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JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #27 - SUMMER 2019

Where Sheep May Safely Graze Jersey’s multi-horned sheep and their shepherd

Secret Gardens

Jersey Occupied

Open garden in St John

Three articles to mark this year’s important war-time anniversaries

SPRING 2019

- 1


Welcome T

Energy for Bliss & Becky

his season of the year always provides the opportunity to enjoy the Island’s countryside: its coastal areas, fields and the exuberant summer growth of vegetation in areas not regularly trodden. But both ‘wild’ and ‘tame’ country are equally manmade – they are both just as artificial as any urban, concrete landscape. The only natural landscape for Jersey would be woodland. That is what its first inhabitants would have found when they settled here after the last Ice Age had finally receded. They began to alter the landscape to suit themselves and we have never stopped doing that since those early days. We have always needed to eat, to graze livestock, to build ourselves homes. It is easy to romanticise the countryside; primarily, it is a functional survival tool – but, at its best, a beautiful hand-made tool. It has always provided inspiration for artists and from 21 June to 26 July, the Jersey Summer Exhibition at the CCA Galleries International in Hill Street will display many works of art inspired by the Island’s countryside.

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #26 - SPRING 2019

Jersey Landscape award, worth £600, for the work of art that best evokes Jersey’s traditional rural landscape.

Horses In Hand

Growing Our Security

Barette’s carriage driving hobby

How can Jersey safeguard its own food security?

A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Are there solutions to the JSPCA’s problems?

The presentation to the winning artist will take place on the evening of Thursday, 11 July, 5.30pm to 7.30pm. The evening will also include a short talk by Doug Ford, formerly Director of Community Learning at Jersey Heritage, titled: ‘Changes to the Jersey rural landscape through the ages.’ From woodland to open fields, to cider orchards, cattle pasture, fields of potatoes and tomatoes, the face of Jersey’s countryside has changed and continues to change. Join us for this celebration of the best of rural Jersey – the soul of the Island. The evening is open to all – see the invitation on page 43 Just let us know in advance if you can come, so we have an idea of likely numbers. Hope to see you there.

SPRING 2019

- 1

Front cover image: Aaron Le Couteur Picture by Gary Grimshaw RURAL magazine can be collected free of charge from any number of places around the island. If you are unable to find a copy, please contact us on 864344 and we will ensure that you receive a copy directly. www.ruraljersey.co.uk

RURAL magazine, in partnership with Signtech Ltd, are offering an additional award category: the Signtech Rural

She’ll say this till the cows come home Becky loves her job. But it’s many hours work to get a return. Every penny counts. So to keep her business fluid (rich Jersey milk) thank goodness the Island has some of the cheapest electricity in the EU. Energy for everyone.

Find out more online - EnergyForEveryone.je

Jersey’s electricity is

15% CHEAPER than the EU average

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL

Sales: Rebecca Harrington rebecca@getrefined.com T: 01534 720200 Design: Eunice Fromage eunice@getrefined.com

Published by: Crosby Media and Publishing Ltd La Cohue, St John JE3 4FN T 01534 865334 M 07797 773880

Editor: Alasdair Crosby editorial@ruraljersey.co.uk Photographer: Gary Grimshaw info@photoreportage.co.uk

©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. Disclaimer While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies, however caused. No liability can be accepted for copy, illustrations, photographs, artwork or advertising material while in transmission or with the publisher or their agents. All information is correct at time of going to print.

SPRING 2019

- 3


Welcome T

Energy for Bliss & Becky

his season of the year always provides the opportunity to enjoy the Island’s countryside: its coastal areas, fields and the exuberant summer growth of vegetation in areas not regularly trodden. But both ‘wild’ and ‘tame’ country are equally manmade – they are both just as artificial as any urban, concrete landscape. The only natural landscape for Jersey would be woodland. That is what its first inhabitants would have found when they settled here after the last Ice Age had finally receded. They began to alter the landscape to suit themselves and we have never stopped doing that since those early days. We have always needed to eat, to graze livestock, to build ourselves homes. It is easy to romanticise the countryside; primarily, it is a functional survival tool – but, at its best, a beautiful hand-made tool. It has always provided inspiration for artists and from 21 June to 26 July, the Jersey Summer Exhibition at the CCA Galleries International in Hill Street will display many works of art inspired by the Island’s countryside.

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #26 - SPRING 2019

Jersey Landscape award, worth £600, for the work of art that best evokes Jersey’s traditional rural landscape.

Horses In Hand

Growing Our Security

Barette’s carriage driving hobby

How can Jersey safeguard its own food security?

A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Are there solutions to the JSPCA’s problems?

The presentation to the winning artist will take place on the evening of Thursday, 11 July, 5.30pm to 7.30pm. The evening will also include a short talk by Doug Ford, formerly Director of Community Learning at Jersey Heritage, titled: ‘Changes to the Jersey rural landscape through the ages.’ From woodland to open fields, to cider orchards, cattle pasture, fields of potatoes and tomatoes, the face of Jersey’s countryside has changed and continues to change. Join us for this celebration of the best of rural Jersey – the soul of the Island. The evening is open to all – see the invitation on page 43 Just let us know in advance if you can come, so we have an idea of likely numbers. Hope to see you there.

SPRING 2019

- 1

Front cover image: Aaron Le Couteur Picture by Gary Grimshaw RURAL magazine can be collected free of charge from any number of places around the island. If you are unable to find a copy, please contact us on 864344 and we will ensure that you receive a copy directly. www.ruraljersey.co.uk

RURAL magazine, in partnership with Signtech Ltd, are offering an additional award category: the Signtech Rural

She’ll say this till the cows come home Becky loves her job. But it’s many hours work to get a return. Every penny counts. So to keep her business fluid (rich Jersey milk) thank goodness the Island has some of the cheapest electricity in the EU. Energy for everyone.

Find out more online - EnergyForEveryone.je

Jersey’s electricity is

15% CHEAPER than the EU average

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL

Sales: Rebecca Harrington rebecca@getrefined.com T: 01534 720200 Design: Eunice Fromage eunice@getrefined.com

Published by: Crosby Media and Publishing Ltd La Cohue, St John JE3 4FN T 01534 865334 M 07797 773880

Editor: Alasdair Crosby editorial@ruraljersey.co.uk Photographer: Gary Grimshaw info@photoreportage.co.uk

©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. Disclaimer While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies, however caused. No liability can be accepted for copy, illustrations, photographs, artwork or advertising material while in transmission or with the publisher or their agents. All information is correct at time of going to print.

SPRING 2019

- 3


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BBQS / FIRE PITS / HEATERS / ALL WEATHER FURNITURE / DECKING / BEANBAGS SAFETY SURFACING / SPAS & SWIM SPAS / GARDEN ACCESSORIES / PLAY EQUIPMENT St Helier | T: 738806 | enquiry@romerils.co.je


Wellis Jupiter Plug and Play Spa Free steps, delivery, chemical pack, cover and cover arm. Available from stock. £5795

Landmann Rexon 3 3 burner Gas BBQ *assembly not included Now £329

INCLUDES

FREE BBQ HOTPLATE Worth £39.99

CREATE YOUR OWN UNIQUE OUTDOOR WORLD

Landmann Triton 3 Premium 3 Burner Gas BBQ WAS £449 NOW £399

Landmann Miton 3 Premium Stainless Steel 3 Burner Gas Barbecue WAS £499 NOW £439 INCLUDES

FREE BBQ HOTPLATE Worth £39.99

Wellis Mercury 6 Person 32A Spa Free steps, delivery, chemical pack, cover and cover arm. Available from stock. £6495

BBQS / FIRE PITS / HEATERS / ALL WEATHER FURNITURE / DECKING / BEANBAGS SAFETY SURFACING / SPAS & SWIM SPAS / GARDEN ACCESSORIES / PLAY EQUIPMENT St Helier | T: 738806 | enquiry@romerils.co.je


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Contents 9 - Over The Wall

Ruth Le Cocq met Caroline Ovenden and her friend, Archimedes

By our food columnist, Joseph Baker

40 - Art, Inspired By Nature

10 - A Jersey Salmagundi

We feature Jersey artist Suzanne Blackstone

a mixed salad of Jersey life and events

42 - The Jersey Summer Exhibition

OUT AND ABOUT

12 - Secret Gardens

Art and culture in Jersey with Sasha Gibb

Les Chasses, St John, is open on 7 July to benefit the Jersey Association for Youth and Friendship, Chloe Bowler paid a visit

25 - The Future Is Rural

FARM AND GARDEN

Alasdair Crosby is quite encouraged by the title of the latest report by the Post Carbon Institute

Gill Maccabe met the shepherd, Aaron Le Couteur (and Mist, the dog), who care for the herd of Manx Loaghtan sheep on the north coast

54 - Food For Thought

ART AND CULTURE

A RURAL view

17 - Where Sheep May Safely Graze

35 - Life With A Horse

27 - Soil And SelfSufficiency Safeguarding Jersey’s greatest agricultural resource – its soil, by Andrew Le Quesne

29 - From Our Foreign Correspondent By Justine Bouscatel, a young farmer from near Toulouse

31 - The Rabbit, The Fox And The ‘Tail’ Of A Mole

Best-selling author Rosamund Young farms organically at Kite’s Nest Farm in the Cotswolds

6

- SPRING 2019

58 - Through The Hoop And Pegging Out Croquet – more than just a garden game, as Gill Maccabe discovers

BUSINESS

68 - Bringing Holidays Up To Date Which date would you choose for a bank holiday? asks Sean Guégan

69 - Rural Property

THE FUR SIDE

46 - Walkie Talkies Kieranne Grimshaw talks to St Saviour Deputy Jess Perchard while on a walk with Gatsby, Deputy Perchard’s dog

49 - A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Kieranne Grimshaw continues her series on the work of the JSPCA

HERITAGE

By Tommy A’Court

60 - The Mother Of The Spitfire

70 - The Hero of The Pot

How a tax exile in 1920s Jersey would later use her wealth to help win the Battle of Britain. By James Le Cocq

62 - Give Me Shelter Air raid precautions and the 1940 raid just prior to Occupation by David Dorgan

63 - Part Of A Bigger Picture

By Graeme Le Marquand, chairman of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association

Graham Querée lists his favourite roses

By well-being expert Chloë Bowler

Hamish Marett-Crosby visits VilledieuLes-Poëles in Normandy

How ‘fashion’ can be combined with ‘gardening’, by Gill Maccabe

32 - The Value Of Polytunnels

33 - A Rose By Any Other Name

56 - Walk And Run The Island

65 - Bells, Copper And Lace

44 - Blooming In The Garden

Records of a wilder time, by Mike Stentiford

22 - All The Thorny Issues

SPORT

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

FOOD AND KITCHEN

52 - In The Kitchen Summertime recipes from Zoë Garner

The Channel Islands Military Museum celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. Alasdair Crosby spoke to its founder and curator, Damien Horn

A genuinely Genuine Jersey product: clay, from the seashore. Very good for pots. Alasdair Crosby spoke to potter Claire Haithwaite

71 - Stop Off Any Time And Buy One How Classic Farm, St Peter, are providing more milk and less plastic

72 - A Chip Off The Old Block Terry Neale met traditional stonemason Matthew Thebault

74 - Sustainable Farming David Warr has the last word

Contributors Tommy A’Court Joseph Baker Suzanne Blackstone Justine Bouscatel Chloë Bowler William Church David Dorgan Zoë Garner Sasha Gibb Kieranne Grimshaw Sean Guégan Ruth Le Cocq Graeme Le Marquand Andrew Le Quesne Gill Maccabe Hamish Marett-Crosby Terry Neale Graham Querée Mike Stentiford David Warr Rosamund Young

SPRING 2019

- 7


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Contents 9 - Over The Wall

Ruth Le Cocq met Caroline Ovenden and her friend, Archimedes

By our food columnist, Joseph Baker

40 - Art, Inspired By Nature

10 - A Jersey Salmagundi

We feature Jersey artist Suzanne Blackstone

a mixed salad of Jersey life and events

42 - The Jersey Summer Exhibition

OUT AND ABOUT

12 - Secret Gardens

Art and culture in Jersey with Sasha Gibb

Les Chasses, St John, is open on 7 July to benefit the Jersey Association for Youth and Friendship, Chloe Bowler paid a visit

25 - The Future Is Rural

FARM AND GARDEN

Alasdair Crosby is quite encouraged by the title of the latest report by the Post Carbon Institute

Gill Maccabe met the shepherd, Aaron Le Couteur (and Mist, the dog), who care for the herd of Manx Loaghtan sheep on the north coast

54 - Food For Thought

ART AND CULTURE

A RURAL view

17 - Where Sheep May Safely Graze

35 - Life With A Horse

27 - Soil And SelfSufficiency Safeguarding Jersey’s greatest agricultural resource – its soil, by Andrew Le Quesne

29 - From Our Foreign Correspondent By Justine Bouscatel, a young farmer from near Toulouse

31 - The Rabbit, The Fox And The ‘Tail’ Of A Mole

Best-selling author Rosamund Young farms organically at Kite’s Nest Farm in the Cotswolds

6

- SPRING 2019

58 - Through The Hoop And Pegging Out Croquet – more than just a garden game, as Gill Maccabe discovers

BUSINESS

68 - Bringing Holidays Up To Date Which date would you choose for a bank holiday? asks Sean Guégan

69 - Rural Property

THE FUR SIDE

46 - Walkie Talkies Kieranne Grimshaw talks to St Saviour Deputy Jess Perchard while on a walk with Gatsby, Deputy Perchard’s dog

49 - A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Kieranne Grimshaw continues her series on the work of the JSPCA

HERITAGE

By Tommy A’Court

60 - The Mother Of The Spitfire

70 - The Hero of The Pot

How a tax exile in 1920s Jersey would later use her wealth to help win the Battle of Britain. By James Le Cocq

62 - Give Me Shelter Air raid precautions and the 1940 raid just prior to Occupation by David Dorgan

63 - Part Of A Bigger Picture

By Graeme Le Marquand, chairman of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association

Graham Querée lists his favourite roses

By well-being expert Chloë Bowler

Hamish Marett-Crosby visits VilledieuLes-Poëles in Normandy

How ‘fashion’ can be combined with ‘gardening’, by Gill Maccabe

32 - The Value Of Polytunnels

33 - A Rose By Any Other Name

56 - Walk And Run The Island

65 - Bells, Copper And Lace

44 - Blooming In The Garden

Records of a wilder time, by Mike Stentiford

22 - All The Thorny Issues

SPORT

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

FOOD AND KITCHEN

52 - In The Kitchen Summertime recipes from Zoë Garner

The Channel Islands Military Museum celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. Alasdair Crosby spoke to its founder and curator, Damien Horn

A genuinely Genuine Jersey product: clay, from the seashore. Very good for pots. Alasdair Crosby spoke to potter Claire Haithwaite

71 - Stop Off Any Time And Buy One How Classic Farm, St Peter, are providing more milk and less plastic

72 - A Chip Off The Old Block Terry Neale met traditional stonemason Matthew Thebault

74 - Sustainable Farming David Warr has the last word

Contributors Tommy A’Court Joseph Baker Suzanne Blackstone Justine Bouscatel Chloë Bowler William Church David Dorgan Zoë Garner Sasha Gibb Kieranne Grimshaw Sean Guégan Ruth Le Cocq Graeme Le Marquand Andrew Le Quesne Gill Maccabe Hamish Marett-Crosby Terry Neale Graham Querée Mike Stentiford David Warr Rosamund Young

SPRING 2019

- 7


Over the wall.

SUMMER PROMOTIONS 15% OFF TETRAD FURNITURE

A RURAL view.

P

lanning issues are always a rich vein of controversy, especially when there is no ultimate ‘right’ or ‘wrong’.

A case in point is the controversy over building development of a field in St Peter in St Peter’s Village, which would go under the name of ‘Ville de Manoir’. The owning dairy farming family has always been connected with the old West Show, which, in its original form, took place biennially on this land, which included the proposed development site. However, the idea that the development would comprise the entire site is incorrect; the land submitted for building development consists of only 10 vergées, a small portion of the land lining the main road.

T E T R A D AT

Professional service and expert advice C a r r e f o u r S e l o u s , S t L a w r e n c e | Te l e p h o n e 8 6 5 9 6 5 | E m a i l : s a l e s @ d a v i d h i c k . c o | Vi s i t : w w w. d a v i d h i c k . c o O p e n Tu e s t o S a t 9 . 3 0 a m - 5 . 0 0 p m , l a t e n i g h t T h u r s u n t i l 6 . 3 0 p m . Promotion available for a limited time only. Terms and conditions apply.

In fact, given the pressing need for affordable housing, the site is a reasonable one to consider for development. The proposed 65 houses would lie in the heart of the now already much-developed and urbanised St Peter’s Village area. Its proximity to the school, supermarkets and other parish amenities means that there would not be a significant increase in traffic since most things needed locally would be within walking distance. The houses – if architectural sketches are to be taken at face value – show an attractively designed area of houses with grassy public areas; they would be at an affordable cost, which would benefit young people with families and with a connection to the parish. It could be far worse. There is, of course, an opposing point of view that suggests that there could indeed be potential increases in traffic congestion, which, together with a lack

Turning to broader issues, there is once again a flurry of Jersey dairy farmers selling up or intending to do so. It seems quite possible that there will now be yet another farmer joining their number. of services and infrastructure, constitute sufficient reasons to scrap the plans. The results of a ballot at a recent Parish Assembly showed a narrow majority of those who attended voted to push forward with the plans. A second ballot resulted in an overwhelming majority decision to work with the Planning Department to include the development in the new 2020 Island Plan rather than seek a revision to the current Island Plan and re-zone the land. The land owners are indeed willing sellers, but have stressed that by no means is it their intention to ‘take the money and run’, as has been, at times, unkindly suggested. They have a very creditable farming history, characterised by constant struggles against policies they see as inimical to a sustainable farming industry. They produce their own milk; they make their own cheese and yoghurts; they have great sympathy for organic and smallscale food production. Nothing in the world would give them greater pleasure than to be able to continue farming; the proceeds of selling the land would simply be reinvested in the farm to make their operation more economically viable. The sale of their land is now part of the ‘consideration and postponement process’ so well known in Jersey public life. Although the sale could still go ahead, it might not be until when (or if) the area is re-zoned in the next Island Plan before any development begins. This is no great encouragement to the landowners, who believe that a postponed sale will make it even more difficult to continue farming in the short term.

How long before the volume of milk produced in the Island ceases to be sufficient for local consumption? And what then happens to the existing arguments against the import of cheaper fresh milk from elsewhere? And, if cheaper milk from elsewhere were to be imported, what would happen then to the Jersey breed in its Island home? Extending the scope of these issues yet further, what actually is the future of farming in Jersey in any recognisable or familiar form? It is becoming ever more difficult for farmers to farm – and those who want to do so, bearing in mind the present interest in localism and local food production - ought to be encouraged, rather than rebuffed. Moreover, this particular issue highlights the problems facing the Island as population rises and more housing and infrastructure are needed at the expense of the environment. Granted that the ten-vergée site is a tiny fraction of the 33,000 vergées of agricultural land in the Island and its loss would make little difference, it can be argued that all these salami slices of development are combining to limit the Island’s countryside and destroy its historic rural character – as is sadly apparent elsewhere in the Island. There is no easy answer. The slogan is often trotted out: ‘We need to ensure that there are brown cows in green fields’. In the case of the St Peter development, if delayed or ultimately unsuccessful, there would indeed be a green field – but whether there would be brown cows available to graze it would be far more debatable. SPRING 2019

- 9


Over the wall.

SUMMER PROMOTIONS 15% OFF TETRAD FURNITURE

A RURAL view.

P

lanning issues are always a rich vein of controversy, especially when there is no ultimate ‘right’ or ‘wrong’.

A case in point is the controversy over building development of a field in St Peter in St Peter’s Village, which would go under the name of ‘Ville de Manoir’. The owning dairy farming family has always been connected with the old West Show, which, in its original form, took place biennially on this land, which included the proposed development site. However, the idea that the development would comprise the entire site is incorrect; the land submitted for building development consists of only 10 vergées, a small portion of the land lining the main road.

T E T R A D AT

Professional service and expert advice C a r r e f o u r S e l o u s , S t L a w r e n c e | Te l e p h o n e 8 6 5 9 6 5 | E m a i l : s a l e s @ d a v i d h i c k . c o | Vi s i t : w w w. d a v i d h i c k . c o O p e n Tu e s t o S a t 9 . 3 0 a m - 5 . 0 0 p m , l a t e n i g h t T h u r s u n t i l 6 . 3 0 p m . Promotion available for a limited time only. Terms and conditions apply.

In fact, given the pressing need for affordable housing, the site is a reasonable one to consider for development. The proposed 65 houses would lie in the heart of the now already much-developed and urbanised St Peter’s Village area. Its proximity to the school, supermarkets and other parish amenities means that there would not be a significant increase in traffic since most things needed locally would be within walking distance. The houses – if architectural sketches are to be taken at face value – show an attractively designed area of houses with grassy public areas; they would be at an affordable cost, which would benefit young people with families and with a connection to the parish. It could be far worse. There is, of course, an opposing point of view that suggests that there could indeed be potential increases in traffic congestion, which, together with a lack

Turning to broader issues, there is once again a flurry of Jersey dairy farmers selling up or intending to do so. It seems quite possible that there will now be yet another farmer joining their number. of services and infrastructure, constitute sufficient reasons to scrap the plans. The results of a ballot at a recent Parish Assembly showed a narrow majority of those who attended voted to push forward with the plans. A second ballot resulted in an overwhelming majority decision to work with the Planning Department to include the development in the new 2020 Island Plan rather than seek a revision to the current Island Plan and re-zone the land. The land owners are indeed willing sellers, but have stressed that by no means is it their intention to ‘take the money and run’, as has been, at times, unkindly suggested. They have a very creditable farming history, characterised by constant struggles against policies they see as inimical to a sustainable farming industry. They produce their own milk; they make their own cheese and yoghurts; they have great sympathy for organic and smallscale food production. Nothing in the world would give them greater pleasure than to be able to continue farming; the proceeds of selling the land would simply be reinvested in the farm to make their operation more economically viable. The sale of their land is now part of the ‘consideration and postponement process’ so well known in Jersey public life. Although the sale could still go ahead, it might not be until when (or if) the area is re-zoned in the next Island Plan before any development begins. This is no great encouragement to the landowners, who believe that a postponed sale will make it even more difficult to continue farming in the short term.

How long before the volume of milk produced in the Island ceases to be sufficient for local consumption? And what then happens to the existing arguments against the import of cheaper fresh milk from elsewhere? And, if cheaper milk from elsewhere were to be imported, what would happen then to the Jersey breed in its Island home? Extending the scope of these issues yet further, what actually is the future of farming in Jersey in any recognisable or familiar form? It is becoming ever more difficult for farmers to farm – and those who want to do so, bearing in mind the present interest in localism and local food production - ought to be encouraged, rather than rebuffed. Moreover, this particular issue highlights the problems facing the Island as population rises and more housing and infrastructure are needed at the expense of the environment. Granted that the ten-vergée site is a tiny fraction of the 33,000 vergées of agricultural land in the Island and its loss would make little difference, it can be argued that all these salami slices of development are combining to limit the Island’s countryside and destroy its historic rural character – as is sadly apparent elsewhere in the Island. There is no easy answer. The slogan is often trotted out: ‘We need to ensure that there are brown cows in green fields’. In the case of the St Peter development, if delayed or ultimately unsuccessful, there would indeed be a green field – but whether there would be brown cows available to graze it would be far more debatable. SPRING 2019

- 9


A JERSEY SALMAGUNDI A mixed salad of Jersey life and events

The sales and marketing director of the Jersey Royal Company, William Church, updates us as on this year’s season so far.

We are now entering the main part of the season when daily exports will hit their peaks, but to be honest this could have started two weeks earlier. Whilst the wholesale market plays its part, retailers remain the principal outlets and due to the nature of how they work everything

ART FUND JERSEY SPRING SUMMER PROGRAMME 2019

Poulk Prints. Ben Nicholson (1894 - 1982) Princess 1949 57 x 73 cms

10

- SPRING 2019

THIS year’s opera and jazz festival, in the grounds of Domaine Des Vaux, St Lawrence, takes place from Saturday 13 July to Wednesday 17 July. For the first time last year a special jazz evening featuring Jersey vocalist Adria Godfrey and the six-piece jazz band, Serenata, became part of the annual festival. This continues this year and starts off the festival on Saturday 13 July.

ROYAL PROGRESS

The 2019 season continues to be the polar opposite to last year. All crops were planted into excellent seed beds following a drier winter, and since then there has been equal measures of sun and rain to keep everything growing well.

DOMAINE DES ‘ VAUX OPERA FESTIVAL

is planned so far in advance, and it is often difficult to react to changes in fortunes of the weather. Frustrating this may be, but focussing on the positive, yields are very good and following more rain this week the later planted crops and the seed crop are both in a really good place too. All of the early côtils and lesser gradients were dug by hand in April, and farmers have now moved on to using harvesters on the larger flatter fields.

The generic PR campaign has again been working very well, with some excellent coverage across numerous publications as well as a few slots on television, with arguably the highlight being Phil Vickery cooking Jersey Royals on the côtil overlooking Mont Orgueil castle for ITV’s ‘This Morning’ programme at the start of April.

The rest of the programme is: Madame Butterfly (Puccini) on Monday 15 July; L’Italiana in Algeri (Rossini); an Opera Gala, titled ‘From Beethoven to Bernstein’ on Wednesday 17 July.

This collaboration of talented Jersey musicians in Jersey, led by Adria Godfrey, will take the audience on a journey through some of the most memorable melodies of the modern era, well known classics with some rarely heard standards, together with smooth ballads and foot tapping up tempo numbers. It should be an unforgettable evening of music, stories and dance.

This year, Serenata Jazz promises an evening of musical art of different cultures. Jazz, influenced by Latin, European, African and Arabic rhythmic traditions, will make this an uplifting, rich and inventive evening.

This will be the 32nd season in which the Diva Opera Company will be performing at Domaine Des Vaux. The opera festival continues to support the vital work of Jersey Zoo; this year supporting the Chough breeding programme. The Lady

CCA GALLERIES On 13 June the Arts Fund will host a talk by Ashley Gray on 20th Century British and American textiles. Ashley will tell the story of the evolution of British textiles and tapestries from its initial relationship from artist (such as Vanessa Bell, Henry Moore, Graham Sutherland and Henri Matisse) to textile manufacture in post war Britain. Attendees will also hear about the fascinating subject of American textiles after the Great Depression in 1929 and President Franklin D Roosevelt’s inspired artistic ‘New Deal’ for getting America back on its creative feet. During times of austerity comes creativity. Hundreds of skilled and unskilled artists and many illiterate women were desperate for work and became trained in sewing and textile printing - the hand blocked textiles they designed have a wonderful naive feel and translate to an item of beauty; it is an extraordinary piece of history that these have been saved and their story told.

