advice for Defence Force........................................... 22

Fish & Ships

Not-for-Profits Making it Easier to Give ............................................................ 22 Advocacy & “Charitable Activities”: Decision ............................. 22 Alternative Welfare Working Group Report ............................... 22 Community Provider Location/Funding Site .............................. 23

Business Export Values Remain High ...................................................... 23 Retail Trade Survey: November 2010 ....................................... 23 Manufacturing Activity Solid ...................................................... 23 NZ-HK Trade Agreement: Update ............................................. 23 Businesses Slower to Pay ......................................................... 23 New Business Support Network ................................................ 23 NZ Project Management: Some Surprises ................................ 24 Banks Improving Customer Service .......................................... 24 Paying Business Tax Differently ................................................ 24 NZECO: Three More Years ....................................................... 24 Use China-NZ Connections: AsiaNZ ......................................... 24 Global Business Regulations Ranked ....................................... 24 Economic Growth from Creative Industries ............................... 25 Brands With a Conscience Awards ........................................... 25

Money Matters Wage Rates Grow 1.7 Percent.................................................. 25 Global Economic Prospects 2011 ............................................. 25 NZ Government’s Assets/Liabilities… ....................................... 25 … & Part-Sale of SOEs? ........................................................... 26 Commissioner’s Superannuation Recommendations ................ 26 New Tax Rules… ...................................................................... 26 … & More Tax Statistics Online ................................................ 26 Credit Reporting Changes ......................................................... 26 Household Saving Improving .................................................... 26 Fall in Food Prices..................................................................... 27 Our Favourite Fruit and Veg .................................................. 27 December Spending Down… .................................................... 27 … & Pokie 2010 Spend Down ................................................... 27 GDP as Measure of Wellbeing? ................................................ 27

Internet/ICT Quality of Broadband Improving ................................................ 27 Broadband Rollout: Update ....................................................... 28 111 Calling System: Review… .................................................. 28 … & Social Media & Emergencies............................................. 28 Computer Crime and Security ................................................... 28 Global Top Twitter Trends ......................................................... 28 More Elders Use Social Networks ............................................. 28 TV Partners Facebook for U...................................................... 29 Free Webpage Parking Services ............................................... 29 A Handful of Sites .................................................................. 29

Treaty Matters Progress on Treaty Issues ........................................................ 30 Ngati Porou Treaty Claims Settled…......................................... 30 …& Ngati Apa (Nth Is) Settlement ............................................. 30

Arts & Culture Arts Contestable Online Funding Guide .................................... 30 Te Ara Expands into Biographies .............................................. 30 NZ on Air: Music Funding .......................................................... 30 Health of Maori Heritage Arts: Report ....................................... 31 NZ Short Films for Berlin ........................................................... 31 2011: Year of the Rabbit ........................................................... 31 Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Sub-Antarctic Islands: Marine Reserves ................................... 31 Marlborough Blue Cod Fishery Opening ................................... 32 Designer Homes for Fish........................................................... 32

Science/Technology Agricultural Greenhouse Gas: Contracts ................................... 32 LINZ: Mapping Land & People .................................................. 32 Fast Early Forest Clearance… .................................................. 32 …& Settlement in NZ: Study ..................................................... 32 Human Clothing, Lice & Migration ............................................. 32

General Warm Autumn Likely ................................................................. 33 2010 - Wettest Year And Equal Hottest..................................... 33 NZ’s Prosperity Rating .............................................................. 33 Children Pick Education First… ................................................. 33 …Growing Up in NZ…............................................................... 34 … & Self Control in Childhood................................................... 34 Media Representation of Immigrants......................................... 34 Status of NZ Women: CEDAW Report ...................................... 34 NZ Surf Breaks Now Protected ................................................. 34 More Terrorist Groups Named .................................................. 34 Purple Cake Day ....................................................................... 34 Know Your Sausage.................................................................. 35 Some Conferences/Events........................................................ 35 Lameness in Ruminants Conference ..................................... 35 2nd AsiaPacific Outgames ..................................................... 35 Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) 2011 conference......... 35 Chinese Lantern Festival 2011 .............................................. 35 NZ Rehabilitation Association Biennial Conference ............... 35 NZ Coalition to End Homelessness Conference .................... 35 2011 Kapa Haka* Nationals ................................................... 35 National Not-for-Profit Sector Conference ............................. 35 NZ Land Treatment Collective Annual Conference ................ 35 First National Conference on NZ Wars .................................. 36 NZBIO conference ................................................................. 36 Extreme Weather in Australasia Conference ......................... 36 International Conference of the Nursing Network on Violence Against Women...................................................................... 36 Science Communicators Association of NZ (SCANZ) Conference 2011 ................................................................... 36 Some Funding/Awards/Opportunities ........................................ 36 Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011 ................................. 36 Community Response Fund .................................................. 36 Supporting Local Parents through the Local Initiatives Fund (LIF) ....................................................................................... 36 Creative NZ: Contestable Arts Grants.................................... 36 Fulbright Applications............................................................. 36 Three Writers’ Awards ........................................................... 37 Lottery Grants Board Funding ................................................ 37 Governance Training for Cooperatives .................................. 37 Public Health Leadership Programme 2011 .......................... 37 Clendon Award: Romance writing contest ............................. 37 NZBIO Annual Excellence Awards......................................... 37 Rita Angus Artist’s Residency 2011 ....................................... 37 Small Communities: Drinking Water Subsidy Scheme........... 37 Farming to Succeed Applications Open ................................. 37 AsiaNZ Grants ....................................................................... 38 Making a Difference Fund ...................................................... 38 Appointments ............................................................................ 38

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 2


Consultation

Security Intelligence Service Bill This Bill would:

Protecting Native Plants, Animals & Habitats

x

clarify that the SIS warrant framework does cover the use of electronic tracking devices;

x

confirm that facilities (e.g., mobile numbers, Internet provider addresses) can be specified as the subject of warrant applications;

x

exempt SIS working with computers from the “access without authorisation” law;

x

protect all people acting under NZSIS warrants from liability, regardless of the foreign or domestic status of the warrant; and

x

allow the SIS to have more say in who they use to exercise warrants without having to specify them in the warrant application.

The Ministry for the Environment is currently consulting on a National Policy Statement (NPS) on indigenous biodiversity. Indigenous biodiversity refers to the number of native species, the genetic variation within each species, and the variety and quality of native habitats (e.g., wetlands and lowland native forests) in NZ. The NPS sets out how local councils should protect biodiversity in rare and threatened habitats on private land while recognising the rights and responsibilities of landowners and the interests of Maori. It contains a list of criteria for identifying areas of indigenous vegetation and habitats of indigenous animals that have been recognised as being rare and/or threatened at a national level. Regional policy statements notified after the NPS is released will need to include these criteria, along with ways of identifying any other areas of indigenous vegetation or habitats of indigenous animals that the council considers significant. Submissions close on 2 May 2011. You can fill in the online submission form, email a separate submission to biodiversity@mfe.govt.nz , or mail one to Biodiversity NPS, PO Box 10362, Wellington 6143. For more (including information on consultation meetings being held around the country between 21 February and 5 April 2011) go to http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/biodiversity/indigenousbiodiversity/index.html#how

Submissions close on 18 February 2011. Two copies go to the Law and Order Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington (note that submissions will be heard in private). The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0259/latest/whole.html?search=t s_bill_security_resel&p=1

2050: 50% Greenhouse Gas Reduction? The Government is proposing to gazette a 50% reduction in NZ’s greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

Telecommunications: Broadband/TSO Bill The Telecommunications (TSO), Broadband and Other Matters) Amendment Bill deals with the provision of broadband services in NZ. It covers (amongst other things): x

the Ultra-fast Broadband (UFB) Initiative: a competitive tender programme to develop fibre-to-the-premises broadband networks connecting 75% of NZ households;

x

the Rural Broadband Initiative (the RBI): a competitive tender programme to set up broadband networks in nonurban areas of NZ; and

x

the Telecommunications Service Obligations (TSO) reforms: these affect the regulations that enable telecommunications services to be made available to supplement the services that are commercially available.

A Supplementary Paper may propose more amendments around (also amongst other things) access rights when setting up broadband systems, and the structural separation of Telecom NZ. Submissions close on 25 February 2011. Two copies go to the Finance and Expenditure Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0250/latest/DLM3387314.html For more on Telecommunications Service Obligations, see http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/StandardSummary____296.aspx

3 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Similar targets have been set in Australia (-50%), Canada (-50 to 65%), Japan (-55 to 80%) and the United States (-80%). To meet the target, NZ would need to reduce net emissions by 31 million tonnes a year, though it already produces 70% of its electricity from renewables. This will only be achievable if there are major technological breakthroughs in areas like agriculture and transport (these are seen to be possible given the timeframe). Submissions close on 28 February 2011. Email them to the Ministry for the Environment at 2050target@mfe.govt.nz, or post them to 2050 Emissions Reduction Target Consultation, Ministry for the Environment, PO Box 10362, Wellington 6143. For more go to http://www.climatechange.govt.nz/reducing-ouremissions/targets.html

Red Meat Sector Strategy Farmers around the country are being consulted on a red meat sector strategy at meetings facilitated by Deloitte (on behalf of Beef + Lamb New Zealand, the Meat Industry Association, the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry, and New Zealand Trade and Enterprise). The strategy identifies a number of areas which would require change from farmers and industry to maximise returns to the red meat sector. They cover stock procurement processes, stock management and logistics, processing and marketing, and variable farm performance.

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Consultation closes on 14 February 2011. More, including consultation meeting details, is at www.beeflambnz.com

Trust Law: Law Commission Review The Law Commission is seeking information about how trusts are used in NZ. Trusts seem to be very popular here compared to other countries; around one in every 18 people in NZ has a trust. In its issues paper (the second of three in its review of trusts), “Some Issues with the use of Trusts in NZ” the Commission looks at the reasons why people have established family trusts and raises the question of whether there are some purposes for which trusts should not be used.

Livestock Tracing (NAIT) Bill The National Animal Identification and Tracing (NAIT) sets up a system for collecting information on livestock, their location, and their movement history throughout their lifetime. Animals would have radio frequency identification tags, people in charge of animals and their location would be registered, and reports would be logged when the animals moved locations. The Bill also outlines the powers NAIT will have and the way it will work. The aims of NAIT are to protect farmers in the international marketplace (as other agriculture-producing nations move to compulsory tracing of individual animals), and to strengthen NZ’s biosecurity. Submissions close on 10 February 2011. Two copies go to the Primary Production Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0268/latest/versions.aspx

The paper also examines the law surrounding trusts and how the Courts and case law have dealt with the use of trusts. Then, it raises some options relating to legislation that “looks through” trusts, and covers when a trust might be found to be invalid. Comments and submissions on this paper close on 31 March 2011. Email these to trusts@lawcom.govt.nz or post to Law Commission, P O Box 2590, Wellington 6011. You can access a copy of the issues paper at http://www.lawcom.govt.nz/project/review-law-trusts?quicktabs_23=issues_paper (Note, the issues paper is only available online). You can access the first issues paper (which is mostly a background paper) from the same web page

Weathertight Homes Bill The Weathertight Homes Resolution Services (Financial Assistance Package) Amendment Bill 258-1 (2010) would (if you’re still with us after reading its title?): x

limit the liability of the participating territorial authorities, and the liability of other contributing parties, for claims being addressed through the financial assistance package;

x

remove the Crown’s liability for the failure of any repairs/losses made under the financial assistance package and process;

x

authorise the Minister to give a Crown guarantee or indemnity when it comes to loans for repairs made under the finance package; and

x

limit the period in which eligible homeowners can join the scheme to 5 years from when it becomes operational.

Submissions close on 18 February 2011. Two copies go to the Local Government and Environment Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at

http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0258/latest/DLM3389701.html?searc h=ts_bill_weathertight_resel&p=1&sr=1

Building Amendment Bill (No 3) This is the first of two Bills to follow the Building Act Review. This one provides for x

the regulation of building work;

x

a licensing system for builders;

x

performance standards for buildings; and

x

more accountability from the people responsible for making sure that building work complies with the building code.

Submissions close on 4 March 2011. Two copies go to the local Government and Environment Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0253/latest/DLM3387707.html?s earch=ts_bill_building_resel&p=1&sr=1

Maori Affairs Bill This Bill would (amongst other things): x

enable the status of a Mandated Maori Organisation and certain fisheries settlement assets it holds, to be transferred to another independent body also governed by the same iwi;

x

amend the Maori Trust Boards Act 1955 to provide for direct accountability between Maori Trust Boards and their beneficiaries;

x

change how a Maori estate (Pukepuke Tangiora) is administered; and

x

make minor amendments to Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993.

The Bill will be split at the committee of the Whole House stage into a Maori Purposes Bill, a Maori Fisheries Amendment Bill, a Maori Trust Boards Amendment Bill, and a Te Ture Whenua Maori Amendment Bill. Submissions close on 4 March. Two copies go to the Maori Affair Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0234/latest/DLM3335255.html

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 4


Changing NZ’s Criminal Procedures The Criminal Procedure (Reform and Modernisation) Bill provides for (amongst other things): x

offences punishable by up to three years imprisonment to be tried by a judge alone, and offences punishable by more than three years imprisonment - that are not the most serious category of offences - to be presumed to be tried by a judge alone unless the defendant elects trial by jury;

x

a defendant to formally identify the issues that are in dispute before the trial;

x

the courts to ask all defendants to plead once they have had the opportunity to obtain legal advice and have received initial disclosure from the prosecution (currently they are asked to plead after committal);

x

the parties to engage in case management for all offences, except those not punishable by imprisonment;

x

the court to impose cost orders against a defendant, defence counsel, or the prosecution if they fail without a reasonable excuse to comply with a procedural requirement;

x

x

a presumption that the court will begin or continue proceedings if the defendant is absent from court without a reasonable excuse; and publication of names unless publication would cause extreme hardship to a defendant, or undue hardship to a victim or witness.

Submissions close on 18 February 2011. Two copies go to the Justice and Electoral Committee, Parliament Buildings, Welington (or submit online). The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0243/latest/DLM3359962.html

Biosecurity Reform Bill The Biosecurity Law Reform Bill proposes a wide range of amendments to the Biosecurity Act, and amendments to four other Acts. These relate to a number of projects already underway covering border biosecurity, joint decision-making on newly-detected harmful organisms, and ongoing management of established pests. The overall aim is to develop a government-industry agreement on preparing for, and responding to, newly-detected harmful organisms, and for sharing the costs of jointly-agreed activities. Submissions close on 10 February 2011. Two copies go to the Primary Production Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0256/3.0/versions.aspx

Tax Administration Bill The Tax (Administration and Remedial Matters) Bill would (amongst other things): x

extend the IRD Commissioner’s ability (in certain circumstances) to disclose information to allow for more efficient administration of the tax system, and to improve government efficiency;

x

abolish gift duty,

x

more closely match taxpayer-initiated disputes processes with Commissioner-initiated disputes processes; and

x

make some changes to provisional tax pooling rules.

The closing date for submissions is 18 February 2011. Two copies go to the Finance and Expenditure Committee, Parliament Buildings, Wellington. The Bill is at http://www.legislation.govt.nz/bill/government/2010/0257/latest/DLM3388803.html?s earch=ts_bill_taxation_resel&p=1&sr=1

Exploring Offshore Petroleum Safely Your views are sought on the findings of a recent review of health, safety and environmental systems for offshore petroleum operations. The review finds NZ’s health, safety and environmental (HSE) systems generally compare favourably with international systems. However, it makes a number of recommendations for improvement, which relate to: funding and resourcing; more cooperation between agencies; making permit seekers consider HSE matters as a legal requirement; closer examination of individual safety cases; setting up a body with responsibility for environmental regulation in the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and the extended continental shelf; investigating insurance and liability arrangements; and ratifying international protocols and conventions.. Submissions close on 15 February 2011. Email them to HSEreview@med.govt.nz, r post them to HSE Review, Energy and Communications Branch, Ministry of Economic Development, PO Box 1473, Wellington 6140. More is at http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/Page____44679.aspx

Historic Places Trust: Guides The Historic Places Trust has is seeking comment on the following draft historic places guides: x

“Providing for Accessibility in Heritage Places”;

x

“Guide for Identification of Historic Heritage”;

x

“Guidelines for Fire Safety”; and

x

“Heritage Provisions for Earthquake Prone Buildings Polices under the Building Act 2004”.

Submissions close on 28 February 2011. They go to R McLean, Senior Heritage Policy Advisor, NZHPT, P O Box 2629, Wellington 6140. More is at http://www.historic.org.nz/en/ProtectingOurHeritage/ConsultingOn.aspx

5 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Flight Training Safety Review Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) is reviewing flight training safety. The terms of reference for the review cover (amongst other things): the standard of flying instruction; the standard of training of flying instructors; experience levels of instructors; management of flying training in controlled and uncontrolled airspace; radio communications-related requirements, training and practice; knowledge of collisions, near-misses and other flying training accidents; incidents in the past 5 years related to flying training safety; and anything else submitters think is relevant to the inquiry. NZ is a an increasingly popular destination for flight training, particularly with foreign students, with recorded pilot training hours have doubled to nearly 300,000 per year in the last 15 years.