Ashley Gray is a successful Modern Art specialist and has lectured throughout America and the UK. The event will be held at the Jersey Museum, 18.30 to 20.30 on 13 June. To book, please contact Anne Binney on jersey@artfund.org.uk or call 01534 863129

Saturday gallery opening with Bachîn ringing by Geraint Jennings

23 May – 7 June Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973) Musical Fawn, 1963 Screen Printed in Colour on Linen, Artist Signature in Print, Provenance Bloomcraft Fabr

22 June, 11.00 – 2.00 Saturday gallery opening

Purtchi, 2018, Acrylic and foam on Triplewall, 35x49.5cms

3 May, 12.30 -1.30

4 May, 11.00 – 2.00

Martin Toft: the Last 100 exhibition, pop up photography studio and discussion to record and celebrate local Jèrriais speakers and their environment

For further details and tickets, please contact Anne Binney at: anne.binney@aol.com

21 June – 26 July

3 May – 10 June

‘How Jersey can connect with the International Art Scene’, a masterclass with Danny Rolph, tickets £10 from CCAI

The Diva Opera Company’s inimitable mix of superb singing and acting, beautiful costumes and sets and outstanding performances from Bryan Evans on the piano bring the operas to life. All the performances take place in a marquee in the round, giving everyone in the audience the thrill of opera up close.

Jersey Summer Exhibition selective exhibition of some of the best established and emerging artists in Jersey. Curated by Rob and Nicky Carter with Dylan Jones OBE.

Exhibition Schedule Spring 2019

Danny Rolph: Jerriais an exhibition of new Triplewall paintings based on the Jèrriais language

Taverners is also supported once again this year, and it is hoped that proceeds from the Opera Gala evening will help them purchase two sports wheelchairs.

30 April – 7 June

Recent print releases by Paul Huxley and Sir Peter Blake with archive prints by Sandra Blow, Damien Hirst and Storm Thorgerson Limited edition silk screen prints, with collage, embossing, paint, glazes and glitter by contemporary print masters and rare archive prints by the legendary Sandra Blow, with icon album covers by Storm Thorgerson and Storm Studios.

4 July, 5.00

‘Why Invest in Jersey’s Culture’. A discussion with Ben Shenton and Stephen McCoubrey. Tickets from the gallery in advance.

11 July, 5.30

Presentation of Signtech Rural Landscape Award and lecture by Doug Ford on ‘Changes to Jersey’s rural landscape through the ages’.

1 Aug– 2 Sept

Gallery closed

SPRING 2019

- 11


A JERSEY SALMAGUNDI A mixed salad of Jersey life and events

The sales and marketing director of the Jersey Royal Company, William Church, updates us as on this year’s season so far.

We are now entering the main part of the season when daily exports will hit their peaks, but to be honest this could have started two weeks earlier. Whilst the wholesale market plays its part, retailers remain the principal outlets and due to the nature of how they work everything

ART FUND JERSEY SPRING SUMMER PROGRAMME 2019

Poulk Prints. Ben Nicholson (1894 - 1982) Princess 1949 57 x 73 cms

10

- SPRING 2019

THIS year’s opera and jazz festival, in the grounds of Domaine Des Vaux, St Lawrence, takes place from Saturday 13 July to Wednesday 17 July. For the first time last year a special jazz evening featuring Jersey vocalist Adria Godfrey and the six-piece jazz band, Serenata, became part of the annual festival. This continues this year and starts off the festival on Saturday 13 July.

ROYAL PROGRESS

The 2019 season continues to be the polar opposite to last year. All crops were planted into excellent seed beds following a drier winter, and since then there has been equal measures of sun and rain to keep everything growing well.

DOMAINE DES ‘ VAUX OPERA FESTIVAL

is planned so far in advance, and it is often difficult to react to changes in fortunes of the weather. Frustrating this may be, but focussing on the positive, yields are very good and following more rain this week the later planted crops and the seed crop are both in a really good place too. All of the early côtils and lesser gradients were dug by hand in April, and farmers have now moved on to using harvesters on the larger flatter fields.

The generic PR campaign has again been working very well, with some excellent coverage across numerous publications as well as a few slots on television, with arguably the highlight being Phil Vickery cooking Jersey Royals on the côtil overlooking Mont Orgueil castle for ITV’s ‘This Morning’ programme at the start of April.

The rest of the programme is: Madame Butterfly (Puccini) on Monday 15 July; L’Italiana in Algeri (Rossini); an Opera Gala, titled ‘From Beethoven to Bernstein’ on Wednesday 17 July.

This collaboration of talented Jersey musicians in Jersey, led by Adria Godfrey, will take the audience on a journey through some of the most memorable melodies of the modern era, well known classics with some rarely heard standards, together with smooth ballads and foot tapping up tempo numbers. It should be an unforgettable evening of music, stories and dance.

This year, Serenata Jazz promises an evening of musical art of different cultures. Jazz, influenced by Latin, European, African and Arabic rhythmic traditions, will make this an uplifting, rich and inventive evening.

This will be the 32nd season in which the Diva Opera Company will be performing at Domaine Des Vaux. The opera festival continues to support the vital work of Jersey Zoo; this year supporting the Chough breeding programme. The Lady

CCA GALLERIES On 13 June the Arts Fund will host a talk by Ashley Gray on 20th Century British and American textiles. Ashley will tell the story of the evolution of British textiles and tapestries from its initial relationship from artist (such as Vanessa Bell, Henry Moore, Graham Sutherland and Henri Matisse) to textile manufacture in post war Britain. Attendees will also hear about the fascinating subject of American textiles after the Great Depression in 1929 and President Franklin D Roosevelt’s inspired artistic ‘New Deal’ for getting America back on its creative feet. During times of austerity comes creativity. Hundreds of skilled and unskilled artists and many illiterate women were desperate for work and became trained in sewing and textile printing - the hand blocked textiles they designed have a wonderful naive feel and translate to an item of beauty; it is an extraordinary piece of history that these have been saved and their story told.

Ashley Gray is a successful Modern Art specialist and has lectured throughout America and the UK. The event will be held at the Jersey Museum, 18.30 to 20.30 on 13 June. To book, please contact Anne Binney on jersey@artfund.org.uk or call 01534 863129

Saturday gallery opening with Bachîn ringing by Geraint Jennings

23 May – 7 June Pablo Picasso (1881 - 1973) Musical Fawn, 1963 Screen Printed in Colour on Linen, Artist Signature in Print, Provenance Bloomcraft Fabr

22 June, 11.00 – 2.00 Saturday gallery opening

Purtchi, 2018, Acrylic and foam on Triplewall, 35x49.5cms

3 May, 12.30 -1.30

4 May, 11.00 – 2.00

Martin Toft: the Last 100 exhibition, pop up photography studio and discussion to record and celebrate local Jèrriais speakers and their environment

For further details and tickets, please contact Anne Binney at: anne.binney@aol.com

21 June – 26 July

3 May – 10 June

‘How Jersey can connect with the International Art Scene’, a masterclass with Danny Rolph, tickets £10 from CCAI

The Diva Opera Company’s inimitable mix of superb singing and acting, beautiful costumes and sets and outstanding performances from Bryan Evans on the piano bring the operas to life. All the performances take place in a marquee in the round, giving everyone in the audience the thrill of opera up close.

Jersey Summer Exhibition selective exhibition of some of the best established and emerging artists in Jersey. Curated by Rob and Nicky Carter with Dylan Jones OBE.

Exhibition Schedule Spring 2019

Danny Rolph: Jerriais an exhibition of new Triplewall paintings based on the Jèrriais language

Taverners is also supported once again this year, and it is hoped that proceeds from the Opera Gala evening will help them purchase two sports wheelchairs.

30 April – 7 June

Recent print releases by Paul Huxley and Sir Peter Blake with archive prints by Sandra Blow, Damien Hirst and Storm Thorgerson Limited edition silk screen prints, with collage, embossing, paint, glazes and glitter by contemporary print masters and rare archive prints by the legendary Sandra Blow, with icon album covers by Storm Thorgerson and Storm Studios.

4 July, 5.00

‘Why Invest in Jersey’s Culture’. A discussion with Ben Shenton and Stephen McCoubrey. Tickets from the gallery in advance.

11 July, 5.30

Presentation of Signtech Rural Landscape Award and lecture by Doug Ford on ‘Changes to Jersey’s rural landscape through the ages’.

1 Aug– 2 Sept

Gallery closed

SPRING 2019

- 11


OUT & ABOUT

Secret

GARDENS As part of this year’s summer programme of Open Gardens, the garden of St John property Les Chasses, owned by David Roberts, is open on 7th July to benefit the Jersey Association for Youth and Friendship. Chloë Bowler paid a visit.

12

- SPRING 2019

OUT & ABOUT

E

ach year, as part of their fundraising efforts, the Jersey Association for Youth and Friendship hold a series of Open Garden events in the spring and summer, in which some of the Island’s beautiful private gardens – ‘secret gardens’, one might say – are opened to the public.

The JAYF is a charity which was formed to provide homes for young people who, through no fault of their own, have nowhere to live. The charity also provides caretakers and counsellors in these homes for these young people to help improve their situation.

Les Chasses is a traditional granite home, built in the 18th Century.

SPRING 2019

- 13


OUT & ABOUT

Secret

GARDENS As part of this year’s summer programme of Open Gardens, the garden of St John property Les Chasses, owned by David Roberts, is open on 7th July to benefit the Jersey Association for Youth and Friendship. Chloë Bowler paid a visit.

12

- SPRING 2019

OUT & ABOUT

E

ach year, as part of their fundraising efforts, the Jersey Association for Youth and Friendship hold a series of Open Garden events in the spring and summer, in which some of the Island’s beautiful private gardens – ‘secret gardens’, one might say – are opened to the public.

The JAYF is a charity which was formed to provide homes for young people who, through no fault of their own, have nowhere to live. The charity also provides caretakers and counsellors in these homes for these young people to help improve their situation.

Les Chasses is a traditional granite home, built in the 18th Century.

SPRING 2019

- 13


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

David Roberts of Les Chasses, St John, has supported this charity day before, and is delighted to be opening again to the public on 7 July this year. Les Chasses is a traditional granite home, built in the 18th Century, with some parts potentially dating even earlier. It has a grand drive lined with trees, and arrives at a large entrance in front of the house, complete with cider press and pump. It was exactly 30 years ago this year, during a lunch with the previous owners who happened to be good friends, when they mentioned that they were going to return to South Africa. Not one to miss a chance, David did a deal there and then to purchase the property and has lived there happily ever since. It is easy to see that he is in love with the property. The house itself is one of huge historical importance in Jersey, being mentioned in the book Old Jersey Houses Vol. 1. It has Listed parts, original stone carved fireplaces, and even an outdoor, stone staircase. The whole house is surrounded by its garden, which has been a labour of love for David from the moment he moved in.

It [the house] has Listed parts, original stone carved fireplaces, and even an outdoor, stone staircase.

David enlisted the help of Chelsea Flower Show Gold Medallists Hillier’s in Southampton to come over and advise on the garden plan, which amongst other projects, resulted in growing an orchard. David is keen to stress the importance of his team who have helped and continue to help him over the years, including Keith who lives at the property and who has been employed by David for about forty years, Paulo who looks after the day to day maintenance, and whom the ducks and chickens follow around like the Pied Piper, and Tom the botanist who also lives on site and is a constant source of knowledge on plants and trees. The garden is run organically, producing its own fertiliser, as well as housing an impressive vegetable garden. As soon as you enter the garden you can feel the history of the place. Some of the plants and trees date back years, such as the magnificent tulip tree, which is probably one of the largest in the

14

- SPRING 2019

There are many parts to the gardens at Les Chasses, including a beautiful pond filled with wildlife, hidden pathways lined with bluebells, and red squirrels...

island. It stands in great beauty behind the house, surrounded by camellias and magnolia trees. There are many parts to the gardens at Les Chasses, including a beautiful pond filled with wildlife, hidden pathways lined with bluebells, and red squirrels chasing through the woods. David is delighted to be opening the garden again this year. As he says, he really believes in the work that JAYF does for people of a vulnerable age. It is over four years since Les Chasses first became part of the JAYF Open Gardens, and in 2018 it was held at a different time of year, so he is delighted that visitors will be able to see it in full bloom this summer. Les Chasses JAYF Open Garden Day is on 7 July from 2pm to 5pm. For more information visit jersey.com

” SPRING 2019

- 15


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

David Roberts of Les Chasses, St John, has supported this charity day before, and is delighted to be opening again to the public on 7 July this year. Les Chasses is a traditional granite home, built in the 18th Century, with some parts potentially dating even earlier. It has a grand drive lined with trees, and arrives at a large entrance in front of the house, complete with cider press and pump. It was exactly 30 years ago this year, during a lunch with the previous owners who happened to be good friends, when they mentioned that they were going to return to South Africa. Not one to miss a chance, David did a deal there and then to purchase the property and has lived there happily ever since. It is easy to see that he is in love with the property. The house itself is one of huge historical importance in Jersey, being mentioned in the book Old Jersey Houses Vol. 1. It has Listed parts, original stone carved fireplaces, and even an outdoor, stone staircase. The whole house is surrounded by its garden, which has been a labour of love for David from the moment he moved in.

It [the house] has Listed parts, original stone carved fireplaces, and even an outdoor, stone staircase.

David enlisted the help of Chelsea Flower Show Gold Medallists Hillier’s in Southampton to come over and advise on the garden plan, which amongst other projects, resulted in growing an orchard. David is keen to stress the importance of his team who have helped and continue to help him over the years, including Keith who lives at the property and who has been employed by David for about forty years, Paulo who looks after the day to day maintenance, and whom the ducks and chickens follow around like the Pied Piper, and Tom the botanist who also lives on site and is a constant source of knowledge on plants and trees. The garden is run organically, producing its own fertiliser, as well as housing an impressive vegetable garden. As soon as you enter the garden you can feel the history of the place. Some of the plants and trees date back years, such as the magnificent tulip tree, which is probably one of the largest in the

14

- SPRING 2019

There are many parts to the gardens at Les Chasses, including a beautiful pond filled with wildlife, hidden pathways lined with bluebells, and red squirrels...

island. It stands in great beauty behind the house, surrounded by camellias and magnolia trees. There are many parts to the gardens at Les Chasses, including a beautiful pond filled with wildlife, hidden pathways lined with bluebells, and red squirrels chasing through the woods. David is delighted to be opening the garden again this year. As he says, he really believes in the work that JAYF does for people of a vulnerable age. It is over four years since Les Chasses first became part of the JAYF Open Gardens, and in 2018 it was held at a different time of year, so he is delighted that visitors will be able to see it in full bloom this summer. Les Chasses JAYF Open Garden Day is on 7 July from 2pm to 5pm. For more information visit jersey.com

” SPRING 2019

- 15


FARM & GARDEN

Think Rayburn. Think Rubis. Install | Fuel | Maintain

Where Sheep May Safely Graze

If you own or are buying a Rayburn for your home, Rubis is the only accredited Rayburn Heat Centre in the Channel Islands. Speak to us about installation and maintenance and find out more about our Thermo Premium kerosene to keep your stove in top condition.

01534 709 800 or 01481 200 800 enquiries@rubis-ci.co.uk

The ‘Jersey Sheep’ was popular in the Island centuries before that livestock-come-lately, the Jersey cow. Now, as the similar-looking Manx Loaghtan multi-horned breed, it is once more visible on the Island’s north coast. Gill Maccabe met the shepherd, Aaron Le Couteur

rubis-ci.co.uk SPRING 2019

- 17


FARM & GARDEN

Think Rayburn. Think Rubis. Install | Fuel | Maintain

Where Sheep May Safely Graze

If you own or are buying a Rayburn for your home, Rubis is the only accredited Rayburn Heat Centre in the Channel Islands. Speak to us about installation and maintenance and find out more about our Thermo Premium kerosene to keep your stove in top condition.

01534 709 800 or 01481 200 800 enquiries@rubis-ci.co.uk

The ‘Jersey Sheep’ was popular in the Island centuries before that livestock-come-lately, the Jersey cow. Now, as the similar-looking Manx Loaghtan multi-horned breed, it is once more visible on the Island’s north coast. Gill Maccabe met the shepherd, Aaron Le Couteur

rubis-ci.co.uk SPRING 2019

- 17


FARM & GARDEN

I

FARM & GARDEN

n the early 20th Century, the Island’s north coast was an almost continuous belt of natural, wild landscape, supporting an intricate network of habitats that supported a wide variety of wildlife. Cattle, ponies and sheep grazed upon the cliffs and gorse and bracken were collected for fuel and bedding.

A few years later he was then offered a job with the States and year by year the herd grew - along with the length of Aaron’s workdays.

Roll on 50 years and pioneer species dominated the wilder areas, such as bracken, gorse, holme oak and sycamore, smothering and extinguishing what had gone before. This led to a decline in biodiversity, with many coastal and heathland species, such as the Yellowhammer, becoming extinct locally. Men with scythes - and later, with more modern machinery - were struggling to cope and maintain order.

‘Yes, it’s a bit of a misconception that I am a full-time shepherd… but actually I am! But I’m also a full time States employee. I have a great line manager, but apart from lambing, most of the work can be done after work and at weekends.

Positive action was taken by the National Trust in 2008 when, after much research, 20 of the primitive Manx Loaghtan breed were brought over to the Island and introduced into some 140 vergées of land between Sorel Point and Devil’s Hole. The aim was to trial an old idea with a new name – ‘conservation grazing’. The Manx was chosen because of its genetic similarity to the traditional Jersey multi-horned sheep, which used to graze the headlands and slopes of the north coast. The six-horned sheep had one horn on each side bent towards the nose, another pair towards the neck and the third upright, and were probably of Viking ancestry. Manx Loaghtans are a hardy breed able to survive in harsh conditions, and they are active browsers, making them an ideal breed for conservation grazing. FOR sheep to safely graze there must be a good shepherd looking after them. Meet Aaron Le Couteur. He usually works as a States Agricultural and Plant Health Inspector, but for three weeks a year, he is both shepherd and midwife, responsible for the daily care of 400 curly-horned, rare Manx Loaghtan sheep. He spends his annual holiday literally living - and sleeping - on the job. He was a young agricultural contractor working with his father, Michael, and they were doing some work for the National Trust at the time the project was launched. He had just gained a degree from Harper Adams University - the leading specialist university in the UK, which tackles the future development of our planet’s food production, process and sustainable business - and heard himself saying ‘yes’ to becoming a part-time shepherd.

Now, every April he has a three week holiday in his van, overlooking the lamb maternity ward.

‘Europe lost 80% of its heathland in the last 100 years because of the lack of grazing animals. Manx sheep have a hardy nature and are nimble and light of foot which makes them ideal for the steep slopes. ‘It’s quite complicated, but put simply, sheep keep the bracken down with their feet, which encourages the grass below to grow. They eat the grass, which is grain, and the bio-diversity continues.’

Europe lost 80% of its heathland in the last 100 years because of the lack of grazing animals.

On the day we caught up with him, it was week two, and already that day some 13 little black-bodied youngsters had appeared, some easier than others.

I need a job to pay for all of this,’ he said, gazing around at his flock. ‘I get a lot of help from nice people there are a lot of nice people around helping with anything from vets bills to hay fields and weighing scales. We also get a bit of funding from the Countryside Enhancement Scheme, which covers a few costs. And the field we use for lambing belongs to my dad. ‘Balance the books? I don’t know how I do it really. My sister, Allison, is really clever, she helps me a lot.’ Asked what was the most rewarding aspect of his work, he replied, without hesitation: ‘Oh, that’s easy - seeing the difference in the habitat, watching grass and other species come through again after years of absence. ‘If you go to Sorel where the sheep are gazing freely, you will see the difference. The heathland was covered with bracken ten years ago - no animal can eat bracken. If we had just left the heathland alone our temperate climate would quickly cause it to revert to woodland.

The large field was separated into penned areas: pre-natal, maternity, ante-natal and ‘Special Care’ - if required.

The maternity unit for the sheep - a portacabin in a previous life - has little in the way of facilities. But for three weeks in spring it has the most stunning role: a 20-vergée lambing unit, containing 163 lambing Manx Loaghtan ewes. Think of a pre-Raphaelite plein air painting - Ford Maddox Brown Pretty Baa Lambs perhaps, but with modern clothing. A lovely ‘baa’ sound, which actually sounds closer to ‘maa’ fills the air. It’s a thin, high pitched bleat, which is countered by the low pitched, low intensity vocals of the mother - said to produce a calming effect on the lamb. It’s the sort of sound you wish to record and play back - enchanting and hopeful and spring-like. Aaron’s sheep family all give birth within a three-week period.

To maximise the chances of the bereaved foster mother accepting the new lamb, the skin from the stillborn lamb can be put over the rejected lamb for a few days – a technique that must be almost as old as the domestication of sheep. He apologised: ‘If I’m a bit smelly, I haven’t showered for a week and I might not manage to find the words as it’s difficult when you are tired. He sounded just like any new parent. As Aaron was introducing the layout of his busy field ward, he was looking off into the middle distance. It was apparent something had caught his eye: ‘Oh, hang on a minute, I’ll be back. She’s done a runner.’ He grabbed his crook and leapt over a gate with Mist the nine-year-old sheepdog at heel, towards a ewe running to the far corner of the field. A tiny, wet, shivering black bundle was visible on the grass nearby. If lambs don’t receive vital colostrum within two hours of birth, they won’t survive.

The Manx breed are good at lambing but can just walk away from their young for all number of reasons - many of them solvable by an astute shepherd. And so the baby was lifted up in one hand and with a brief instruction, Mist herded the wayward mother into a nearby birthing pen. Obviously sheep don’t go anywhere alone and so there was a little kerfuffle as other ewes wanted to get in on the action and follow the dog. Eventually the new mother was isolated together with the correct youngster and Mist was further deployed to guard the pen. She resumed position - her nose sticking under the bottom rung of the fence facing inwards - and did not move an inch. ‘She gives the mother a feeling of security, the ewe knows she is safe in there as the dogs protect the herd,’ explained Aaron. Even in the close proximity of the fiveby-five pen, the mother refused to look over at her new-born, instead tugging frantically at the grass and hay with a voracious appetite. Over and over again, the absurdly cute little bundle of curly black hair (they stay black for a couple of months after birth) tried to get up on its little spindly legs, only to fall over, before trying again - and again.

For about ten minutes we watched the drama being played out hoping nature would take its course. Then the spell broke. Mum started pawing at the ground and sat down, one giant heave of her flanks and out plopped a sac containing another little wet, black bundle. Mum took a brief look before returning to her grazing. Aaron jumped in to help the lamb’s start in life as it was obvious the mother wasn’t going to do so. He patted and massaged its middle to help promote its first breath, as the mother would have done had she read the textbooks. The little sibling was still bleating plaintively and trying to stand up but getting weaker with every attempt – while Mum was still chewing away, seemingly unperturbed. Aaron gently swung the still lamb by its back legs to get the airflow started, until thankfully, its little mouth opened and it joined its sibling in high pitched bleats. Seconds later a lamb was spotted presenting incorrectly: the forelegs weren’t facing right way, meaning a possible breech. Some brief intervention time later and two big lambs popped out in quick succession.

SPRING 2019

- 19


FARM & GARDEN

I

FARM & GARDEN

n the early 20th Century, the Island’s north coast was an almost continuous belt of natural, wild landscape, supporting an intricate network of habitats that supported a wide variety of wildlife. Cattle, ponies and sheep grazed upon the cliffs and gorse and bracken were collected for fuel and bedding.

A few years later he was then offered a job with the States and year by year the herd grew - along with the length of Aaron’s workdays.

Roll on 50 years and pioneer species dominated the wilder areas, such as bracken, gorse, holme oak and sycamore, smothering and extinguishing what had gone before. This led to a decline in biodiversity, with many coastal and heathland species, such as the Yellowhammer, becoming extinct locally. Men with scythes - and later, with more modern machinery - were struggling to cope and maintain order.

‘Yes, it’s a bit of a misconception that I am a full-time shepherd… but actually I am! But I’m also a full time States employee. I have a great line manager, but apart from lambing, most of the work can be done after work and at weekends.

Positive action was taken by the National Trust in 2008 when, after much research, 20 of the primitive Manx Loaghtan breed were brought over to the Island and introduced into some 140 vergées of land between Sorel Point and Devil’s Hole. The aim was to trial an old idea with a new name – ‘conservation grazing’. The Manx was chosen because of its genetic similarity to the traditional Jersey multi-horned sheep, which used to graze the headlands and slopes of the north coast. The six-horned sheep had one horn on each side bent towards the nose, another pair towards the neck and the third upright, and were probably of Viking ancestry. Manx Loaghtans are a hardy breed able to survive in harsh conditions, and they are active browsers, making them an ideal breed for conservation grazing. FOR sheep to safely graze there must be a good shepherd looking after them. Meet Aaron Le Couteur. He usually works as a States Agricultural and Plant Health Inspector, but for three weeks a year, he is both shepherd and midwife, responsible for the daily care of 400 curly-horned, rare Manx Loaghtan sheep. He spends his annual holiday literally living - and sleeping - on the job. He was a young agricultural contractor working with his father, Michael, and they were doing some work for the National Trust at the time the project was launched. He had just gained a degree from Harper Adams University - the leading specialist university in the UK, which tackles the future development of our planet’s food production, process and sustainable business - and heard himself saying ‘yes’ to becoming a part-time shepherd.

Now, every April he has a three week holiday in his van, overlooking the lamb maternity ward.

‘Europe lost 80% of its heathland in the last 100 years because of the lack of grazing animals. Manx sheep have a hardy nature and are nimble and light of foot which makes them ideal for the steep slopes. ‘It’s quite complicated, but put simply, sheep keep the bracken down with their feet, which encourages the grass below to grow. They eat the grass, which is grain, and the bio-diversity continues.’

Europe lost 80% of its heathland in the last 100 years because of the lack of grazing animals.

On the day we caught up with him, it was week two, and already that day some 13 little black-bodied youngsters had appeared, some easier than others.

I need a job to pay for all of this,’ he said, gazing around at his flock. ‘I get a lot of help from nice people there are a lot of nice people around helping with anything from vets bills to hay fields and weighing scales. We also get a bit of funding from the Countryside Enhancement Scheme, which covers a few costs. And the field we use for lambing belongs to my dad. ‘Balance the books? I don’t know how I do it really. My sister, Allison, is really clever, she helps me a lot.’ Asked what was the most rewarding aspect of his work, he replied, without hesitation: ‘Oh, that’s easy - seeing the difference in the habitat, watching grass and other species come through again after years of absence. ‘If you go to Sorel where the sheep are gazing freely, you will see the difference. The heathland was covered with bracken ten years ago - no animal can eat bracken. If we had just left the heathland alone our temperate climate would quickly cause it to revert to woodland.

The large field was separated into penned areas: pre-natal, maternity, ante-natal and ‘Special Care’ - if required.

The maternity unit for the sheep - a portacabin in a previous life - has little in the way of facilities. But for three weeks in spring it has the most stunning role: a 20-vergée lambing unit, containing 163 lambing Manx Loaghtan ewes. Think of a pre-Raphaelite plein air painting - Ford Maddox Brown Pretty Baa Lambs perhaps, but with modern clothing. A lovely ‘baa’ sound, which actually sounds closer to ‘maa’ fills the air. It’s a thin, high pitched bleat, which is countered by the low pitched, low intensity vocals of the mother - said to produce a calming effect on the lamb. It’s the sort of sound you wish to record and play back - enchanting and hopeful and spring-like. Aaron’s sheep family all give birth within a three-week period.

To maximise the chances of the bereaved foster mother accepting the new lamb, the skin from the stillborn lamb can be put over the rejected lamb for a few days – a technique that must be almost as old as the domestication of sheep. He apologised: ‘If I’m a bit smelly, I haven’t showered for a week and I might not manage to find the words as it’s difficult when you are tired. He sounded just like any new parent. As Aaron was introducing the layout of his busy field ward, he was looking off into the middle distance. It was apparent something had caught his eye: ‘Oh, hang on a minute, I’ll be back. She’s done a runner.’ He grabbed his crook and leapt over a gate with Mist the nine-year-old sheepdog at heel, towards a ewe running to the far corner of the field. A tiny, wet, shivering black bundle was visible on the grass nearby. If lambs don’t receive vital colostrum within two hours of birth, they won’t survive.

The Manx breed are good at lambing but can just walk away from their young for all number of reasons - many of them solvable by an astute shepherd. And so the baby was lifted up in one hand and with a brief instruction, Mist herded the wayward mother into a nearby birthing pen. Obviously sheep don’t go anywhere alone and so there was a little kerfuffle as other ewes wanted to get in on the action and follow the dog. Eventually the new mother was isolated together with the correct youngster and Mist was further deployed to guard the pen. She resumed position - her nose sticking under the bottom rung of the fence facing inwards - and did not move an inch. ‘She gives the mother a feeling of security, the ewe knows she is safe in there as the dogs protect the herd,’ explained Aaron. Even in the close proximity of the fiveby-five pen, the mother refused to look over at her new-born, instead tugging frantically at the grass and hay with a voracious appetite. Over and over again, the absurdly cute little bundle of curly black hair (they stay black for a couple of months after birth) tried to get up on its little spindly legs, only to fall over, before trying again - and again.

For about ten minutes we watched the drama being played out hoping nature would take its course. Then the spell broke. Mum started pawing at the ground and sat down, one giant heave of her flanks and out plopped a sac containing another little wet, black bundle. Mum took a brief look before returning to her grazing. Aaron jumped in to help the lamb’s start in life as it was obvious the mother wasn’t going to do so. He patted and massaged its middle to help promote its first breath, as the mother would have done had she read the textbooks. The little sibling was still bleating plaintively and trying to stand up but getting weaker with every attempt – while Mum was still chewing away, seemingly unperturbed. Aaron gently swung the still lamb by its back legs to get the airflow started, until thankfully, its little mouth opened and it joined its sibling in high pitched bleats. Seconds later a lamb was spotted presenting incorrectly: the forelegs weren’t facing right way, meaning a possible breech. Some brief intervention time later and two big lambs popped out in quick succession.

SPRING 2019

- 19


FARM & GARDEN

Discover a Bright Future in Finance

This mum licked and patted and rubbed and smothered, as she fussed and dried them, and a few minutes later - and after a few false starts - their bambi-like legs, skinny as twigs, were holding them up. It meant they were able to reach underneath their mothers waiting udders and the first feed of vital life giving colostrum. Thankfully, most of the births are problem free. Thankfully, most of the births are problem free. Meanwhile in a special care pen, the reluctant mother was still chewing frantically at the grass, occasionally giving her lambs a little butt with her horns. They had attempted to feed but were finding it difficult to latch on, and she wasn’t helping. At one point, the lambs toddled over to Mist and started licking her nose. She didn’t move an inch, her big dark, wise eyes focused on the job in hand. She has seen it all before also and knew the routine. An everyday medical drama at the Jersey ewes’ maternity hospital. The National Trust for Jersey are understandably pleased with their project. The chief executive officer, Charles Alluto, said: ‘In my view, the conservation grazing project has helped to create a 20

- SPRING 2019

living coastal landscape in which other wildlife will be able to flourish in future. It is a long term plan and only over time will we secure the benefits we seek, but even in a short time ‘Le Don Paton’ (the area where the sheep graze) has benefited with choughs, buzzards, kestrels, fledgling heathland and greater floral diversity such as foxgloves and heathers. ‘Aaron is successfully diversifying our agricultural industry and utilising abandoned land to generate an amazing produce as well as helping sustain a “rare breed” in the British Isles. It is a win/win on so many levels but for it to work well we do need more coastal grazing land so that we can maintain an extensive grazing regime while still increasing the flock to an economically sustainable level.’ And the final word to Aaron: ‘As I get older, I sometimes think I would be quite happy to sign a document saying I will work for you if you feed me and look after me until its time for me to move on.’ And with that, Aaron, who has been living in a modified container for three weeks surviving on tinned food and the largesse of friends dropping by with home-made goodies, had to rush off again to another little birthing incident close by.

Wool After sheep shearing the wool is stored locally or sent off to a company in Cornwall which can sort, scour and card the strong crumbly rich deep brown wool and process it as required, or send it back in 5ply balls which can be sold in local shops. Manx wool is good when used on its own for outerwear or rugs and when blended with mohair can produce a softer yarn ideal for socks They would love to spin it locally but as Aaron comments: ‘It is expensive thousands of pounds expensive. We could produce more of an income with the wool if we were able to make a capital outlay but that is not possible at the moment but it is not wasted, as long as it is clean and dry, we can store it.’

Meat The meat comes from animals of around 15-18 months maturity and has a naturally rich gamey flavour. It is sold via Classic Herd butchers in St Peter or thereservejersey.com, which can supply whole or half meat boxes.

Opportunities to travel

Training and career progression

Meet like-minded people

Team-building community initiatives

Over the past decade, more than 3,000 young Islanders found their first job in finance. Discover your bright future, visit www.jerseyfinance.je/careers

Follow Jersey Finance on Instagram

Roles to suit everyone


FARM & GARDEN

Discover a Bright Future in Finance

This mum licked and patted and rubbed and smothered, as she fussed and dried them, and a few minutes later - and after a few false starts - their bambi-like legs, skinny as twigs, were holding them up. It meant they were able to reach underneath their mothers waiting udders and the first feed of vital life giving colostrum. Thankfully, most of the births are problem free. Thankfully, most of the births are problem free. Meanwhile in a special care pen, the reluctant mother was still chewing frantically at the grass, occasionally giving her lambs a little butt with her horns. They had attempted to feed but were finding it difficult to latch on, and she wasn’t helping. At one point, the lambs toddled over to Mist and started licking her nose. She didn’t move an inch, her big dark, wise eyes focused on the job in hand. She has seen it all before also and knew the routine. An everyday medical drama at the Jersey ewes’ maternity hospital. The National Trust for Jersey are understandably pleased with their project. The chief executive officer, Charles Alluto, said: ‘In my view, the conservation grazing project has helped to create a 20

- SPRING 2019

living coastal landscape in which other wildlife will be able to flourish in future. It is a long term plan and only over time will we secure the benefits we seek, but even in a short time ‘Le Don Paton’ (the area where the sheep graze) has benefited with choughs, buzzards, kestrels, fledgling heathland and greater floral diversity such as foxgloves and heathers. ‘Aaron is successfully diversifying our agricultural industry and utilising abandoned land to generate an amazing produce as well as helping sustain a “rare breed” in the British Isles. It is a win/win on so many levels but for it to work well we do need more coastal grazing land so that we can maintain an extensive grazing regime while still increasing the flock to an economically sustainable level.’ And the final word to Aaron: ‘As I get older, I sometimes think I would be quite happy to sign a document saying I will work for you if you feed me and look after me until its time for me to move on.’ And with that, Aaron, who has been living in a modified container for three weeks surviving on tinned food and the largesse of friends dropping by with home-made goodies, had to rush off again to another little birthing incident close by.

Wool After sheep shearing the wool is stored locally or sent off to a company in Cornwall which can sort, scour and card the strong crumbly rich deep brown wool and process it as required, or send it back in 5ply balls which can be sold in local shops. Manx wool is good when used on its own for outerwear or rugs and when blended with mohair can produce a softer yarn ideal for socks They would love to spin it locally but as Aaron comments: ‘It is expensive thousands of pounds expensive. We could produce more of an income with the wool if we were able to make a capital outlay but that is not possible at the moment but it is not wasted, as long as it is clean and dry, we can store it.’

Meat The meat comes from animals of around 15-18 months maturity and has a naturally rich gamey flavour. It is sold via Classic Herd butchers in St Peter or thereservejersey.com, which can supply whole or half meat boxes.

Opportunities to travel

Training and career progression

Meet like-minded people

Team-building community initiatives

Over the past decade, more than 3,000 young Islanders found their first job in finance. Discover your bright future, visit www.jerseyfinance.je/careers

Follow Jersey Finance on Instagram

Roles to suit everyone


FARM & GARDEN

ALL THE THORNY ISSUES The best-selling author of The Secret Life of Cows, Rosamund Young, farms organically at Kite’s Nest Farm in the Cotswolds

C

limate change, feeding the world, personal health, pollution, poverty, eating meat, crime levels, depression and suicide… all these thorny issues are connected. The reason we farm the way we do organically and with total commitment to animal welfare - is to promote human health. All other challenges flow from there. Without health none of us can do anything about all the other problems facing the world and the people on it. In order to achieve, promote and sustain health we all have to eat well; we have to eat what our bodies require and we have to avoid undesirable extras such as chemical residues and air-borne or windborne pollution and of course we need to drink safe water. Sounds easy. It’s not. As my invalid mother’s carer for 40 years, I managed to bring her back from the edge of death by fundamentally changing her diet, and watching her original deterioration and subsequent revival fuelled my near obsessive preoccupation with the power of food to make us ill or well. I know five people who have reversed their type-2 diabetes diagnosis recently by diet alone; it is a powerful ally and a fearsome, silent, near invisible foe. Eating a poisonous plant and being made ill or dead within a short space of

22

- SPRING 2019

time is dramatic and obvious. Ingesting low-levels of insidious substances that build up in your fat tissues and maybe do not do clear harm for years, is illness by stealth, and one of the reasons that so many people fail to believe what might be happening inside them and why so many still seek out cheap food, happily blind to the potential consequences. I have been accused of failing to address the ‘meat-eating’ debate in my book, The Secret Life of Cows, and it’s true. I wanted to concentrate on celebrating the individuality and intelligence of farm animals. The facts though, are there for us all to assimilate and evaluate. Life is a series of moral dilemmas and practical hurdles. The more we know the better decisions we can make. In the early 1980’s I met a large number of children who had been ‘labelled’ as hyper-active. Many of them came here with their parents to stay on the farm and we all discovered some dramatic facts about their behaviour and general well-being in relation to the food they ate. What we did was certainly not scientific but for a week they only ate unprocessed, whole food (grown here) and drank spring water and fresh milk, had freedom and fresh air… and their aggression and rashes and sleeplessness diminished drastically. This was one of many experiences that made me certain that food quality and appropriateness cannot just affect and

reverse diabetes but depression, eczema, insomnia and a whole host of other conditions. Obviously, there is more to any illness than diet, but I concluded that unless the diet was right then all the other factors are hampered, to say the least. These children also benefitted from feeling useful: they helped harvest food from the garden and hedgerows, came with me to walk the cows in and helped feed the pet lambs. One of the most significant steps any government could take would be to facilitate reconnecting people to how food is grown and allowing them to learn to value and evaluate it: to taste the difference of fresh, whole food as opposed to processed and preserved food and feel the benefit to their health. The knock-on effect would be monumental, saving the NHS money and improving health, tempers, relationships, personal achievements, crime levels, not to mention saving the planet. From 1982 the House of Commons sourced organic food for its restaurants, after the findings of a Royal Commission into pesticide levels in some staple foods were made known to MPs, but it was not published until two years later. It was then substantially re-worded the conclusions were deemed to be too alarming!

JERSEY WATER


Turning off the tap when brushing your teeth can save 6l of water Don’t Waste water For more information about how you can save water, visit www.jerseywater.je


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FARM & GARDEN

SUNSET CONCERT 2019

THE FUTURE IS RURAL The title of a recent report by the American Post Carbon Institute caught the eye, naturally enough, of Alasdair Crosby

The National Trust for Jersey (NTJ), in association with Ashburton Investments, will once again be holding the Sunset Concerts at the stunning natural open-air amphitheatre of Grantez, St Ouen, on Friday 21 and Saturday 22 June 2019.

F

riday night welcomes headliners Choo Ch’Boogie, a New Orleans jazz band who draw inspiration from gypsy jazz greats, supported by local band Brick House. On Saturday, Jersey’s very own songbird, Jessica Lloyd Chays, and her band take to the stage with energetic dance-floor fillers, pop, blues and jazz to get you up on your feet, supported by local band Tibetan Funk! 2018 celebrated the 10th anniversary of Ashburton’s involvement in the concerts, over the course of which the concerts have raised over £80,000 towards the NTJ’s Coastline Campaign. These funds have helped to maintain the coastline and protect the island’s range of native species and diverse natural environment. Managing Director at Ashburton Investments (International), Tony Wilshin, shared that “the concerts are a highlight among Ashburton’s team and their families who are always keen

to volunteer and take part in the event. We take pride in our team’s commitment to preserving our island and educating Jersey’s next generation, whether in the classroom or the great outdoors.” Last year’s concerts raised over an incredible £10,000 alone, thanks to the kindness and generosity of the people of Jersey. This was more than any previous year and the organisers would love to see the target beaten once again in 2019. Following a rising battle against plastic and rubbish being left behind after the concerts, as well as growing global concerns about the environment, Ashburton Investments and the NTJ decided to make this the primary focus for 2018’s concerts; the #leavenothingbutfootprints philosophy was born. In the months following the event, the team were delighted to discover that the

T #leavenothingbutfootprints campaign, removal of single-use plastics and supplier’s commitment to reducing waste and re-usable materials had earned the Sunset Concerts certification of a Plastic Free Jersey Event. Marketing and Events Manager at the NTJ, Donna Le Marrec noted that ‘the #leavenothingbutfootprints campaign saw awareness of the Sunset Concerts, the NTJ and the importance of looking after our coastline rise monumentally; this resulted in very minimal amounts of rubbish left behind and people really did leave nothing but their footprints. We hope to see the same enthusiasm for leaving nothing but footprints at this year’s event’. Both evenings are free to attend. Parking on site is charged at £6 for one evening or £10 for a weekend ticket and can be purchased online on Eventbrite or on the day at the event. Gates open from 5:30pm with performances starting at 7:15pm and the last notes playing as the sun begins to go down around 9:15pm. Remember to bring a picnic to enjoy while the music plays and take everything with you when you go.

he future is rural. It was hardly surprising that I found the idea pleasing and inspiring. Other publications and commercial advertisers might care to make a note of this pleasantly prophetic concept.

but at college I came across Schumacher’s ‘Small is Beautiful’ book, which has had a lasting influence on me.’

However, unfortunately this was not referring to my own magazine, but to the title of a report issued by the Post Carbon Institute. Jersey has already been visited by one of its Fellows: the author, economist and entrepreneur Michael Shuman, a globally recognised expert on community economics, who spoke in 2015 at a well-attended meeting at the Princess Royal Pavilion at the Jersey Zoo, organised by the then chairman of the Jersey Chamber of Commerce, David Warr, and by Kevin Keen. His theme was stimulating economic growth through local companies.

Back to ‘The Future is Rural’ report: its author, Jason Bradford is also closely connected to the Institute. Its subject is the future of food, and in his biographical notes in the report: he ‘reveals key blind spots in

On talking to him after his address, it was evident that he was the opposite to the somewhat derogatory British caricature of an American, totally enthused by bigness, with farms that are as big as Jersey if not as big as Wales, by big cities, tall buildings and by big economies. ‘There are two very different traditions in the USA,’ he said. If you go back to the earliest days of the Republic, there were “Jeffersonians” versus “Hamiltonians”. The Hamiltonians believed in a bigger, stronger state; the Jeffersonians were more in the agrarian, small government mould. I am trying to represent the Jeffersonian tradition. ‘I have been enthused by this all my life –

So that should give you the general idea of the Post Carbon Institute.

conventional wisdom on energy, technology, and demographics. It represents Bradford’s analysis from his career in ecology and agriculture, as well as a synthesis of the historical and scientific underpinnings of the astonishing changes that will transform the food system and society as a whole.’ Quoting from the introduction to the report:

‘Today’s economic globalisation is the most extreme case of complex social organisation in history - and the energetic and material basis for this complexity is waning. Not only are concentrated raw resources becoming rarer, but previous investments in infrastructure (for example, ports) are in the process of decay and facing accelerating threats from climate change and social disruptions. The collapse of complex societies is an historical common occurrence, but what we are facing now is at an unprecedented scale. Contrary to the forecasts of most demographers, urbanisation will reverse course as globalisation unwinds during the 21st Century. The eventual decline in fossil hydrocarbon flows, and the inability of renewables to fully

substitute will create a deficiency of energy to power bloated urban agglomerations and require a shift of human populations back to the countryside. ‘In short, the future is rural.’ That is a comforting though, even if he the author was not actually referring to my magazine. Orthodox wisdom informs us that there will be an ever-increasing rise of people living in cities. This report argues precisely the opposite. All big cities decline; a page in the report is illustrated by a picture of the temple complex of Angkor Wat in Cambodia; constructed in the 12th Century; it is estimated that at its peak it had 1 million inhabitants. Until modern archaeological excavation, it was completely covered by jungle. As the report states: ‘Prior to the fossil fuel era, cities could only be “insect-sized”, whereas with fossil fuels they have grown as large as dinosaurs.’ A section of the report outlines some modern schools of thought on agrarian ways of living without fossil fuels and such things as organic, biodynamic and permacultural farming are considered. The report in its entirety may be downloaded from www.postcarbon.org/ publications/the-future-is-rural. It is a good read and very relevant to the current upsurge in concern about climate change and the changes necessary to our present way of life.

Keep up to date with all the latest news on the Sunset Concerts in association with Ashburton Investments by following @SunsetConcertsJersey on Facebook and Instagram.

24

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 25


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

FARM & GARDEN

SUNSET CONCERT 2019

THE FUTURE IS RURAL The title of a recent report by the American Post Carbon Institute caught the eye, naturally enough, of Alasdair Crosby

The National Trust for Jersey (NTJ), in association with Ashburton Investments, will once again be holding the Sunset Concerts at the stunning natural open-air amphitheatre of Grantez, St Ouen, on Friday 21 and Saturday 22 June 2019.

F

riday night welcomes headliners Choo Ch’Boogie, a New Orleans jazz band who draw inspiration from gypsy jazz greats, supported by local band Brick House. On Saturday, Jersey’s very own songbird, Jessica Lloyd Chays, and her band take to the stage with energetic dance-floor fillers, pop, blues and jazz to get you up on your feet, supported by local band Tibetan Funk! 2018 celebrated the 10th anniversary of Ashburton’s involvement in the concerts, over the course of which the concerts have raised over £80,000 towards the NTJ’s Coastline Campaign. These funds have helped to maintain the coastline and protect the island’s range of native species and diverse natural environment. Managing Director at Ashburton Investments (International), Tony Wilshin, shared that “the concerts are a highlight among Ashburton’s team and their families who are always keen

to volunteer and take part in the event. We take pride in our team’s commitment to preserving our island and educating Jersey’s next generation, whether in the classroom or the great outdoors.” Last year’s concerts raised over an incredible £10,000 alone, thanks to the kindness and generosity of the people of Jersey. This was more than any previous year and the organisers would love to see the target beaten once again in 2019. Following a rising battle against plastic and rubbish being left behind after the concerts, as well as growing global concerns about the environment, Ashburton Investments and the NTJ decided to make this the primary focus for 2018’s concerts; the #leavenothingbutfootprints philosophy was born. In the months following the event, the team were delighted to discover that the

T #leavenothingbutfootprints campaign, removal of single-use plastics and supplier’s commitment to reducing waste and re-usable materials had earned the Sunset Concerts certification of a Plastic Free Jersey Event. Marketing and Events Manager at the NTJ, Donna Le Marrec noted that ‘the #leavenothingbutfootprints campaign saw awareness of the Sunset Concerts, the NTJ and the importance of looking after our coastline rise monumentally; this resulted in very minimal amounts of rubbish left behind and people really did leave nothing but their footprints. We hope to see the same enthusiasm for leaving nothing but footprints at this year’s event’. Both evenings are free to attend. Parking on site is charged at £6 for one evening or £10 for a weekend ticket and can be purchased online on Eventbrite or on the day at the event. Gates open from 5:30pm with performances starting at 7:15pm and the last notes playing as the sun begins to go down around 9:15pm. Remember to bring a picnic to enjoy while the music plays and take everything with you when you go.

he future is rural. It was hardly surprising that I found the idea pleasing and inspiring. Other publications and commercial advertisers might care to make a note of this pleasantly prophetic concept.

but at college I came across Schumacher’s ‘Small is Beautiful’ book, which has had a lasting influence on me.’

However, unfortunately this was not referring to my own magazine, but to the title of a report issued by the Post Carbon Institute. Jersey has already been visited by one of its Fellows: the author, economist and entrepreneur Michael Shuman, a globally recognised expert on community economics, who spoke in 2015 at a well-attended meeting at the Princess Royal Pavilion at the Jersey Zoo, organised by the then chairman of the Jersey Chamber of Commerce, David Warr, and by Kevin Keen. His theme was stimulating economic growth through local companies.

Back to ‘The Future is Rural’ report: its author, Jason Bradford is also closely connected to the Institute. Its subject is the future of food, and in his biographical notes in the report: he ‘reveals key blind spots in

On talking to him after his address, it was evident that he was the opposite to the somewhat derogatory British caricature of an American, totally enthused by bigness, with farms that are as big as Jersey if not as big as Wales, by big cities, tall buildings and by big economies. ‘There are two very different traditions in the USA,’ he said. If you go back to the earliest days of the Republic, there were “Jeffersonians” versus “Hamiltonians”. The Hamiltonians believed in a bigger, stronger state; the Jeffersonians were more in the agrarian, small government mould. I am trying to represent the Jeffersonian tradition. ‘I have been enthused by this all my life –

So that should give you the general idea of the Post Carbon Institute.

conventional wisdom on energy, technology, and demographics. It represents Bradford’s analysis from his career in ecology and agriculture, as well as a synthesis of the historical and scientific underpinnings of the astonishing changes that will transform the food system and society as a whole.’ Quoting from the introduction to the report:

‘Today’s economic globalisation is the most extreme case of complex social organisation in history - and the energetic and material basis for this complexity is waning. Not only are concentrated raw resources becoming rarer, but previous investments in infrastructure (for example, ports) are in the process of decay and facing accelerating threats from climate change and social disruptions. The collapse of complex societies is an historical common occurrence, but what we are facing now is at an unprecedented scale. Contrary to the forecasts of most demographers, urbanisation will reverse course as globalisation unwinds during the 21st Century. The eventual decline in fossil hydrocarbon flows, and the inability of renewables to fully

substitute will create a deficiency of energy to power bloated urban agglomerations and require a shift of human populations back to the countryside. ‘In short, the future is rural.’ That is a comforting though, even if he the author was not actually referring to my magazine. Orthodox wisdom informs us that there will be an ever-increasing rise of people living in cities. This report argues precisely the opposite. All big cities decline; a page in the report is illustrated by a picture of the temple complex of Angkor Wat in Cambodia; constructed in the 12th Century; it is estimated that at its peak it had 1 million inhabitants. Until modern archaeological excavation, it was completely covered by jungle. As the report states: ‘Prior to the fossil fuel era, cities could only be “insect-sized”, whereas with fossil fuels they have grown as large as dinosaurs.’ A section of the report outlines some modern schools of thought on agrarian ways of living without fossil fuels and such things as organic, biodynamic and permacultural farming are considered. The report in its entirety may be downloaded from www.postcarbon.org/ publications/the-future-is-rural. It is a good read and very relevant to the current upsurge in concern about climate change and the changes necessary to our present way of life.

Keep up to date with all the latest news on the Sunset Concerts in association with Ashburton Investments by following @SunsetConcertsJersey on Facebook and Instagram.

24

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 25


FARM & GARDEN

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Soil and self-sufficiency Andrew Le Quesne of ‘Earth Project Jersey’ discusses ways in which Jersey could do more to safeguard its greatest agricultural resource - its soil

T

26

- SPRING 2019

he turning of the seasons is always a pleasure and a fascination. But never more so than at the beginning of the growing season when that critical point is passed with rising night time temperatures and longer hours of daylight.

remarkable lack of variety of crops in the fields, the virtual monoculture of the Jersey Royal Potato. The fields are either green with grass for cattle or full of spuds with barely a variation from parish to parish apart from the spread between early and late land.

Now is the time when nature really steps up a gear with buds and sprouts everywhere, but whilst much of it is very uplifting there is an element of concern in amongst all that growth, the

With the lifting of something in the region of 30,000 tonnes of potatoes last year we have to ask the question of where does it all come from and what are we as an Island doing to preserve this vital resource?