Submissions close on 21 February 2011. They go to submissions@taic.org.nz. More is at http://www.taic.org.nz/Currentinquiries/Inquiryintocivilflyingtrainingsafety/tabid/229/la nguage/en-NZ/Default.aspx

Pharmac’s “Exceptional Circumstances” PHARMAC is proposing changes to its Exceptional Circumstances policy. Currently the three exceptional circumstances schemes provide pharmaceutical funding consideration for patients in rare or unusual medical situations, where there are cost-savings to hospitals, and for cancer patients in certain circumstances. The proposed new single scheme aims to provide fairer and wider consideration for more patients to receive funded access to pharmaceuticals not considered for listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule. PHARMAC says a clearer application process, better information about decisions, and a trial of an exemption for DHBs from applying for approval to fund community treatments under $500 are also features of the proposal. Consultation closes on 25 March 2011. Send your comments to B Wigodsky, PO Box 10-254, Wellington 6143, email: ecreview@pharmac.govt.nz. More is at http://www.pharmac.govt.nz/ecreview

NZ Sign Language Act Review Old Regulations: Going…Going… The Ministry of Economic Development (MED) is consulting on a list of more than 200 regulations from a number of government ministries that have been put forward for repeal because they are no longer required. A number of these are fisheries regulations. Submissions about any regulations on the list that people think should be kept close on 28 February 2011. Email them to revocations@med.govt.nz/, or, in the case of the fisheries regulations, email bob.johnston@fish.govt.nz. The regulations are listed at http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/StandardSummary____45554.aspx

Protecting Lake Ellesmere: Proposal Submissions on a Runanga o Ngai Tahu (Ngai Tahu) Department of Conservation (DoC) proposal to amend the Lake Ellesmere (Te Waihora) Water Conservation Order (WCO) to recognise additional outstanding values are sought by Environment Canterbury. Water conservation orders (WCO) can prohibit or restrict a regional council from issuing new water and discharge permits (they do not affect existing permits). The proposal is aimed at making sure indigenous vegetation, fisheries and cultural characteristics, as well as wildlife habitat, are protected, while also recognising the needs of farming through the current lake management agreement. Submissions close on 11 February 2011. They go to Environment Canterbury, 58 Kilmore Street, PO Box 345, Christchurch 8140. You also need to send your submission to Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu and Department of Conservation, Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere Water Conservation Order, PO Box 13-046, Christchurch 8141, email Jason.arnold@ngaitahu.iwi.nz and dnewey@doc.govt.nz. More is at http://ecan.govt.nz/get-involved/have-your-say/lake-ellesmere-wco/Pages/faqs.aspx

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

The Office for Disability Issues (ODI) is reviewing this Act to see if changes are needed in the following areas (amongst others): how successful it has been in: having NZ Sign Language (NZSL) recognised as an official language; promoting NZSL; getting government departments to use NZSL; promoting use of NZSL in legal proceedings when a Deaf person is involved; and ensuring that competent NZSL interpreters are used. Views of Deaf people, their families/whanau, and of organisations and providers on the questions posed by ODI are particularly sought. Submissions close on 28 February 2011. Feedback should be marked “NZSL Act Review”. It goes to NZSL Act Review, Office for Disability Issues, PO Box 1556, Wellington 6140, email odi@msd.govt.nz. Dates, times and venues for Deaf Aotearoa meetings are at www.deaf.org.nz. More is at http://www.odi.govt.nz/whatshappening/index.html#ReviewoftheNZSLActhaveyoursay1

Defence Science Review An independent expert panel reviewing the role of the Defence Technology Agency (DTA) is now seeking public submissions. The DTA provides specialist science and technology support, advice and solutions to the NZ Defence Force’s (NZDF) current and future capabilities. DTA is located in the Devonport Naval Base, Auckland, and support is provided through four research groups: Sensor Systems, Network Systems, Applied Vehicle Systems, and Human Systems. Defence Science Review submissions close on 14 February, 2011. A page on the NZDF website has been created to allow people to provide their views on five key questions identified by the review panel, at http://www.nzdf.mil.nz/publicdocuments/public-consultation/science-review/default.htm

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 6


Proposed Tuhua Mataitai Reserve The Tuhua Trust Board, on behalf of Te Whanau a Tauwhao, a hapu of Ngaiterangi, has applied to the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture for a mataitai reserve for the fisheries around Mayor Island, excluding Tuhua Marine Reserve on the northern side of the Island. A mataitai reserve is an identified traditional fishing ground in fisheries waters established for the purpose of noncommercial customary food gathering. Submissions close on 1 March 2011. They go to R Bess, Ministry of Fisheries, PO Box 1020, Wellington, email Randall.Bess@fish.govt.nz. More is at http://www.fish.govt.nz/ennz/Consultations/Proposed+Tuhua+Mataitai+Reserve/default.htm

LINZ Records: Retention/Disposal Land Information NZ (LINZ) has to maintain a “retention and disposal schedule” for all paper records it holds that are over 25 years old. It has been developing a draft appraisal report and retention and disposal schedule to enable it to identify: highvalue items that require long-term preservation; items of no value that are still required for LINZ’s business purposes; and items of very little value that are no longer required. LINZ is seeking feedback from interested groups on the recommendations outlined in the draft report. Submissions close on 11 February 2011. Email them to customersupport@linz.govt.nz with the subject heading “LINZ disposal and retention consultation”. More is at http://www.linz.govt.nz/survey-titles/stats-projectsnotices/news-notices/2010/1217-retention-and-disposal-consultation/index.aspx

Border Inspection of Vehicles The NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) is seeking feedback from interested parties on the options available for vehicle border inspection following the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) intention to withdraw from carrying out these inspections in mid 2011. NZTA proposes to appoint NZ-registered organisations to provide vehicles border inspection services both in NZ and offshore. Submissions close on 11 March 2011. Email them toborder.inspection@nzta.govt.nz, or send them to D Hutchinson, National Manager Vehicles, NZ Transport Agency, Private Bag 6995, Wellington

x

ERMA200696: to manufacture TimTech High Concentration Soluble Borate containing boric acid for use as a wood preservative for treating sawn timber and wood based products (28 February 2011);

x

ERMA200721: to import Raid Controls Heavy Cockroach and Flea Infestations aerosol insecticide fogger containing cypermethrin for use in domestic homes in NZ (28 February 2011);

x

ERMA200678: to import a polyisocyanate resin for use in water-borne, high performance, 2-pack polyurethane coating systems in NZ (23 February 2011);

x

ERMA200704: to manufacture AGV1001 as a sheep pour on veterinary medicine to control sheep louse infestation (23 February 2011);

x

ERMA200695: to import or manufacture ParaMite Selective Miticide (110g/kg etoxazole) for control of Six-Spotted Mite in avocados (21 February 2011);

x

ERMA200658: this application has been prepared to obtain approval for manufacture of the timber treatment concentrate, J57.48A and the ready to use solution J57.48B (21 February 2011);

x

ERMA200661: to import or manufacture Proxanil as a fungicide containing the active ingredients propamocarb and cymoxanil for the control of blight in potatoes (21 February 2011);

x

ERMA200472: revision to the Dental Product Group Standards (2 March 2011);

x

ERMA200667: to manufacture Donaghys Serious G600 containing glyphosate, for use as a non selective herbicide (16 February 2011);

x

ERMA200677 To import or manufacture Vixen, a herbicide containing glufosinate-ammonium and oxyfluorfen, to be used to give rapid brown-off for selective vegetative control (16 February 2011);

x

ERMA200679: to import DuPont Talendo fungicide, containing proquinazid, for the control of powdery mildew in grapes, apples, squash, pumpkins and zucchini (16 February 2011); and

x

ERMA200680: to import or manufacture Saxon, containing mecoprop-P, MCPA and fluroxypyr, as a herbicide giving selective vegetative control in cereal crops (16 February 2011).

Submissions go to ERMA NZ, PO Box 131, Wellington 6140, email submissions@ermanz.govt.nz. More is at http://www.ermanz.govt.nz/consultations/consult-apps.html

ERMA Consultations The Environmental Risk Management Authority is consulting on (closing dates are in brackets): x

ERMA200751: to import RB-2-140 as an insecticidal product containing transfluthrin for indoor household use (25 February 2011);

x

ERMA200714: to import Divino Fungicide containing difenoconazole for the control of fungal diseases in vegetable crops (25 February 2011);

7 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural New Vision for Global Agriculture At the recent Davos Economic Forum, a coalition of businesses, governments and farmers launched a new global strategy for agriculture. Led by 17 global companies, the strategy sets ambitious targets for collective action to increase production by 20%, decrease Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


greenhouse gas emissions per tonne by 20%, and reduce rural poverty by 20% each decade.

Wine Survey: Vintage 2010 …

The report is at http://www3.weforum.org/docs/IP/AM11/CO/WEF_AgricultureNewVision_Roadmap _2011.pdf

“Vintage 2010”, the fifth annual financial benchmarking survey for the NZ wine industry indicates that NZ wineries are continuing to experience steadily declining profits and rising debts, and that improvement is unlikely in the short term.

2011 Agriculture Outlook Higher prices for agricultural goods and ongoing (perhaps increased) volatility* are going to be the main features for the year ahead in the global food and agribusiness sectors, according to a just-released Rabobank report. Called “NZ Agriculture in Focus”, the report says that apart from managing volatility, the two challenges that stand out for the year ahead are the high NZ dollar and the importance of developing further engagement with emerging markets. The dairy sector is expected to lead NZ’s agriculture sector again in 2011. *volatility: unpredictability Read more at http://www.rabobank.co.nz/news-and-events/media-releases/2011news-archive/pages/media-release-20110127.aspx

Farm Safety: Watch It Although 2010 showed positive signs for all terrain vehicle (ATV) safety, with a 13% decline in serious harm injuries (according to Department of Labour statistics), it was not a good year for farm safety. Overall, agricultural serious harm notifications were up 15% over 2009 with a noticeable spike occurring this summer. ATV fatalities (17) were the same as in 2009.

A reduced vintage in 2010 has gone some way to alleviating problems caused by the previous two years (due to an oversupply of wines in global markets), but predictions that the 2011 harvest could exceed 300,000 tonnes worry the industry. Large scale wineries (with revenue over $20 million) continue to be the most profitable with an average profit before tax of 7.8%, while the smallest wineries (revenue under $1 million) are suffering the most with an average loss of 31.9%. The Vintage 2010 report is at www.deloitte.com/nz/wine

… & Wine Drinking: Ancient Art Chemical analysis has confirmed the discovery of the oldest complete wine production facility ever found, including grape seeds, withered grape vines, remains of pressed grapes, a rudimentary wine press, a clay vat apparently used for fermentation, wine-soaked potsherds, and even a cup and drinking bowl. The facility, which dates back to roughly 4100 BC — 1,000 years before the earliest comparable find — was unearthed in an Armenian cave complex. Read more at http://www.international.ucla.edu/news/article.asp?parentid=119445

UN: Rural Women Disadvantaged A joint report from three United Nations agencies concludes that the recent global financial and food crises have slowed progress towards gender equality in farming-related labour – with women continuing to reap less benefit from employment in agriculture than men. The report indicates that discrimination that women face limits both their economic productivity and their personal development. It goes on to say that rural women need access to education, training, credit, markets, technical assistance and labour protection. They also need equal, secure access to land and other assets and “social capital,” including the ability to participate equally in farmers’ organisations. “Gender dimensions of agricultural and rural employment: Differentiated pathways out of poverty” is at http://www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1638e/i1638e00.htm

2010 Trade Barriers Report The 2010 edition of “NZ Horticulture: Barriers to Our Export Trade” came out late last year. The report helps readers to get to grips with all the different trade conditions surrounding the export of more than 50 horticultural products to more than 120 countries every year. It is also used by exporters and growers to determine the potential of various markets and the costs associated with them.

Wool Industry Research Group A research group, including the Wool Research Organisation of NZ Inc -WRInc - and other wool industry representatives, has been set up to research ways to lift prices in the wool industry. Research organisations associated with the group include AgResearch and NZ universities. The group will receive Government funding of $17.25 million over the next five years, with the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology contributing $8.6 million over five years, and WRInc and others matching this amount. The research is aimed at: x

securing wool’s market position as a sustainable, natural fibre;

x

addressing issues relating to wool use (e.g., fade and insect susceptibility that put wool at a disadvantage compared to synthetics); and

x

finding new uses that emphasise wool’s positive characteristics.

HortNZ does not put a copy of the report on its website, but you can request a digital copy from leigh.catley@hortnz.co.nz

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 8


Meeting Malaysian Halal Requirements

x

domestic action by NZ’s main trading partners;

x

NZ’s shouldering its “fair share” of international action to reduce emissions;

Malaysia and NZ have agreed on an arrangement setting out how NZ will meet Malaysia’s halal requirements. NZ’s meat trade with Malaysia has been restricted since 2005, when Malaysian auditors delisted many NZ beef plants for export for failing to fully comply with Malaysia’s new halal standards.

x

the need to meet international obligations;

x

the need to reduce emissions in the most cost effective way; and

x

the need to boost the economic resilience of the NZ economy.

An estimate puts the global halal food market as worth about US$635 billion annually - approximately 16% of the entire food industry. Malaysia alone imported from around the world NZ$666 million worth of halal meat in 2009.

December Rural Property Figures An end-of-year increase in dairy property transactions in December helped lift the average farm sale price to the highest level of 2010. From $968,500 at the end of November 2010, the national average farm sale price rose to $1,150,000 for the three months to December 2010. In the last three months of 2010 there were 213 farm sales, up on the 170 sold in the three months to the end of November, but still down on the 241 sales in the three months to December 2009. The national median selling price for a lifestyle property in the three months to December 2010 was $445,000, which is up on the median of $431,750 for the three months to November 2009, but down on the median of $464,000 for the last three months of 2009. More is at https://www.reinz.co.nz/reinz/index.cfm?1CC3D519-18FE-7E88-42494CE523B4D44B&obj_uuid=19473251-18FE-7E88-426C-16E8825A0635

Clearing Tree Weeds: ETS Exemptions The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) has opened a second round of exemptions from the ETS rules applying to landowners clearing tree weeds.

The terms of reference for the review are at http://www.beehive.govt.nz/sites/all/files/ETSReview_Terms_of_Reference.pdf

Advisory Group on Green Growth The terms of reference for a new Advisory Group on Green Growth cover: x

how Government agencies can help exporters get greater value from NZ’s clean, green brand;

x

how it can assist the growth of clean technologies; and

x

how it can assist small and medium-size businesses move to a low-carbon economy.

More is at http://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/green-growth-initiative-announced

Changes to Air Quality Standards The current standards for air quality set limits on the concentration of certain air pollutants in the air for different regions. They include restrictions before 2013, and a ban on granting consent for industry after 2013, if the limit is not achieved. Coming changes to the standards will: x

remove restrictions in the regulations on industry consents for certain industrial discharges;

x

extend the compliance dates depending on the state of air quality in each region, with the regions that exceed limits more than 10 times a year needing to reduce to three times a year by 1 September 2016, and to once a year by 1 September 2020. Regions exceeding limits fewer than 10 times a year will need to reduce to once a year by 1 September 2016;

x

mean that exceptional events (e.g., dust storms, volcanic eruptions) can be excluded from the total count;

x

permit industrial discharges from new industries if they reduce emissions from elsewhere; and

x

prohibit new solid-fuel open fires in homes in regions with air pollution from September 2012 (gas open fires will still be permitted).

Tree weeds are defined as pests under a local pest management strategy and in the Climate Change Response Act. Applications close on 31 March 2011. More is at http://www.maf.govt.nz/newsresources/news/maf-opens-second-round-of-wilding-tree-exemptions.aspx

Environment Emissions Trading Scheme Review A review of the emissions trading scheme (ETS) is underway, with the reviewers recommending how the NZ ETS should evolve after 2012, taking into account: x

More, including compliance dates for different regions is at http://www.mfe.govt.nz/laws/standards/air-quality/review/index.html#next

the uncertainty of the results of international climate change negotiations;

9 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Battling Fossil Fuel Subsidies In December 2010 NZ set up a meeting of Ministers of the small and medium-sized countries supporting the reform of inefficient fossil fuel subsidies, and a new group has now been formed to deal with the issue: the “Friends of Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform”. A move to establish a US$100 billion a year fund to help developing countries combat man-made climate change is also underway. Research suggests that together the two moves could reduce global GHG emissions by up to 10% by 2050, making a significant contribution to keeping global warming below 2 degrees Celsius in 2050. More is at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA1012/S00297/nz-coordinates-actionon-fossil-fuel-subsidy-reform.htm

Homeowners Wary of Sustainability? A Victoria University project investigated why homeowners say they value innovations like solar water heating panels and double glazing, but aren’t prepared to pay full price for them. The research revealed that, for many people, the risks outweigh the benefits of adopting sustainability technologies. Those risks include the upfront payment required and scepticism about whether the technology would deliver what it promised. But one of the greatest barriers highlighted in the research is people not wanting to be seen to be different. They are worried about what others may think and don’t want to be first. The research also confirmed that having energy efficient technologies installed in a house is currently not valued in the real estate market. For example, while online ads, which have more space, sometimes market homes as having sustainability innovations, the words are usually dropped in the shorter printed version. Read the press release at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1101/S00245/fear-ofbeing-first-scares-homeowners-off-innovation.htm

Climate Change: Plant Shiny Crops? Another new idea involves breeding crops to be shinier, with broader canopies and waxier leaves, which could potentially offset global warming by 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit or more. The technique, which could be achieved through conventional plantbreeding programs, would cause plants to reflect more of the sun's energy back into space, leaving the planet slightly cooler. Read more at http://news.discovery.com/earth/reflective-crops-climate-change.html

Swedish Environmental Innovations Instead of traditional fuel options, the residents of Kristianstad, Sweden, generate energy through a biological process that transforms waste such as potato peel, manure, old cooking oil and pig intestines into a form of methane called biogas. The biogas can be used for heat, electricity and fuel for cars. The city's 80,000 residents don't use any coal, oil or natural gas for heating, and the city has cut its fossil fuel use in half and reduced carbon dioxide emissions by 25% over the past 10 years. In another non-traditional move, Jernhusen, a real estate company in Stockholm, has found a way to channel the body heat from the hordes of commuters passing through Stockholm's Central Station to warm another building that is just across the road. Read more about Kristianstad and biogas at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/11/science/earth/11fossil.html?_r=2&ref=science and the Stockholm project at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12137680

Protecting Lake Taupo: Agreement

Get Ready for "Global Dimming"?

The Lake Taupo Protection Trust has signed a private agreement with Tuwharetoa Waihi Pukawa Ahu Whenua Trust Farming aimed at reducing the nitrogen flow into Lake Taupo. Nitrogen leaking into the lake will in future cause the water quality to deteriorate.

Scientists say that air pollution from the fossil-fuel sector could actually dim the sun's rays and reduce the amount of heat that reaches the Earth, with the sun bouncing back into space off the smoggy haze.

The agreement includes a nitrogen cap on discharges of nitrogen from farming, mainly from animal urine, and changes to stock numbers or changes from pastoral land to forestry, all enabling nitrogen to be reduced.

At first, it sounds like an ironic solution to climate-change problems. But not so fast: Scientists say that the reflective "brown clouds" formed by polluted air would simultaneously mask the full extent of climate change, and cause severe droughts by inhibiting rain-cloud formation.

The transfer of pastoral land into forestry involves an agreement between Mighty River Power and Waihi Pukawa, with Mighty River buying the carbon credits from new forestry, under the Emission Trading Scheme (ETS).

Read more at http://www.enn.com/climate/article/42125?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=f eed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+EnvironmentalNewsNetwork+%28Environmental+ News+Network%29

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

The changes are by private agreement, with Environment Waikato issuing a resource consent and monitoring the situation.

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 10


Hakatere Conservation Park Extended Hakatere Conservation Park has been extended following a review of the Barrosa pastoral lease. The new part of the park links the Heron Basin to the Canterbury Plains. It will provide protection for rare native species such as the NZ falcon/ karearea, NZ scaup, and the Australasian bittern/matuku and crested grebe/kamana.

…& NZ’s Top 2010 Destinations Accommodation website Wotif.com recently released its top 20 list, based on domestic bookings online. The list is: 1: Auckland; 2: Wellington; 3: Christchurch; 4: Queenstown; 5: Rotorua; 6: Dunedin; 7: Taupo; 8: Hamilton; 9: Napier; 10: Palmerston North; 11: Nelson; 12: Paihia; 13: Tauranga; 14: Wanaka; 15: Te Anau; 16: New Plymouth; 17: Hanmer Springs; 18: Invercargill; 19: Blenheim; and 20: Franz Josef.

Tourism

Global Tourism Recovering

Adventure Tourism: New Safety Rules

Thanks to improved economic conditions worldwide, international tourism recovered strongly last year, according to the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). Although there was an increase in tourist arrivals in all regions, emerging economies drove the recovery.

New safety regulations for the adventure tourism industry are to be in place from 1 October 2011. They will include making it an offence to provide activities involving significant hazards, and instruction or leadership, without a current safety certificate. The Department of Labour (DoL) will be appointing an organisation to run a registration system for adventure tourism, and safety inspectors will also be accredited by DoL to carry out inspections of adventure tourism activities. There will be a three-year transition period, after which adventure tourism businesses will have to be registered and have a current safety certificate. In an earlier review of adventure tourism, activities were organised into three levels of risk (with acknowledgement that risks in adventure tourism will be influenced by the environment they are carried out in). The three levels are: x

low risk: e.g., land-based fishing;

x

medium risk: e.g., mountain biking; and

x

high risk: e.g., river-boarding, canyoning.

Asia was the first region to recover and the strongest growing region in 2010. Africa, which was the only region to show positive figures in 2009, maintained growth during 2010, thanks in part to the hosting of events such as the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. Results returned to double digits in the Middle East, where almost all destinations grew by 10% or more. Recovery was slower in Europe than in other regions due to the air traffic disruption caused by the volcanic eruption in Iceland and the economic uncertainty affecting the Euro zone. Meanwhile, the Americas rebounded from the decline in 2009. UNWTO forecasts international tourist arrivals to grow at between 4% and 5% in 2011, a rate slightly above the long-term average. More is at http://85.62.13.114/media/news/en/press_det.php?id=7331&idioma=E">news

Tourism activities that don’t any pose risks will not come under the regulations, and neither will organisations that don’t charge fees, like schools or voluntary clubs or groups.

Health & Welfare

The Department of Labour will be seeking feedback during the development of the regulations.

Another Kind of ACC? ACC has announced changes to the way it works, amongst which are:

Where to Travel in 2011…

x

Try NZ. This country has been named as number two in the top nine destinations for 2011 by global broadcasting network CNN coming in just behind New York. The Rugby World Cup, and our film reputation are seen as important reasons behind the high ranking.

a decision in principle to introduce choice in the Work Account (this provides cover and entitlements for employees and the self-employed for work-related personal injuries), with employers being able to nominate a workplace insurer other than ACC (ACC would still be one of the providers);

x

experience rating being introduced in the Work Account from 1 April this year - organisations will be rated on their claims experience, with a no-claims discount for small employers, and a claims experience rating for larger employers;

x

extending the Accredited Employers’ Programme: accredited employers manage their own workplace health and safety, injury management including rehabilitation, and management of employees' work-related injury claims; and

The top CNN destinations are: 1 - New York; 2 - NZ; 3 - Peruvian Amazon; 4 – Barcelona; Spain; 5 - Norway; 6 – Albania; 7 – Japan; 8 – Guatemala; and 9 - Bulgaria

11 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


x

making the ACC Disputes Resolution Service more independent.

ACC says it is also: x

checking claims more carefully, to make sure they meet relevant conditions for cover (e.g., with elective surgery claims, it is checking that its only pays for injury-related needs, and not pre-existing health conditions or age-related needs, which are the responsibility of the public health system);

x

setting up new claims management processes to help clients get the right help more quickly,

x

having a new approach to helping clients with long-term claims recover their independence;

x

putting greater emphasis on work-based rehabilitation (it says international evidence shows this leads to the best recovery outcomes);

x

working in new ways with the health professionals contracted to deliver ACC funded services such as: paying them to achieve specified rehabilitation “outcomes”, rather than for providing a set number of services; monitoring their performance more closely, to make sure the right results are being achieved; and setting more reasonable prices in contracts, to get more value for money.

There will be no increase in workplace, motor vehicle, or earner levies for 2011.

Pike River Tragedy: Royal Commission A Royal Commission has been appointed to look into: the cause of the explosions in the Pike River Coal Mine, mine practices, the search and rescue operation, legal requirements governing the situation, resourcing, and events in other countries. More is at http://admin.beehive.govt.nz/sites/all/files/Royal_Commission_on_the_Pike_River_ Coal_Mine_Tragedy.pdf

Preventing Child Neglect: OCC Report The Office of the Children’s Commissioner has released a report called “Preventing child neglect in NZ”. The report says homelessness, parental stress, financial difficulties, transient neighbourhoods, easily available alcohol, socio-economic inequalities, high unemployment, and a lack of services all increase the likelihood of child neglect. It recommends (amongst other things): x

the Ministry of Social Development (MSD), Child, Youth and Family (CYF), the Ministry of Health (MoH), Ministry of Education (Minedu), and Police developing a shared understanding of child abuse (with MSD leading this work);

x

preparing good practice guidelines for agency staff dealing with neglect;

x

reviewing the adequacy of current detection systems;

x

making information on neglect and its prevention available to parents;

x

gathering population-based information on neglect;

x

developing the DHB child protection alert system; and

x

setting up a plan for strengthening child protection alerts within the school system.

ACC will be consulting on details of the changes, with final decisions being made after the 2011 election. More information on the changes: Stocktake of ACC Accounts www.dol.govt.nz/initiatives/workplace/acc/stocktake/index.asp; Review of Employermanaged Workplace Injury Claims: Final Report: www.dol.govt.nz/initiatives/workplace/acc/stocktake/index.asp; Next Steps on ACC www.dol.govt.nz/initiatives/workplace/acc/stocktake/index.asp; experience rating http://img.scoop.co.nz/media/pdfs/1012/Questions__answers_on_experience_rating .pdf ; introducing choice in the workplace http://www.beehive.govt.nz/sites/all/files/Questions_and_answers_on_decision_in_ principle_for_introduction_of_choice_in_the_Work_Account.pdf and changes to accredited employer scheme http://www.beehive.govt.nz/sites/all/files/Questions_and_answers_on_extension_of _Accredited_Employers'_Programme.pdf

Display of Tobacco Products: Bill The Smoke-free Environments (Controls and Enforcement) Bill, which tightens tobacco controls, has passed its first reading in Parliament. Its aim is to prohibit the display of tobacco products in or at the exterior of retail and other sales outlets and to “tighten up tobacco controls and enforcement”. The Bill also proposes banning tobacco retail displays and retailers from using tobacco trading names to advertise tobacco and stricter restrictions on selling tobacco to minors. Restriction on display would come into force six months after the Bill becomes law, but people offering tobacco products for sale could be exempted from compliance during a 2-year transition period. Smoke-free Environments (Controls and Enforcement) Bill is at http://www.parliament.nz/enNZ/PB/Legislation/Bills/BillsDigests/e/2/0/49PLLawBD18311-Smoke-freeEnvironments-Controls-and-Enforcement-Amendment.htm

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

The report is at http://www.occ.org.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/7882/CC_Preventing_child_negl ect_122010.pdf

Food Labelling Law: Report The Panel conducting the Independent Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy (commissioned by the Australia and NZ Food Regulation Ministerial Council) has published its final report called “Labelling Logic.” The 61 recommendations contained in the report are designed to address the current somewhat random approach to food labelling. The main recommendation is for a “Food Labelling Issues Hierarchy,” in descending order of: food safety, preventative health, new technologies, and consumer values issues.

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 12


The food label is recognised one of the most highly valued and competitively sought-after communication channels in the market place.

International Civil Defence Agreements

More information is at www.foodlabellingreview.gov.au

NZ, Australian and United States have signed civil defence agreements allowing civil defence agencies in these countries to support each other during and after emergencies, including maintaining 24/7 contact points as necessary.

Auditing Rest Homes The Ministry of Health and District Health Boards (DHBs) are to address all the recommendations from a report from the Office of the Auditor-General into rest home performance. They include:

Kiwi Teeth in Better Condition

x

tightened criteria for agencies that audit rest homes;

x

more oversight of rest home auditors with a requirement that they have third party accreditation;

x

spot audits of rest homes;

x

more information about results of audits being made available online for to older NZers and their families;

x

collecting and sharing more information from both the audit agencies and rest home providers to identify "at risk" rest homes;

x

streamlining the DHBs’ and the Ministry’s rest home-related functions;

x

more funding for rest home nursing supervision; and

Report Card on Human Rights

x

increasing residential care subsidies (in last year's budget).

The Human Rights Commission’s (HRC) “Human Rights in NZ2010 report card” identifies 30 priorities for the next five years, with three of the most critical being poverty, inequality, and discrimination.

The Government’s response to the OAG’s report on rest homes is available via http://www.parliament.nz/en-NZ/PB/Presented/Papers/

The 2009 NZ Oral Health Survey examines the habits and dental status of 4906 Kiwis (it’s the first comprehensive study on this scale since 1988). In essence, the survey shows the NZers are now keeping their teeth for longer, and in a better condition than ever before. However, 1 in 20 NZ adults still don’t brush their teeth on a regular basis, and the majority of adults only go to the dentist when they have problems with their teeth. More is at http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/indexmh/our-oral-health-key-findings2009-nz-oral-health-survey

The priority areas consider economic, social and cultural rights, covering health, education, equal employment opportunities, social security and housing.

Ambulance Call Centres: More Funding Emergency ambulance call centres, which take 111 calls are to get more funding - $700,000 more - so they can provide more support for over-the-phone triage* of emergency calls. The money will cover the cost of additional clinical advice to call takers and dispatch staff. Staff in the new role will also be able to provide additional support and mentoring to the call takers. *Triage is the process of prioritising sick or injured people for treatment according to the seriousness of the condition or injury.

NZ-Russia Adoption Process Agreed Inter Country Adoption NZ (ICANZ)) is now permitted by Russia to operate an adoption programme for NZers wanting to adopt Russian children. Russian adoptions were suspended in 2006 due to uncertainties with the process. Russian children in need of adoptions are likely to be school aged and they may have health needs or disabilities.

HRC is recommending that Parliament establishes a Human Rights Select Committee to strengthen Parliament’s focus on protecting human rights. It also recommends reducing child poverty through a coordinated approach, with specific attention paid to: Maori children, Pacific and disabled children; increasing the supply and diversity of social housing; and addressing the adequacy of core benefit rates. *“Human Rights in NZ2010” is available at http://www.hrc.co.nz/home/hrc/humanrightsenvironment/humanrightsinnewzealand2 010/humanrightsinnewzealand2010.php

Humanitarian Response: NZ Up There In the Humanitarian Response Index 2010, NZ is placed just behind Denmark and Ireland, in terms of its humanitarian response to international crises. NZ gives $7 of humanitarian assistance for every resident. More is at http://daraint.org/humanitarian-response-index/humanitarian-responseindex-2010/

More about ICANZ is at www.icanz.gen.nz

13 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Australasian Disability Professionals: in NZ

Education/Training

Australasian Disability Professionals currently has chapters in seven States in Australia, and the organisation is about to set up a NZ chapter. An individual membership professional association will then be available to all people working in the disability sector in NZ.

Education Amendment Bill

Find out more at http://adp.org.au/

WHO: Classifying Traditional Medicine The World Health Organisation (WHO- the United Nations health agency) is to develop information standards for traditional medicine,* a primary source of health care for many people in parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Traditional medicine is also increasingly being used in Europe and North America. The “International Classification of Traditional Medicine” project will assist in creating an evidence base for traditional medicine – producing terminologies and classifications for diagnoses and interventions. *Traditional medicine, as defined by WHO, is the sum total of knowledge, skills and practices based on the theories, beliefs and experiences indigenous to different cultures that are used to maintain health, as well as to prevent, diagnose, improve or treat physical and mental illnesses. More is at http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2010/trad_medicine_20101207/en/inde x.html

ATMs for Vision Impaired ANZ NZ has teamed up with the Association of Blind Citizens NZ to offer “talking” ATMs that provide greater banking security and usability for the blind and vision impaired. In collaboration with the Association, ANZ and The National Bank have begun incorporating the latest in ATM technology into its 750 ATMs – the largest network of ATMs in the country.

Asthma Studies: Participants Sought According to the World Health Organisation, some 300 million people currently suffer from asthma and it is the most common chronic disease among children. Scientists today still work to find out more about what triggers it and what relieves it. Currently, volunteers in both Auckland and Christchurch are needed to take part in Asthma studies. The studies vary and need people both on and off medication who are over 18 years of age.

The Education Amendment Bill (No 2) now law: x

sets up secondary-tertiary programmes (Trades Academies), which allow senior secondary students to study across secondary and tertiary education;

x

clarifies that teachers that may be a danger to students can be suspended;

x

allows the Teachers Council to note the teachers found to be incompetent on the teachers’ register;

x

exempts short-term crèches from early-childhood licensing standards to make it easier for recreation facilities, shopping centres and similar organisations to provide short-term babysitting (Police checks for crèche staff will be required under the Health and Safety Act);

x

changes private school legislation to implement the recommendations in the Law Commission’s 2009 report, “Private Schools and the Law”;

x

amends refund requirement provisions for international students enrolled at Private Training Establishments, to make it more difficult to “play” the system by changing courses once students are in NZ; and

x

gives children of board members and of former pupils some priority when out-of-school-zone places are offered to students.

Interim Visas for Overseas Students Under a new Immigration Act, which recently came into effect, “interim visas” can be granted to students while their applications are being processed. With these visas, students will be able to study here lawfully during the application process, as long as they are lawfully in NZ when they apply. In another change, feepaying foreign students will only have to provide police and medical certificates every three years, rather than every two years as at present. In other respects students will still have to meet all the standard conditions. The aims of the changes are to provide peace of mind for students, and make the enrolment process easier for education providers. In 2009/10 Immigration NZ approved nearly 94,000 student visa applications, of which 65,500 were from full fee-paying international students. More is at http://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/new-visa-reduced-red-tape-foreignstudents

To find out more go to www.getparticipants.com

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 14


University/Polytech 2011 Funding… The Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) has published details of the 2011 funding approved for each NZ tertiary provider, together with the funding each was allocated in 2010. TEC says that the funding for student places at universities in 2011 is up $56 million on the 2010 allocation, and that it is estimated to result in 2,600 more core student places than in 2009. It also says that over the next five years a 20% increase in the number of completed degree-level courses is expected. An additional $25 million in funding is to be spent on improving the overall quality of courses and the outcomes for students studying at Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics (ITPs). The total number of places on offer in ITPs is estimated to decrease slightly. Details are at http://www.tec.govt.nz/About-us/News/Media-releases/fundingdecisions-for-2011/

…& ITOs’ Educational Performance The Tertiary Education Commission has also released information about the education performance of individual industry training organisations (ITOs) in 2009. Industry training is designed to be flexible and allow trainees to fit in training around their work. The system is competencybased and learning often does not have well-defined start and end dates. This means that there can be lags between trainees beginning training and the reporting of credit achievement. A large number of credits are often reported at the end of training, and this can affect both the credit achievement rates, and the programme completion rates at some ITOs. More is at http://www.tec.govt.nz/Learners-Organisations/Learners/performance-intertiary-education/Educational-performance-at-individual-tertiary-providers/

National Standards: Maorimedium Schools After being trialled in 2010, Nga Whanaketanga Rumaki Maori Maori-medium national standards are now in place for all kura and Maori-medium schools (for years 1 to 8 students). They cover korero (oral language panui (reading), tuhituhi (writing), and pangarau (maths) the students need in all curriculum areas. Students' progress and achievement against Nga Whanaketanga Rumaki Maori will be assessed throughout the year and parents and whanau will receive plain language reports. Work on the standards has also involved development of assessment techniques and professional development for teachers.

Kiwi Students Performance Rated The 2009 results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA*) show Kiwi students performed a lot better than the average for OECD countries in reading, science and maths (respectively, fourth, fourth, and tenth). However, NZ still has too many lower achievers and there has been little change in reading performance since 2000 or in maths since 2003. Maori and Pasifika students are over-represented at the low end of the reading, science, and maths results. Girls outperformed boys in reading in every participating country. Among the top and high performing countries, NZ has one of the largest differences between girls and boys. *PISA is a comprehensive summary of the assessment of the skills and knowledge of NZ 15-year-old students in reading, mathematics and science. It compares NZ’s performance with other top or high performing PISA countries or economies, as well as with the average for the 34 OECD member countries. For more information on PISA 2009 see http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/series/2543

Maori Language Teaching Resource: Award Three Victoria University Faculty of Education lecturers have developed a Maori language teaching resource for teachers using video podcasts, online support and in-school facilitation. The resource is part of a Teacher Professional Development project called Whakapiki i te Reo, funded by the Ministry of Education. Three rural regions have started using the resource, which recently won the International Award for Excellence for a paper published by Ubiquitous Learning: An International Journal. More is at http://chronicle.com/campusViewpointArticle/M-ori-language-teachinggoes/390/

Employment Promising Signs in Employment Market The NZ employment market is showing encouraging signs as 2011 gets under way, according to an analysis of 32,000 jobs listed on Trade Me Jobs in the three months from October to December. Christmas, for instance, is often a big drag on the fourth quarter, so advertised vacancies normally drop from the preceding quarter. In 2010 this wasn’t the case – activity levels were robust with continued demand from employers seeking to staff up. Across the country, advertised vacancies were up 28% on the same period a year ago. As well as more jobs, there was also good news on the pay packet front with average salaries for jobs listed on the site ticking up to $63,901, up 1.7% on the same period a year ago.

15 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


The areas showing the most significant wage rises over the past year are top-end administrative jobs, sales and support roles. Other findings were that: x

of the main centres, Canterbury was the standout performer; and

x

there was good news for people looking for work in farming, information technology, or transport & logistics with these sectors boasting the largest increases in job numbers.

The researchers found that workers who must avoid appearing either overly positive or negative - such as journalists, health care professionals, social workers, lawyers, and law enforcement officers - suppress expressions of emotion more than workers in other service-oriented professions, where the expression of positive emotions is called for. Emotion suppression takes a toll on people. Workers who must remain neutral are often more rundown or show greater levels of burnout. The more energy you spend controlling your emotions, the less energy you have to devote to the task at hand.

Unemployment Rate: December Quarter

But, emotion suppression also affects customers too. The study showed that customers who interacted with a neutrally expressive employee were in less-positive moods and, in turn, gave lower ratings of service quality and held less-positive attitudes toward that employee's organisation.

In seasonally adjusted terms, the unemployment rate rose to 6.8% during the December 2010 quarter, compared with 6.4% in the September 2010 quarter and 7.0% a year ago.

By contrast, when an employee was positive, it transferred to the client or customer they were working with. Because of that good mood, the client or customer rated the organisation better.

During the quarter, full-time employment increased, while parttime employment decreased, and the number of males employed part-time fell sharply during the quarter.

Read the original press release at http://www.media.rice.edu/media/NewsBot.asp?MODE=VIEW&ID=15221

However, Statistics NZ noted that while the December quarter results indicate a further deterioration in the labour market, key indicators are showing an improvement since this time last year, with lower unemployment and positive annual employment growth.