The point is, as a rough example, if we assume that our lovely potatoes are made up of 85% water then of the notional total of 30,000 tonnes some 4,500 tonnes was organic vegetable matter. Where did all that 4,500 tonnes come from you may ask, it came from the air the soil and the water, photosynthesis, the process by which green plants take in sunlight energy, water and carbon dioxide and with a mix of minerals and elements turn it into carbohydrates such as sugars and the starches that make the structure of plants.

SPRING 2019

- 27


FARM & GARDEN

Excellent Value

mercurydeliver.com offers real value on everyday essentials

Big Brands

Order Online

A wide range of your favorite brands delivered direct to your door

Place your order Online in minutes. Ideal for those heavy bulky items

Soil and self-sufficiency Andrew Le Quesne of ‘Earth Project Jersey’ discusses ways in which Jersey could do more to safeguard its greatest agricultural resource - its soil

T

26

- SPRING 2019

he turning of the seasons is always a pleasure and a fascination. But never more so than at the beginning of the growing season when that critical point is passed with rising night time temperatures and longer hours of daylight.

remarkable lack of variety of crops in the fields, the virtual monoculture of the Jersey Royal Potato. The fields are either green with grass for cattle or full of spuds with barely a variation from parish to parish apart from the spread between early and late land.

Now is the time when nature really steps up a gear with buds and sprouts everywhere, but whilst much of it is very uplifting there is an element of concern in amongst all that growth, the

With the lifting of something in the region of 30,000 tonnes of potatoes last year we have to ask the question of where does it all come from and what are we as an Island doing to preserve this vital resource?

The point is, as a rough example, if we assume that our lovely potatoes are made up of 85% water then of the notional total of 30,000 tonnes some 4,500 tonnes was organic vegetable matter. Where did all that 4,500 tonnes come from you may ask, it came from the air the soil and the water, photosynthesis, the process by which green plants take in sunlight energy, water and carbon dioxide and with a mix of minerals and elements turn it into carbohydrates such as sugars and the starches that make the structure of plants.

SPRING 2019

- 27


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

Traditionally, for our local potato industry the answer was provided by ‘Vraic’, the dark stringy bladder seaweed that washes up so plentifully on our beaches. This was and is still a fantastic natural fertiliser and a source of organic material to help build and maintain the structure of the soil. Many people I know claim that the trace amounts of iodine and other elements in the vraic helped to impart that special flavour to our Jersey Royals, I like to believe that, but since I do not have a squad of Nobel Laureates to back me up it cannot be substantiated.

Andrew Le Quesne

The problem arises when the soil is depleted to the point where it is no longer able to provide all the ‘food’ that plants need and no longer able to hold the water that the roots need, the complex and highly evolved system starts to fail us and our crops diminish, long term it can result in ‘desertification’ as seen in the Dustbowl in America.

We now find ourselves in a modern, technology driven world where we appear to have everything we need and plenty to waste and throw away and no time for the labour intensive process of gathering the seaweed, but we still need to feed the soil, it cannot maintain structure and fertility on chemicals alone. I am sure that Graeme Le Marquand (see spring edition) and every other vegetable grower in the world will be thinking COMPOST at this point, and they would be correct. What the soil needs best is compost; it helps to let air into the soil, aids water retention, allows fungi and microbes to thrive and also has the ability to put carbon back into the ground.

M A R K E T S | FA R M S H O P S | R E S TA U R A N T S

Passionate about food.

Ongoing trials at Jersey Airport have shown a huge success with the mechanical composting process of a ‘Garbage Guzzler’. This machine can take food waste, green waste and compostable ‘single use’ materials and in the space of 24 hours turn them into a completely safe aerobic compost. This concentrated compost can then be mixed down with lower grade compost and used to grow the next generation of crops. This is, I believe, one of the components of the future of horticulture not just in Jersey but far and wide around the world and especially in small island nations similar to us. Taken in combination with the spare land we have in our empty glasshouses, this also represents a huge opportunity for local horticulture and a reduction in our dependency upon imports. For us in Jersey this represents an opportunity to reduce the approximately 14,000 tonnes of food waste per year that we burn in the incinerator, but also to develop and refine a model that can then be exported around the world. We are not inventing anything new here - we are merely putting the pieces of the jigsaw together.

FROM OUR FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT B A young farmer, Justine Bouscatel, currently a student at the Toulouse agricultural high school in southern France, reports on farming in that region

onjour from France! My farm is 40 km away from Toulouse in an agricultural area called Lauragais. Its size is 165 hectares, which is about average ; 30 hectares of the farm are organic. In the past, there used to be a lot of dairy farms; nowadays, it is more common to farm cereals and beef cattle. On my farm, we only have Charolais cows. We also raise chickens and grow cereals: corn, wheat and sunflower. We also grow fodder such as alfalfa and raygrass. Some of our production of corn is for silage to feed the cows, some is sold to a cooperative and the rest is turned into flour to feed the cows. It is the same for wheat and sunflower, that is to say, we keep some for the cattle and we sell the rest to the cooperative. For the summer, our cows are driven to pasture near a town high in the Pyrenees. We call a company specialized in cattle transportation to take them there and take them back. The meat from the cows is sold directly at local farmers’ markets, in a farm shop and we belong to a large group of producers, which allows us to sell the meat to butchers and school cafeterias. The unrest caused by the notorious ‘gilets jaunes’ demonstrators has a real impact on us: because the stores are close to a place where they demonstrate on Saturdays, we make less money because customers cannot reach the store. I am 16 and in due course I plan to take over my parents’ farm.

Whether it’s reared, grown, caught or made in Jersey, Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of local provenance. In a nutshell, the Mark allows you to make an informed choice to support the local economy, embrace seasonality and reduce your food miles.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

28

- SPRING 2019

If young farmers are ready to adjust to the market, they can thrive. But if they are stubborn and do not want to change, they will not survive. Today, thanks to government subsidies, more and more farmers are going organic. Some farmers are increasingly conscious that pesticides are dangerous both for health and for the environment – I am sure that organic farming is the way ahead.

SPRING 2019

- 29


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

Traditionally, for our local potato industry the answer was provided by ‘Vraic’, the dark stringy bladder seaweed that washes up so plentifully on our beaches. This was and is still a fantastic natural fertiliser and a source of organic material to help build and maintain the structure of the soil. Many people I know claim that the trace amounts of iodine and other elements in the vraic helped to impart that special flavour to our Jersey Royals, I like to believe that, but since I do not have a squad of Nobel Laureates to back me up it cannot be substantiated.

Andrew Le Quesne

The problem arises when the soil is depleted to the point where it is no longer able to provide all the ‘food’ that plants need and no longer able to hold the water that the roots need, the complex and highly evolved system starts to fail us and our crops diminish, long term it can result in ‘desertification’ as seen in the Dustbowl in America.

We now find ourselves in a modern, technology driven world where we appear to have everything we need and plenty to waste and throw away and no time for the labour intensive process of gathering the seaweed, but we still need to feed the soil, it cannot maintain structure and fertility on chemicals alone. I am sure that Graeme Le Marquand (see spring edition) and every other vegetable grower in the world will be thinking COMPOST at this point, and they would be correct. What the soil needs best is compost; it helps to let air into the soil, aids water retention, allows fungi and microbes to thrive and also has the ability to put carbon back into the ground.

M A R K E T S | FA R M S H O P S | R E S TA U R A N T S

Passionate about food.

Ongoing trials at Jersey Airport have shown a huge success with the mechanical composting process of a ‘Garbage Guzzler’. This machine can take food waste, green waste and compostable ‘single use’ materials and in the space of 24 hours turn them into a completely safe aerobic compost. This concentrated compost can then be mixed down with lower grade compost and used to grow the next generation of crops. This is, I believe, one of the components of the future of horticulture not just in Jersey but far and wide around the world and especially in small island nations similar to us. Taken in combination with the spare land we have in our empty glasshouses, this also represents a huge opportunity for local horticulture and a reduction in our dependency upon imports. For us in Jersey this represents an opportunity to reduce the approximately 14,000 tonnes of food waste per year that we burn in the incinerator, but also to develop and refine a model that can then be exported around the world. We are not inventing anything new here - we are merely putting the pieces of the jigsaw together.

FROM OUR FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT B A young farmer, Justine Bouscatel, currently a student at the Toulouse agricultural high school in southern France, reports on farming in that region

onjour from France! My farm is 40 km away from Toulouse in an agricultural area called Lauragais. Its size is 165 hectares, which is about average ; 30 hectares of the farm are organic. In the past, there used to be a lot of dairy farms; nowadays, it is more common to farm cereals and beef cattle. On my farm, we only have Charolais cows. We also raise chickens and grow cereals: corn, wheat and sunflower. We also grow fodder such as alfalfa and raygrass. Some of our production of corn is for silage to feed the cows, some is sold to a cooperative and the rest is turned into flour to feed the cows. It is the same for wheat and sunflower, that is to say, we keep some for the cattle and we sell the rest to the cooperative. For the summer, our cows are driven to pasture near a town high in the Pyrenees. We call a company specialized in cattle transportation to take them there and take them back. The meat from the cows is sold directly at local farmers’ markets, in a farm shop and we belong to a large group of producers, which allows us to sell the meat to butchers and school cafeterias. The unrest caused by the notorious ‘gilets jaunes’ demonstrators has a real impact on us: because the stores are close to a place where they demonstrate on Saturdays, we make less money because customers cannot reach the store. I am 16 and in due course I plan to take over my parents’ farm.

Whether it’s reared, grown, caught or made in Jersey, Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of local provenance. In a nutshell, the Mark allows you to make an informed choice to support the local economy, embrace seasonality and reduce your food miles.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

28

- SPRING 2019

If young farmers are ready to adjust to the market, they can thrive. But if they are stubborn and do not want to change, they will not survive. Today, thanks to government subsidies, more and more farmers are going organic. Some farmers are increasingly conscious that pesticides are dangerous both for health and for the environment – I am sure that organic farming is the way ahead.

SPRING 2019

- 29


FARM & GARDEN

THE RABBIT, THE FOX AND THE ‘TAIL’ OF A MOLE Records of a wilder time, by Mike Stentiford

QUALITY CRAFTMANSHIP. TRUSTED SERVICE. EXPERT ADVICE. At Maple Tree Carpentry, we take on all aspects of trade from new homes to extensions, personal and commercial projects. We pride ourselves on precision, accuracy and guaranteeing a luxury finish.

H

owever far we wish to delve back into time, history holds a remarkably ingrained fascination for us. Although stories of past events and human endeavours have been writ large by the many, recording facts and figures of the Island’s natural inhabitants has, unsurprisingly, enthused only the few.

Documents show that in the 13th Century, Richard de Grey, Custodian of the Isles, was given the unenviable task of fiercely protecting the rabbit warrens at Gorey and La Moye belonging to Henry III.

Nevertheless, thanks to a fair amount of naturally historical documentation within such treasures as Les Chroniques de Jersey (1585), life in the wild lane of yore has been secured for our general delectation The reality, of course, is that nature is a master at the art of fidgetting. It has, and always will have, a strong desire to adapt, move on and survive despite frequent interference from us humans. Not that the woolly rhino, mammoth or reindeer had much choice when they became part of a caveman’s food chain at La Cotte some 250,000 years ago.

Apparently, controversy and squabbles over warren ownership caused bitter feuds and, in many cases, resulted in court cases and heavy penalties. With such high and culinary respect for rabbits at the time, it comes as little surprise that the red fox found difficulty in gaining any similar local residential qualifications.

It was, of course, much, much later that members of the more familiar animal brigade began to gain a mention in the local history books.

If you’ve got a project you’d like us to look at, contact us today for your free quotation. Call Jordan Elliott on 07797 829039 or Matt Rawlings on 07797923439 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapletree.je

30

- SPRING 2019

First to find fame for comment were rabbits, industrious little breeding machines that, once initially introduced by the Normans, went on to gain a premier mention in a local chronicle on 23 April 1253 - how specific is that? Regarded as a tasty addition to any dinner plate, rabbits were prized by Jersey’s high and mighty and woe betide anyone from the lower ranks who ‘dared to snare’.

There were certainly none recorded during the 17th Century although, rather remarkably, foxes were found breeding at Samarès and Surville as late as the 1860s. The demise of Jersey’s last remaining red fox was recorded in the parish of St Brelade in 1870. It seems evident that foxes were brought into the Island for the sole pleasure of the hunting lobby but, with a dearth of wide open spaces, the thrill of the chase likely prohibited any chance of an adrenalin rush. As much alive and productive today as it was in the 17th Century is that carefree wee destroyer of lawns, the mole. Rightly regarded as the originator of nature’s official underground movement, these velvet-coated insectivores first came into learned prominence in 1675

when recommendations to control their excessive numbers were embodied in an Act of the States. This lawful requirement meant that each landowner had a duty to remove every mole found burrowing on their respective property. It all became rather confusing with ‘mole evictions’ strictly dependent on the number of vergées owned. At least there was a monetary reward for each confirmed mole-tail presented to the relevant parish authorities. A single tail raised around one sous (a fraction of a shilling), an offer that apparently encouraged a tsunami of countryside mole catching. According to official records, some 110,345 mole tails were presented to the parish authorities between 1796/98. That the mole is still alive and digging in the 21st Century is certainly testament to the animal’s determination. Despite the likelihood of such stories failing to excite the Island’s populace as a whole, they nevertheless foster thoughts as to why it was felt important to record them in the first place. Just a hint of an historical soft spot for wildness, perhaps?

SPRING 2019

- 31


FARM & GARDEN

THE RABBIT, THE FOX AND THE ‘TAIL’ OF A MOLE Records of a wilder time, by Mike Stentiford

QUALITY CRAFTMANSHIP. TRUSTED SERVICE. EXPERT ADVICE. At Maple Tree Carpentry, we take on all aspects of trade from new homes to extensions, personal and commercial projects. We pride ourselves on precision, accuracy and guaranteeing a luxury finish.

H

owever far we wish to delve back into time, history holds a remarkably ingrained fascination for us. Although stories of past events and human endeavours have been writ large by the many, recording facts and figures of the Island’s natural inhabitants has, unsurprisingly, enthused only the few.

Documents show that in the 13th Century, Richard de Grey, Custodian of the Isles, was given the unenviable task of fiercely protecting the rabbit warrens at Gorey and La Moye belonging to Henry III.

Nevertheless, thanks to a fair amount of naturally historical documentation within such treasures as Les Chroniques de Jersey (1585), life in the wild lane of yore has been secured for our general delectation The reality, of course, is that nature is a master at the art of fidgetting. It has, and always will have, a strong desire to adapt, move on and survive despite frequent interference from us humans. Not that the woolly rhino, mammoth or reindeer had much choice when they became part of a caveman’s food chain at La Cotte some 250,000 years ago.

Apparently, controversy and squabbles over warren ownership caused bitter feuds and, in many cases, resulted in court cases and heavy penalties. With such high and culinary respect for rabbits at the time, it comes as little surprise that the red fox found difficulty in gaining any similar local residential qualifications.

It was, of course, much, much later that members of the more familiar animal brigade began to gain a mention in the local history books.

If you’ve got a project you’d like us to look at, contact us today for your free quotation. Call Jordan Elliott on 07797 829039 or Matt Rawlings on 07797923439 or e-mail us at enquiries@mapletree.je

30

- SPRING 2019

First to find fame for comment were rabbits, industrious little breeding machines that, once initially introduced by the Normans, went on to gain a premier mention in a local chronicle on 23 April 1253 - how specific is that? Regarded as a tasty addition to any dinner plate, rabbits were prized by Jersey’s high and mighty and woe betide anyone from the lower ranks who ‘dared to snare’.

There were certainly none recorded during the 17th Century although, rather remarkably, foxes were found breeding at Samarès and Surville as late as the 1860s. The demise of Jersey’s last remaining red fox was recorded in the parish of St Brelade in 1870. It seems evident that foxes were brought into the Island for the sole pleasure of the hunting lobby but, with a dearth of wide open spaces, the thrill of the chase likely prohibited any chance of an adrenalin rush. As much alive and productive today as it was in the 17th Century is that carefree wee destroyer of lawns, the mole. Rightly regarded as the originator of nature’s official underground movement, these velvet-coated insectivores first came into learned prominence in 1675

when recommendations to control their excessive numbers were embodied in an Act of the States. This lawful requirement meant that each landowner had a duty to remove every mole found burrowing on their respective property. It all became rather confusing with ‘mole evictions’ strictly dependent on the number of vergées owned. At least there was a monetary reward for each confirmed mole-tail presented to the relevant parish authorities. A single tail raised around one sous (a fraction of a shilling), an offer that apparently encouraged a tsunami of countryside mole catching. According to official records, some 110,345 mole tails were presented to the parish authorities between 1796/98. That the mole is still alive and digging in the 21st Century is certainly testament to the animal’s determination. Despite the likelihood of such stories failing to excite the Island’s populace as a whole, they nevertheless foster thoughts as to why it was felt important to record them in the first place. Just a hint of an historical soft spot for wildness, perhaps?

SPRING 2019

- 31


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

THE VALUE OF POLYTUNNELS

A ROSE by any other name...

The polytunnel is one of the most sought after tools for producing our fruit and vegetables and dietary needs - and a favourite haunt at home of Graeme Le Marquand, chairman of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association

P

olytunnels allow us to create a warm sheltered microclimate to grow tender plants from seedlings virtually all the year round, in conditions that otherwise they would never cope with. On a cold and wet blustery day there is nothing like being among those wellnurtured plants with a mug of piping hot coffee and a tipple of something comforting! In addition to my plants – too many to detail - I have several peach trees in the tunnel. An old favourite of mine is PEREGRINE, which produces tasty white fleshed fruit. I also have a container of those very sweet ELSANTA strawberries which I have modified with a plastic water container attached to a down pipe, which is perforated and used for feeding as well as watering. I also have a discarded kitchen refuse bin that I am using in a trial to grow MALBEC long carrots that are renowned for their flavour and are especially recommended for roasting. Of the ten varieties of tomatoes, I grow the SUN GOLD sweet cherry tomato, which is one of my wife’s favourites and is renowned for its very sweet flavour. My own favourites are GUILETTA, which

32

- SPRING 2019

is a large, meaty plum tomato with an excellent flavour followed by the very large beef steak RED PEAR, which apparently originates from Italy and is very popular for barbecues. The polytunnel is approximately 16 x 6 metres and the main growing season commences in February - March and continues through to October/ November. During December I will restock my beds with some of my good garden compost with added fertiliser and cover with sheets of white plastic, which keep the beds free of weeds with the added bonus that the white covering will keep the soil cool from the sun, will deter weeds and will reflect more light. At the end of each growing season the plastic will be recycled. All my seeds are ‘chittered’ - a term used for starting the germination in a propagator, which normally starts

with tomatoes in February/March and aubergines peppers and cucumbers in March/April and when the seedlings mature to two true leaves they are transferred to 3-inch pots with a continuation of larger pots during the growing process, until they are ready to be transferred into the soil. The plants will then be taken out of the pots and planted through the polythene into the soil with a splattering of volcanic rock dust. This should add minerals back to the soil and is widely used by organic growers. Over the last few years I have experimented in companion planting with some fairly good results, especially with nasturtiums that seem to ward off white fly on tomatoes and cucumbers. The yellow flowered blooming variety of cucumber acts as a trap for aphids which I will put on trial with French marigolds and plectranthus - which send off the most foul odour when the leaves are crushed!

President of the former Rosarian society, Graham Querée, tells us about some of his favourite roses

I

realised that I needed to know more about roses when, in 1992, I had the good fortune to be accepted to work in the gardens of Radier Manor, the home of the 9th Earl and Countess of Jersey. I had shown a few roses for my previous employers, but in my new job there were close on 200 roses to care for. Luckily for me, I found on a shelf at a garden centre a little book Growing and Showing Roses by Don Charlton. I was able to

get in touch with Don Charlton, who came to Jersey to give a talk to the Jersey Gardening Club.

Let me detail some of my favourite rose varieties, starting with Hybrid Teas – these are large flowered roses.

Don and his very good friends, Fred and Mary Barnes, were very keen showmen, growing over 2,500 roses between them in their gardens and allotments. They were always willing to give me advice in growing roses and they were very helpful when we organised the rose shows at Samarès Manor.

Red roses – my favourite has to be Ingrid Bergman, which blooms early and continues until you cut the back in late autumn. Other reds would be Royal William, Red Devil, Alec’s Red, Deep Secret, National Trust – and not forgetting the fabulous Fragrant Cloud.

SPRING 2019

- 33


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

THE VALUE OF POLYTUNNELS

A ROSE by any other name...

The polytunnel is one of the most sought after tools for producing our fruit and vegetables and dietary needs - and a favourite haunt at home of Graeme Le Marquand, chairman of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association

P

olytunnels allow us to create a warm sheltered microclimate to grow tender plants from seedlings virtually all the year round, in conditions that otherwise they would never cope with. On a cold and wet blustery day there is nothing like being among those wellnurtured plants with a mug of piping hot coffee and a tipple of something comforting! In addition to my plants – too many to detail - I have several peach trees in the tunnel. An old favourite of mine is PEREGRINE, which produces tasty white fleshed fruit. I also have a container of those very sweet ELSANTA strawberries which I have modified with a plastic water container attached to a down pipe, which is perforated and used for feeding as well as watering. I also have a discarded kitchen refuse bin that I am using in a trial to grow MALBEC long carrots that are renowned for their flavour and are especially recommended for roasting. Of the ten varieties of tomatoes, I grow the SUN GOLD sweet cherry tomato, which is one of my wife’s favourites and is renowned for its very sweet flavour. My own favourites are GUILETTA, which

32

- SPRING 2019

is a large, meaty plum tomato with an excellent flavour followed by the very large beef steak RED PEAR, which apparently originates from Italy and is very popular for barbecues. The polytunnel is approximately 16 x 6 metres and the main growing season commences in February - March and continues through to October/ November. During December I will restock my beds with some of my good garden compost with added fertiliser and cover with sheets of white plastic, which keep the beds free of weeds with the added bonus that the white covering will keep the soil cool from the sun, will deter weeds and will reflect more light. At the end of each growing season the plastic will be recycled. All my seeds are ‘chittered’ - a term used for starting the germination in a propagator, which normally starts

with tomatoes in February/March and aubergines peppers and cucumbers in March/April and when the seedlings mature to two true leaves they are transferred to 3-inch pots with a continuation of larger pots during the growing process, until they are ready to be transferred into the soil. The plants will then be taken out of the pots and planted through the polythene into the soil with a splattering of volcanic rock dust. This should add minerals back to the soil and is widely used by organic growers. Over the last few years I have experimented in companion planting with some fairly good results, especially with nasturtiums that seem to ward off white fly on tomatoes and cucumbers. The yellow flowered blooming variety of cucumber acts as a trap for aphids which I will put on trial with French marigolds and plectranthus - which send off the most foul odour when the leaves are crushed!

President of the former Rosarian society, Graham Querée, tells us about some of his favourite roses

I

realised that I needed to know more about roses when, in 1992, I had the good fortune to be accepted to work in the gardens of Radier Manor, the home of the 9th Earl and Countess of Jersey. I had shown a few roses for my previous employers, but in my new job there were close on 200 roses to care for. Luckily for me, I found on a shelf at a garden centre a little book Growing and Showing Roses by Don Charlton. I was able to

get in touch with Don Charlton, who came to Jersey to give a talk to the Jersey Gardening Club.

Let me detail some of my favourite rose varieties, starting with Hybrid Teas – these are large flowered roses.

Don and his very good friends, Fred and Mary Barnes, were very keen showmen, growing over 2,500 roses between them in their gardens and allotments. They were always willing to give me advice in growing roses and they were very helpful when we organised the rose shows at Samarès Manor.

Red roses – my favourite has to be Ingrid Bergman, which blooms early and continues until you cut the back in late autumn. Other reds would be Royal William, Red Devil, Alec’s Red, Deep Secret, National Trust – and not forgetting the fabulous Fragrant Cloud.

SPRING 2019

- 33


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

Yellow roses – Two fairly new yellow roses are the Wainwright Rose and also Lowri – really good roses with a beautiful form. Pink roses – Wimi is a must to have as a really good show rose, as is Isn’t She Lovely, Savoy Hotel and Andres Stelzer (a real winner, but which grows too tall – it can be over 8ft!) White roses – Ice Cream is a very fragrant white. I would also recommend Sally Kane and the very good Silver Wedding. Other colours – From all the various shades of all the bi-colours: Nostalgia (much admired at shows), Peace, Admiral Rodney and all the shades of blue in Blue Moon, Twice in a Blue Moon and the very healthy Soliterre.

Growing Floribundas to show standard: When clusters form, take out the centre bud and for Hybrid Tea roses take out the side buds as they form. Miniature and Patio roses These are exciting to grow, as they thrive in pots as well as in a border. Some of my favourites are: Irresistable, Behold, Dancing Flame, Mother’s Love, Old Glory and Kristin. Cider Cup is a very good Patio rose. Climbers and Ramblers Climbing Etoile de Hollande is very early to flower and has a fantastic perfume. Compassion is one of the best. I would also recommend Penny Lane and New Dawn and the really strong growing Rosa Fillipes Kiftgate. I put a cutting at the base of a tree and it is now well over 50ft high.

Floribunda roses (cluster flowered) Probably the most stunning when shown in bowls are the pink Sexy Rexy and Tickled Pink, bred from Sexy Rexy. One of the best whites is Iceberg: besides being pure white it will have three flushes a season, with the last flush, the tips of the buds become pink.

Shrub roses My absolutely favourite shrub is Jacqueline Du Pre. It has a very delicate scent and beautifully shaped blooms, which flower from May to December. There is also the large range of David Austin roses with their wonderful perfume. Shrub roses also includes all the ground cover roses.

Other good floribundas are Amber Queen, Lucky, Champagne Moment, Great Expectations, English Miss and Korresia.

Growing in pots You can grow any type of rose in a pot using good compost like John Innes No

3. I had a lot of success with a weeping rose, Suma and with Hybrid Teas as well, but they need more care than growing in borders. Showing roses Prune Hybrid Tea roses slightly harder than Floribundas. Spray early when you see leaf buds are formed ready to burst and water them when dry. BUT make sure you mulch them really well with anything, such as horse manure or seaweed in late spring. I enjoy showing roses. You get a buzz from getting the blooms just at the right time. Sometimes it is just luck. But I think the most rewarding moment is when a visitor to a rose show comes up to me to thanks me for showing, as they live in a flat with no garden and to see the joy on their face when they smell Fragrant Cloud.