“Mythbusing” Older Workers

More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/work_income_and_spending/employment _and_unemployment/HouseholdLabourForceSurvey_MRDec10qtr.aspx

Supported Employment: New Partnership

Many employers seem to regard older workers as less productive and than younger employees, but other countries such as Japan are actively recruiting older employees. A recent US article seeks to tackle some of the prevailing perceptions (myths actually) about older workers. For example: x

Myth: older workers cost more than younger ones and are less productive on the job.

x

Reality: both concerns are untrue. While older workers may take longer to recover from injuries, studies show that they use fewer sick days on the whole than their younger counterparts. Health care costs are actually less for older workers because most no longer have small children as dependents on their health care plans. When it comes to job performance, older workers have less absenteeism, less turnover, superior interpersonal skills, and deal better with customers.

The Association of Supported Employment NZ (ASENZ) and the NZ Federation of Vocational and Support Services (VASS) have formed a partnership. The announcement follows discussions between the two organisations and support from their members to explore ways to work together. Together the organisations represent approximately 120 providers involved in the provision of employment and community support services for disabled people.

The article “The 'Silver Tsunami': Why Older Workers Offer Better Value Than Younger Ones” is at http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2644

More is at http://lists.community.net.nz/cna/?p=9527

Poker-faced Professions: The Downside According to new international research, employees who have to maintain a neutral disposition while they are working tend to spend more energy meeting that requirement.

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Housing/Building Building Consents Way Down Statistics NZ says: x

the value of residential building consents fell 26%, to $368 million (the lowest value since early 2009);

x

the value of non-residential building consents fell 18%, to $332 million;

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 16


x

994 new dwellings were authorised, including apartments – the lowest number issued in a December month since the series began in 1965;

Energy

x

85 new apartments were authorised (just 12 were assistedliving apartments associated with retirement villages); and

Latest NZ Energy Figures

x

taking account of seasonal differences, the number of new dwellings authorised excluding apartments, fell 11%, in the sixth consecutive monthly fall.

The latest edition of the NZ Energy Quarterly includes information on the supply of major fuels, electricity generation and greenhouse gas emissions, and prices to the end of September 2010. Amongst the information: x

increased production at the Kupe gas field resulted in quarterly production of liquefied petroleum gas reaching a four-year high;

x

greenhouse gas emissions from geothermal electricity generation exceeded those of coal generation for the first time;

Residential Property Market Update…

x

demand for diesel was up for the first time in two years (2% on a year ago); conversely, petrol demand was 0.6% lower than the same quarter last year; and

Looking back over 2010, values across NZ increased in the first few months of the year continuing the trend from mid 2009. From April 2010 onwards, values in most cities and regions began to gradually decrease again and by the end of December had dropped 1.9% compared to March. The rate of decline slowed towards the end of the year, suggesting that values may be beginning to stabilise in some areas.

x

increased availability of gas led to substitution of coal at Huntly, and electricity generation from coal reached an eight-year low.

More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/industry_sectors/Construction/BuildingCo nsentsIssued_MRDec10.aspx

The publication is at http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/ContentTopicSummary____32570.aspx

Significant differences were seen in the main urban, provincial and rural areas throughout 2010: x

x

x

values of residential properties across all rural areas stayed relatively flat through until May before steadily dropping for the rest of the year (by the end the year values were 2.5% below the same time last year); across all provincial areas values rose through until March before falling until June, stabilising for a few months, then dropping steadily in the last three months of the year (values ended the year 2.3% below the same time last year); and across all the main urban areas values rose through until April before starting to decline; this rate of decline slowed towards the end of the year, and values ended the year 1.1% below the same time last year.

More details at http://www.qv.co.nz/aboutus/pressreleases/2010ResidentialPropertyMarketupdatea ndreview13012011.htm

Energy Outlook 2010 The Ministry of Economic Development (MED) recently released the 2010 edition of “NZ Energy Outlook”. The Outlook presents long-term forecasts of energy supply, demand, prices and energy sector greenhouse gas emissions. Some of the predictions include: x

consumer energy demand is projected to grow at 0.9% per annum to 2030, lower than the 1.4% per annum seen since 1990;

x

by 2030, renewable energy sources are expected to provide half of NZ’s energy supply; and

x

emissions from transport continue to grow while emissions from electricity decline.

The changes are being driven by: x

higher economic growth increasing NZ’s energy consumption but also triggering greater energy improvements;

x

sustained higher oil prices encouraging the purchase of more fuel-efficient vehicles and a greater uptake of electric vehicles and locally produced biofuels; and

The high vacancy rates generally reflect lower migration levels to this country, and people moving to find work, as businesses close or downsize in regional centres. For other reasons, Wellington has unusually high vacancy rates at the moment.

x

a higher valued NZ dollar making imported technology cheaper, e.g., wind turbines, resulting in lower wholesale electricity prices.

However, at the same time slower property sales have lead to some homes being launched privately into the rental market pending sale.

More is at www.med.govt.nz/energy/publications

…& Rental Vacancy Rates Double Residential rental property vacancy rates are around double (at 6%) the January 2010 figures, as house sales continue to dawdle, according to the most recent First National Group quarterly survey.

Read more at http://infonews.co.nz/news.cfm?id=62966

17 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Electricity SOEs Swap Assets The three state-owned (SOE) electricity generator-retailers Genesis Energy, Meridian Energy, and Mighty River Power have signed “virtual asset swap” contracts. The aim is to allow consumers greater choice of supplier and encourage the SOEs to compete more: Meridian Energy has little generation in the North Island and Genesis Energy and Mighty River Power have none in the South Island. Each virtual asset swap contract involves Meridian Energy selling electricity by way of financial hedges, up to 450 GWh/year to Genesis Energy and 700 GWh/year to Mighty River Power in the South Island, and buying the same volumes of electricity from Genesis Energy and Mighty River Power in the North Island. The contracts, which last for 15 years, don’t involve any physical assets being transferred or sold between the SOEs. In a separate transaction, Tekapo A and B power stations will be transferred from Meridian Energy to Genesis Energy. This is expected to happen in the first half of 2011. More is at http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/Page____45391.aspx

Combined Minerals Reviews Coming A review of the Crown Minerals Act (1991) and a review covering minerals programmes and regulations are planned. The reviews are part of the government's Petroleum Action Plan for more development of NZ's petroleum resources. Review papers proposing changes to the minerals programmes and the regulations will be prepared for public comment by the end of April 2011.

Tauhara II Ready to Roll Following an application to the Environmental Protection Authority, a Board of enquiry has granted consents (with conditions) for Contact Energy’s $1 billion Tauhara II 250 MW geothermal power station in Taupo. Contact Energy applied for consent to consent to build the Tauhara II Geothermal Development in March 2010. Construction and development of the power station will lead to 350 jobs over the 33-month construction period, and 250MW of renewable power will be added to the national grid, enough to power more than 200,000 homes.

New Wind Farms Pioneer Generation is to build the 7.65MW Mt Stuart wind farm near Milton, and it should be generating electricity by December 2011. Five companies are now building wind farms across the country, and several other companies are progressing potential projects. The Te Uku and Te Rere Hau wind farms are under construction in the North Island. The Mt Stuart, Mahinerangi and Lulworth wind farms are being built in the South Island. These projects have a combined capacity of 157MW. These new projects will increase this country’s installed wind capacity by 25% (wind energy already supplies 4% of NZ’s electricity). Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Taranaki: Underground Gas Storage An Origin/Contact Energy consortium has been granted a permit to begin developing an underground gas storage plant near Stratford in Taranaki that will store and supply gas for electricity generation. The Ahuroa project will also will also supply Contact’s 200 megawatt gas-fired peaking power station being constructed in Stratford. For more go to the petroleum section of the Crown Minerals website at www.crownminerals.govt.nz

2010 EECA Energy Efficiency Awards The EECA Awards celebrate organisations and individuals who have demonstrated excellence and innovation in energy efficiency or renewable energy. The 2010 winners were: x

Supreme Winner: Downer NZ, which cut its annual fuel bill by $3 million in just two years;

x

Small-Medium Business Award: Taranaki pig farm the Lepper Trust for a project that captures gas from the farm's effluent and uses it to produce electricity

x

Transport Award: Ruakuri Contracting, a small earthmoving and transport company from Te Kuiti;

x

Public Sector & Renewable Energy Awards: Christchurch City Council for its energy-efficient civic building, and its citywide system which uses various forms of bioenergy;

x

Energy Management Award: Westpac;

x

Community Award: Energy Efficiency Community Network for an energy advice line for householders; and

x

Outstanding Achievement in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Professor Ralph Sims, of the Centre for Energy Research at Massey University.

The full list of category winners and place-getters is http://www.eeca.govt.nz/node/11302

For Sale: Electricity Generation Plant The government is selling the diesel-fired electricity generation plant at Whirinaki on the NZ market by tender instead of transferring it to Meridian Energy. Whirinaki has three diesel-fired units totalling 155MW. It was commissioned in 2004 under the reserve energy scheme and is operated by Contact Energy. The plant will only be able to be relocated during the summer of 2011/12 or 2012/13 because it has to be available under the reserve energy scheme until the end of 2011. It also has to be available to assist with winter loads after that, so it needs to stay in operating condition in NZ for at least three years after its sale. More is at http://www.med.govt.nz/templates/Page____45577.aspx

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 18


Transport & Travel “Give Way” Rules: About Turn Plans to change the give ways rules at intersections in NZ in early 2012 have been confirmed. Currently, if you are turning left you have to give way to right turning traffic coming towards you. This will be reversed - so the left turning vehicle would have right of way in this situation. Changes are also planned to the rule for T-intersections. This rule applies when there are conflicting right-turns at a Tintersection. Currently, the right-turning vehicle on the terminating road (the base of the 'T') has priority over the rightturning vehicle on the through road (the top of the 'T'). The change will require traffic from an uncontrolled terminating road to give way to traffic on a through road. The proposal to change the give way rules will be included in a draft Road User Amendment Rule.

Air NZ & Virgin Blue: Cuddles Air NZ and Virgin Blue (which operates as Pacific Blue in Australasia) have been given the go-ahead to work together for three years on the services and fares they offer on trans-Tasman services. The two airlines have agreed on minimum seat numbers that they will operate across the Tasman, and on increased capacity on some routes. Both will report to the Ministry of Transport on compliance provisions twice a year, and the Minister of Transport retains the ability to revoke authorisation if they fail to comply with the terms of the agreement. More is at http://www.transport.govt.nz/ourwork/air/airnewzealandandvirginbluegroupairallianc equestionsandanswers/

Auckland-China Direct Flights

An education campaign is planned so drivers are aware of the new rules before they come into force.

China Southern Airlines is to open a direct route from Guangzhou to Auckland starting on 8 April, with three flights a week. The new route is expected to bring in 25,000 more visitors, mostly from mainland China, to NZ each year.

More information on the change and on “Safer Journeys: NZ's Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020” is available at: www.saferjourneys.govt.nz

In the year to November 2010, 120,222 visitors arrived in NZ from China, up 15% on the 12 months to November 2009.

New Motorcycle Safety Council A new Motorcycle Safety Levy Advisory Council has been set up to improve motorcycle safety, with a $2 million budget coming from the Motorcycle Safety Levy. The Council will be supported by Police, Ministry of Transport, and ACC staff.

A Lower Road Toll The provisional 2010 road toll of 373 compares to 385 in 2009 and 366 in 2008, and it is the second lowest in the last 50 years. This is the third year in a row that NZ has had less than 400 deaths.

Daily Commuting: International Study According to IBM’s recent NZ Commuter Pain study of commuters in Auckland, Wellington, and Christchurch (which is part of a much larger global study), more people use private cars for commuting in NZ cities than in other international cities. Driving a car alone is the main way Kiwis get to and from work, university or school, with 70% commuting this way (one of the highest figures in the world). The rising dependency on cars is creating increasing problems, including traffic congestion, pollution, higher fuel prices, and increased driver stress. Some 80% of NZ drivers find aspects of their commute frustrating. As many as a quarter of drivers surveyed believe that traffic has negatively affected their health (and therefore their productivity).

Information about the road toll indicates that alcohol was a factor in 33% of fatal crashes, with speed being a factor in 29% of fatal crashes.

Globally, there was a tremendous disparity in the pain of the daily commute from city to city. Globally, Stockholm had the least painful commute of the cities studied, followed by Wellington, Melbourne and Houston (which all tied).

Taxi Security: Cameras & Communications

More is at http://www-03.ibm.com/press/nz/en/pressrelease/33112.wss

All taxis operating in towns that are currently serviced by more than 30 taxis will be required to be fitted with security cameras by 1 August this year (the kind of security camera that can be used will be specified). There will be limits on access to camera images to protect passenger privacy. Drivers are also to have around-the-clock telecommunications support - each taxi driver will have a direct link with the taxi company, and be able to alert them in an emergency. More is at http://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/rules/operator-licensing-2007index.html

19 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

NZ Autocar: Car of the Year The Volkswagen Polo has been named the 2010 Car of the Year at the annual AMI Insurance NZ Autocar Car of the Year Awards (ahead of the BMW 5 Series). It is the third time a small car has won the award in the last four years. The other finalists included: Compact Car - Nissan Qashqai; Medium/Large Car - Skoda Superb Combi; Performance Car Subaru WRX; Luxury Car - BMW 5 Series; and Crossover/SUV Mitsubishi ASX.

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Justice / The Law

Youth in Police Custody Review

Cleaning Up Our Acts

The treatment and conditions experienced by children and young people in Police custody are to be reviewed by the Independent Police Conduct Authority; the Office of the Children’s Commissioner; and the Human Rights Commission to make sure they are safe, humane, and meet international standards.

A recently introduced Regulatory Reform Bill would amend 13 Acts, removing duplication, getting rid of unnecessary requirements, and clearing up inconsistencies. Amongst the changes proposed: x

amending the Companies Act 1993 to allow companies to choose whether or not to use electronic shareholder participation (aimed at reducing company costs);

x

amending the Unit Trusts Act 1960 so financial statements and accounts can be distributed electronically; and

x

amending the Films, Videos, and Publications Classification Act 1993 to modernise labelling (aimed at reducing compliance costs).

2010 Global Corruption Barometer Transparency International has just released its 2010 Global Corruption Barometer which presents the main findings of a public opinion survey on corruption and bribery around the world. In NZ, political parties followed by Parliament and the private sector are viewed as the most corrupt institutions in this country, with the military perceived to be the least corrupt. Some 73% of NZers believe corruption is increasing (compared to 38% in Singapore and 29% in Denmark). Four percent of NZers admitted they had paid a bribe in NZ in the last 12 months. This compares with 9% in Singapore and nil (0%) in Denmark. The NZ figure was higher than the countries we traditionally benchmark against – Australia (2%) and the UK (1%). When it comes to fighting corruption, 54% of NZ respondents believed the Government was doing an effective job and it is encouraging to note 93% would report an incident of corruption. More is at http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/gcb/2010

The review is being conducted under the United Nations OPCAT framework (Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture), which was ratified by NZ in 2007. For more go to http://www.ipca.govt.nz/Site/media/2010/2010-Dec-10-JointThematic-Review.aspx

Police Report Released The Police have released the third report prepared for the State Services Commission into change management in the wake of the Commission of Inquiry into Police Conduct. The report was prepared by PriceWaterhouse Coopers. The report by PriceWaterhouse Coopers said say the NZ Police are virtually unique among policing jurisdictions in its comparative freedom from entrenched or systematic corruption. The report also notes the increasing maturity of strategic vision and the leadership and innovation that is occurring within the policing reform programme. Nevertheless, the SSC-PWC report's findings underline the need for fundamental change among police managers and staff, at all levels, to signal that poor performance and behaviour will not be tolerated. Things the Police need to focus on include: x

overhauling their Employment Relations strategy;

x

refining their appointments process;

x

keeping the pace up on resolution of professional standards cases; and

x

developing and putting in place action plans to respond to issues raised in staff engagement surveys.

The report is available at http://www.police.govt.nz/sites/default/files/resources/ssc_police_coi_report_final.pd f

OPCAT Annual Report The third annual report on detention facilities in NZ highlights improvements as a result of monitoring visits. Examples include agreements to: cease use of a substandard facility; upgrade a facility to meet minimum health and safety standards; alter an exercise area to allow improved access to the outdoors; reduce lockdown hours; and provide children and young people with a say in how residences could be improved. Monitoring of detention facilities is carried out under NZ’s obligations to the Optional Protocol on the Convention against Torture (OPCAT). Find out more at http://www.hrc.co.nz/home/hrc/newsandissues/commissionreleasesannualreportono pcat.php

Electricity/Gas Complaints Information A new selection of case notes has just been added to the website of the Electricity and Gas Complaints Commission (The EEG is a free and independent service for resolving complaints about energy companies). Case notes show what complainants and companies can expect when the Electricity and Gas Complaints Commissioner makes a recommendation on a complaint. There are also case notes showing how the parties settled the complaint between them after the complainant brought the complaint to the Scheme. You can access the new case notes at http://www.egcomplaints.co.nz/casenotes_dec_10.php

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 20


Parliament 2011 Election Date The 2011 General Election will take place on Saturday 26 November. The Government’s intention is that the House will rise on Thursday 6 October, and Parliament will be dissolved on 20 October.

…& New Electoral Finance Law The Electoral (Finance Reform and Advance Voting) Amendment Act (amongst other things): x

adds a new definition of “regulated period” which is likely to result in a regulated period of around three months (compared with up to 11 months under the earlier rules);

x

makes the definition of “election advertisement” media neutral, with clear exemptions;

x

makes it clear that Parliamentary Service funding is not available for an election advertisement published during the regulated period;

x

includes increases to the amount of money that political parties and candidates can spend on election advertising;

x

requires more information about the identity of promoters on election advertisements and stricter rules about who can authorise these advertisements;

x

requires parties to disclose the number and total amount of donations in bands; and

x

sets up new rules for third party promoters who spend more than $12,000 (GST included)/spend more than $100,000 (GST included) on election advertising during the regulated period, prohibiting them from spending more than $300,000 (GST included) each on election advertising.

Constitutional Review/s The Govt has launched a crossparty review of NZ’s constitutional arrangements, with a final report to be presented to Cabinet at the end of 2013. The review will be led by Deputy PM Bill English and Maori party co-leader Dr Pita Sharples in consultation with a cross-party reference group of MPs. It will cover: x

the size of Parliament;

x

the length of the electoral term;

x

Maori representation;

x

the role of the Treaty of Waitangi; and

x

whether NZ needs a written constitution.

As well, a Working Group on Constitutional Transformation is to consult with Maori and develop a model constitution for NZ based on Maori kawa and tikanga, He Whakaputanga o te Rangatiratanga o Niu Tireni, and Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The group say they will then issue an invitation to meet with the Government.

Frequently asked questions about electoral finance can be found at http://www.justice.govt.nz/electoral/electoral-finance-reform

Botany By-Election Electoral Referendum Bill Passed…

A by-election is to be held in Botany on 5 March 2011. The last day for candidate nominations to be received will be 8 February.

Only people enrolled in the Botany electorate can vote in this by-election, and there is only one vote, which is for an

The Electoral Referendum Bill, which was passed at the end of last year, sets out the process for and questions asked in, a referendum to be held in conjunction with next year’s general election.

electorate MP (there is no Party Vote). Advance voting and voting from overseas will start on 16 February 2011. Information about where to vote will be available from 8 February 2011.

The first question asks whether voters wish to keep the MMP voting system, while the second asks if NZ was to change to another voting system, which voting system would they choose: First Past the Post, Preferential Vote, Single Transferable Vote, and Supplementary Member. If a majority of voters opt for a change, a second run-off referendum will be held in 2014 asking voters to choose between MMP and the most preferred alternative.

You can enrol to vote at https://secure.elections.org.nz/app/enrol/, by free texting your name and address to 3676, by visiting any PostShop or by calling 0800 ENROL NOW (0800 36 76 56. More is at http://www.elections.org.nz/study/news/electoral-commission-prepares-for-voting-inbotany-electorate.html

If 50% or more voters opt to retain MMP, the Electoral Commission will undertake a review of MMP to consider whether any changes are necessary or desirable. Further information on the referendum and other electoral projects under way can be found at www.justice.govt.nz.

21 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Public Service/Local Authorities Ministry of Science & Innovation The Research, Science and Technology Bill passed at the end of last year amalgamates the Ministry of Research, Science and Technology and the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology into a new Ministry of Science and Innovation (MSI), operating from 1 February 2011. The legislation also establishes two new boards, a Science Board and an Innovation Board, to work with the new Ministry. The Science Board will allocate science funding to research organisations. The Innovation Board will make funding decisions related to business-related programmes.

Archives, National Library, DIA Merger Archives NZ, the National Library and Internal Affairs (DIA) have merged. Their main roles and functions are unchanged, as are the roles of the Chief Archivist and National Librarian.

x

introducing Gift Aid where the benefit of charitable donations goes directly to the charitable organisation (rather than the donor) to boost the return to institutions from private giving;

x

exploring a cultural gifting scheme (to encourage the donation of items of cultural significance such as paintings, manuscripts and private collections in exchange for tax relief on the market value of the gift);

x

recognising the generosity of philanthropists; and

x

rewarding with matched government funding the cultural organisations that succeed in increasing their levels of income derived from private giving.

More is at http://www.mch.govt.nz/research-publications/publications/ministryreports/cultural-philanthrophy

Advocacy & “Charitable Activities”: Decision Australia’s highest court has determined that advocacy work intended for the public benefit is a charitable activity. The High Court decided the system of law requires "agitation" for legislative and political changes: it is the operation of these constitutional processes that contributes to the public welfare. It accepted that the generation of public debate as to the best methods for the relief of poverty contributes to the public welfare, being for a purpose beneficial to the community.

Scientific Advice for Defence Force

More is at http://www.apo.org.au/notice/high-court-decision-wincharities%E2%80%99-freedom-speech

An independent expert panel has been appointed to provide advice on scientific and technological issues in defence after the recent Defence White Paper identified the need for an external review of the Defence Technology Agency. Interested parties will be able to make submissions to this panel online from late January, through the Defence Force website. A final report on the findings is due in late March 2011.

Alternative Welfare Working Group Report

More is at http://www.nzdf.mil.nz/public-documents/public-consultation/sciencereview/default.htm

Not-for-Profits Making it Easier to Give The Cultural Philanthropy Taskforce has recommended the following changes to encourage NZers to give more generously to philanthropic causes: x

advising and mentoring cultural organisations on a one-toone basis about fundraising;

x

promoting knowledge and awareness of recently introduced tax incentives;

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

The main options put forward in the Alternative Welfare Working Group’s report include: x

improve the health, education and income of families with young children as an investment in the country’s future;

x

promote jobs that enable citizens to obtain social security through paid employment at adequate wages;

x

reduce barriers for paid employment faced by people with impairments;

x

change the culture in Work and Income offices; and

x

have adequate benefit levels to prevent poverty.

The report is at http://welfarejustice.org.nz/?sid=48

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 22


Community Provider Location/Funding Site A new “contract mapping” website gives information about the locations of community providers around the country and the level of MSD funding they receive. The Ministries of Justice, Health, Education and Te Puni Kokiri will be adding location of providers they fund and details of their funding to the site soon. The site is at www.contractmapping.govt.nz

It was also the first time since the start of 2008 that all five indices - production (52.6), employment (51.1), new orders (54.3) finished stocks (51.6) and deliveries (54.9) – were all in expansion for the second consecutive month.

NZ-HK Trade Agreement: Update A NZ-Hong Kong trade agreement (CEP) is now in force, with cuts to remaining NZ tariffs now in effect, and more reductions coming. In the first half of 2010, Hong Kong's GDP grew by a robust 7.2%, largely attributable to the return of domestic demand and strong exports to mainland China.

Business Export Values Remain High The value of November 2010 export goods (at $3.7 billion) was $589 million (19%) higher than November 2009. The milk powder, butter, and cheese group was the major contributor to the increase in November export values, led by unsweetened whole milk powder. In November 2010, the trade balance was a deficit of $186 million (5.1% of the value of exports). This compares with an average November deficit of 24% of exports for the previous five years. The annual trade balance for the year ended November 2010 was a surplus of $1.3 billion (3.1% of exports). This is the first surplus for a November year since 2001. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/industry_sectors/imports_and_exports/Ov erseasMerchandiseTrade_MRNov10.aspx

Retail Trade Survey: November 2010 The value of seasonally adjusted total retail sales rose 1.5 % ($82 million) in the November 2010 month. The rise was led by increases in both the vehicle-related industries (motor vehicles and parts retailing, and fuel retailing). Core retail sales (which exclude the motor vehicle-related industries) were flat, down 0.2% ($7 million). Nine of the 13 core industries recorded increases in November 2010, however, these increases were offset by a decrease in supermarket and grocery stores sales. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/industry_sectors/RetailTrade/RetailTrade Survey_MRNov10.aspx

Manufacturing Activity Solid Manufacturing activity ended 2010 with its third consecutive month in expansion, according to the BNZ - BusinessNZ Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI). The seasonally adjusted PMI for December stood at 53.1, up slightly from 52.7 in November and 50.4 in October (a PMI reading above 50.0 indicates that manufacturing is generally expanding; below 50.0 that it is declining).

23 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Hong Kong is NZ's ninth largest export market, worth $865 million in the year to October 2010. NZ and Hong Kong are the only two developed economies with Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) with China. The FTAs are credited with lessening the effects of the global recession because of the performance of businesses in the Chinese market.

Businesses Slower to Pay Businesses are taking longer to pay their bills to each other, according to Dun & Bradstreet. The credit information company's December 2010 quarter survey shows that nine of the 14 sectors examined experienced a deterioration in their payment times compared to the previous quarter, while 10 allowed payments to slow compared to a year before. On average, NZ firms took 43.9 days to settle their trade accounts during the December quarter, a figure that's two weeks above the standard 30 day payment terms. Larger firms were consistently the slowest to pay, with those having 500+ employees taking 46.7 days on average to settle their accounts. The quickest paying group was the agricultural sector which took 39.9 days to pay their bills. Read more at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/BU1101/S00317/nz-businessesslower-to-pay-bills-in-fourth-quarter-db.htm

New Business Support Network Two of the country’s largest business networks are joining forces to provide more help for Kiwi business, in response to growing demand for business mentor support. MYOB, the country’s leading supplier of business support services, will become a Partner Patron of Business Mentors NZ (MBNZ). BMNZ is a national network of volunteer, independent, business mentors that is supported by the Ministry of Economic Development, local economic development agencies and chambers of commerce. More is at http://www.businessmentors.org.nz/

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


NZ Project Management: Some Surprises NZ’s first major nationwide survey into Project Management (a KPMG one) has found that in the past 12 months, 70% of NZ companies had experienced at least one major project failure. The report noted that “most organisations were far from being business-like in the way they conduct projects and for many, embarking on a project appears to be a ‘leap of faith’, in the hope, rather than the expectation, of delivering on time, on budget.” However, all is not doom and gloom. There are some highperforming organisations, whose projects share a number of characteristics. Their projects, for instance: x

are aligned with corporate strategy and have a high-quality business case;

x

have an effective sponsor who provides clear direction for the project;

x

manage risks actively; and

x

have timely, accurate and up-to-date reporting.

You can read more in the press release at http://www.kpmg.com/NZ/en/IssuesAndInsights/ArticlesPublications/Pressreleases/Pages/project-management-survey.aspx and download the KPMG NZ Project Management Survey report at http://www.kpmg.com/NZ/en/IssuesAndInsights/ArticlesPublications/Documents/Pro ject-Management-Survey-report.pdf

Banks Improving Customer Service One-third of respondents to the recently released Colmar Brunton Customer Experiences Survey (conducted around the middle of 2010) said they have had a particularly good experience when dealing with their bank in the past 12 months. But one in five NZ consumers report having had a negative experience when dealing with their telco provider in the same period, with phone companies contributing one-third of all bad customer experiences. In addition, particularly bad telco experiences outnumber particularly good ones by four to one.

NZECO: Three More Years The NZ Export Credit Office (NZECO) which provides support to exporters (and was due to close in June 2011), will now work on for three more years. It will have more flexibility in the way it offers financial guarantees and insurance to exporters and banks. NZECO works in partnership with the private sector (it doesn’t provide direct lending), and it has supported more than $1 billion of total exports since it was established. Its function and performance will be reviewed again in three years. More information on NZECO can be found at http://www.nzeco.govt.nz.

Use China-NZ Connections: AsiaNZ Connections between NZ and China have grown in the past 30 years on the strength of short and long-term people exchanges, but these networks are not being used to their full potential, say the authors of AsiaNZ’s latest diaspora* report - Outlook 14: “NZ’s diaspora in China: untapped resources”. The report considers this country’s exchange migration with China (including Hong Kong SAR), and indicates that NZ is failing to use these connections as well as it could to capitalise on the political and socio-economic opportunities of the 21st century. Outlook 14 includes a list of NZ expatriate organisations in China and Hong Kong. Organisations like KEA, chambers of commerce and university networks maintain professional connections and keep NZ top of mind in China and Hong Kong. The report makes a number of recommendations about nurturing NZers abroad as the flow of trans-national movements between NZ and Asia accelerates in the future. *Diaspora: settlements of people living outside their original country. More is at http://www.asianz.org.nz/our-work/knowledge-and-research/outlookseries/outlook-14-china-nz-diaspora

Read more at http://www.interest.co.nz/news/banks-fill-seven-top-10-slots-colmarbrunton-customer-experiences-survey

Global Business Regulations Ranked

Paying Business Tax Differently

“Doing Business 2011: Making a Difference for Entrepreneurs”, is a report ranking 183 economies on key aspects of business regulation for domestic firms. For the fifth year running, Singapore leads in the ease of doing business, followed by Hong Kong SAR China, NZ, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Among the top 25 economies, 18 made things even easier over the past year.

Inland Revenue’s (IRD’s) business transformation programme is cutting back paper forms and will shortly be letting businesses manage most taxes through their normal business or payroll software. On 1 April IRD will be providing secure access, via third party software, to key account information, and tax agents will be able to view their clients’ tax information from within their practice management solutions. There will also be new online services for family and individual IRD customers this year as well as email and text alerts and GST online filing.

For more information about the Doing Business report series, visit: www.doingbusiness.org

More is at http://www.ird.govt.nz/help/demo/workspace/

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 24


Economic Growth from Creative Industries

Money Matters

According to a recently-released UN survey the demand for products from creative industries – especially those made for the home market – could well help national economies recover from the global economic downturn.

Wage Rates Grow 1.7 Percent

Global exports of creative goods and services like arts and crafts, audiovisuals, books, design work, films, music, new media, printed media, visual and performing arts, and creative services more than doubled between 2002 and 2008 to $592 billion in 2008. The growth rate of these industries over that sixyear period averaged 14%. They appear to have stayed relatively "firm" during the global recession, and there are signs that demand for them could return to the 2008 high. The researchers say they hold great potential for developing countries that want to diversify their economies. More is at http://www.unctad.org/Templates/webflyer.asp?docid=14229&intItemID=5763&lang =1&mode=highlights

Brands With a Conscience Awards The Medinge Group (www.medinge.org), an international thinktank on branding and business, uses yearly awards to support and encourage businesses who demonstrate humanistic, compassionate, sustainable and socially responsible behaviour. This year’s winners are: x

Aquamarine Power/UK - www.aquamarinepower.com Aquamarine Power’s Oyster tidal energy technology produces electricity from the ocean waves;

x

BBC World News–Newsweek for World Challenge/UK www.theworldchallenge.co.uk - Now in its sixth year, World Challenge is a global competition aimed at finding projects or small businesses from around the world that have shown enterprise and innovation at a grass roots’ level;

x

x

x

Caja Navarra/Spain - www.cajanavarra.es/en/home.htmThis not-for-profit bank loaned €3·3 billion and had a net profit of €200 million in 2008. Customers decide the social causes to which profits shall be allocated; Masdar City/UAE- www.masdarcity.ae/en/index.aspx- The world’s first zero-carbon city, designed to be powered by the sun and free of cars and skyscrapers; and TED/USA - www.ted.com - This non-profit organization believes that sharing compelling ideas is the way to change the world. They have created an 18-minute filmed talk shared for free on the web, a demonstration of the positive power of internet-borne social media which exists in tandem with regular international seminars.

25 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Salary and wage rates, which include overtime, grew 1.7% in the year to the December 2010 quarter. This follows 1.6% increases in both the years to the September 2010 and June 2010 quarters. Salary and wage rates for the private sector increased 1.9% in the year to the December 2010 quarter. Public sector rates rose 1.4% in the year to the December 2010 quarter. The Quarterly Employment Survey (QES), also released recently, showed that average total hourly earnings continued to rise. In the December 2010 year, average total hourly earnings increased 1.9%, which is up from a 1.3% increase in the September 2010 year. Private sector average total hourly earnings increased 1.8%. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/prices_indexes/Lab ourCostIndexSalaryandWageRates_MRDec10qtr.aspx

Global Economic Prospects 2011 The world economy is moving from a post-crisis bounce-back phase of the recovery to slower but still solid growth this year and next, with developing countries contributing almost half of global growth, says the World Bank’s latest “Global Economic Prospects 2011”. Read the press release at http://web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/NEWS/0,,contentMDK:22807059~pa gePK:64257043~piPK:437376~theSitePK:4607,00.html

NZ Government’s Assets/Liabilities… The Government's first Investment Statement (December 2010) forecasts Crown assets to grow by $33 billion over the next five years to $256 billion (about five times the size of the sharemarket), and names areas where capital is not being used efficiently as: x

social housing: about 27,000 state houses are the wrong size, location or quality to meet the needs of high-priority Housing NZ clients. There are also 5,000 tenants currently paying market rent who could afford to rent in the private sector;

x

defence: opportunities exist to consolidate bases and housing, and to sell surplus housing stock, which would reap significant gains; and

x

education: the Ministry of Education has 244 surplus schools, teacher houses, vacant sites or other assets worth $96 million.

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Crown assets and liabilities are: x

social: e.g., highways, schools, housing, hospitals, conservation land: $111 billion;

x

commercial: e.g., SOE assets, rail network, Air NZ: $52 billion;

x

financial: e.g., Crown Financial Institutions, Reserve Bank, DMO: $60 billion; and

x

total assets: $223 billion, total liabilities (e.g. debt, ACC and GSF liabilities): ($128 billion); making a net worth of $95 billion.

x

some loopholes in the tax treatment of loss attributing qualifying companies (LAQCs) have been closed;

x

building depreciation rules have been clarified to enable people to still claim accelerated depreciation on the fit-out of commercial and industrial buildings. They will also be able to claim the depreciation loading on assets if the investment decisions were made before 20 May 2010, but not completed until sometime after; and

x

the redundancy tax credit previously repealed in Budget 2010 as a result of lower personal tax rates has now been extended to 31 March 2011, with the extension available to redundancy payments made before 1 April 2011011, and the tax credit being paid at 6 cents in the dollar to a maximum of $3,600.

The investment statement is at http://www.treasury.govt.nz/budget/2010/is

… & More Tax Statistics Online … & Part-Sale of SOEs? The Treasury has been asked to advise on whether there should be mixed (i.e., public and private ownership) of four state-owned enterprises (SOEs): Mighty River Power, Meridian, Genesis, and Solid Energy. The Government would retain a majority stake in the companies, and NZ investors would “have to be at the front of the queue for shareholdings”. The Ministers’ letter to Treasury and Treasury’s previous advice on the subject is at: http://www.comu.govt.nz/publications/information-releases/mixed-ownership-model/

Inland Revenue has added information about debt and compliance to its range of statistics updated annually on its website. By the end of 2010 IRD had added 10 new sections— five relate to debt and five to compliance. It also updated data and added the 2009 statistics. The revenue statistics cover the years from July 2001 to June 2009, and customer statistics are available from April 2001 to March 2009. For more information go to http://www.ird.govt.nz/aboutir/external-stats/taxstatistics-index.html?id=homepage

Credit Reporting Changes Commissioner’s Superannuation Recommendations In her latest three-yearly review, the Retirement Commissioner recommends the following changes to NZ Superannuation to keep it affordable and strengthen the principle of universal individual entitlement: x

raise the age of eligibility by two months a year from 2020 until it reaches 67 in 2033;

x

remove the non-qualified partner rate;

x

make the un-partnered and partnered rates equal when accommodation is shared; and

x

abolish the deduction of a person’s foreign pension from their partner’s NZ Superannuation.

The full report, containing 17 recommendations in all, is available at www.retirement.org.nz.

New Tax Rules… These include: x

GST-registered vendors are now required to charge GST at a zero rate on most transactions involving land if the purchaser is also GST-registered;

x

the definition of income for Working for Families, the Student Allowance, and the Community Services Card has been broadened to help prevent people from structuring their income to gain entitlements to these programmes;

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Credit reporting regulations changed late last year with a new amendment to the Credit Reporting Privacy Code. Amendment No.4 brings in two key changes: credit reporters will be able to collect and use more information about people; and, for the first time, credit reporters may collect drivers licence numbers to be able to match people’s credit information more accurately. Because sensitive financial information will become available to third parties on credit reporting databases, Amendment No.4 also has new controls to protect privacy. Controls include: x

limiting who can see credit account information;

x

credit reporters conducting robust auditing and reporting to the Privacy Commissioner each year; and

x

making sure that the driver licence numbers are not misused or made available to others.