Jane Bailey Interiors v Beautifully made Curtains, v v v v v

Large or small projects –

call Jane on 07797 723465

34

- SPRING 2019

Blinds and Pelmets Stunning Upholstery Bespoke Cushions and Throws Commissioned Artwork Personally Designed Fabric Full Design Service available

Life with a horse The desire to spend quality time with horses can strike at any age but for many that reality can seem like an unattainable dream. Ruth Le Cocq spoke to an Islander who has fulfilled that dream in the shape of a rather large and hairy equine called Archimedes.

T

he look of adoration on Caroline Ovenden’s face says it all. She is standing next to a fence and pointing to a horse grazing in the field. ‘It’s taken months,’ she said, her voice betraying an edge of excitement. ‘It’s only in the last week that he’s started nuzzling me. He was a real plodder when he came here four months ago but now he is taking an interest in what I’m doing. He gallops to the gate when my car drives up.’ Hearing Caroline’s voice, Archimedes or Archie for short, walks over to the fence. It’s easy to see that Sir Winston Churchill’s quote about the magical value of horses interacting with humans

is at work here. The wartime Prime Minister was an accomplished horseman who once said: ‘There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man’. Caroline, who is in her fifties, had no idea horses were going to play a starring role in her life. As a young girl, she loved horses but found it difficult to watch as her friends took up horse riding while she was unable to do so. ‘When I was a child it seemed that all my friends had horses and I didn’t,’ she said. ‘I loved going to help them with their ponies but felt sad not having my own. I couldn’t cope with my feelings and I decided to walk away.’

However, last year Caroline had more time available and she started helping her sister-in-law with her horse. ‘Once I started coming here I had to keep visiting because I’m allergic to horses unless I’m around them all the time,’ she said. Caroline mucked out the stables and revelled in ‘just being around horses’. ‘I love mucking out, it is so therapeutic. The other girls laugh at me and with me - we all get on well and it’s a really great atmosphere. We call ourselves “stable sisters”,’ she said. ‘When you have a bad day, you can come here and have a cup of tea and


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

Yellow roses – Two fairly new yellow roses are the Wainwright Rose and also Lowri – really good roses with a beautiful form. Pink roses – Wimi is a must to have as a really good show rose, as is Isn’t She Lovely, Savoy Hotel and Andres Stelzer (a real winner, but which grows too tall – it can be over 8ft!) White roses – Ice Cream is a very fragrant white. I would also recommend Sally Kane and the very good Silver Wedding. Other colours – From all the various shades of all the bi-colours: Nostalgia (much admired at shows), Peace, Admiral Rodney and all the shades of blue in Blue Moon, Twice in a Blue Moon and the very healthy Soliterre.

Growing Floribundas to show standard: When clusters form, take out the centre bud and for Hybrid Tea roses take out the side buds as they form. Miniature and Patio roses These are exciting to grow, as they thrive in pots as well as in a border. Some of my favourites are: Irresistable, Behold, Dancing Flame, Mother’s Love, Old Glory and Kristin. Cider Cup is a very good Patio rose. Climbers and Ramblers Climbing Etoile de Hollande is very early to flower and has a fantastic perfume. Compassion is one of the best. I would also recommend Penny Lane and New Dawn and the really strong growing Rosa Fillipes Kiftgate. I put a cutting at the base of a tree and it is now well over 50ft high.

Floribunda roses (cluster flowered) Probably the most stunning when shown in bowls are the pink Sexy Rexy and Tickled Pink, bred from Sexy Rexy. One of the best whites is Iceberg: besides being pure white it will have three flushes a season, with the last flush, the tips of the buds become pink.

Shrub roses My absolutely favourite shrub is Jacqueline Du Pre. It has a very delicate scent and beautifully shaped blooms, which flower from May to December. There is also the large range of David Austin roses with their wonderful perfume. Shrub roses also includes all the ground cover roses.

Other good floribundas are Amber Queen, Lucky, Champagne Moment, Great Expectations, English Miss and Korresia.

Growing in pots You can grow any type of rose in a pot using good compost like John Innes No

3. I had a lot of success with a weeping rose, Suma and with Hybrid Teas as well, but they need more care than growing in borders. Showing roses Prune Hybrid Tea roses slightly harder than Floribundas. Spray early when you see leaf buds are formed ready to burst and water them when dry. BUT make sure you mulch them really well with anything, such as horse manure or seaweed in late spring. I enjoy showing roses. You get a buzz from getting the blooms just at the right time. Sometimes it is just luck. But I think the most rewarding moment is when a visitor to a rose show comes up to me to thanks me for showing, as they live in a flat with no garden and to see the joy on their face when they smell Fragrant Cloud.

Jane Bailey Interiors v Beautifully made Curtains, v v v v v

Large or small projects –

call Jane on 07797 723465

34

- SPRING 2019

Blinds and Pelmets Stunning Upholstery Bespoke Cushions and Throws Commissioned Artwork Personally Designed Fabric Full Design Service available

Life with a horse The desire to spend quality time with horses can strike at any age but for many that reality can seem like an unattainable dream. Ruth Le Cocq spoke to an Islander who has fulfilled that dream in the shape of a rather large and hairy equine called Archimedes.

T

he look of adoration on Caroline Ovenden’s face says it all. She is standing next to a fence and pointing to a horse grazing in the field. ‘It’s taken months,’ she said, her voice betraying an edge of excitement. ‘It’s only in the last week that he’s started nuzzling me. He was a real plodder when he came here four months ago but now he is taking an interest in what I’m doing. He gallops to the gate when my car drives up.’ Hearing Caroline’s voice, Archimedes or Archie for short, walks over to the fence. It’s easy to see that Sir Winston Churchill’s quote about the magical value of horses interacting with humans

is at work here. The wartime Prime Minister was an accomplished horseman who once said: ‘There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man’. Caroline, who is in her fifties, had no idea horses were going to play a starring role in her life. As a young girl, she loved horses but found it difficult to watch as her friends took up horse riding while she was unable to do so. ‘When I was a child it seemed that all my friends had horses and I didn’t,’ she said. ‘I loved going to help them with their ponies but felt sad not having my own. I couldn’t cope with my feelings and I decided to walk away.’

However, last year Caroline had more time available and she started helping her sister-in-law with her horse. ‘Once I started coming here I had to keep visiting because I’m allergic to horses unless I’m around them all the time,’ she said. Caroline mucked out the stables and revelled in ‘just being around horses’. ‘I love mucking out, it is so therapeutic. The other girls laugh at me and with me - we all get on well and it’s a really great atmosphere. We call ourselves “stable sisters”,’ she said. ‘When you have a bad day, you can come here and have a cup of tea and


FARM & GARDEN

MORE PEOPLE H AV E B E E N I N TO S PAC E THAN H AV E PA S S E D THE MASTER OF WINE EXAM

the horses make you relax. It’s not about competing and winning rosettes, it’s all about the relationship you have with the horses,’ she explained. Caroline laughed as she recounted how Archie came into her life. ‘It all started off as a joke back in November. My sister-in-law had a spare stable and I was joking about it with my husband, Steve, and he said “if you want one you can have one so long as it doesn’t blow over in the wind” so I started looking at cobs.’ Within a week Caroline was in the UK looking at Archie. His four hooves touched Jersey soil for the first time soon after although not before her husband had bought himself a new motorbike. ‘I got a horse and my husband got a motorbike. In fact, he got his bike before I got my horse which definitely wasn’t fair,’ chuckled Caroline. However, her laughter fades as she describes just why Archie arrived so quickly. ‘Once I saw him there was no way I could leave him in the situation he was in. His feet were in a bad state and his legs were cut and bleeding where he had been clipped. He was a real mess.’ Despite his concerning appearance, Archie had the perfect temperament for a novice rider. ‘He is a strong, steady type and, because I haven’t ridden much and obviously because of my age, I can’t get on something and get thrown off,’ said Caroline. ‘To begin with I couldn’t ride him because of the state of his feet but that didn’t bother me – I had my horse!’ When she isn’t spending time in Archie’s presence, Caroline is reading books about horses while being supported in her quest to know more by her ‘stable sisters’. ‘One article says do this and another says do that and it can get confusing. As a new horse owner, it is important to have somebody knowledgeable to support you,’ she said. At this point, Archie reaches over the fence with his nose snuffling at Caroline’s pockets before turning tail and heading back towards the middle of the field and a tasty tussock of grass. 36

- SPRING 2019

Caroline sighs contentedly and turns towards me wearing a huge smile. ‘He is just so wonderful and I absolutely love all this,’ she said, as she flung one arm out over the countryside. ‘I love being outside and watching the sunrises and the sunsets. Having a horse makes you reassess things – this is life, this is living.’ The prospect of owning a horse can be exciting but there are lots of important considerations to take into account before going ahead. Most people underestimate the time commitment and the long term and

unexpected financial costs. Decisions need to be made about where to keep the horse as well as being honest with yourself about your equine knowledge and riding ability. There are certain questions you should ask the vendor and it is important to have your potential horse fully vetted. Living in Jersey, there may be the additional costs of a boat trip to bring a horse to the Island so his or her passport will need to be up-to-date.

Meet Pierpaolo, he’s one of three Masters of Wine here at Waitrose & Partners. He and his team spend their lives searching the planet to find the best wines for our customers. Think of them as your very own sommeliers. Because every single wine we sell has been hand-picked by them.

The British Horse Society gives information and advice about buying or loaning a horse on their website www. bhs.org.uk/advice-andinformation/ horse-ownership/buying-a-horse

FOR US, IT’S PERSONAL

Pierpaolo, Partner & Head of Wine Buying


FARM & GARDEN

MORE PEOPLE H AV E B E E N I N TO S PAC E THAN H AV E PA S S E D THE MASTER OF WINE EXAM

the horses make you relax. It’s not about competing and winning rosettes, it’s all about the relationship you have with the horses,’ she explained. Caroline laughed as she recounted how Archie came into her life. ‘It all started off as a joke back in November. My sister-in-law had a spare stable and I was joking about it with my husband, Steve, and he said “if you want one you can have one so long as it doesn’t blow over in the wind” so I started looking at cobs.’ Within a week Caroline was in the UK looking at Archie. His four hooves touched Jersey soil for the first time soon after although not before her husband had bought himself a new motorbike. ‘I got a horse and my husband got a motorbike. In fact, he got his bike before I got my horse which definitely wasn’t fair,’ chuckled Caroline. However, her laughter fades as she describes just why Archie arrived so quickly. ‘Once I saw him there was no way I could leave him in the situation he was in. His feet were in a bad state and his legs were cut and bleeding where he had been clipped. He was a real mess.’ Despite his concerning appearance, Archie had the perfect temperament for a novice rider. ‘He is a strong, steady type and, because I haven’t ridden much and obviously because of my age, I can’t get on something and get thrown off,’ said Caroline. ‘To begin with I couldn’t ride him because of the state of his feet but that didn’t bother me – I had my horse!’ When she isn’t spending time in Archie’s presence, Caroline is reading books about horses while being supported in her quest to know more by her ‘stable sisters’. ‘One article says do this and another says do that and it can get confusing. As a new horse owner, it is important to have somebody knowledgeable to support you,’ she said. At this point, Archie reaches over the fence with his nose snuffling at Caroline’s pockets before turning tail and heading back towards the middle of the field and a tasty tussock of grass. 36

- SPRING 2019

Caroline sighs contentedly and turns towards me wearing a huge smile. ‘He is just so wonderful and I absolutely love all this,’ she said, as she flung one arm out over the countryside. ‘I love being outside and watching the sunrises and the sunsets. Having a horse makes you reassess things – this is life, this is living.’ The prospect of owning a horse can be exciting but there are lots of important considerations to take into account before going ahead. Most people underestimate the time commitment and the long term and

unexpected financial costs. Decisions need to be made about where to keep the horse as well as being honest with yourself about your equine knowledge and riding ability. There are certain questions you should ask the vendor and it is important to have your potential horse fully vetted. Living in Jersey, there may be the additional costs of a boat trip to bring a horse to the Island so his or her passport will need to be up-to-date.

Meet Pierpaolo, he’s one of three Masters of Wine here at Waitrose & Partners. He and his team spend their lives searching the planet to find the best wines for our customers. Think of them as your very own sommeliers. Because every single wine we sell has been hand-picked by them.

The British Horse Society gives information and advice about buying or loaning a horse on their website www. bhs.org.uk/advice-andinformation/ horse-ownership/buying-a-horse

FOR US, IT’S PERSONAL

Pierpaolo, Partner & Head of Wine Buying


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE St Peter’s House Terrebonne

Why Jersey’s rural estates offer a tempting alternative to coastal living While Jersey’s premium property market has historically been linked with beachside locations and views of sparkling blue water, the countryside homes found inland have their own distinct appeal which just might tempt you away from the stunning coastal views which the island is known for the world over. Savills head of office, Geri O’Brien, suggests that purchasing a home in a rural location within one of Jersey’s many picturesque Parishes is a compelling proposition, particularly for those relocating to the island. She says, “While the quality of the coastal property is undoubtedly one of the island’s biggest draws, there is a relatively small pool of properties to choose from. Buyers often find that they have to sacrifice acreage and open space to obtain those coastal views. Although buyers may not have come to their property search actively seeking an inland rural property, it soon becomes clear to many that by considering parts of the island away from the coast they can access a much more extensive range of property. They are also able to benefit from the increased privacy which comes hand in hand with extensive grounds, plus access to the countryside

pursuits which they are used to if they own rural properties in the mainland UK or Europe.” For those looking for a property which makes a real statement there are few homes in Jersey to rival the truly impressive St Peter’s House in La Route Des Hetres, St Peters. Set within 20 acres of gardens, grounds and agricultural land, St Peter’s House is located in a beautiful unspoilt rural location, offering the combined benefits of countryside living with easy access to the rugged beauty, rolling dunes and sandy beaches of St Ouen’s Bay. “St Peter’s House presents an exceptional opportunity to buy a prestigious countryside estate,” says Geri O’Brien. “It offers everything a buyer could wish for in a prime country residence, including separate staff accommodation in the form of a farm house and cottage.”

For buyers seeking a private estate of slightly smaller proportions, Terrebonne in La Rue Es Phillipes in Grouville offers exceptional levels of privacy and charm. Set in seven acres of land with three separate treelined driveways and fine views over classic Jersey countryside, Terrebonne is just minutes away from the restaurants at Gorey Harbour and the awardwinning Royal Jersey Golf Course.

The imposing period manor house and separate coach house are approached via a private tree-lined drive. Upon first sight, it’s clear that this is an exceptional home with true elegance and grandeur, retaining many beautiful period features such as detailed plasterwork, sparkling chandeliers and parquet flooring. A heated swimming pool with pool house provides informal relaxation and entertaining space, and the grounds and gardens feature beautiful

walks, an enclosed walled produce and flower garden, plus parkland and agricultural fields. St Peter’s House is currently on the market with Savills at a guide of £8.95 million. Geri O’Brien adds, “This property will resonate with prestige buyers from anywhere in the world thanks to its stunning architecture and sense of heritage which has been sensitively combined with modern adaptations.”

In addition to the six bedroom main residence, the estate comprises a four bedroom pink granite 17th century longhouse, a two bedroom barn conversion, a one bedroom dower house and a one bedroom apartment, allowing the Terrebonne estate to be utilised as an extensive family home.

Terrebonne

This additional accommodation has previously been let out, generating an income of up to £100,000 per annum, making this an attractive proposition for purchasers looking to see an immediate return on their investment. The future owner of Terrebonne may have the chance to acquire something even more special than a superb country estate in one of Jersey’s most beautiful locations. The owner gains the opportunity to independently acquire the

For more information on St Peter’s House or Terrebonne, contact Geri O’Brien at Savills Jersey on 01534 722 227.

Geri O'Brien Director Savills Jersey 01534 722 227

Terrebonne

title to the Fief or Seigneurie of La Fosse Astelle – adding an additional cachet to this historic estate, which has come to market for the first time in 120 years. Terrebonne is being marketed by Savills at a guide of £4.75 million. Geri O’Brien comments, “This lovely family home is steeped in history and offers particularly versatile accommodation which would suit multi-generational living or a family with staff. The main residence has truly unique historic character, an abundance of period features and an impressive library, with superb potential for a new owner to put their own stamp upon it.” With such spectacular countryside living on offer in Jersey, it’s little wonder that buyers are being enticed away from the coastline to enjoy the serenity of rural living. St Peter’s House and Terrebonne are just two of a number of rural properties which Savills is currently marketing. Could one of these be your forever home in the country?


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE St Peter’s House Terrebonne

Why Jersey’s rural estates offer a tempting alternative to coastal living While Jersey’s premium property market has historically been linked with beachside locations and views of sparkling blue water, the countryside homes found inland have their own distinct appeal which just might tempt you away from the stunning coastal views which the island is known for the world over. Savills head of office, Geri O’Brien, suggests that purchasing a home in a rural location within one of Jersey’s many picturesque Parishes is a compelling proposition, particularly for those relocating to the island. She says, “While the quality of the coastal property is undoubtedly one of the island’s biggest draws, there is a relatively small pool of properties to choose from. Buyers often find that they have to sacrifice acreage and open space to obtain those coastal views. Although buyers may not have come to their property search actively seeking an inland rural property, it soon becomes clear to many that by considering parts of the island away from the coast they can access a much more extensive range of property. They are also able to benefit from the increased privacy which comes hand in hand with extensive grounds, plus access to the countryside

pursuits which they are used to if they own rural properties in the mainland UK or Europe.” For those looking for a property which makes a real statement there are few homes in Jersey to rival the truly impressive St Peter’s House in La Route Des Hetres, St Peters. Set within 20 acres of gardens, grounds and agricultural land, St Peter’s House is located in a beautiful unspoilt rural location, offering the combined benefits of countryside living with easy access to the rugged beauty, rolling dunes and sandy beaches of St Ouen’s Bay. “St Peter’s House presents an exceptional opportunity to buy a prestigious countryside estate,” says Geri O’Brien. “It offers everything a buyer could wish for in a prime country residence, including separate staff accommodation in the form of a farm house and cottage.”

For buyers seeking a private estate of slightly smaller proportions, Terrebonne in La Rue Es Phillipes in Grouville offers exceptional levels of privacy and charm. Set in seven acres of land with three separate treelined driveways and fine views over classic Jersey countryside, Terrebonne is just minutes away from the restaurants at Gorey Harbour and the awardwinning Royal Jersey Golf Course.

The imposing period manor house and separate coach house are approached via a private tree-lined drive. Upon first sight, it’s clear that this is an exceptional home with true elegance and grandeur, retaining many beautiful period features such as detailed plasterwork, sparkling chandeliers and parquet flooring. A heated swimming pool with pool house provides informal relaxation and entertaining space, and the grounds and gardens feature beautiful

walks, an enclosed walled produce and flower garden, plus parkland and agricultural fields. St Peter’s House is currently on the market with Savills at a guide of £8.95 million. Geri O’Brien adds, “This property will resonate with prestige buyers from anywhere in the world thanks to its stunning architecture and sense of heritage which has been sensitively combined with modern adaptations.”

In addition to the six bedroom main residence, the estate comprises a four bedroom pink granite 17th century longhouse, a two bedroom barn conversion, a one bedroom dower house and a one bedroom apartment, allowing the Terrebonne estate to be utilised as an extensive family home.

Terrebonne

This additional accommodation has previously been let out, generating an income of up to £100,000 per annum, making this an attractive proposition for purchasers looking to see an immediate return on their investment. The future owner of Terrebonne may have the chance to acquire something even more special than a superb country estate in one of Jersey’s most beautiful locations. The owner gains the opportunity to independently acquire the

For more information on St Peter’s House or Terrebonne, contact Geri O’Brien at Savills Jersey on 01534 722 227.

Geri O'Brien Director Savills Jersey 01534 722 227

Terrebonne

title to the Fief or Seigneurie of La Fosse Astelle – adding an additional cachet to this historic estate, which has come to market for the first time in 120 years. Terrebonne is being marketed by Savills at a guide of £4.75 million. Geri O’Brien comments, “This lovely family home is steeped in history and offers particularly versatile accommodation which would suit multi-generational living or a family with staff. The main residence has truly unique historic character, an abundance of period features and an impressive library, with superb potential for a new owner to put their own stamp upon it.” With such spectacular countryside living on offer in Jersey, it’s little wonder that buyers are being enticed away from the coastline to enjoy the serenity of rural living. St Peter’s House and Terrebonne are just two of a number of rural properties which Savills is currently marketing. Could one of these be your forever home in the country?


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

ART, INSPIRED BY NATURE In each issue this year we profile works by contemporary Jersey artists who draw their inspiration from Jersey’s landscapes or natural environment. In this issue we feature Suzanne Blackstone’s The Way to Seymour Tower. She writes: ‘I generally work up my paintings from a sketch, or several sketches that I do on sight. I really enjoying going for a walk with my sketchbook and the various tools for drawing or painting, or more recently just with my IPad. Then I work up a painting in the studio. As I work I get absorbed into the subject I remember all the sights and sounds and smells of what I encountered whilst sketching, the excitement of that subject comes back to me all over again.’ The medium of the painting : oil on canvas Price: £900

40

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 41


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

ART, INSPIRED BY NATURE In each issue this year we profile works by contemporary Jersey artists who draw their inspiration from Jersey’s landscapes or natural environment. In this issue we feature Suzanne Blackstone’s The Way to Seymour Tower. She writes: ‘I generally work up my paintings from a sketch, or several sketches that I do on sight. I really enjoying going for a walk with my sketchbook and the various tools for drawing or painting, or more recently just with my IPad. Then I work up a painting in the studio. As I work I get absorbed into the subject I remember all the sights and sounds and smells of what I encountered whilst sketching, the excitement of that subject comes back to me all over again.’ The medium of the painting : oil on canvas Price: £900

40

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 41


ART & CULTURE

A D V E R T I S EA MRE T N T& FCEUALTTUURREE

THE JERSEY SUMMER EXHIBITION Art and culture in Jersey, with CCA Galleries director Sasha Gibb

T

he Jersey Summer Exhibition was launched two years ago in response to increasing demand for good quality, curated local art. It has since become an anticipated highlight in the Jersey art scene. The work on show, including ceramics, prints, photography, paintings and sculpture, sells to Jersey collectors as well as visitors to the Island. It encompasses artists from the Channel Islands and UK who have a connection with Jersey as well artists currently working here.

The exhibition is based on the successful model at the Royal Academy in London – exhibits are selected by a panel of professional artists and critics and shown in a group selling exhibition. As well as exhibiting at a prestigious, international gallery, being selected for the Jersey Summer Exhibition helps propel the careers of promising Jersey artists, as well as re-enforcing that of those already established. Last year the gallery launched the ‘Summer Prize’ for the artist that the judges agreed exhibited the most accomplished piece of work. Its winner, Katy Brown, celebrated her first major show in Jersey for over 10 years – a joint exhibition at CCA Galleries International with sculptor Anna Gillespie at Christmas. There were nearly 250 submissions for this year’s show. After an initial shortlist, the final selection was made

by International artist duo Nicky and Rob Carter, journalist and Editor of GQ Magazine Dylan Jones OBE, Gallery Director Sasha Gibb and Managing Director Gillian Duke. Working with such an eminent panel of Movers and Shakers not only helps keep the selection fresh and impartial, it greatly informs the Jersey arts scene and helps establish Jersey within a wider context. Bringing artists and art experts to the island to exhibit, entertain and educate is a key part of what goes on at the gallery. Working with artists over many years in both the UK and Jersey means not only can we source rare and valuable work, it means we sell work by artists people connect with. Over the Jersey Summer Exhibition, artists such Anna Gillespie, Stephen Rew, Carol Ann Sutherland, Graham Bannister and Astrid Harrison will be showing alongside established and emerging local talent. This year, as well as the Summer Prize, all exhibiting landscape artists are eligible for the Signtech Rural Landscape Award. A separate judging panel that includes the National Trust for Jersey’s Charles Alluto, Environmentalist Mike Stentiford, RJAHS’s Robert Perchard and RURAL’s Alasdair Crosby will award the prize money of £600 to the artist who’s work they believe best evokes Jersey’s traditional rural landscape. This is a great addition to the exhibition and one we hope will promote much discussion around the development of the Jersey landscape. The former Jersey Heritage community learning director, Doug Ford, will speak at this event on the development of the Island’s landscape over the centuries.

Astrid Harrison, Sindri

42

- SPRING 2019

Throughout the exhibition, there is a programme of talks and events. Another highlight will be a discussion by Ben Shenton of TEAM on ‘Why Invest in Jersey’s Culture?’ on Thursday, 4 July. TEAM has sponsored the exhibition for the past three years and the arts in Jersey have flourished as a result. Ben will be joined by Curator and Contemporary Arts Advisor Stephen McCoubrey. Stephen has over 20 years’ experience navigating the contemporary art world in established and developing markets across the globe. He also has a long history of curating and managing major public exhibitions throughout Europe and Asia, including Art Basel, Tate and Guggenheim. For more information on exhibiting artists, talks, events and awards visitwww.ccagalleriesiinternational.com or visit the gallery at 10 Hill Street.

The Signtech

RURAL JERSEY LANDSCAPE AWARDS

Your Invitation Alasdair Crosby, Sean Guegan and CCA Galleries International request the pleasure of your company at the Signtech Rural Jersey Landscape Awards and to the accompanying talk: ‘Changes to the Jersey rural landscape through the ages’ by Doug Ford Thursday 11 July 5.30 – 7.30 pm at CCA Galleries International, 10 Hill Street RSVP to: Sasha Gibb, CCA Galleries International 10 Hill Street, St Helier JE2 4UA, Tel 01534 739900 sasha.gibb@ccagalleriesinternational.com

Or: Alasdair Crosby, Rural – Jersey Country Life magazine La Cohue – St John JE34FN, Tel 01534 865334 acrosby@live.co.UK

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL SPRING 2019

- 43


ART & CULTURE

A D V E R T I S EA MRE T N T& FCEUALTTUURREE

THE JERSEY SUMMER EXHIBITION Art and culture in Jersey, with CCA Galleries director Sasha Gibb

T

he Jersey Summer Exhibition was launched two years ago in response to increasing demand for good quality, curated local art. It has since become an anticipated highlight in the Jersey art scene. The work on show, including ceramics, prints, photography, paintings and sculpture, sells to Jersey collectors as well as visitors to the Island. It encompasses artists from the Channel Islands and UK who have a connection with Jersey as well artists currently working here.