A copy of Amendment No.4 is available at www.privacy.org.nz/credit-reportingprivacy-code/ along with an information paper

Household Saving Improving Household spending continues to outpace income, with Kiwis showing a steady preference for investment in the property market, according to new saving statistics from Stats NZ. The household saving rate has been mostly negative since 1999 but has improved in recent years, reaching negative 2.2% in the year ended March 2010. Household saving is calculated by subtracting expenditure from income received through salaries, wages, interest, and dividends.

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 26


More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/NationalAccounts/In stitutionalSectorAccounts_MR99-08.aspx

More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/businesses/business_characteristics/Elec tronicCardTransactions_MRDec10.aspx

Fall in Food Prices

… & Pokie 2010 Spend Down

Food prices fell 0.8% in the December 2010 month, following a 0.6% decrease in November 2010. Seasonal falls in vegetable prices (7.9%) were the main contributor to lower food prices in November and December 2010.

Gaming machine spending in the country’s 1400 pubs and clubs in the year ended 31 December 2010 was 3% lower than in 2009, according to Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) figures. Spending dropped from $865.5 million to $840.7 million.

Other food price movements in December 2010 were grocery food prices falling 0.4%, and meat, poultry, and fish prices rising 0.8%.

There were fewer licence holders, gambling venues, and gaming machines at the end of 2010 compared with 12 months earlier. Licence holders fell 3% from 378 to 367, venues declined from 1491 to 1443, and gaming machines decreased by 3.5% from 19,359 to 18,681.

In the year to December 2010, food prices rose 4.2%, including a 2.2% increase in October, when goods and services tax (GST) rose. All subgroups went up, with significant increases coming from grocery food (up 4.9%) and restaurant meals and ready-toeat food (up 4.0%). Fruit and vegetables (up 5.5%), meat, poultry, and fish (up 3.2%), and non-alcoholic beverages (up 1.8%) also rose. More is at http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/prices_indexes/Foo dPriceIndex_MRDec10.aspx

Our Favourite Fruit and Veg A recent Statistics NZ survey shows tomatoes were Kiwis’ favourite vegetables and bananas our favourite fruit in 2010 – because we spent most on them. The top 20 fruit and vegetables for 2010 are (figures represent $millions): Fruit: bananas $142.19; apples $98.43; Oranges $41.74;mandarins, clementines $39.81; grapes $34.28; pears $27.83; avocados $27.15 strawberries $26.41; kiwifruit $23.98; nectarines $17.49; watermelons $11.78; plums $10.46; apricots $10.37; blueberries $10.30; lemons $10.21; peaches $9.03; pineapples $7.36; melons $5.61; and cherries $5.58; and mangoes $4.50; and Vegetables: tomatoes $99;19; potatoes $98.95; mushrooms $52.63; lettuce $50;18; carrots $37.73; onions, shallots $37.4; peppers, capsicums, chillies $37.30;kumara $36.75;broccoli, broccolini $31.53; cucumber, gherkins $23.18; gourds $17.83; cabbage $14.71;combinations of fresh vegetables $13.71; zucchini, courgettes $13.09; cauliflower $12.91; spinach $12.08; beans $10.51; fresh herbs $9.47; asparagus $9.07; celery $8.91.

December Spending Down… The total value of electronic card transactions* was down 1.2% in December 2010 when adjusted for seasonal effects. This follows increases of at least 1.0% in each of the three preceding months. All industries recorded falls, except for fuel retailing which was up 3.3%. In addition, the value of transactions in the retail industries was down 0.9% in December 2010, following increases in each of the three previous months. *Electronic card transaction figures, which cover debit, credit, and charge card transactions with NZ-based merchants, include GST.

27 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

GDP as Measure of Wellbeing? A new publication called “The Politics of Happiness” questions whether Gross Domestic Product (GDP) should be taken to be the leading indicator of national well-being. The author’s view is that “strong marriages and close relationships of all kinds, helping others, engaging in civic affairs, and effective, honest, democratic government” tend to be what make people happy. What’s more, they not only benefit individuals, but benefit society as well. He goes on to say that in a time of tight budgets and financial crisis, politicians nowadays look to economic growth as the centrepiece of their domestic policy programs, with GDP taken to be the leading indicator of national well-being. But, he says, as we look ahead to 2011 and beyond, we should ask ourselves whether it is really wise to accord such importance to growth? More is at http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/bok1/English

Internet/ICT Quality of Broadband Improving The quality of our broadband services are continuing to improve according to a report released by the Commerce Commission. The report, covering from 1 January – 30 June 2010, aims to provide a comparison of the relative performance of internet service providers (ISPs) in delivering broadband services in the major NZ cities. The report shows a continuing reduction in variability of web browsing speeds over the course of the day. Internet availability is also improving, with downtime reduced. The full report is available on the Commission’s website at www.comcom.govt.nz/broadbandreports

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Broadband Rollout: Update A deal between Crown Fibre Holdings – the government agency set up to manage the Crown’s $1.5 billion investment in UFB – and Northpower Limited will see fibre rolled out to nearly 52,000 people in Whangarei by 2014. Included will be more than 2,000 business premises, over 300 healthcare services, and more than 20 schools in the region. A deal has also been signed with WEL Networks to rollout fibre in Hamilton, Cambridge, Te Awamutu, Tauranga, New Plymouth, Whanganui, Hawera and Tokoroa.

111 Calling System: Review… Recently-released terms of reference for a coming review of the long term future of the 111 emergency calling service cover: how broad the review is; advances in technology; governance requirements (including funding, audit and enforcement); and timing and consultation from the point of call origination to the initial call answering point. A discussion paper will be published in the middle of the year. Other 111 service moves include: x

a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Telecom about delivery of some aspects of the 111 service;

x

a revised Emergency Services Code which covers industry contributions to the 111 service;

x

a MoU between Telecom, Vodafone and 2Degrees regarding emergency roaming;

x

agreement between Telecom and Police, Fire, and Ambulance regarding activating emergency roaming on the XT network for calls from compatible mobile phones; and

x

appointment of a joint industry/government advisory board to oversee the coordination of emergency calling service activity.

The Terms of Reference are available on the Ministry of Economic Development's website at www.med.govt.nz/111

Read the press release at http://www.openpolytechnic.ac.nz/about-us/news/socialmedia-increasing-point-of-reference-in-kiwi-disasters/

Computer Crime and Security Results from the 2010 NZ Computer Crime and Security Survey indicate a general reduction in security incidents and costs per organisation. Other key points include: x

over 60% of respondents use less than 5% of their IT budget on security;

x

at 46%, “generic external threat” (e.g., virus/malware) was seen to be the greatest security issue; and

x

one in four respondents had no security tools or procedures for mobile device security and over half of respondents had no USB incident protection in place.

The survey results are at www.internetnz.net.nz/our-work/security/2010-newzealand-computer-crime-security-survey

Global Top Twitter Trends Twitter has analyzed the 25 billion tweets sent in 2010 and published the list of top overall trends in the year behind us, as well as the top 10 trending topics in eight categories: news events, people, movies, television, technology, World Cup, sports and hashtags. The global overall Top 10 is: 1. Gulf Oil Spill; 2. FIFA World Cup; 3. Inception [the movie]; 4. Haiti Earthquake; 5. Vuvuzela; 6. Apple iPad; 7. Google Android; 8. Justin Bieber; 9. Harry Potter & the Deathly Hallows; and 10. Pulpo Paul.

The Top 10 people are: 1. Justin Bieber; 2. Dilma Rouseff; 3. Lady Gaga; 4. Julian Assange; 5. Mel Gibson; 6. Lil Kim; 7. Zilda Arns; 8. Kate Middleton; 9. Kim Hee Chul; and 10. Joannie Rochette. More is at http://yearinreview.twitter.com/trends/

… & Social Media & Emergencies Ever more people are using social media as an important point of reference for emergency information, challenging the traditional broadcast media channels for delivery of up to date information. A research article published in the Media International Australia journal shows that during the 2009 tsunami threat off the east coast of the North Island social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Trade Me discussion boards and Kiwiblog became a first point of call for emergency management information for the public and traditional media, and also served as a “back channel” of communication, adding to, and commenting on, official emergency management messages. The article author highlights how, in the early stages of a national emergency, there is a rush to social media as the public await official confirmation and guidance. All of this has implications for emergency management organisations. Increasingly, they will need to monitor social networks, join the conversation by responding to comments made, and use social media to complement what’s being said through the traditional channels. Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

More Elders Use Social Networks In the US, although people aged 18 to 33 (the “millennials”) outpace other adults in almost every category of Internet use, their elders are rapidly closing the gap in social networking, according to a recent Pew report (produced by the Pew Research Centre - a nonpartisan "fact tank" that provides information on the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world). Internet users from all age groups increased their use of social networking from December 2008 to May 2010, with use by people 18 to 33 rising to 83%, from 67%. But those in every generation 45 and older more than doubled their participation. Adults 74 and older who are online quadrupled their social networking presence, and that now stands at 16%. Teenagers, by contrast, cut back on traditional blogging by 50% from 2006 to 2009. Read more at http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Generations-2010/Overview.aspx

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 28


TV Partners Facebook for U Next month TVNZ launches U, a new commercial free-to-air digital channel, targeted at Kiwis aged 15-24. It will feature U live, a hosted block from 4pm to 7pm daily, featuring chat and commentary driven by a U live Facebook application. Profile pictures, people's comments and polling activity will automatically be broadcast, and other parts of the U schedule will also feature audience interaction.

Korea/Pages/Perceptions-of-New-Zealand-in-South-Korea2010.aspx?WT.mc_id=ExportNews_151210 Overall, the article says, there is an implicit pool of goodwill and trust from Korea for NZ. However, there is a perception that this country has “stagnated” in the last 10 years, and that The NZ Brand needs to work harder in Korea with a targeted approach to gain attention.

On Sunday nights, viewers get to be the programmers, by entering a competition to be the U programmer for a month via the channel's Facebook page and website. U will be broadcast on Freeview/TiVo channel 6 and SKY/Telstra channel 16.

When you tell a loud friend that they "really like the sound of their own voice," there may be more truth in that than you realise. Why this may be so is the subject of an article to be found at http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/42116 According to a US study, the brain selectively hears one's own voice while dimming all surrounding sounds. . In their own heads, people will silence other noises while amplifying themselves speak.

Free Webpage Parking Services

The Zen of Team Meetings: How to Keep Your Head When All Around Are Losing theirs make interesting reading at http://www.adifferentkindofwork.com/2010/11/01/zen-teammeetings/

When you come across links and pages that are of personal interest, or useful for work, you can park them for reading later in: x

Instapaper: a free web service that saves links to web pages for reading later. It has applications for iPads too; or

x

Read It Later, which is similar to Instapaper, providing a reading list for wherever you are. Again, it's a free online service that saves a list of links for later reading, and there's an application for iOS devices.

Both services offer a bookmarklet for web browsers. Install the bookmarklet as instructed and it shows up in the Toolbar of the web browser. Then when you visit a web page and decide you'd rather add it to your later reading list just click on the appropriate bookmark in the web browser Toolbar. Provided you haven't scrolled down the page you'll see a small semi-transparent window appear over part of the page, with a message that the link is being saved. If you're reading Twitter or RSS feeds, pick your Twitter client and RSS reader software carefully. You may just find that they have a menu item or button to send items to Instapaper or Read It Later, or both. To read the items you’ve saved either log in at the web page or use the applications for devices such as the iPad, Blackberry or Kindle. Adapted from CommunityNet with thanks

A list of 20 People Every Entrepreneur Should Follow On Twitter can be found at: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-top-20writers-every-small-business-entrepeneur-should-follow-ontwitter-2010-12##ixzz19dT2ULpH … … and a recent survey has found that female entrepreneurs value social media "at three times the level" of male smallbusiness owners. Read about it at http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/2010/12/soc ial_media_fo.html;jsessionid=4L5EU5NLKNMIVQE1GHOSKH4A TMY32JVN People interested in research methods that gather information from whanau collectively, rather than individually might be interested in visiting http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/indexmh/researching-withwhanau-methods. The ”Researching with Whanau Collectives” projects describes12 research methods, with the common theme being the relationship between research, facilitating whanau change, and social justice. The Ministry of Education’s 'Gifted and Talented Online' website at http://gifted.tki.org.nz/ has been re-designed. The site provides a central place for best practice, research and smart tools for helping gifted and talented students. Employees who work from home at least three days a week are more satisfied with their jobs because the arrangement cuts down on work-life tensions and there are fewer interruptions, a study at http://blogs.wsj.com/juggle/2010/12/12/telecommutersare-happier-workers/?mod=WSJ_latestheadlines found.

A Handful of Sites

IBM reveals five cool innovations that will change our lives in the next five years at http://www03.ibm.com/press/nz/en/pressrelease/33304.wss: You'll beam up your friends in 3-D; batteries will breathe air to power our devices; you won’t need to be a scientist to save the planet; your commute will be personalised; computers will help energize your city…

The NZ Defence Force (NZDF) has launched a new website designed for young people – www.operationHQ.co.nz . The aim is to give them a better understanding of life in the Navy, Army and Air Force.

Fourteen tips for getting through airport security (US security especially) can be found at http://www.flightster.com/2010/12/20/the-frequent-travelersguide-to-traveling-better/

A US article pointing out that rugby offers a number of important business lessons, including using self-control and welcoming diversity can be found at http://smartblogs.com/insights/2010/12/09/how-the-culture-ofrugby-parlays-into-business-workplace-and-hiring-character/

If you want to start a business or want to take your business to the next level, and you are seeking finance visit http://www.business.govt.nz/starting-up/where-to-find-sourcesof-capital/main-sources-of-finance. You’ll find sections covering: how to raise capital for your business; an Investment Ready Guide; business grants for Kiwi businesses; tips on applying for a loan; what banks are looking for when you borrow money; what

Read It Later is at http://www.instapaper.com/ and its tools are at https://readitlaterlist.com/apps/. Instapaper is at https://readitlaterlist.com/ with its tools at https://readitlaterlist.com/apps/

Latest survey results on perceptions of NZ by South Korean businesses can be found at http://www.nzte.govt.nz/exploreexport-markets/North-Asia/Doing-business-in-South29 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


investors look for in a person; and what investors look for in a business.

its obligations under the Treaty of Waitangi relating to the purchase in 1849 of the 260,000 acre Rangitikei-Turakina block.

A Government webpage offering people information about the common marine and coastal area is at http://www.beehive.govt.nz/feature/common-marine-and-coastalarea

The settlement includes an apology to Ngati Apa for past dealings; cultural redress of 12 Crown sites transferred; deeds of recognition and place name changes (recognising association with these sites); papakainga properties and funding to set up a cultural redevelopment plan; payment of $16 million; a right of first refusal to buy Crown properties; and an ability to purchase licensed Crown forest land and receive associated rentals.

If you're going to take the time to blog, you really should check at least occasionally to see who's reading, according to one US commentator at http://gigaom.com/collaboration/you-blog-butdoes-anyone-care/. Google Analytics is the most popular tool for the task, but it can't tell you everything. Other suggestions are also made

More is at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/PA1012/S00167/turia-ngati-apa-northisland-claims-settlement-bill.htm

A delightful article about the value of ritual in your workday is at http://blogs.hbr.org/bregman/2010/12/the-value-of-ritual-in-yourwo.html

Arts & Culture Treaty Matters Progress on Treaty Issues The Human Rights Commission’s annual review of Treaty of Waitangi issues shows significant progress has been made in 2010 despite disagreement over the Marine and Coastal Area Bill. Of particular note was the record number of Treaty settlement milestones, support for the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the establishment of Whanau Ora, and the announcement of a constitutional review. Read more at http://www.hrc.co.nz/news-and-issues/race-relations/commissionreport-reveals-progress-on-treaty-issues/

Arts Contestable Online Funding Guide The annual guide on how to apply for Creative NZ contestable funding is now available online. New to this year’s guide is the Arts Development Investment (Toi Uru Kahikatea) programme, which complements the new Arts Leadership Investment (Toi Totara Haemata) programme. These programmes replace the contestable Arts Investment and Sector Investment programmes and the programme for recurrently funded organisations. Access the Funding Guide at http://www.creativenz.govt.nz/funding/contestable_funding_

Te Ara Expands into Biographies Ngati Porou Treaty Claims Settled… The Crown and Ngati Porou have signed a Deed of Settlement for the settlement of Ngati Porou’s historical Treaty of Waitangi claims. Ngati Porou is NZ’s second largest iwi with 72,000 members, 58 hapu and 48 marae on the East Coast of the North Island. The settlement includes financial redress of $110 million and the return of sites of high cultural significance in Ngati Porou totalling around 5,898 hectares. It also provides Ngati Porou with a say on the way specific conservation sites will be governed, and includes relationship agreements between specific Crown agencies and Ngati Porou. The settlement is at http://www.tehaeata.co.nz/images/downloads/OFF8752.19.176__Deed_of_Settlement.pdf

…& Ngati Apa (Nth Is) Settlement

Te Ara, NZ’s online encyclopaedia, has joined up with the Dictionary of NZ Biography (DNZB), to set up a storehouse of national stories and history. Eleven new biographies of wellknown Kiwis have been added, including Robert Muldoon, David Lange, Bill Rowling, Edmund Hillary, Peter Blake, Janet Frame, Allen Curnow, Hone Tuwhare, Arthur Lydiard, Sonya Davies, and Douglas Lilburn. More is at www.teara.govt.nz

NZ on Air: Music Funding NZ On Air has released a the results of a review of its music funding schemes which recommends that it diversify its music funding approach, encourage new artists to achieve airplay, and increase its promotional activities. The review notes that 74% of people rely on radio for their music. The review report is at http://www.nzonair.govt.nz/media/51557/caddick%20report%20final.pdf

The Ngati Apa (North Island) Claims Settlement Act, which settles Ngati Apa's (North Island) Treaty of Waitangi claims, was passed by Parliament at the end of last year. The Ngati Apa (North Island) claims relate primarily to breaches by the Crown of Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 30


Health of Maori Heritage Arts: Report Creative NZ has just released the Health of Maori Heritage Arts 2009 – Research Summary Report which reviews the “health”’ of the following heritage artforms:

Some Paraprosdokian Sentences A para, parapr…well, one of those is a figure of speech in which the second part of a statement is surprising or unexpected in a way that causes the reader /listener to reinterpret the first part. Here’s a sample: x

Evening news is where they begin with 'Good evening', and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.

x

A bus station is where a bus stops. A train station is where a train stops. On my desk, I have a work station.

Whaikorero, Karanga, and Whakapapa recitation (Oral Arts);

x

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

x

Waiata, Moteatea and Pao (traditional song and chant composition) and Taonga Puoro (traditional instruments);

x

A bank is a place that will lend you money, if you can prove that you don't need it.

x

Ta Moko (body modification and tattoo);

x

I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you.

x

Tarai Waka (canoe design and construction, voyaging, navigation);

x

Why does someone believe you when you say there are four billion stars, but check when you say the paint is wet?

x

Haka (composition, teaching and performance);

x

x

Whare Maire (Tumatauenga- martial arts); and

x

Traditional Maori Games.

Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street with a bald head and a beer gut, and still think they are sexy.

x

A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.

x

You do not need a parachute to skydive. You only need a parachute to skydive twice.

x

Hospitality: making your guests feel like they're at home, even if you wish they were.

x

You're never too old to learn something stupid.

x

I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not sure.

x

We never really grow up, we only learn how to act in public.

x

When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water.

x

Toi Whakairo (carving);

x

Kowhaiwhai (rafter decoration), Tukutuku (wall decoration);

x

Whare Pora (weaving, textiles, basketry);

x

The report is at http://www.creativenz.govt.nz/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=TOnkF80blUw%3d&tabid=5 006

NZ Short Films for Berlin The 61st Berlin International Film Festival has selected “Ebony Society”, “Manurewa,” and “Go the Dogs” for the “Generation” section of the Festival, which is aimed at youthful audiences. The Generation programme receives thousands of submissions each year and the selection comprises 32 short films and 27 feature length films from 32 countries. The 61st Berlin International Film Festival runs from 10th – 20th February 2011. For more information see http://berlinale.de

2011: Year of the Rabbit Each year of the Chinese calendar is associated with one of the twelve animals of the Chinese Zodiac: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, and Pig. This year is the year of the Rabbit. If you were born in 1927, 1939, 1951, 1963, 1975, 1987, 1999, or – this year - 2011, you are a Rabbit. Year of the Rabbit people are said to be artistic and reserved, preferring to work behind the scenes. To find out your Chinese Zodiac animal go to http://www.chinesezodiac.com/calculator.php

Fish & Ships Sub-Antarctic Islands: Marine Reserves Three marine reserves totalling 435,163ha are to be established in the Subantarctic Islands. One of the reserves will cover the territorial sea (out to 12 nautical miles) surrounding Antipodes Island, and the other two will be around the Bounty Islands and Campbell Island, covering 58% and 39% of those islands’ territorial seas, respectively. Danish seining* will be banned in the remaining territorial sea around the island groups, ensuring the entire area – 688,548ha achieves Marine Protected Area status.* Danish seine is a type of fishing for flatfish and whitefish from small vessels. A seine is a large fishing net that hangs vertically in the water by attaching weights along the bottom edge and floats along the top. A map of the proposed reserves is at http://www.beehive.govt.nz/sites/all/files/SubantMPA_Media.pdf

31 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Marlborough Blue Cod Fishery Opening The Marlborough Sounds recreational blue cod fishery is to reopen on 1 April 2011. It will then close on 31 August, re-open again on 20 December 2011, and close on 31 August 2012. After that the season will run from 20 December to 31 August annually. The rules for the fishery are: a bag limit of two blue cod, fish size limits of between 30 and 35 centimetres only in a whole or gutted state; and no catches in a no-take zone surrounding Maud Island. Until the fishery reopens, any blue cod caught accidentally in the closed area have to be returned to the sea. More is at http://www.fish.govt.nz/ennz/Recreational/Most+Popular+Species/Blue+Cod. Anyone seeing suspicious fishing activity in any NZ fishery should call 0800 4 POACHER (0800 476 224)

Designer Homes for Fish Seagrass meadows, which are vital nursery grounds for young fish, are vanishing worldwide. In NZ, young snapper, trevally, and other popular fish rely on subtidal seagrass for shelter and food, in many areas. In 2009, NIWA scientists created artificial seagrass beds at Whangapoua Estuary, Coromandel, to look at how habitat quality affects fish densities and habitat use. The research revealed that the fish are really looking for shelter, and seagrasses provide good protection for them. In a follow up experiment being done this summer, several species of fish are being tagged and released back into the artificial seagrass mats. After several months the mats will be sampled to measure fish survival and growth rates, as well as small-scale movements, vary in relation to seagrass mat density. The aim is to find out what changes to habitat quality mean in terms of fish (and associated fisheries) population sizes. NB seagrass was lost last century largely owing to sediment washing into estuaries and harbours from land development.

Science/Technology Agricultural Greenhouse Gas: Contracts The MAF-funded NZ Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Centre (NZAGRC) has announced on behalf of its nine partners, the first 18 science programmes that will receive long term funding through the Centre. The total value of this initial investment is $15.5 million over four years. The Centre's role is to find ways for NZ to meet its international greenhouse gas emission obligations without reducing agricultural output. More is at http://www.nzagrc.org.nz/

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

LINZ: Mapping Land & People Land Information NZ (LINZ) and the NZ Geospatial Office (NZGO) are developing a national system (called spatial data infrastructure) that connects people and users of geospatial location-based - information. Geospatial information deals with the location and names of features underneath, on or above the earth's surface. It can be the basic information found on a map, but it also includes information about land use and population. Sets of this kind of information can be collected many times by different organisations using different formats, so their use is limited. The aims of the national system are to make this information easily available to everyone, and to offer better support for community planning and development. Examples of linked geospatial data include the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry’s FarmsOnline project and the Ministry for the Environment’s Land Use and Carbon Analysis System. More is at http://www.linz.govt.nz/about-linz/news-publications-andconsultations/news-and-notices/corporate/2010/1111-sue-gordon-speech-to-esriconference/index.aspx

Fast Early Forest Clearance… New research indicates that the speed of early forest clearance following human colonisation of the South Island of NZ was much faster and more intense than previously thought. Charcoal recovered from lake-bed sediment cores shows that just a few large fires within 200 years of initial colonisation destroyed much of the South Island’s lowland forest. Bracken and shrubland then replaced the burnt forest and smaller fires prevented forest reestablishing. Read the abstract of this paper at http://www.pnas.org/content/107/50/21343.abstract?sid=6ae56dcf-0a81-44a8-93da39990ede9280 (you can also download the full paper from here)

…& Settlement in NZ: Study A recently-published study in the American journal "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences” analysed more than 1400 radiocarbon dates from 47 Pacific islands. The researchers say the results indicate that NZ was first colonised by humans between 1210 and 1385 AD. A mid-fourteenth century date for the first arrival of Maori in NZ was widely accepted up until the 1950s. The study is at http://www.pnas.org/content/105/22/7676.full?sid=54118bdb-7be54c5b-a135-c2795d881c05

Human Clothing, Lice & Migration A recent University of Florida study following the evolution of lice shows modern humans started wearing clothes about 170,000 years ago, a technology which enabled them to successfully migrate out of Africa into colder climates (this migration is thought to have occurred about 100,000 years ago). The study used lice DNA to calculate when clothing lice first began to evolve genetically from human head lice. Because they are so well adapted to clothing, it’s known that body lice or clothing lice almost certainly didn’t exist until clothing came about in humans.

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 32


General

capital. It was fourth in governance and seventh in safety and security, while picking up 14th place in entrepreneurship and opportunity.

Warm Autumn Likely

However, NZ ranks 19th for its healthcare and 17th for its economic performance.

In its Seasonal Climate Outlook for February – April 2011, NIWA says warmer than normal conditions are likely to continue into autumn. Regional predictions for the next three months:

Find out more at http://www.prosperity.com/rankings.aspx

x

Northland, Auckland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty: Temperatures are likely to be above average. Seasonal rainfall totals over February-April are equally likely to be near normal or above normal. Soil moisture levels and river flows are likely to be above normal;

x

Central North Island, Taranaki, Wanganui, Manawatu and Wellington: Temperatures are likely to be above average. Seasonal rainfall totals over February-April are equally likely to be either near normal or above normal, whereas soil moisture levels and river flows are likely to be above normal;

x

Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, Wairarapa: Temperatures are equally likely to be near average or above average. Seasonal rainfall totals are equally likely to be in the near normal or above normal range. Soil moisture levels and river flows are likely to be above normal;

x

Nelson, Marlborough, Buller: Temperatures are likely to be in the above average range. Seasonal rainfall, soil moisture levels, and river flows are likely to be in the normal range;

x

West Coast, Alps and Foothills, Inland Otago, Southland: Temperatures are very likely to be above average, for the three months as a whole. Seasonal rainfall, soil moisture levels, and river flows are likely to be in the normal range; and

x

Coastal Canterbury, East Otago: Temperatures are equally likely to be in the near average or above average range. Seasonal rainfalls are likely to be near normal, whereas soil moisture levels and river flows are equally likely to be in the near normal or below normal range.

2010 - Wettest Year And Equal Hottest Last year was the world’s wettest on record, and tied 2005 as the hottest year since record-keeping began in 1880. New US figures confirm 2010 was one of the more remarkable years in the Earth’s climate. It featured prodigious snowstorms in the US and Europe; a record-shattering summer heat wave which scorched Russia and massive floods in Pakistan, California, Tennessee, and Australia. The global average surface temperature for 2010 tied the record set in 2005. It was the 34th year running temperatures have been above the 20th century average. Source: NZ Energy & Environment Business Week (19 Jan 2011)

NZ’s Prosperity Rating Britain’s Legatum Institute has ranked NZ fifth on its international scale of the prosperity, with the education system rating as the best in the world. Its Prosperity Index ranks 110 nations, and includes both material wealth and quality of life. On the plus side NZ is first in education and third in personal freedom and social 33 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Children Pick Education First… A Global survey called the ChildFund Alliance global children's survey, Small Voices, Big Dreams, asked children what they would do if they had money or were made President. The aim was to find out what is important to children and to help paint a picture of what life is like for children in developing countries, compared with children in developed countries like NZ. The sample covered 3,000 children aged 10 to 12 from 30 developing countries across the world - from Afghanistan to Zambia - as well as 300 children from NZ, Australia and the United States. Most (57%) of the children across the world said their first order of business would be to improve education by building schools, providing school supplies and increasing access to education for all children. By contrast 25% of NZ children would put an emphasis on education if President, with over a third thinking the provision of food for children was more important, though 93% of them said going to bed hungry at night was "never" a problem. More than a third of children in the developing world go to bed hungry at least once a week. Globally, their next priority would be providing food and water. Almost half said they would spend their dollar on food or water, ahead of clothes, toys and sports. As President, one in eight NZ children would help make other children more safe and secure, with prevalence among this 12% focused on eliminating and/or protecting children from violence, compared with those in developing countries where only 4% listed issues of safety and security as a general concern. When asked what they need most in their daily life, food/water and education were the top two responses. A third (33%) of children in developing countries said the one thing they need most is food and water, while another third (34%) said education. Over half NZ children said they needed food the most daily, but over a quarter said family and friends were the thing they couldn't get by without on a day to day basis. Children across both developing and developed nations share some common fears, with 30% saying they were most afraid of animals. Snakes (15%) topped the list, followed by death/accidents/disease (20%) and war/terror/violence (15%). Marked differences are found in specific countries - for example, the number of children afraid of war, terror and violence is significantly higher in Afghanistan, where 61% of surveyed children reported this fear.

Children in developing countries work hard, spending long hours on daily chores. For 43%, up to half a day can be spent on chores, with a further 22% doing more than this each day. For NZ children, 66% spend less than an hour doing jobs, with none reporting they do more than half a day's work. For more visit http://www.childfundalliance.org/smallvoicesbigdreams/

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


…Growing Up in NZ… Researchers conducting a longitudinal study* on children and their families have released their first report “Before We are Born”. The report, which follows interviews with more than 7,000 parents of children born in the last two years, is a first for longitudinal studies worldwide because it includes data from interviews with both parents before their child was born. The study will follow the families over the next 21 years and will collect details of health and emotional wellbeing, parenting, family functioning, early childhood; education, culture, and identity. *A longitudinal study is a research study that involves repeated observations of the same items over long periods of time - often many decades. To see the report go to http://www.growingup.co.nz/media/12254/growing%20up%20in%20new%20zealan d%20before%20we%20are%20born%20nov%202010.pdf

… & Self Control in Childhood Young children’s self-control skills — such as conscientiousness, self-discipline, and perseverance — can help predict their health, wealth, and criminal history in later life regardless of IQ or social background, according to recent findings from the University of Otago. The results form the first hard evidence that childhood self-control influences adult outcomes in the general population. After accounting for study members’ differences in social status and IQ, children as young as three who scored lower on measures of self-control were more likely than children with higher self-control to have physical health problems, substance dependence, difficulty with financial planning/rearing a child in a single-parent household; and a criminal conviction record. Read the press release at http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/GE1101/S00063/childrenwith-self-control-become-healthier-and-wealthier.htm

Media Representation of Immigrants The representation of immigrant communities in the media is better than it used to be, according to NZ researchers from Massey University. Between 1997 and 1999 the media significantly changed the way it covered immigrant communities and the researchers say that since 2000 there has been a more positive approach to immigration in editorials, features, and opinion pieces More is at http://www.hrc.co.nz/newsletters/diversity-action-programme/nga-reotangata/2010/12/how-the-news-sees-immigrants/?utm_source=nga-reotangata&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=December2010

Status of NZ Women: CEDAW Report The seventh report to the UN under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms Of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) indicates that: x

NZ is again ranked fifth in gender equality in the world behind the Scandinavians (and 18 places above Australia);

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

x

progress has been made in education, with Maori women in particular doing much better in education, having the highest tertiary education participation rates, and increasing the rate at which they are gaining school-based qualifications more quickly than other women;

x

NZ has a high rate of women in paid work – ninth in the OECD – but women are still under represented in senior positions; but

x

reduction of sexual violence and of family violence continue to be of serious concern.

The full CEDAW report is available at www.mwa.govt.nz – follow the link from the home page. For more on CEDAW see www2.ohchr.org/english/bodies/cedaw/index.htm

NZ Surf Breaks Now Protected Nineteen of NZ’s leading surf spots have been officially recognised and protected under the revised NZ Coastal Policy Statement, which came into effect late 2010. The Policy Statement aims to prevent inappropriate use and development that may affect their use and enjoyment. For the full text of the NZ Coastal Policy Statement (Policies 13 and 16 refer to Surf Breaks) see: http://www.doc.govt.nz/publications/conservation/marine-and-coastal/new-zealandcoastal-policy-statement/new-zealand-coastal-policy-statement-2010/

More Terrorist Groups Named Three international terrorist groups newly designated under the Terrorism Suppression Act 2002 include: the Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, the National Liberation Army (ELN) of Colombia, and Harakat-ul Jihad al Islami - Bangladesh. Any assets held by the groups and found in NZ either now or in the future will be frozen. It will also be a criminal offence to deal with their property or make property or financial services available to them. To date NZ has designated under UN Security Council Resolution 1267 nearly 500 terrorist groups and individuals listed by the United Nations, and 11 other terrorist entities not listed by the UN. They are Al-Shabaab (Somalia), ETA (Spain), FARC (Colombia), PKK (Turkey), Indian Mujahideen, Palestinian Islamic Jihad, Izz al-Din al-Qassam Brigades, the Real Irish Republican Army, the Continuity Irish Republican Army, the New People’s Army/Communist Party of the Philippines, and Hizbollah’s military wing.

Purple Cake Day This is on 1 March, 2011, and will become an annual event to celebrate children in our lives and to empower them to help other children in need worldwide. Schools, community groups, individuals, families and children are encouraged to be inventive about making a difference: wear purple, bake cupcakes, write messages of hope, have a purple concert, run a purple sports event… Funds raised will support the Kenbe La Foundation a registered charitable trust supporting the development of educational opportunities for disadvantaged children in Haiti. More is at http://www.purplecakeday.org/

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 34


Know Your Sausage At the 2010 Great NZ Sausage Competition, held recently in Auckland, judges spent two days tasting more than 400 varieties of sausage across 12 categories. The results were:

Community Housing Aotearoa (CHA) 2011 conference The National Conference of Community Housing Aotearoa “Doorways to Community Housing” - will be held at Lincoln Green, West Auckland on 22-23 March 2011.

x

Supreme Award: the Wanaka-based Mediterranean Wholesale Market’s Pork and Fennel creation;

x

beef: Peter Timbs Meats, Christchurch;

x

pork: Meat Cuisine, Auckland; and Waikanae Butchery, Wellington;

x

saveloy/polony/cocktail: saveloy, Southbridge Tasty Meats, Canterbury;

x

frankfurters & rounds: smoked Kielbasa, Island Bay Butchery, Wellington;

x

traditional: Cumberland, Netherby Meats, Ashburton;

More is at http://www.asianz.org.nz/our-work/arts-and-community/festivals/chineselantern-festival

x

flavoured precooked: Precooked Cheese, Tegel, Auckland;

NZ Rehabilitation Association Biennial Conference

x

precooked: Gluten Free Precooked, Hellers Tasty Ltd, Christchurch;

x

flavoured: Angus, Brookfield New World, Tauranga;

x

international bratwursts & boerwors: Boerwor, Ellerslie Meats, Auckland;

More is at http://www.nzrehabconf2011.co.nz/

x

international spicy: Chorizo, Peter Timbs Meats, Christchurch;and Merguez, Franklin Country Meats, Auckland;

NZ Coalition to End Homelessness Conference

x

international mild: Italian Pork & Fennel, Seaside Meats, Auckland;

x

gourmet: Pork & Fennel, Mediterranean Wholesale Market, Wanaka; Gourmet: Venison, Hellers Tasty Ltd, Christchurch; Gourmet: Chicken with lime, Jansessen’s Continental, Auckland; Gourmet: Razorback Wild Boar & Bacon, Harmony Foods, Paeroa; and

x

people’s choice: a beef creation from Peter Timbs Meats in Christchurch.

Some Conferences/Events Lameness in Ruminants Conference "Lameness - a Global Perspective” is being held from 28 February – 3 March 2011 in Rotorua. Its aim is to bring researchers and veterinarians together to find workable solutions for lameness.

More is at http://communityhousing.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/CHAConference-flyer.pdf

Chinese Lantern Festival 2011 The 12th annual Chinese Lantern Festival is being held in Auckland from 18-20 February 2011 from 5.00pm at Albert Park. It is also being celebrated in Christchurch on 26-27 February 2011 from 5.00pm in Victoria Square.

The NZ Rehabilitation Association is holding a conference at the Hyatt Regency Auckland on 3-6 March 2011. It is open to all people involved in rehabilitation in NZ.

The fifth conference of the NZ coalition to end homelessness will be held on 24 March 2011 at Te Mahurehure Conference Centre, 73 Premier Ave, Pt Chevalier, Auckland in Auckland. More is at http://nzceh.onlinegroups.net/about/Conference/

2011 Kapa Haka* Nationals Te Matatini, in association with Tairawhiti rohe*, is hosting Te Matatini National Kapa Haka Festival in Gisborne from 16 – 20 February 2011. * Kapa Haka: Maori performing arts; Rohe: territory. More is at http://www.tematatini.co.nz/events/festival-2011.htm

National Not-for-Profit Sector Conference This year's conference, called “Passion Plus – skills to help you change the world” will be held on 17-18 March 2011 at the Waipuna Conference Centre in Auckland.