The exhibition is based on the successful model at the Royal Academy in London – exhibits are selected by a panel of professional artists and critics and shown in a group selling exhibition. As well as exhibiting at a prestigious, international gallery, being selected for the Jersey Summer Exhibition helps propel the careers of promising Jersey artists, as well as re-enforcing that of those already established. Last year the gallery launched the ‘Summer Prize’ for the artist that the judges agreed exhibited the most accomplished piece of work. Its winner, Katy Brown, celebrated her first major show in Jersey for over 10 years – a joint exhibition at CCA Galleries International with sculptor Anna Gillespie at Christmas. There were nearly 250 submissions for this year’s show. After an initial shortlist, the final selection was made

by International artist duo Nicky and Rob Carter, journalist and Editor of GQ Magazine Dylan Jones OBE, Gallery Director Sasha Gibb and Managing Director Gillian Duke. Working with such an eminent panel of Movers and Shakers not only helps keep the selection fresh and impartial, it greatly informs the Jersey arts scene and helps establish Jersey within a wider context. Bringing artists and art experts to the island to exhibit, entertain and educate is a key part of what goes on at the gallery. Working with artists over many years in both the UK and Jersey means not only can we source rare and valuable work, it means we sell work by artists people connect with. Over the Jersey Summer Exhibition, artists such Anna Gillespie, Stephen Rew, Carol Ann Sutherland, Graham Bannister and Astrid Harrison will be showing alongside established and emerging local talent. This year, as well as the Summer Prize, all exhibiting landscape artists are eligible for the Signtech Rural Landscape Award. A separate judging panel that includes the National Trust for Jersey’s Charles Alluto, Environmentalist Mike Stentiford, RJAHS’s Robert Perchard and RURAL’s Alasdair Crosby will award the prize money of £600 to the artist who’s work they believe best evokes Jersey’s traditional rural landscape. This is a great addition to the exhibition and one we hope will promote much discussion around the development of the Jersey landscape. The former Jersey Heritage community learning director, Doug Ford, will speak at this event on the development of the Island’s landscape over the centuries.

Astrid Harrison, Sindri

42

- SPRING 2019

Throughout the exhibition, there is a programme of talks and events. Another highlight will be a discussion by Ben Shenton of TEAM on ‘Why Invest in Jersey’s Culture?’ on Thursday, 4 July. TEAM has sponsored the exhibition for the past three years and the arts in Jersey have flourished as a result. Ben will be joined by Curator and Contemporary Arts Advisor Stephen McCoubrey. Stephen has over 20 years’ experience navigating the contemporary art world in established and developing markets across the globe. He also has a long history of curating and managing major public exhibitions throughout Europe and Asia, including Art Basel, Tate and Guggenheim. For more information on exhibiting artists, talks, events and awards visitwww.ccagalleriesiinternational.com or visit the gallery at 10 Hill Street.

The Signtech

RURAL JERSEY LANDSCAPE AWARDS

Your Invitation Alasdair Crosby, Sean Guegan and CCA Galleries International request the pleasure of your company at the Signtech Rural Jersey Landscape Awards and to the accompanying talk: ‘Changes to the Jersey rural landscape through the ages’ by Doug Ford Thursday 11 July 5.30 – 7.30 pm at CCA Galleries International, 10 Hill Street RSVP to: Sasha Gibb, CCA Galleries International 10 Hill Street, St Helier JE2 4UA, Tel 01534 739900 sasha.gibb@ccagalleriesinternational.com

Or: Alasdair Crosby, Rural – Jersey Country Life magazine La Cohue – St John JE34FN, Tel 01534 865334 acrosby@live.co.UK

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL SPRING 2019

- 43


FASHION

FASHION

Blooming IN THE GARDEN

an hour before she had a more formal appointment, wearing an outfit of Ralph Lauren jeans tucked into Meghan Markle’s favourite wellingtons from the Muck Boot Company, a Fat Face jacket and top by Joules. She even manages to keep her manicure fresh by ensuring she has gardening gloves handy at all times. 28 year-old graphic designer Eunice Fromage is our Frances Tophill doppelgänger, she drives a moped into work from Trinity so practicality is key: ‘Gardening is my passion, my husband

Fashion clothes’ and ‘gardening’ are words that are not usually combined in one sentence. How wrong you can be, as Gill Maccabe discovered

A

sk any woman of a certain age about gardening fashion and they will say one word: Monty.

Monty Don, the thinking woman’s crumpet, sets many female pulses racing every Friday evening with his fashion chutzpah. His tonal blue outfits in head to toe corduroy with lots of pockets for seeds and string and other manly things are offset by cotton shirts with three buttons to the chest which are worn slightly baggy and billow as he walks through the garden of Long Meadow. His brightly printed neck scarves could be seen as an affectation but are so practical for mopping his brow and pushing back those long curls - and those high waisted trousers which he buys one size larger for comfort, are kept in just the right place with matching braces. His style never changes and it works for all occasions. Apparently he also owns a tweed jacket but the programmes producers won’t let him wear it on screen.

Jacket from Joules at Voisins approx £250; Jeans from Fat Face, £45; Sunglases by Ralph Lauren, £150; Wellingtons Muck Boot, £120 from Ransoms Garden Centre 44

- SPRING 2019

Ask the men however and the youngest Gardeners World presenter, Frances Tophill, gets top billing. The 30-yearold horticulturalist rocks cotton bib and brace workwear dungarees, which she buys from a shop in Edinburgh where she trained. She sews in a bit of elastic to make them fit better on the waist and wears them in the sun a lot so they fade to a lovely shade of purple.

Sarah Raven, my new BFF, who sends me e-mails every day from her cookery and garden school, has the back pages of her regular seed catalogues devoted to gardening fashion. Her gardener’s smock fashioned from heavy- duty cotton twill with two deep front pockets and fold back sleeves can be worn for any casual occasion and her gardening pinafore, a bit like a gymslip and available in three colourways, can be worn over a jumper on colder days. It seems it has never been easier to look good in the garden and even move from garden to desk with just a few tweaks and a comb through your hair. I asked a couple of keen female gardeners who also work full time about their gardening style. 30-something accountant Sarah Gaudion crams more in to her day than most people. The mother of two young girls under six years, works full-time as a financial controller, has a fully stocked vegetable garden plus free-range laying chickens at her barn conversion in St Martin, together with not one, but two allotments at the RJA&HS site in St Lawrence. ‘The allotment is my happy place. The girls like joining me up there, they have their own little gardening outfits and I’ve always got a change of wellingtons and shoes in the back of the car.’ In fact found Sarah happily working in the allotment, half

we

James, who is a teacher, and I love nothing more than checking out what is growing in the morning before work. I lead such a busy life I sometimes have to make an outfit last all day.’ With her fresh glowing skin and long legs Eunice doesn’t have to try too hard. Her outfit choice of Joules yellow jacket, Warehouse top and River Island jeans looked just as fresh when we took our pictures at 6pm as she had 12 hours earlier – and she was going home to do some planting before supper.

Jacket from Joules £109; jeans from River Island £42; top from Warehouse £25, wellington boots from Joules, £49 all at Voisins

Crafting beautiful spaces inside and out

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Discover how our team can transform your home into something truly special, contact us today to find out more. 01534 738 358

www.mtstonemasons.com

07797 750 820

mtstonemasons

mtstonemasons

SPRING 2019

- 45


FASHION

FASHION

Blooming IN THE GARDEN

an hour before she had a more formal appointment, wearing an outfit of Ralph Lauren jeans tucked into Meghan Markle’s favourite wellingtons from the Muck Boot Company, a Fat Face jacket and top by Joules. She even manages to keep her manicure fresh by ensuring she has gardening gloves handy at all times. 28 year-old graphic designer Eunice Fromage is our Frances Tophill doppelgänger, she drives a moped into work from Trinity so practicality is key: ‘Gardening is my passion, my husband

Fashion clothes’ and ‘gardening’ are words that are not usually combined in one sentence. How wrong you can be, as Gill Maccabe discovered

A

sk any woman of a certain age about gardening fashion and they will say one word: Monty.

Monty Don, the thinking woman’s crumpet, sets many female pulses racing every Friday evening with his fashion chutzpah. His tonal blue outfits in head to toe corduroy with lots of pockets for seeds and string and other manly things are offset by cotton shirts with three buttons to the chest which are worn slightly baggy and billow as he walks through the garden of Long Meadow. His brightly printed neck scarves could be seen as an affectation but are so practical for mopping his brow and pushing back those long curls - and those high waisted trousers which he buys one size larger for comfort, are kept in just the right place with matching braces. His style never changes and it works for all occasions. Apparently he also owns a tweed jacket but the programmes producers won’t let him wear it on screen.

Jacket from Joules at Voisins approx £250; Jeans from Fat Face, £45; Sunglases by Ralph Lauren, £150; Wellingtons Muck Boot, £120 from Ransoms Garden Centre 44

- SPRING 2019

Ask the men however and the youngest Gardeners World presenter, Frances Tophill, gets top billing. The 30-yearold horticulturalist rocks cotton bib and brace workwear dungarees, which she buys from a shop in Edinburgh where she trained. She sews in a bit of elastic to make them fit better on the waist and wears them in the sun a lot so they fade to a lovely shade of purple.

Sarah Raven, my new BFF, who sends me e-mails every day from her cookery and garden school, has the back pages of her regular seed catalogues devoted to gardening fashion. Her gardener’s smock fashioned from heavy- duty cotton twill with two deep front pockets and fold back sleeves can be worn for any casual occasion and her gardening pinafore, a bit like a gymslip and available in three colourways, can be worn over a jumper on colder days. It seems it has never been easier to look good in the garden and even move from garden to desk with just a few tweaks and a comb through your hair. I asked a couple of keen female gardeners who also work full time about their gardening style. 30-something accountant Sarah Gaudion crams more in to her day than most people. The mother of two young girls under six years, works full-time as a financial controller, has a fully stocked vegetable garden plus free-range laying chickens at her barn conversion in St Martin, together with not one, but two allotments at the RJA&HS site in St Lawrence. ‘The allotment is my happy place. The girls like joining me up there, they have their own little gardening outfits and I’ve always got a change of wellingtons and shoes in the back of the car.’ In fact found Sarah happily working in the allotment, half

we

James, who is a teacher, and I love nothing more than checking out what is growing in the morning before work. I lead such a busy life I sometimes have to make an outfit last all day.’ With her fresh glowing skin and long legs Eunice doesn’t have to try too hard. Her outfit choice of Joules yellow jacket, Warehouse top and River Island jeans looked just as fresh when we took our pictures at 6pm as she had 12 hours earlier – and she was going home to do some planting before supper.

Jacket from Joules £109; jeans from River Island £42; top from Warehouse £25, wellington boots from Joules, £49 all at Voisins

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07797 750 820

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SPRING 2019

- 45


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

Walkie Talkies

Fortunately, Jess enjoys the new challenge ‘I think Scrutiny really taps into my academic interests; I love literature, critical analysis and improving things, which is what Scrutiny does,’ she explained. Wanting to make a difference, Jess believes there’s great potential for backbenchers ‘Our first job is to scrutinise, but you also have the capacity to bring forward legislative change.’

Kieranne Grimshaw shared a walk with Gatsby and his owner, Jess Perchard, Deputy of St Savour No 3 district.

Equal opportunities for everybody is one of Jess’s main projects: ‘This leads greatly into Education - equality and inclusion are my priority’. On environmental issues, Jess believes we should be a global leader in implementing green energy: ‘We’ve also been talking about the decline in bees and butterflies for years – and no one has taken much notice. It makes you ask what kind of world are we bringing our children into?’

W

alking around Queen’s Valley, Gatsby, a young Cockapoo, and his owner, recently elected States Member, Jess Perchard, looked like a real team. ‘Walking a dog helps me reflect on the reasons why I joined the States and what my plans are for the future,’ said Jess. ‘I’m always thinking about work and walking gives me a sense of perspective. ‘Growing up in Jersey, I’ve always been interested in what’s happening in the community and feel strongly about our Island’s culture and heritage – I think running for the States is always something I would have eventually done.’ Gatsby is clearly an important part of Jess’s life and even helps her get to know her parishioners. ‘When you have a dog, everyone stops to chat,’ said Jess, ‘people don’t always recognise me and that’s when I’m reminded of what people are really thinking about – I like to just listen.’ Jess and her partner, Jamie, bought Gatsby two years ago mainly for his temperament. ’He’s very energetic, but also surprisingly placid for a Cockapoo and enjoys cuddles,’ said Jess. ‘As I work mostly from home, I was able to have a dog and ensure he has plenty of exercise – he loves Queen’s Valley.’ In the States, Jess is on the Scrutiny panel for Corporate Services, which involves scrutiny of both the Treasury Minister and Chief Minister. ‘I chose to start as a back bencher as I think it is important to experience what Scrutiny actually does, especially if you aspire to be a Minister’ she explained.

46

- SPRING 2019

Coming from a teaching environment, the different mix of fellow colleagues is both interesting, but at times frustrating: ‘especially when I think there’s been a lack of academic rigour,’ Jess explained. ‘In teaching you can’t get away with that, you must be up to date with recent pedagogy.’

Leaving her teaching career of five years behind her, Jess made the move to politics in May last year - but why? ‘I’d been teaching 6th form at Jersey College for Girls and often discussed various feminist issues with my students. I would often say to them: you’re the future leaders of the world, you’ve the power to change things. Then one student said to me, ‘well, why don’t you do it, Miss?’ That’s when I realised I should stand - even if I didn’t get in - to be a role model to them.’ So how does teaching compare with politics? ‘In terms of skill set, teaching is the perfect preparation for a career in politics.’ said Jess. ‘You’re on the go all the time, you have to manage your own workload, have a great responsibility to people in your care, lead by example and there’s a performance element. It’s always about the people in front of you, and not about you. You’re also constantly observed and scrutinised – in many ways it’s the best preparation.’ Asked which was harder, Jess admitted that a teacher’s workload was massive: ‘I’ve never had anything like it. You spend about five hours a day in front of 25 children, five hours around that doing admin, and then you spend your weekends and evenings marking and planning.’

I think Scrutiny really taps into my academic interests; I love literature, critical analysis and improving things, which is what Scrutiny does.

get involved and perhaps have a sponsor for future ones. ‘There’s a lot of elderly people who live alone and it’s only going to get worse with an ageing population, so it’s really important that we create opportunities to sit down and talk with people. The Community events will hopefully bring young and old together.’

Equally important to Jess are our Economics models. ‘We’re just assuming that growth is good, without any understanding of the concept that you can’t just have infinite growth. I’d like to work with the Economic Development Minister in that area,’ she said. There’s little doubt that Jess’s students will be interested in seeing what the future holds for Jess and our Island.

‘One problem is that the public perception of politicians can be negative, so people don’t want to pay them more and consequently it is - understandably - quite rare for someone to leave a wellpaid role to become a politician.’ On a positive note, the most rewarding part is getting to know members of the community. Jess explained: ‘During the election campaign, I knocked on all the doors in the district and met a lot of people, many of whom I’ve seen since.’ ‘Community is at the heart of society’ she continued. ‘if you don’t keep those ties, I think we just become increasingly isolated from each other – and that doesn’t help when you’re trying to deal with issues like unfair distribution of wealth or environmental concerns; we need to come together to sort those problems out.’ Jess is excited about her future plans for community events in the Parish. ‘I’ve decided to organise four events throughout the year. The first was an Easter Hunt and Coffee Morning on 20 April, which I organised myself with friends. I’m hoping that more people will SPRING 2019

- 47


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

Walkie Talkies

Fortunately, Jess enjoys the new challenge ‘I think Scrutiny really taps into my academic interests; I love literature, critical analysis and improving things, which is what Scrutiny does,’ she explained. Wanting to make a difference, Jess believes there’s great potential for backbenchers ‘Our first job is to scrutinise, but you also have the capacity to bring forward legislative change.’

Kieranne Grimshaw shared a walk with Gatsby and his owner, Jess Perchard, Deputy of St Savour No 3 district.

Equal opportunities for everybody is one of Jess’s main projects: ‘This leads greatly into Education - equality and inclusion are my priority’. On environmental issues, Jess believes we should be a global leader in implementing green energy: ‘We’ve also been talking about the decline in bees and butterflies for years – and no one has taken much notice. It makes you ask what kind of world are we bringing our children into?’

W

alking around Queen’s Valley, Gatsby, a young Cockapoo, and his owner, recently elected States Member, Jess Perchard, looked like a real team. ‘Walking a dog helps me reflect on the reasons why I joined the States and what my plans are for the future,’ said Jess. ‘I’m always thinking about work and walking gives me a sense of perspective. ‘Growing up in Jersey, I’ve always been interested in what’s happening in the community and feel strongly about our Island’s culture and heritage – I think running for the States is always something I would have eventually done.’ Gatsby is clearly an important part of Jess’s life and even helps her get to know her parishioners. ‘When you have a dog, everyone stops to chat,’ said Jess, ‘people don’t always recognise me and that’s when I’m reminded of what people are really thinking about – I like to just listen.’ Jess and her partner, Jamie, bought Gatsby two years ago mainly for his temperament. ’He’s very energetic, but also surprisingly placid for a Cockapoo and enjoys cuddles,’ said Jess. ‘As I work mostly from home, I was able to have a dog and ensure he has plenty of exercise – he loves Queen’s Valley.’ In the States, Jess is on the Scrutiny panel for Corporate Services, which involves scrutiny of both the Treasury Minister and Chief Minister. ‘I chose to start as a back bencher as I think it is important to experience what Scrutiny actually does, especially if you aspire to be a Minister’ she explained.

46

- SPRING 2019

Coming from a teaching environment, the different mix of fellow colleagues is both interesting, but at times frustrating: ‘especially when I think there’s been a lack of academic rigour,’ Jess explained. ‘In teaching you can’t get away with that, you must be up to date with recent pedagogy.’

Leaving her teaching career of five years behind her, Jess made the move to politics in May last year - but why? ‘I’d been teaching 6th form at Jersey College for Girls and often discussed various feminist issues with my students. I would often say to them: you’re the future leaders of the world, you’ve the power to change things. Then one student said to me, ‘well, why don’t you do it, Miss?’ That’s when I realised I should stand - even if I didn’t get in - to be a role model to them.’ So how does teaching compare with politics? ‘In terms of skill set, teaching is the perfect preparation for a career in politics.’ said Jess. ‘You’re on the go all the time, you have to manage your own workload, have a great responsibility to people in your care, lead by example and there’s a performance element. It’s always about the people in front of you, and not about you. You’re also constantly observed and scrutinised – in many ways it’s the best preparation.’ Asked which was harder, Jess admitted that a teacher’s workload was massive: ‘I’ve never had anything like it. You spend about five hours a day in front of 25 children, five hours around that doing admin, and then you spend your weekends and evenings marking and planning.’

I think Scrutiny really taps into my academic interests; I love literature, critical analysis and improving things, which is what Scrutiny does.

get involved and perhaps have a sponsor for future ones. ‘There’s a lot of elderly people who live alone and it’s only going to get worse with an ageing population, so it’s really important that we create opportunities to sit down and talk with people. The Community events will hopefully bring young and old together.’

Equally important to Jess are our Economics models. ‘We’re just assuming that growth is good, without any understanding of the concept that you can’t just have infinite growth. I’d like to work with the Economic Development Minister in that area,’ she said. There’s little doubt that Jess’s students will be interested in seeing what the future holds for Jess and our Island.

‘One problem is that the public perception of politicians can be negative, so people don’t want to pay them more and consequently it is - understandably - quite rare for someone to leave a wellpaid role to become a politician.’ On a positive note, the most rewarding part is getting to know members of the community. Jess explained: ‘During the election campaign, I knocked on all the doors in the district and met a lot of people, many of whom I’ve seen since.’ ‘Community is at the heart of society’ she continued. ‘if you don’t keep those ties, I think we just become increasingly isolated from each other – and that doesn’t help when you’re trying to deal with issues like unfair distribution of wealth or environmental concerns; we need to come together to sort those problems out.’ Jess is excited about her future plans for community events in the Parish. ‘I’ve decided to organise four events throughout the year. The first was an Easter Hunt and Coffee Morning on 20 April, which I organised myself with friends. I’m hoping that more people will SPRING 2019

- 47


THE FUR SIDE

, FRI 21 JUNE

SAT 22 JUNE

Choo Choo Ch’Boogie

The Jessica Lloyd Band

Supported by

Supported by

BRICK HOUSE

TIBETAN FUNK

A SHELTER, FOR JERSEy S ANIMALS

GRANTEZ, ST OUEN Music starts from 7:15pm In association with

As part of Rural Jersey’s ongoing series about the JSPCA’s Animal Shelter, Kieranne Grimshaw looks at the many and varied facets of the charity, especially their ambulance service – she spoke to ambulance driver Linda Noel

Parking tickets available on Eventbrite Find out more @sunsetconcertsjersey on Facebook and Instagram

Proudly supporting the Coastline Campaign for over 10 years

SPRING 2019

- 49


THE FUR SIDE

, FRI 21 JUNE

SAT 22 JUNE

Choo Choo Ch’Boogie

The Jessica Lloyd Band

Supported by

Supported by

BRICK HOUSE

TIBETAN FUNK

A SHELTER, FOR JERSEy S ANIMALS

GRANTEZ, ST OUEN Music starts from 7:15pm In association with

As part of Rural Jersey’s ongoing series about the JSPCA’s Animal Shelter, Kieranne Grimshaw looks at the many and varied facets of the charity, especially their ambulance service – she spoke to ambulance driver Linda Noel

Parking tickets available on Eventbrite Find out more @sunsetconcertsjersey on Facebook and Instagram

Proudly supporting the Coastline Campaign for over 10 years

SPRING 2019

- 49


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

my hands and knees, but I knew when I needed help!’ No day is the same for Linda. A recent call took her to the United Reform Church at Sion: ‘I had to rescue a goose from the garden,’ she said. ‘It was moving around slowly but making no attempt to fly and it wasn’t obvious where it was injured. Fortunately our on-site vet found the injury and it’s now recovering well. Once it’s got the all clear from the vet, it will be released back into the wild.’ The Animal Shelter also monitors the number of squirrels and the presence of disease. ‘Red squirrels are protected,’ said Linda. ‘We have quite a few calls about dead or injured squirrels. We could do with a few more rope bridges above our busy roads through the valleys.’ Apart from the challenge of never knowing what to expect next, Linda’s main challenge can be the busy traffic: ‘I get a bit frustrated when I’m trying to get to the Shelter as quickly as possible with a badly injured animal. I think of myself as the Fourth Emergency Service – it would be great to have a blue light!’

A

n integral part of the Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal’s team are the ambulance drivers. Linda is the day-time driver and has been working for the Animal Shelter for five years. ‘I used to do the night shift for three years,’ she said. ‘It’s very busy, especially between April and September and it’s not always a nice shift – the majority of night calls are RTA cats, birds and rabbits.’ ‘In the day shift, there’s a lot more variety. During bad weather we normally have the seabirds, some washed up on shore, such as gannets, oiled guillemots and even migratory geese.’ Asked why she joined the Charity, Linda admitted she had thought about it around ten years and after three attempts was finally successful. ‘I absolutely love what I do’ Linda said ‘I put in 100% and

I feel like I’m making a difference by helping the sick and injured animals.

I put in 100% and I feel like I’m making a difference by helping the sick and injured animals.

‘We meet all sorts of people. Sometimes, if we have to pick up a badly injured or dead cat, we contact the owners, or they turn up and you have to speak to them and comfort them. You need to be very compassionate, not just for the animals, but for the people as well.’ Linda also deals regularly with the Fire Service. ‘This is usually for trapped birds’ she explained. ‘Many town offices have netting on their roofs and somehow the birds manage to get inside. Unfortunately, if the netting is loose, birds find their way in and can’t get out. If it’s in a precarious position on the roof, I have to call the Fire Service. ‘Once I tried to rescue a black backed gull. I climbed up a ladder on to the flat roof, but the bird was right in the corner by a sheer drop, I’d been crawling on

Within the first couple of weeks of starting, Linda had to deal with an unexpected incident. While on call, she received a phone call at 3am from the Police: ‘A baby calf, only a few days old, had been found on a road in St Ouen. We managed to lift it into the ambulance and get it to a nearby shed – a neighbour had heard some commotion and offered to help. The next day, we called the Duty Centenier and the calf was reunited with mum.’ But it’s not just larger animals that are rescued. Linda explained: ‘Only recently I had a call from a Tree Surgeon who was just about to put a log through the shredder, when he spotted three baby voles. So he stopped and called the Animal Shelter.’ Linda is full of praise for Jersey’s local public services and the general public who are concerned enough to call the Shelter.

98 dogs & 71 cats

were reunited with their owners during 2018, after arriving as strays.

148 cats were in the JSPCA’s care during 2018.

50

- SPRING 2019

You also need a “can do” approach, excellent interpersonal skills and a love and understanding of animals, she added.

The Charity’s ambulance service is open 24/7. Being a driver requires good local knowledge – Does she ever get lost? ‘ Well, sometimes out East, she replied, ’although my colleagues call me The Almanac.’ Who needs sat nav? ‘You also need a “can do” approach, excellent interpersonal skills and a love and understanding of animals, she added.’ Linda has these in abundance: ‘I used to breed cats, then I had some very large dogs, said Linda. She doesn’t seem scared of anything and clearly loves animals. In the words of George Orwell, All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. But in the case of the Animal Shelter, every animal counts – equally. * Website www.jspca.org.je ; Tel: 724331


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

my hands and knees, but I knew when I needed help!’ No day is the same for Linda. A recent call took her to the United Reform Church at Sion: ‘I had to rescue a goose from the garden,’ she said. ‘It was moving around slowly but making no attempt to fly and it wasn’t obvious where it was injured. Fortunately our on-site vet found the injury and it’s now recovering well. Once it’s got the all clear from the vet, it will be released back into the wild.’ The Animal Shelter also monitors the number of squirrels and the presence of disease. ‘Red squirrels are protected,’ said Linda. ‘We have quite a few calls about dead or injured squirrels. We could do with a few more rope bridges above our busy roads through the valleys.’ Apart from the challenge of never knowing what to expect next, Linda’s main challenge can be the busy traffic: ‘I get a bit frustrated when I’m trying to get to the Shelter as quickly as possible with a badly injured animal. I think of myself as the Fourth Emergency Service – it would be great to have a blue light!’

A

n integral part of the Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal’s team are the ambulance drivers. Linda is the day-time driver and has been working for the Animal Shelter for five years. ‘I used to do the night shift for three years,’ she said. ‘It’s very busy, especially between April and September and it’s not always a nice shift – the majority of night calls are RTA cats, birds and rabbits.’ ‘In the day shift, there’s a lot more variety. During bad weather we normally have the seabirds, some washed up on shore, such as gannets, oiled guillemots and even migratory geese.’ Asked why she joined the Charity, Linda admitted she had thought about it around ten years and after three attempts was finally successful. ‘I absolutely love what I do’ Linda said ‘I put in 100% and

I feel like I’m making a difference by helping the sick and injured animals.

I put in 100% and I feel like I’m making a difference by helping the sick and injured animals.

‘We meet all sorts of people. Sometimes, if we have to pick up a badly injured or dead cat, we contact the owners, or they turn up and you have to speak to them and comfort them. You need to be very compassionate, not just for the animals, but for the people as well.’ Linda also deals regularly with the Fire Service. ‘This is usually for trapped birds’ she explained. ‘Many town offices have netting on their roofs and somehow the birds manage to get inside. Unfortunately, if the netting is loose, birds find their way in and can’t get out. If it’s in a precarious position on the roof, I have to call the Fire Service. ‘Once I tried to rescue a black backed gull. I climbed up a ladder on to the flat roof, but the bird was right in the corner by a sheer drop, I’d been crawling on

Within the first couple of weeks of starting, Linda had to deal with an unexpected incident. While on call, she received a phone call at 3am from the Police: ‘A baby calf, only a few days old, had been found on a road in St Ouen. We managed to lift it into the ambulance and get it to a nearby shed – a neighbour had heard some commotion and offered to help. The next day, we called the Duty Centenier and the calf was reunited with mum.’ But it’s not just larger animals that are rescued. Linda explained: ‘Only recently I had a call from a Tree Surgeon who was just about to put a log through the shredder, when he spotted three baby voles. So he stopped and called the Animal Shelter.’ Linda is full of praise for Jersey’s local public services and the general public who are concerned enough to call the Shelter.

98 dogs & 71 cats

were reunited with their owners during 2018, after arriving as strays.

148 cats were in the JSPCA’s care during 2018.

50

- SPRING 2019

You also need a “can do” approach, excellent interpersonal skills and a love and understanding of animals, she added.

The Charity’s ambulance service is open 24/7. Being a driver requires good local knowledge – Does she ever get lost? ‘ Well, sometimes out East, she replied, ’although my colleagues call me The Almanac.’ Who needs sat nav? ‘You also need a “can do” approach, excellent interpersonal skills and a love and understanding of animals, she added.’ Linda has these in abundance: ‘I used to breed cats, then I had some very large dogs, said Linda. She doesn’t seem scared of anything and clearly loves animals. In the words of George Orwell, All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. But in the case of the Animal Shelter, every animal counts – equally. * Website www.jspca.org.je ; Tel: 724331


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

Asparagus & Courgette Tarts

IN THE KITCHEN

Ingredients (serves 4): 3 courgettes 3tbsp fresh pesto 1 x 375g pack ready rolled puff pastry 8 asparagus stems, trimmed and halved lengthways

Summer recipes from our cookery writer, ZoĂŤ Garner

75g Gruyère cheese, broken into small pieces

Summer brings an abundance of fresh ingredients showing off their true flavours. Here are a few of my favourite recipes to try at this time of year, making the most of the best seasonal foods.

1. Preheat the oven to 200C (180C fan) and line a baking sheet with baking paper. Slice the courgettes into rounds, about the thickness of a pound coin and put into a bowl. Add the pesto and season, mix well. 2. Cut the sheet of pastry into 4 rectangles and put them onto the lined baking sheet. Using a sharp knife, score a border about 1cm inside the edge. Cover each pastry rectangle with

Strawberry Pannacotta Ingredients (serves 5):

3. the courgette rings, keeping inside the border, top with the asparagus and bake for 15mins. Then top with the gruyere pieces and return to the oven for a further 5mins. Serve immediately, along with a BBQ or just a simple salad.

3 gelatine leaves 450ml double cream 200ml whole milk 100g caster sugar 1/4tsp vanilla bean paste 250g strawberries 1tbsp caster sugar Granola to decorate, optional 1. Put the gelatine leaves in a small bowl of cold water to soften, about 5mins. Meanwhile put the cream, milk, sugar and vanilla bean paste in a pan. Heat gently until hot but not bubbling. Remove the gelatine leaves from the water and squeeze out any excess water, do this one sheet at a time. Add to the hot cream mix and stir until dissolved. Leave to stand for 20mins to cool. Strain the liquid through a sieve into 6 glasses and chill in the fridge for at least 4hrs. 2. Slice the strawberries, then mix together with the sugar and 1tsp water, if needed. Set aside to macerate for 20mins. 3. Once the panna cottas are set, top with the strawberries and their juices. Sprinkle over a little granola if you like and serve.

52

- SPRING 2019

Summer Duck Salad

Ingredients (serves2): 1 duck leg 100g bag rocket salad 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 4 spring onions, thinly sliced 2 carrots, thinly sliced 1 garlic clove, grated 1tsp fresh grated root ginger 2tbsp soy sauce 3tbsp honey 1. Preheat the oven to 220C (200C fan). Season the duck leg, place on a baking tray and roast for 25mins. Meanwhile make the dressing, mix together the garlic, ginger, soy and honey. Once the duck is cooked remove from the oven. When cool enough to handle, remove the duck meat and crispy skin from the bone and finely shred. 2. Put the salad, tomatoes, spring onion and carrots into a bowl. Add the shredded duck and drizzle over the dressing mix. Toss together and serve. SPRING 2019

- 53


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

Asparagus & Courgette Tarts

IN THE KITCHEN

Ingredients (serves 4): 3 courgettes 3tbsp fresh pesto 1 x 375g pack ready rolled puff pastry 8 asparagus stems, trimmed and halved lengthways

Summer recipes from our cookery writer, ZoĂŤ Garner

75g Gruyère cheese, broken into small pieces

Summer brings an abundance of fresh ingredients showing off their true flavours. Here are a few of my favourite recipes to try at this time of year, making the most of the best seasonal foods.

1. Preheat the oven to 200C (180C fan) and line a baking sheet with baking paper. Slice the courgettes into rounds, about the thickness of a pound coin and put into a bowl. Add the pesto and season, mix well. 2. Cut the sheet of pastry into 4 rectangles and put them onto the lined baking sheet. Using a sharp knife, score a border about 1cm inside the edge. Cover each pastry rectangle with

Strawberry Pannacotta Ingredients (serves 5):

3. the courgette rings, keeping inside the border, top with the asparagus and bake for 15mins. Then top with the gruyere pieces and return to the oven for a further 5mins. Serve immediately, along with a BBQ or just a simple salad.

3 gelatine leaves 450ml double cream 200ml whole milk 100g caster sugar 1/4tsp vanilla bean paste 250g strawberries 1tbsp caster sugar Granola to decorate, optional 1. Put the gelatine leaves in a small bowl of cold water to soften, about 5mins. Meanwhile put the cream, milk, sugar and vanilla bean paste in a pan. Heat gently until hot but not bubbling. Remove the gelatine leaves from the water and squeeze out any excess water, do this one sheet at a time. Add to the hot cream mix and stir until dissolved. Leave to stand for 20mins to cool. Strain the liquid through a sieve into 6 glasses and chill in the fridge for at least 4hrs. 2. Slice the strawberries, then mix together with the sugar and 1tsp water, if needed. Set aside to macerate for 20mins. 3. Once the panna cottas are set, top with the strawberries and their juices. Sprinkle over a little granola if you like and serve.

52

- SPRING 2019

Summer Duck Salad

Ingredients (serves2): 1 duck leg 100g bag rocket salad 250g cherry tomatoes, halved 4 spring onions, thinly sliced 2 carrots, thinly sliced 1 garlic clove, grated 1tsp fresh grated root ginger 2tbsp soy sauce 3tbsp honey 1. Preheat the oven to 220C (200C fan). Season the duck leg, place on a baking tray and roast for 25mins. Meanwhile make the dressing, mix together the garlic, ginger, soy and honey. Once the duck is cooked remove from the oven. When cool enough to handle, remove the duck meat and crispy skin from the bone and finely shred. 2. Put the salad, tomatoes, spring onion and carrots into a bowl. Add the shredded duck and drizzle over the dressing mix. Toss together and serve. SPRING 2019

- 53


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD FOR THOUGHT By Chef –Restaurateur Joseph Baker of No 10 Restaurant, Bond Street

Pastella are proud to have exclusivity for Happy D.2 Plus. Visit Pastella for the ‘bathroom of the future’

J

ersey is bountiful right now. We have freshly dug royals, asparagus, plump scallops, spider crabs, fortifying dairy and so much more. The sort of produce, right on our doorstep, that any London restaurant would bite your hand off to use. But the matter of making the most of seasonal bounties, and the positive effects on quality and sustainability this can have, is still hard to understand.

E

legant, expressive bathroom interiors with an added extra in terms of form and colour… this is the new range available from Pastella.

In food, embellishment is rarely useful, in spite of its ubiquity. It is habitual to oversell, because we need to compete with things more complex, more beautiful/progressive/à la mode. But then you under-deliver: mighty ideas are always prone to inconsistency. Marketing, trends and branding is a quagmire of differentiating oneself to consumers. The terms ‘seasonal’ and ‘local’ are flaunted. They resonate with people (quite rightly), but instead of living by the value of these ideas, marketing slaps the name on and moves swiftly on. With this is mind it can be difficult to see the wood for the trees. It becomes hard to identify what actually being ‘local’, ‘seasonal’ and ‘sustainable’ means. In a time where the food industry - and particularly restaurants - are compelled to market themselves furiously, truth shines through, but it also hurts. Everywhere from high-end restaurants to small cafés promote these ideals. Sadly, it’s mostly jumping on buzz words, paying lip-service to an abstract idea. The reality is that most businesses’ (food included) primary concern is for the bottom line. Appropriating the language of ethically minded artisans is easily done, but more often than not it’s a superb hypocrisy.

54

- SPRING 2019

ELEGANCE IN THE BATHROOM

The archetypical open oval of the Happy D. design classic runs through the elements of this new range. Wash bowls with precise lines, stand-alone consoles and matching semi-tall cabinets and circular mirrors combine to create perfectly harmonized washing areas. The new range enables elegant, expressive style collections to be individually designed with a darker or lighter basic mood. Genuinely cooking with the best ingredients, supporting those that farm and grow them, having patience with the seasons, being uncompromising from start to finish, requires real thought, flexibility and acceptance that it won’t reflect well on your bottom line. It means not serving scallops if it’s too rough to dive. And then explaining this to people who want to eat scallops. Often a sticking point. That’s why it’s a bit of a unicorn. At Number 10 we try to frame our offering around the principles of quality, seasonality and localism, but we are so far from where I want to be. Baby steps are better than none at all. I do believe that operating ethically and sustainably can be economically viable and achievable in the restaurant industry,

but it probably requires a shift in value perception and facing the truth of the supply chain. If people want to live and consume by these ideals (and it looks to me like we should), you can’t expect a menu of 20 items, all cooked beautifully, with the best ingredients, for bargain prices. It has to come from the heart, from belief that it’s the right thing to do for you, your customers, your environment. Not because the cool kids are doing it somewhere. And when you do believe in it, it is difficult to see these ideals diluted through the vacuum of marketing. Less talk more action. We should abide by the seasons, we should maximise locally sourced options. These are not mighty ideas, this is common sense. Something us bizarre humans are often incapable of.

Washbasins with their narrow, flattened rim come in two new colour variants Anthracite Matt or a two-tone contrast, with glossy White on the inside and Anthracite Matt on the outside. Subtly rounded contours, handle-free fronts and optional interior lighting for the pull-out compartments on bathroom furniture are highlights of the series.

Visit Pastella to see the cutting edge design of the new Viu/XViu the bathroom of the future.

This impressive elegance is also reflected when it comes to bathing: the bathtubs made from glossy acrylic are optionally available in Graphite Super Matt with seamless panelling.

A complete bathroom range that exudes forward-looking design. The post-industrial elegance of the pieces emerges from the interaction of soft, organic forms with a precise geometry and details finished to a previously unattained level of perfection. Sharp contrasts arise from surfaces that combine the finest ceramics, glass and metal with matt lacquers or high-quality woods.

Pop into our refurbished showroom at Five Oaks for that extra inspiration.

The highlight is a washing area variant based on the patented Duravit c-bonded

The circular mirrors come in two finishes: graphic-radiating (‘Radial’) or bionic-geometric (‘Organic’).

technology. The exterior is a strict rectangle, while the interior features gentle organic curves with a spacious inner basin and generous shelf. The prominent contour of the supporting metal console with its V-shape profile in elegant Champagne Matt or Black Matt. A further highlight of the XViu series is the free-standing bathtub, an eyecatching centerpiece. The prominent metal frame comes in Champagne Matt or Black Matt as a contrast to the highgloss white acrylic and is available in two sizes: 160x80 cm and 180x80 cm. Visit Pastella for that extra inspiration and make your bathroom special!

SPRING 2019

- 55


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD FOR THOUGHT By Chef –Restaurateur Joseph Baker of No 10 Restaurant, Bond Street

Pastella are proud to have exclusivity for Happy D.2 Plus. Visit Pastella for the ‘bathroom of the future’

J

ersey is bountiful right now. We have freshly dug royals, asparagus, plump scallops, spider crabs, fortifying dairy and so much more. The sort of produce, right on our doorstep, that any London restaurant would bite your hand off to use. But the matter of making the most of seasonal bounties, and the positive effects on quality and sustainability this can have, is still hard to understand.

E

legant, expressive bathroom interiors with an added extra in terms of form and colour… this is the new range available from Pastella.

In food, embellishment is rarely useful, in spite of its ubiquity. It is habitual to oversell, because we need to compete with things more complex, more beautiful/progressive/à la mode. But then you under-deliver: mighty ideas are always prone to inconsistency. Marketing, trends and branding is a quagmire of differentiating oneself to consumers. The terms ‘seasonal’ and ‘local’ are flaunted. They resonate with people (quite rightly), but instead of living by the value of these ideas, marketing slaps the name on and moves swiftly on. With this is mind it can be difficult to see the wood for the trees. It becomes hard to identify what actually being ‘local’, ‘seasonal’ and ‘sustainable’ means. In a time where the food industry - and particularly restaurants - are compelled to market themselves furiously, truth shines through, but it also hurts. Everywhere from high-end restaurants to small cafés promote these ideals. Sadly, it’s mostly jumping on buzz words, paying lip-service to an abstract idea. The reality is that most businesses’ (food included) primary concern is for the bottom line. Appropriating the language of ethically minded artisans is easily done, but more often than not it’s a superb hypocrisy.

54

- SPRING 2019

ELEGANCE IN THE BATHROOM

The archetypical open oval of the Happy D. design classic runs through the elements of this new range. Wash bowls with precise lines, stand-alone consoles and matching semi-tall cabinets and circular mirrors combine to create perfectly harmonized washing areas. The new range enables elegant, expressive style collections to be individually designed with a darker or lighter basic mood. Genuinely cooking with the best ingredients, supporting those that farm and grow them, having patience with the seasons, being uncompromising from start to finish, requires real thought, flexibility and acceptance that it won’t reflect well on your bottom line. It means not serving scallops if it’s too rough to dive. And then explaining this to people who want to eat scallops. Often a sticking point. That’s why it’s a bit of a unicorn. At Number 10 we try to frame our offering around the principles of quality, seasonality and localism, but we are so far from where I want to be. Baby steps are better than none at all. I do believe that operating ethically and sustainably can be economically viable and achievable in the restaurant industry,

but it probably requires a shift in value perception and facing the truth of the supply chain. If people want to live and consume by these ideals (and it looks to me like we should), you can’t expect a menu of 20 items, all cooked beautifully, with the best ingredients, for bargain prices. It has to come from the heart, from belief that it’s the right thing to do for you, your customers, your environment. Not because the cool kids are doing it somewhere. And when you do believe in it, it is difficult to see these ideals diluted through the vacuum of marketing. Less talk more action. We should abide by the seasons, we should maximise locally sourced options. These are not mighty ideas, this is common sense. Something us bizarre humans are often incapable of.

Washbasins with their narrow, flattened rim come in two new colour variants Anthracite Matt or a two-tone contrast, with glossy White on the inside and Anthracite Matt on the outside. Subtly rounded contours, handle-free fronts and optional interior lighting for the pull-out compartments on bathroom furniture are highlights of the series.

Visit Pastella to see the cutting edge design of the new Viu/XViu the bathroom of the future.

This impressive elegance is also reflected when it comes to bathing: the bathtubs made from glossy acrylic are optionally available in Graphite Super Matt with seamless panelling.

A complete bathroom range that exudes forward-looking design. The post-industrial elegance of the pieces emerges from the interaction of soft, organic forms with a precise geometry and details finished to a previously unattained level of perfection. Sharp contrasts arise from surfaces that combine the finest ceramics, glass and metal with matt lacquers or high-quality woods.

Pop into our refurbished showroom at Five Oaks for that extra inspiration.

The highlight is a washing area variant based on the patented Duravit c-bonded

The circular mirrors come in two finishes: graphic-radiating (‘Radial’) or bionic-geometric (‘Organic’).

technology. The exterior is a strict rectangle, while the interior features gentle organic curves with a spacious inner basin and generous shelf. The prominent contour of the supporting metal console with its V-shape profile in elegant Champagne Matt or Black Matt. A further highlight of the XViu series is the free-standing bathtub, an eyecatching centerpiece. The prominent metal frame comes in Champagne Matt or Black Matt as a contrast to the highgloss white acrylic and is available in two sizes: 160x80 cm and 180x80 cm. Visit Pastella for that extra inspiration and make your bathroom special!

SPRING 2019

- 55


SPORT

SPORT

WALK & RUN THE ISLAND Chloë Bowler is a Wellbeing Expert, looking after her clients’ complete wellbeing including fitness, nutrition and emotional wellbeing.

One of my favourite places to walk and run is Queen’s Valley Reservoir. It is brimming with wildlife, as well as beautiful trees and plants. There is plenty of parking, and although it has a few, small hills in it, it is very manageable. There is even a short cut halfway round if need be! It is nearly exactly 2 miles around so can be a great way to improve your walking or running fitness. Jersey Water has even been kind enough to track the routes and distances for you on their website (jerseywater.je/leisure/). They also do this for Val de la Mare, if you are based out West.

S

ummer is with us; the days are warmer and the evenings are lighter. Now is the perfect time to get outside and exercise in the fresh air in our beautiful island. Jersey has so many unspoilt tracks and paths to discover, and although running isn’t for everyone, I really believe that walking and running are extremely beneficial to joint strength, heart health and mental wellbeing.

With over ten years’ experience working in central London, looking after a host of celebrity clients, Chloë now lives and works in Jersey. She loves helping people to learn to enjoy exercise and good nutrition in a comfortable and friendly environment.

If you are a seasoned runner, you may be well-versed in the beautiful trail runs Jersey has to offer. I would recommend the Half Marathon, held in June, to everyone who enjoys running. It covers some of the most spectacular parts of the island, following the Five Mile Road in St Ouen, and travelling down the railway path to St Aubin and along to the Waterfront. There is so much beautiful scenery to look at, it certainly helps the miles go by. (For more information see runjersey.co.uk). Running may be something you have avoided, or feel it is beyond you. It rarely is, but walking is an excellent way to start and is amazing exercise in its own right. I would always suggest to people that they start off by setting a goal, so that you can keep track of your progress, and stay positive as you tick off challenges along the way. This can be as simple as walking for twenty minutes three times a week. If you work in town, Victoria Avenue has a large walkway, offering flat terrain, and a constant sea view. This is great for a lunch break workout, where you can fit your walk or run into your day, get some Vitamin D, and feel energised for the afternoon at your desk. Before your run, make sure you are warmed up with some slow jogging and dynamic stretches. These are moving stretches and help ready the muscles for work. You can then move on to more explosive movements such as high knee skips, using the arms as well as the legs, to help prevent injury. After your run, static stretches will help prevent stiffness. Also make sure that you keep warm and hydrated afterwards.

56

- SPRING 2019

For more information on Personal Training, and Meal Delivery packages see chloebowler.com

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

Created in

Jersey.

Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become objects of desire. Available across the Island, a purchase supports local craftspeople and supports the local economy.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

SPRING 2019

- 57


SPORT

SPORT

WALK & RUN THE ISLAND Chloë Bowler is a Wellbeing Expert, looking after her clients’ complete wellbeing including fitness, nutrition and emotional wellbeing.

One of my favourite places to walk and run is Queen’s Valley Reservoir. It is brimming with wildlife, as well as beautiful trees and plants. There is plenty of parking, and although it has a few, small hills in it, it is very manageable. There is even a short cut halfway round if need be! It is nearly exactly 2 miles around so can be a great way to improve your walking or running fitness. Jersey Water has even been kind enough to track the routes and distances for you on their website (jerseywater.je/leisure/). They also do this for Val de la Mare, if you are based out West.

S

ummer is with us; the days are warmer and the evenings are lighter. Now is the perfect time to get outside and exercise in the fresh air in our beautiful island. Jersey has so many unspoilt tracks and paths to discover, and although running isn’t for everyone, I really believe that walking and running are extremely beneficial to joint strength, heart health and mental wellbeing.

With over ten years’ experience working in central London, looking after a host of celebrity clients, Chloë now lives and works in Jersey. She loves helping people to learn to enjoy exercise and good nutrition in a comfortable and friendly environment.

If you are a seasoned runner, you may be well-versed in the beautiful trail runs Jersey has to offer. I would recommend the Half Marathon, held in June, to everyone who enjoys running. It covers some of the most spectacular parts of the island, following the Five Mile Road in St Ouen, and travelling down the railway path to St Aubin and along to the Waterfront. There is so much beautiful scenery to look at, it certainly helps the miles go by. (For more information see runjersey.co.uk). Running may be something you have avoided, or feel it is beyond you. It rarely is, but walking is an excellent way to start and is amazing exercise in its own right. I would always suggest to people that they start off by setting a goal, so that you can keep track of your progress, and stay positive as you tick off challenges along the way. This can be as simple as walking for twenty minutes three times a week. If you work in town, Victoria Avenue has a large walkway, offering flat terrain, and a constant sea view. This is great for a lunch break workout, where you can fit your walk or run into your day, get some Vitamin D, and feel energised for the afternoon at your desk. Before your run, make sure you are warmed up with some slow jogging and dynamic stretches. These are moving stretches and help ready the muscles for work. You can then move on to more explosive movements such as high knee skips, using the arms as well as the legs, to help prevent injury. After your run, static stretches will help prevent stiffness. Also make sure that you keep warm and hydrated afterwards.

56

- SPRING 2019

For more information on Personal Training, and Meal Delivery packages see chloebowler.com

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

Created in

Jersey.

Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become objects of desire. Available across the Island, a purchase supports local craftspeople and supports the local economy.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

SPRING 2019

- 57


SPORT

SPORT

The game is played in teams of four, the object being to hit the balls through the course of six hoops in the right sequence in each direction and concludes by pegging out or hitting them against the centre peg. There are four balls: blue, red, black and yellow which must be played in that order and the colours are painted on the centre peg to act as a reminder. The side which completes the course first with both balls wins. “It can be very competitive,” explains Euan, the retired police sergeant who was introduced to the game by his parents and often brings his sons up to the club during the week.

Through the hoop and pegging out Croquet, a traditional summer game, is played in gardens and also at the Jersey Croquet Club. Gill Maccabe went there and realised the game had far more to it than simply an excuse for Pimms and cucumber sandwiches

W

hich Island sport brings together a retired States Police Sergeant, a retired Trust Manager and a JFA referee on a Tuesday evening in summer? No, not Golf, but Golf Croquet. Sometimes called chess on grass, or polo without the horse, this game of strategy, skill and tactics doesn’t need a publicschool education or Russell Group University degree to appreciate. You don’t even need to enjoy drinking Pimms or have a large lawn.

58

- SPRING 2019

The majority of the members of the Jersey Croquet Club actually know each other from running together with the Crapaud Hash House Harriers. “One of our longest serving members Paula Le Moignan, who is also a runner, encouraged us all to come along a few years ago and we are still here.” “In fact, I’m the chairman now,” laughed Jeff Baron, who also runs his own business, and is keen to illustrate that the game is not as easy is it looks.

“Naturally we are polite - but competitive,” he smiled. “You can hit other people’s balls, you can block people out of the way, you can be sneaky - you and your team member need to stop other people or knock them out.”

“It can be quite complicated,” he explained. “But, it is relatively easy to pick up and once you learn the rules, it is great fun.” “I’ve played golf since I was 13 but have only played Croquet for three or four years – there is a lot more to it than meets the eye,” he said.

JFA referee Nigel Hammond has been a sportsman all his life: “not golf though, golf and fishing are bottom of my list,” he laughed. He too was introduced to the sport by his running mates and has come to love Croquet. He enjoys being able to play with his wife who was on the

other lawn with a team of girls – in fact the club has many couples. Paula used to call herself a Croquet widow as Tony played it almost constantly when their children were young. Now she plays more than he does and is wonderfully welcoming. She explained that the social side of the club can be particularly appealing during the summer months when long days can be spent with friends and a picnic hamper (and yes Pimms if you wish) with the lawn to yourself - as long as one of them is a member and they pay a small green fee. “You can stay here all afternoon if you like, we share the clubhouse with a cycling club, so you may have to wait for the kettle to boil but it’s a great facility. We even supply all the equipment, the mallets, the hoops and the balls so there is nothing to buy apart from a pair of flat shoes. You don’t even have to wear white anymore,” she explained. “Membership is £60 a year, Club night is on a Tuesday at 6pm until it gets too dark to play, after which we go to the club house and either have a glass of wine or cup of tea or sometimes a meal.” You can find out more by calling Gavin Carter on 07797739678 or emailing Carter.gavin@gmail.com.

There are a few variations of Croquet worldwide; the International Tournament Version, also called Association Croquet, used to be played in the Island but has been replaced over the last few years by the less complicated Golf method, which is faster and easier to play. The club was formed in the mid-eighties by Richard Sowerby who started playing on a lawn in his garden until they grew out of that space and managed to beg a small area at the Rugby Club. In 1990 they moved to Les Quennevais. In those days there was not even a loo and only a small shed for equipment, but the game was so popular they were able to take on the existing huge clubhouse with access to two lawns, which were designed to international standards in 1995. Jersey has hosted many Open and European championships and has produced four local players who have been ranked in the world’s top 20, one of whom is Paula and Tony Le Moignan’s son James, now aged 29, and the other the very well-known player Gavin Carter who still plays and enjoys hero status with the members.