More is at www.lamenessinruminants.org

More is at http://growevents.co.nz/nfp-conference/

2nd AsiaPacific Outgames

NZ Land Treatment Collective Annual Conference

This event is being held in Wellington from 12-19 March 2011. The programme provides a week of sports competition, cultural events, shows and go parties, and also a human rights conference programme with national and international speakers.

This conference - "Winds of Change: Land treatment in challenging times" - is being held on 23-25 March 2011 in Palmerston North.

More is at http://www.wellingtonoutgames.com/home

35 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

More is at www.waternz.org.nz/nzltc_conference.html

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


First National Conference on NZ Wars “Tutu te Puehu: NZ’s Wars of the 19th Century” – the first conference on the NZ Wars - will be held at Massey University’s Wellington campus from 11-13 February 2011. See conference brochure at http://www.scribd.com/doc/39991125/Tutu-te-PuehuBrochure

NZBIO conference The NZBIO conference is being held from 21-23 March 2011 at the Sky\City Convention Centre. It showcases the NZ life sciences sector, attracting delegates from around the world and from all aspects of the life sciences industry. This year’s theme is “Enabling Successful Bio Enterprise”. More is at http://www.nzbio2011.co.nz/home

Extreme Weather in Australasia Conference AMOS and MetSoc NZ are holding a joint conference on extreme weather on 9-11 February 2011, at Te Papa, Wellington. The conference will cover extreme weather in the Australasian region, from the impacts of floods and droughts to climate change More is at http://www.cvent.com/EVENTS/Info/Summary.aspx?e=a52856ef-d67749c4-a5af-93143630ce2f

International Conference of the Nursing Network on Violence Against Women This is being held on 16–18 February at the Heritage Hotel in Auckland. The theme is “Stopping Violence: Innovations & Partnerships for Sustainable Change”. More is at http://www.confer.co.nz/nnvawi/

Science Communicators Association of NZ (SCANZ) Conference 2011

Entries close on 18 March 2011. More is at http://www.ruralwomen.org.nz/InformationSheet2011medres.pdf.pdf

Community Response Fund This fund is for critical social services providing support directly to families, children, young and older people in the following areas: family violence; child abuse and neglect; budget and financial advice; sexual violence; early intervention for vulnerable and at risk children and families; families under stress; vulnerable and at risk young people; vulnerable and at risk older people. Services applying need to be experiencing financial difficulty and/or an increased demand for their services. Applications close on 25 February 2011. To find out how to apply go to http://www.familyservices.govt.nz/working-with-us/funding-andcontracting/community-response-fund/application-process.html. For more contact your MSD funding advisor, call 0800 777 100, or email l communityresponse@msd.govt.nz

Supporting Local Parents through the Local Initiatives Fund (LIF) The SKIP* Local Initiatives Fund supports local communities to explore new ways to increase the use of positive parenting by parents and whanau of children aged 0-5. Successful applicants will be developing and trying new ways to get parenting messages to those who may not otherwise hear them. *SKIP: Strategies for Kids, information for Parents Applications close on 25 March 2011 for winter grants (these are up to 12 months and 3 years grants). For more about the LIF, contact A Sarty at andrea.sarty001@msd.govt.nz or A Jones at alan.jones020@msd.govt.nz. More about SKIP is at http://www.skip.org.nz/

Creative NZ: Contestable Arts Grants Creative NZ (CNZ) distributes around $11.5 million each year in contestable funding to support projects that develop NZ arts. It funds applications that show strong artistic merit and help achieve arts outcomes.

This one is being held on 21-22 February 2011 at the University of Auckland's city campus. The conference theme is “Listening to the other side”.

Applications next close on 4 March 2011. Apply at http://www.creativenz.govt.nz/funding/contestable_funding_/how_to_apply_for_cont estable_funding For more information email info@creativenz.govt.nz or tel 04 473 0880

More is at http://www.scanz.co.nz/

Fulbright Applications

Some Funding/Awards/Opportunities

Applications are now open for the Fulbright-Harkness NZ Fellowship for an emerging NZ leader in any field of study or vocation other than health care, to study or research in the US for a minimum of six weeks. Successful applicants receive NZ$15,000 towards a programme of their own design at any US university or institution.

Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011 Entries are now open for the Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011. This award enables rural women to showcase their business. It is open to all women running small rural-based businesses. Cash prizes are offered to North & South Island winners, and to the overall winner of the award.

Applications close on 1 March 2011. More is at http://www.fulbright.org.nz/awards/nz-fulbrightharkness.html

The award is sponsored by Access, Telecom and Rural Women New Zealand, with the winners being announced in May 2011 at the Rural Women New Zealand National Conference in Auckland. Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 36


Three Writers’ Awards They are: x

x

x

the Creative NZ Michael King Writers’ Fellowship, valued at $100,000: awarded for a project that will take two years or more to complete. It is open to established authors; the Berlin Writers’ Residency: offers a NZ writer the opportunity to live and write in Berlin for a period of up to eleven months. The aim of the award ($40,000) is for the successful applicant to work on an approved project in a new environment; and University of Iowa International Writing Program, this three-month residency from August to November offers return travel to Iowa and accommodation on the University of Iowa campus to writers who have previously published at least one volume of work.

Applications for all three close on 25 February 2011. Application forms are at http://www.creativenz.govt.nz/funding/fellowships_awards_and_residencies. For more information contact F Birch atfelicity.birch@creativenz.govt.nz

Lottery Grants Board Funding There are 11 Lottery Community regional committees. Funding is available for projects, activities, resources or services that have a community/social service focus, for example developmental or preventative projects, welfare and support services, or projects that help improve the wellbeing of people in the community. Applications close on 2 March 2011. The Lottery Community Facilities Fund makes grants to organisations for projects to build or improve community facilities. Funding is provided for community facilities that support participation in community activities and social interaction, to foster cohesion and strengthen communities. Applications close on 4 March 2011. The Marae Heritage and Facilities Committee makes grants for the capital costs of the conservation, restoration and development of marae facilities, particularly wharenui, wharekai and wharepaku facilities. Applications close on 25 February 2011. More is at http://www.cdgo.govt.nz/availablegrants/downloads.aspx#ApplicationType_14

Governance Training for Cooperatives The NZ Cooperatives Association (NZCoop) is hosting governance training for directors of cooperative and mutual businesses, or for boards, when they need it and where they want it. Seminars are arranged on two consecutive days or two days no more than three months apart. The next session for individual directors and potential board members is on 24-25 March 2011at the Brentwood Hotel, Wellington. For more email the NZCoop office at nzca@nz.coop or tel 04 384 4595

Public Health Leadership Programme 2011 This is a six-day residential programme, delivered as three twoday sessions, designed specifically for public health leaders in NZ. Participants are expected to have a good knowledge of public heath principles including an understanding of the social determinants of health, inequalities in health, how culture influences health, and the significance of the Treaty of Waitangi 37 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

in health. Three programmes are offered: Programme 1 (Wellington): 4-5 July, 29-30Aug, 1-2 Nov; Programme 2 (Wellington) 8-9 Aug, 6-7 Sept, 7-8 Nov; and Programme 3 (Auckland) 2-3Aug, 13-14Sept, 10-11Nov. Applications close on 21 February 2011. More information/online applications at http://www.publichealthworkforce.org.nz/public-health-leadershipprogramme_182.aspx

Clendon Award: Romance writing contest Unpublished authors can submit a romance novel manuscript to be judged for the 2011 Clendon Award. Entries are judged by between three and eight romance readers, with finalist manuscripts judged by an editor at Harlequin Books in New York. The 2011 Clendon Award closes 26 February 2011. More is at www.romancewriters.co.nz

NZBIO Annual Excellence Awards Nominations are now being accepted for the following NZBIO Annual Excellence Awards: Company of the Year; Emerging Company of the Year; Distinguished Biotechnologist of the Year; and Young Biotechnologist of the Year. Submissions close on 25 February, 2011. More, including application details, is at http://www.nzbio2011.co.nz/awards

Rita Angus Artist’s Residency 2011 This residency (either one 26-week term for one artist or two 13week terms for two artists) supports an artist to produce a new body of work that reflects upon the interplay between technology and culture. Artists are encouraged to exhibit and talk about their work with the Wellington arts community. Applications close on 7 March 2011. More is at http://www.weltec.ac.nz/residency/Rita_Angus_Residency.html

Small Communities: Drinking Water Subsidy Scheme The Ministry of Health (MoH) has re-opened the drinking water subsidy scheme for communities of under 5,000 people, with $10 million is available for allocation each year until 2015. The scheme will pay up to 85% of costs (previously it was 95%) to communities with a “deprivation index” higher than 7 (deprivation index of 10 is the least socially and materially well off). Applications close on 31 March 2011. More is at http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/indexmh/revised-criteria-drinking-water

Farming to Succeed Applications Open Farming to Succeed runs once yearly over five days, during which participants go through a structured series of workshops, farm visits and discussion groups. Only 25 people are accepted to each course. Topics covered include career development, staged capital growth and asset management, goal setting and motivation, successful business partnerships, financial development, time management, and managing stress.

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


Applications close on 18 February. To apply trainees must currently be enrolled in Level 3 or above training with Agriculture ITO. Application forms and full terms and conditions are available on www.farmingtosucceed.co.nz or by calling 0800 691 111

AsiaNZ Grants They are: x

the Emerging Researcher grant: open for applications until 21 February 2011;

x

Asia Aware grants supporting school projects/practices which enhance Asia awareness. These close on 22 April 2011; and

x

a Shanghai business studies trip for school leaders and professional educators: registrations of interest accepted until 25 February 2011.

More on the Emerging Researcher Grant is at http://www.asianz.org.nz/opportunities/knowledge-and-research; on Asia Aware grants is at http://www.asianz.org.nz/opportunities/educating-asia/asia-awaregrants; and more on the Shanghai business studies trip is at http://www.asianz.org.nz/our-work/educating-asia/professionaldevelopment/shanghai-business-studies-trip-2011

Making a Difference Fund The Making a Difference Fund supports communities to take action that helps improve attitudes and behaviours towards disabled people. Priority is given to well-planned collaborative projects that have support from the community. Note that in this round priority will be given to projects that are already underway. The maximum grant available is $20,000. Applications close on 28 February 2011. They go to Making a Difference Fund, Family and Community Service, Ministry of Social Development, PO Box 1556, Wellington 6001. More is at http://www.odi.govt.nz/what-we-do/improving-attitudesand-behaviours/index.html or email Josi.Wilson045@msd.govt.nz

Appointments NZ’s next High Commissioner in Australia, will be Martyn Dunne. Justice John Richard Wild has been appointed a Judge of the Court of Appeal. Adrian Macey has been elected as chair of the Kyoto Protocol at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Cancún, Mexico. Australia has recruited NZ Health and Disability deputy commissioner Rae Lamb, to be its next Aged Care Commissioner. The new Chief of the NZ Defence Force is Major General Rhys Jones. An independent panel appointed to provide advice on scientific and technological issues in defence includes Rear Admiral (Rtd) David Ledson (chair), Helen Anderson, and Neville Jordan. Denise Bowen has been appointed a member of the Governing Board of the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and NZ (JAS-ANZ). Sarn Herdson has been appointed as an additional coroner for the Auckland region. Three commissioners appointed to the Royal Commission into the Pike River mine tragedy are Justice Graham Panckhurst (chair), Stewart Bell, and David Henry. Members of the Panel reviewing the Emissions Trading Scheme include David Caygill (chair), Julia Hoare, Chris Karamea Insley, Tom Lambie, David Russell, Geoff Thompson, Duncan Cotterill, and John Wood.

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524

Dr Lynne Lane has been appointed as the new chair of the Mental Health Commission. Graeme Reeves has been appointed as Chief Gambling Commissioner and Lisa Hansen is a new Gambling Commissioner. Dr Andrew Jack has been appointed as Chief Censor. The NZ Institute has a new chair: Tony Carter. Anne Leijnen has been appointed as an Environment Commissioner and Carron Blom as a Deputy Environment Commissioner. Dr Janice Wilson has been appointed as Chief Executive of the Health Quality & Safety Commission, and Dr Peter Foley has been appointed as deputy chair. Wayne Walden and Alison Gerry have been appointed to the board of Television NZ. Kevin Woods is the new Chief Executive and Director General of the Ministry of Health. The members of the Motorcycle Safety Levy Advisory Council are Gareth Morgan (chair), Paul Searancke, (deputy chair); Peter McIntosh, Yvonne Forrest, Bill Grice, Brent Hutchison, and Jess Corbett. Six new members appointed to the Minister of Pacific Island Affairs' Advisory Council include Usufonoimanu Peseta Betty Sio, Alfred Ngaro, Ikamafana Tameifuna, Les Atoni, Tina McNicholas and Reverend Tom Etuata (and members reappointed for a further term are Galumalemana Alfred Hunkin, Mary Cole, Dr Palatasa Havea, Rev Nove Vailaau, and Sagaa Malua). Three new members have been appointed to PHARMAC’s Pharmacology and Therapeutics Advisory Committee (PTAC): Assoc Prof Derelie (Dee) Mangin, Dr Melissa Copland, and Dr Christina Cameron. The Advisory Group on Green Growth will be chaired by Phil O’Reilly and include Melissa Clark-Reynolds, Whaimutu Dewes, Lain Jager, Neville Jordan, Dr Andrew Pearce, Guy Salmon, and Peter Yealands. Michael Heron and Stephen Cottrell have been appointed to the Drug Free Sport NZ board. Dr Grant Phillipson has been appointed to the Waitangi Tribunal and Sir Douglas Kidd and Dr Ann Parsonson have been reappointed. Alan Jackson has been appointed as chair of the Housing NZ Corporation Board, with Susan Paterson being appointed a member, and Greg Hinton and Lope Ginnen being reappointed. Raumawhitu (Te Rau) Kupenga has been appointed to the Broadcasting Standards Authority board. Five new appointments to the Board of Te Mangai Paho (which allocates funds for Maori broadcasting) include Dr Piri Sciascia (chair), Toni Waho, Dr Hinemoa Elder, Taria Tahana, and Gabrielle Huria. Guy Royal, Garth Gallaway, and Kate Davenport have been appointed to the Film and Literature Board of Review. Maggie Burrill has been appointed to the Lottery Grants Board and Tina WehipeihanaWilson has been reappointed to this board. Michael Glading has been reappointed to the board of NZ On Air. Susan Brown has been appointed to National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) and Don Nicholson has been reappointed. Jamie Simpson has been appointed to the Alcohol Advisory Council of NZ (ALAC) and Anne Hobby has been reappointed. Ingrid Collins and Murray Burns have been appointed to the Crown Health Financing Agency (CHFA), and Alastair Scott (chair) and Pip Dunphy have been reappointed. Members of the new Science Board include Sir David Skegg (chair), Richard Blaikie, Denise Church, Peter Hunter, Wendy Nelson, William Rolleston, Charles Royal, and Warren Tate. Three new members of the Marsden Fund Council include: Kurt Krause, Linda Smith, and David Williams. Innovation Board members are Dr William Rolleston (chair), Harlene Hayne, Sarah Kennedy, Alastair MacCormick, Stuart McKenzie, Phil O’Reilly, Grant Ryan, and Peter Townsend.

Rural Bulletin February 2011 - 38


Lt General (Rtd) Don McIver has been appointed to the National War Memorial Advisory Council after being elected as President of the Royal NZ Returned and Services’ Association, and Air Vice Marshal (Rtd) Robin Klitscher has been reappointed. Gay Shirley has been appointed to the Waikato District Health Board. Creative NZ has appointed Makerita Urale as its Senior Programme Adviser, Pacific Arts. New members on the Cooperatives Association Council include Kim DeGarnham and Bruce McPherson. New members of the Health & Disability Sector NGO Working Group include: Angela Crawford, Sandy Taylor, Mandy Shelker, and Joyce Anne Raihania, and Chris Harris, Carole Maraku, Jane Poa, and Jackie Edmond have been reappointed.

To be added to the mailing list contact: Rural Women NZ tel 04 473 5524 email enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz For editorial enquiries contact the editors: Craig Matthews/Paddy Twist tel 04 473 5524 email ruralbulletin@ruralwomen.org.nz

39 – Rural Bulletin February 2011

Rural Women NZ, enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, 04 473 5524


do the right thing for the environment, and support Kiwi kids at the same time Taking care of the environment has never looked so good for many of the 150,000 children from around the country who are cared for by Starship Children’s Hospital each year. The Starship Mobile Phone Appeal, launched in 2009, enables New Zealanders to donate their old mobile phones to help raise money for Starship, and last year won the supreme award at the Prime Minister’s Social Heroes Awards for corporate-community partnerships. Telecom customers have already donated over 80,000 old phones since the programme began, contributing to the $800,000 raised so far. “Telecom was the first company in New Zealand to be involved in mobile recycling, and has been running recycling programmes since 2001,” says Telecom’s Environmental Manager, Steve Kerr. “There’s a huge opportunity to recycle mobile phones, as on average New Zealanders replace handsets every 18 months, and almost 90% of material found in mobile phones can be recovered and used in other products. “And now, through our partnership with Starship, we’re taking our recycling programme a step further by enabling New Zealanders to do the right thing for the environment, and support Kiwi kids at the same time,” says Steve. Alex Milne, Sponsorship Manager, thanks the thousands of people around New Zealand who have already sent in their old mobile phones. “The money raised so far has already made a fantastic contribution to the hospital - going towards the Starship Air Rescue service. This enables Starship specialist retrieval teams to bring a child back to Auckland for care in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit – all within hours and no matter their location. This is particularly relevant for those living in rural areas. “There is no end date to the Mobile Phone Appeal – so if people keep donating their old mobile phones, I’m confident we’ll hit the $1 million mark before too long. All mobile phones, regardless of make, model or condition can be recycled.  Phones in working order are refurbished, while those beyond repair are recycled through the correct environmental channels. Simply call into any Telecom store nationwide and drop your old mobile phone into one of our recycling bins, or post* it free-of-charge to Freepost 223107 Starship Mobile Phone Recycling Appeal Private Bag 208007 Highbrook Manukau 2161 To comply with NZ Post guidelines, please remove the battery from each phone and wrap it separately in paper or plastic before putting the phone and battery in the package. Remember to remove and keep your SIM card though!


In-home Respite Care Here at Access, we offer a full range of home-based healthcare services to help New Zealanders maintain their independence in their homes and communities. One of the services we offer is In-home Respite Care. With over 80 years of experience in the healthcare industry, we’re in a great position to understand the demands of providing care. We can help you to work out a solution to give you the break you need, without your loved one having to leave their home. Our care covers everything including dressing, housekeeping, medication monitoring and assisting with grocery shopping. We work with the whole family to ensure that your loved one is comfortable with us throughout the period of respite. Whether you need us to fill in while you go on holiday, or in response to an unexpected hospital visit, we provide both everyday and crisis respite care.

Rural Bulletin February 2011  

Rural Bulletin February 2011

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