SPRING 2019

- 59


SPORT

SPORT

The game is played in teams of four, the object being to hit the balls through the course of six hoops in the right sequence in each direction and concludes by pegging out or hitting them against the centre peg. There are four balls: blue, red, black and yellow which must be played in that order and the colours are painted on the centre peg to act as a reminder. The side which completes the course first with both balls wins. “It can be very competitive,” explains Euan, the retired police sergeant who was introduced to the game by his parents and often brings his sons up to the club during the week.

Through the hoop and pegging out Croquet, a traditional summer game, is played in gardens and also at the Jersey Croquet Club. Gill Maccabe went there and realised the game had far more to it than simply an excuse for Pimms and cucumber sandwiches

W

hich Island sport brings together a retired States Police Sergeant, a retired Trust Manager and a JFA referee on a Tuesday evening in summer? No, not Golf, but Golf Croquet. Sometimes called chess on grass, or polo without the horse, this game of strategy, skill and tactics doesn’t need a publicschool education or Russell Group University degree to appreciate. You don’t even need to enjoy drinking Pimms or have a large lawn.

58

- SPRING 2019

The majority of the members of the Jersey Croquet Club actually know each other from running together with the Crapaud Hash House Harriers. “One of our longest serving members Paula Le Moignan, who is also a runner, encouraged us all to come along a few years ago and we are still here.” “In fact, I’m the chairman now,” laughed Jeff Baron, who also runs his own business, and is keen to illustrate that the game is not as easy is it looks.

“Naturally we are polite - but competitive,” he smiled. “You can hit other people’s balls, you can block people out of the way, you can be sneaky - you and your team member need to stop other people or knock them out.”

“It can be quite complicated,” he explained. “But, it is relatively easy to pick up and once you learn the rules, it is great fun.” “I’ve played golf since I was 13 but have only played Croquet for three or four years – there is a lot more to it than meets the eye,” he said.

JFA referee Nigel Hammond has been a sportsman all his life: “not golf though, golf and fishing are bottom of my list,” he laughed. He too was introduced to the sport by his running mates and has come to love Croquet. He enjoys being able to play with his wife who was on the

other lawn with a team of girls – in fact the club has many couples. Paula used to call herself a Croquet widow as Tony played it almost constantly when their children were young. Now she plays more than he does and is wonderfully welcoming. She explained that the social side of the club can be particularly appealing during the summer months when long days can be spent with friends and a picnic hamper (and yes Pimms if you wish) with the lawn to yourself - as long as one of them is a member and they pay a small green fee. “You can stay here all afternoon if you like, we share the clubhouse with a cycling club, so you may have to wait for the kettle to boil but it’s a great facility. We even supply all the equipment, the mallets, the hoops and the balls so there is nothing to buy apart from a pair of flat shoes. You don’t even have to wear white anymore,” she explained. “Membership is £60 a year, Club night is on a Tuesday at 6pm until it gets too dark to play, after which we go to the club house and either have a glass of wine or cup of tea or sometimes a meal.” You can find out more by calling Gavin Carter on 07797739678 or emailing Carter.gavin@gmail.com.

There are a few variations of Croquet worldwide; the International Tournament Version, also called Association Croquet, used to be played in the Island but has been replaced over the last few years by the less complicated Golf method, which is faster and easier to play. The club was formed in the mid-eighties by Richard Sowerby who started playing on a lawn in his garden until they grew out of that space and managed to beg a small area at the Rugby Club. In 1990 they moved to Les Quennevais. In those days there was not even a loo and only a small shed for equipment, but the game was so popular they were able to take on the existing huge clubhouse with access to two lawns, which were designed to international standards in 1995. Jersey has hosted many Open and European championships and has produced four local players who have been ranked in the world’s top 20, one of whom is Paula and Tony Le Moignan’s son James, now aged 29, and the other the very well-known player Gavin Carter who still plays and enjoys hero status with the members.

SPRING 2019

- 59


HERITAGE

HERITAGE

The Mother Of The Spitfire Lady Houston, was an eccentric Jersey resident in the 1920s. But she was also very patriotic and very, very rich and she funded the development of aircraft engines that resulted in the Spitfire. James Le Cocq explains how her wealth would help enable Britain to win the Battle of Britain

S

un bathing in the nude? How to gain a notorious reputation in 1920s Jersey. But then Lucy Houston was eccentric – but also very patriotic and extremely rich. In fact, her patriotic ambitions would be pivotal to Britain in the years before the Second World War.

House, a property at Mont de la Rosière, Grands Vaux, where Lucy provided care to her husband as he continued to decline. Sir Robert finalised his will in January 1926 and died three months later, leaving her £5.5 million. Although her married life in Jersey was brief, it quickly escalated into a period of strife that would see her clash with the Royal Court. This conflict revolved around her husband’s will after his death and the question of her own mental well being. While she had cared for him, Lucy became convinced that people sought to murder them. This ‘persecution mania’ was used by the Royal Court to withhold the contents of the will and claim that she was mentally unfit. The following months contained a desperate battle as Lucy fought to prove she was healthy in mind. Numerous prominent psychiatrists were called in, but it was not until June 1926 that the Royal Court finally restored Lucy’s civil rights.

The experience left Lady Houston feeling unfairly treated by the Island’s authorities and she left shortly after reclaiming her rights. While her experiences in the Island were less than idyllic, the months Lucy spent under enforced care saw her adopt new ambitions that according to her biographer, Miles Macnair, ‘were indeed totally unselfish but highly political’ in nature. Fuelled by her distaste for the lack of strong leadership plaguing Britain at the time, she dedicated herself to pushing for a stronger government and funding several causes that aroused her sympathy. This led her to send £100,000 - equivalent to about £4 million today - to the Royal Aero Club as they were preparing to win the coveted Schneider Trophy. The competition had been founded in 1912 as an international race that would push aeroplane development forwards. In Britain, the RAF’s design officer, R.J. Mitchell, was responsible for many of the new modifications and advances leading to more reliable engines capable of significant horsepower and endurance.

All of this work would have been for naught had Lucy not stepped in after the government withdrew its funding for the competition. Her money helped to accelerate development of the new Rolls Royce ‘R’ type engine and ensure Britain could compete and ultimately win the Schneider Trophy in 1931. But Britain’s victory, gained through Lady’s Houston’s generosity, did much more than win a trophy. It kick-started the development of the Spitfire engine and if it had not been for this, the creation and critical deployment of the Spitfire fighter plane at the Battle of Britain might never have happened. Lucy’s patriotic ambitions, re-ignited by her difficult time in Jersey, had farreaching consequences that went on to aid the country in its defence during the Second World War. Jersey may not have accommodated Lady Houston as well as she may have liked, but the Island in effect gave her the will to pursue her ambitions to the fullest, and ultimately save her beloved country in its most desperate hour.

Lucy Houston, whose third husband was a wealthy shipping magnate and Baronet, came to the Island to avoid British taxes, but left with a new-found determination to champion British pride in an increasingly uncertain time. She would have an unlikely role in helping victory in the Battle of Britain. ‘Poppy’ Fannie Lucy Houston was born in Lambeth in 1857, the daughter of a draper. She became a chorus girl and aged 16, ran away to Paris, with a (married) member of the family who owned Bass Brewery, who was more than twice her age. When he died in 1882, he bequeathed her £6,000 a year for life. She was an active suffragette before the First World War and an ardent and productive campaigner for women’s rights, conducting works of charity during the First World War, which included providing a convalescent home for nurses returning from the front line. In recognition of these endeavours she was made a Dame of the British Empire in 1917. Lady Houston moved to Jersey shortly after marrying the ailing Sir Robert Houston in December 1924. Like many wealthy people before and since, they wished to escape the ‘penal tax regime’ in England. They purchased Beaufield

60

- SPRING 2019

Your Safety, our Priority! Call or visit our showroom/office and discuss your requierment with our team or go to our webiste to see a complete profile of our services and products Opening hours: Mon - Closed Tue - Sat: 9am to 5pm Contacts: M: Martin +44 779 78 368 72 T: +44 1534 484439 E: info@homefiresjersey.com homefiresjersey.com

La Rue Du Galet, Millbrook, St.Lawrence, Jersey, JE3 1LQ

SPRING 2019

- 61


HERITAGE

HERITAGE

The Mother Of The Spitfire Lady Houston, was an eccentric Jersey resident in the 1920s. But she was also very patriotic and very, very rich and she funded the development of aircraft engines that resulted in the Spitfire. James Le Cocq explains how her wealth would help enable Britain to win the Battle of Britain

S

un bathing in the nude? How to gain a notorious reputation in 1920s Jersey. But then Lucy Houston was eccentric – but also very patriotic and extremely rich. In fact, her patriotic ambitions would be pivotal to Britain in the years before the Second World War.

House, a property at Mont de la Rosière, Grands Vaux, where Lucy provided care to her husband as he continued to decline. Sir Robert finalised his will in January 1926 and died three months later, leaving her £5.5 million. Although her married life in Jersey was brief, it quickly escalated into a period of strife that would see her clash with the Royal Court. This conflict revolved around her husband’s will after his death and the question of her own mental well being. While she had cared for him, Lucy became convinced that people sought to murder them. This ‘persecution mania’ was used by the Royal Court to withhold the contents of the will and claim that she was mentally unfit. The following months contained a desperate battle as Lucy fought to prove she was healthy in mind. Numerous prominent psychiatrists were called in, but it was not until June 1926 that the Royal Court finally restored Lucy’s civil rights.

The experience left Lady Houston feeling unfairly treated by the Island’s authorities and she left shortly after reclaiming her rights. While her experiences in the Island were less than idyllic, the months Lucy spent under enforced care saw her adopt new ambitions that according to her biographer, Miles Macnair, ‘were indeed totally unselfish but highly political’ in nature. Fuelled by her distaste for the lack of strong leadership plaguing Britain at the time, she dedicated herself to pushing for a stronger government and funding several causes that aroused her sympathy. This led her to send £100,000 - equivalent to about £4 million today - to the Royal Aero Club as they were preparing to win the coveted Schneider Trophy. The competition had been founded in 1912 as an international race that would push aeroplane development forwards. In Britain, the RAF’s design officer, R.J. Mitchell, was responsible for many of the new modifications and advances leading to more reliable engines capable of significant horsepower and endurance.

All of this work would have been for naught had Lucy not stepped in after the government withdrew its funding for the competition. Her money helped to accelerate development of the new Rolls Royce ‘R’ type engine and ensure Britain could compete and ultimately win the Schneider Trophy in 1931. But Britain’s victory, gained through Lady’s Houston’s generosity, did much more than win a trophy. It kick-started the development of the Spitfire engine and if it had not been for this, the creation and critical deployment of the Spitfire fighter plane at the Battle of Britain might never have happened. Lucy’s patriotic ambitions, re-ignited by her difficult time in Jersey, had farreaching consequences that went on to aid the country in its defence during the Second World War. Jersey may not have accommodated Lady Houston as well as she may have liked, but the Island in effect gave her the will to pursue her ambitions to the fullest, and ultimately save her beloved country in its most desperate hour.

Lucy Houston, whose third husband was a wealthy shipping magnate and Baronet, came to the Island to avoid British taxes, but left with a new-found determination to champion British pride in an increasingly uncertain time. She would have an unlikely role in helping victory in the Battle of Britain. ‘Poppy’ Fannie Lucy Houston was born in Lambeth in 1857, the daughter of a draper. She became a chorus girl and aged 16, ran away to Paris, with a (married) member of the family who owned Bass Brewery, who was more than twice her age. When he died in 1882, he bequeathed her £6,000 a year for life. She was an active suffragette before the First World War and an ardent and productive campaigner for women’s rights, conducting works of charity during the First World War, which included providing a convalescent home for nurses returning from the front line. In recognition of these endeavours she was made a Dame of the British Empire in 1917. Lady Houston moved to Jersey shortly after marrying the ailing Sir Robert Houston in December 1924. Like many wealthy people before and since, they wished to escape the ‘penal tax regime’ in England. They purchased Beaufield

60

- SPRING 2019

Your Safety, our Priority! Call or visit our showroom/office and discuss your requierment with our team or go to our webiste to see a complete profile of our services and products Opening hours: Mon - Closed Tue - Sat: 9am to 5pm Contacts: M: Martin +44 779 78 368 72 T: +44 1534 484439 E: info@homefiresjersey.com homefiresjersey.com

La Rue Du Galet, Millbrook, St.Lawrence, Jersey, JE3 1LQ

SPRING 2019

- 61


HERITAGE

HERITAGE

GIVE ME SHELTER David Dorgan writes about his new book, which covers the story of air raid precautions in the Channel Islands

S

t Helier had a number of Air Raid Shelters, some private and the majority public. The dug shelters were at Parade Gardens and the Lower Park. Others were at the Animal Shelter, Belmont Road where the car park is today, in Pinel Gardens at First Tower and at Colomberie on the site of Newton & Newton.

Part Of A Bigger Picture

The solid structures were the two old copper tunnels at Westmount, the first where the new flats are in the old Parish Yard, opposite the Bowls Club, Wesley Chapel Apartments, Lawn House, Mont-aL’Abbé and others elsewhere. My book describes what equipment was issued, the shelters both private and public, the people and what they did. There are personal accounts from a number of people and one from a man who was bombed - twice. The air raid on St Helier (28th June 1940) began with the first bomb landing at the Rope Walk, Green Street, the next at the States Offices, South Hill then the aircraft turned and bombed South Pier, Pier Road, Commercial Buildings and the main Harbour. Two bombs went into the courtyard garden at the Pomme d’Or Hotel and the flight then turned to the west dropping a final bomb on the beach about the site of the Finance Centre. The town was machine gunned, the Royal Yacht Hotel and Wildfire were all damaged and many windows blown out including the town Church windows. At 6.40pm Bernie Robert and his friend Gerald Le Marrec were knocked off the sea wall at La Rocque by the blast of the first two bombs to hit Jersey.

The first bomb hit the beach blowing mud up over the cottages across the road. The second hit behind the north wall of the slip. Both boys were unhurt unlike a visitor, Thomas Pilkington and locals Minnie Farrell and John Adam, the local A.R.P. Warden, all of whom lost their lives.

The Channel Islands Military Museum celebrates its 30th anniversary of opening its doors in May 1989. Its proprietor, Damien Horn, spoke to Alasdair Crosby

Four years later (19 June 1944) Bernie Robert was on his way to school at about 8.30am when flying past above him were 20 American P38 Lightning bombers. The majority of the planes flew on, but Bernie saw one of them peel away and come towards La Rocque. Then two objects dropped from the Lightning before it veered off. The German MG34 machine guns, on top of the nearby Conway Tower, together with the 3 x MG 34 positions around the base of the Tower burst furiously into life and there was shrapnel dropping everywhere from the guns and the 2 x 500lb bombs exploding. The first bomb hit the road between Barmoor and Rockston and created a huge crater. The blast also knocked down four

T

I hope, in my book, to help keep alive memories of incidents that are rapidly passing out of memory as the generation that had direct experience of them itself becomes part of the Island’s past history.

he sight of grey wartime concrete bunkers dotted around Jersey is surely as familiar to Islanders as the fact of the German Occupation itself. So, surprising, perhaps, there are many visitors to the Channel Islands Military Museum, located in one such bunker on the coastal side of the Five Mile Road, who ask the proprietor, Damien Horn: ‘Did the British build this?’

“Give Me Shelter” is available from Amazon.co.uk - book, Kindle, Société Jersiaise bookshop, RURAL magazine or by phoning 01534 733194.

He said: ‘I tell them: “No, this was built by the Germans when Jersey was occupied for five years in the war.” A lot of people from the UK don’t know that.

of the houses across the road and a shop, with other houses very badly damaged. The other bomb fell onto the beach behind Rockston but did not explode.

‘I have come to the conclusion that most people now don’t give the Occupation

62

- SPRING 2019

a thought. It is, after, all, receding into history. Yet I am always looking to see if there’s anything remaining. There’s always something to find. Most people don’t even look. Maybe that’s an obsession of mine gone mad. That’s how I am.’ He was asked what made his own museum different to other, perhaps better-known attractions interpreting the story of the Occupation. ‘With us, there are no buttons to press, no gimmicks, just original artefacts. When new items come, we fit them in, or change them over… we’re always looking for new items to display. There’s nothing else on this scale in the Island, now.’

And indeed there are some fascinating artefacts to view: every item tells a story. It contains an Enigma machine (one of two in the collection), for example, found by Dereck Langlois at Liberation time. (He thought they were typewriters, but as there was nowhere to insert a sheet of paper they spent years in a cupboard until he donated them to Damien). Then there is the ‘Honour Board’ of Machine Gun Battalion 16, which was stationed in Jersey. The board was for its soldiers who had perished earlier in the war. A beautiful piece of woodwork, it contains the names of three soldiers of the unit who had stumbled into a Guernsey minefield and were all killed.

SPRING 2019

- 63


HERITAGE

HERITAGE

GIVE ME SHELTER David Dorgan writes about his new book, which covers the story of air raid precautions in the Channel Islands

S

t Helier had a number of Air Raid Shelters, some private and the majority public. The dug shelters were at Parade Gardens and the Lower Park. Others were at the Animal Shelter, Belmont Road where the car park is today, in Pinel Gardens at First Tower and at Colomberie on the site of Newton & Newton.

Part Of A Bigger Picture

The solid structures were the two old copper tunnels at Westmount, the first where the new flats are in the old Parish Yard, opposite the Bowls Club, Wesley Chapel Apartments, Lawn House, Mont-aL’Abbé and others elsewhere. My book describes what equipment was issued, the shelters both private and public, the people and what they did. There are personal accounts from a number of people and one from a man who was bombed - twice. The air raid on St Helier (28th June 1940) began with the first bomb landing at the Rope Walk, Green Street, the next at the States Offices, South Hill then the aircraft turned and bombed South Pier, Pier Road, Commercial Buildings and the main Harbour. Two bombs went into the courtyard garden at the Pomme d’Or Hotel and the flight then turned to the west dropping a final bomb on the beach about the site of the Finance Centre. The town was machine gunned, the Royal Yacht Hotel and Wildfire were all damaged and many windows blown out including the town Church windows. At 6.40pm Bernie Robert and his friend Gerald Le Marrec were knocked off the sea wall at La Rocque by the blast of the first two bombs to hit Jersey.

The first bomb hit the beach blowing mud up over the cottages across the road. The second hit behind the north wall of the slip. Both boys were unhurt unlike a visitor, Thomas Pilkington and locals Minnie Farrell and John Adam, the local A.R.P. Warden, all of whom lost their lives.

The Channel Islands Military Museum celebrates its 30th anniversary of opening its doors in May 1989. Its proprietor, Damien Horn, spoke to Alasdair Crosby

Four years later (19 June 1944) Bernie Robert was on his way to school at about 8.30am when flying past above him were 20 American P38 Lightning bombers. The majority of the planes flew on, but Bernie saw one of them peel away and come towards La Rocque. Then two objects dropped from the Lightning before it veered off. The German MG34 machine guns, on top of the nearby Conway Tower, together with the 3 x MG 34 positions around the base of the Tower burst furiously into life and there was shrapnel dropping everywhere from the guns and the 2 x 500lb bombs exploding. The first bomb hit the road between Barmoor and Rockston and created a huge crater. The blast also knocked down four

T

I hope, in my book, to help keep alive memories of incidents that are rapidly passing out of memory as the generation that had direct experience of them itself becomes part of the Island’s past history.

he sight of grey wartime concrete bunkers dotted around Jersey is surely as familiar to Islanders as the fact of the German Occupation itself. So, surprising, perhaps, there are many visitors to the Channel Islands Military Museum, located in one such bunker on the coastal side of the Five Mile Road, who ask the proprietor, Damien Horn: ‘Did the British build this?’

“Give Me Shelter” is available from Amazon.co.uk - book, Kindle, Société Jersiaise bookshop, RURAL magazine or by phoning 01534 733194.

He said: ‘I tell them: “No, this was built by the Germans when Jersey was occupied for five years in the war.” A lot of people from the UK don’t know that.

of the houses across the road and a shop, with other houses very badly damaged. The other bomb fell onto the beach behind Rockston but did not explode.

‘I have come to the conclusion that most people now don’t give the Occupation

62

- SPRING 2019

a thought. It is, after, all, receding into history. Yet I am always looking to see if there’s anything remaining. There’s always something to find. Most people don’t even look. Maybe that’s an obsession of mine gone mad. That’s how I am.’ He was asked what made his own museum different to other, perhaps better-known attractions interpreting the story of the Occupation. ‘With us, there are no buttons to press, no gimmicks, just original artefacts. When new items come, we fit them in, or change them over… we’re always looking for new items to display. There’s nothing else on this scale in the Island, now.’

And indeed there are some fascinating artefacts to view: every item tells a story. It contains an Enigma machine (one of two in the collection), for example, found by Dereck Langlois at Liberation time. (He thought they were typewriters, but as there was nowhere to insert a sheet of paper they spent years in a cupboard until he donated them to Damien). Then there is the ‘Honour Board’ of Machine Gun Battalion 16, which was stationed in Jersey. The board was for its soldiers who had perished earlier in the war. A beautiful piece of woodwork, it contains the names of three soldiers of the unit who had stumbled into a Guernsey minefield and were all killed.

SPRING 2019

- 63


HERITAGE

NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

BELLS, COPPER AND LACE

Their names: Anton Fromm, Peter Molitor and Willi Keller. Damien did research and found photos of the three: until then, they had just been names. Damien was a 7-year-old pupil when his school had a ‘show and tell’ session: find and bring in to school things to do with the Occupation. Parents and grandparents were asked what they might have to lend and various Occupation related items were brought along. Damien recounted: ‘The Occupation themed sessions were soon superseded by a craze for playing marbles. After a couple of weeks I picked up the discarded bits and pieces left lying around – and that is how my collection started. ‘It fascinated me to think that the Island had been occupied by an enemy power only 25 years before I was born and the collection just went on expanding as I discovered new artefacts all the time. The museum was a natural progression from having a collection that was taking up ever more space in the attic of his parents’ home; it was fortunate that the bedroom ceilings never caved in.

Hamish Marett-Crosby looks at the living museum that is Villedieu Les Poêles. In this issue, he concentrates on copper; bells and lace come later

The museum’s site is a former bunker in use as a store and rubbish dump for the former ‘Chateau Plaisir’ tourism attraction - that has long been superseded by new housing development. He and his then business partner cleared out the bunker and in exchange were able to occupy it rent-free for three years. ‘The car park is a little further away now than formerly, because we don’t have it

QUARTER PAGE ADVERT:Layout 1 25/04/2019 10:35 Page 1

W HOLE MILK

Milk as it should be

Featuring Rosie Charleen ✿ Straight from our cows who are fed on grass and non-GM feed ✿ Healthy contented cows ✿ Pasteurised unhomogenised milk processed on our farm ✿ Naturally produced with no butterfat standardisation Classic Herd, Manor Farm, St Peter, JE3 7DD Telephone: 01534 485692 www.classicfarmshop.com

64

- SPRING 2019

right outside the door,’ he said. ‘I have tried to get Environment to put a board walk in to help the elderly because access is along a footpath through dunes, which is not so easy for wheel chair users – to date, without success.’ Throughout the 30 years his collection has continued to grow and he said it had outgrown the bunker in many ways, but it made for a nice, friendly visitor attraction. He has worked for his father’s menswear shop in Hilgove Street, ‘C.E.Horn’. ‘My father preferred to come to the bunker and talk about the Occupation to visitors, while I ran the shop. I was running his business, he was running mine. The shop had lots of farming customers and as they were buying their clothes I would ask them if they had any German Occupation items in their barn – “Oh but yes” – so we would arrange a swap, perhaps a couple of pairs of trousers in exchange for a German helmet.’ Asked whether he intended to continue keeping the Museum open – tourist numbers are not what they were 30 years ago – he replied: ‘I’m 55 – I have another ten years or so before I reach retirement. Collecting and researching is what I do. I can’t see myself re-training to go and work in an office now. ‘For me, collecting is akin to breathing. I find it interesting and think it’s important: it is part of the bigger picture of Jersey’s history.’ * Damien is always looking for any bits and pieces that might still be out there, such as paperwork or helmets. All items are of interest. If anyone has anything, could they contact him on 07797 732072. SPRING 2019

- 65


HERITAGE

NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

BELLS, COPPER AND LACE

Their names: Anton Fromm, Peter Molitor and Willi Keller. Damien did research and found photos of the three: until then, they had just been names. Damien was a 7-year-old pupil when his school had a ‘show and tell’ session: find and bring in to school things to do with the Occupation. Parents and grandparents were asked what they might have to lend and various Occupation related items were brought along. Damien recounted: ‘The Occupation themed sessions were soon superseded by a craze for playing marbles. After a couple of weeks I picked up the discarded bits and pieces left lying around – and that is how my collection started. ‘It fascinated me to think that the Island had been occupied by an enemy power only 25 years before I was born and the collection just went on expanding as I discovered new artefacts all the time. The museum was a natural progression from having a collection that was taking up ever more space in the attic of his parents’ home; it was fortunate that the bedroom ceilings never caved in.

Hamish Marett-Crosby looks at the living museum that is Villedieu Les Poêles. In this issue, he concentrates on copper; bells and lace come later

The museum’s site is a former bunker in use as a store and rubbish dump for the former ‘Chateau Plaisir’ tourism attraction - that has long been superseded by new housing development. He and his then business partner cleared out the bunker and in exchange were able to occupy it rent-free for three years. ‘The car park is a little further away now than formerly, because we don’t have it

QUARTER PAGE ADVERT:Layout 1 25/04/2019 10:35 Page 1

W HOLE MILK

Milk as it should be

Featuring Rosie Charleen ✿ Straight from our cows who are fed on grass and non-GM feed ✿ Healthy contented cows ✿ Pasteurised unhomogenised milk processed on our farm ✿ Naturally produced with no butterfat standardisation Classic Herd, Manor Farm, St Peter, JE3 7DD Telephone: 01534 485692 www.classicfarmshop.com

64

- SPRING 2019

right outside the door,’ he said. ‘I have tried to get Environment to put a board walk in to help the elderly because access is along a footpath through dunes, which is not so easy for wheel chair users – to date, without success.’ Throughout the 30 years his collection has continued to grow and he said it had outgrown the bunker in many ways, but it made for a nice, friendly visitor attraction. He has worked for his father’s menswear shop in Hilgove Street, ‘C.E.Horn’. ‘My father preferred to come to the bunker and talk about the Occupation to visitors, while I ran the shop. I was running his business, he was running mine. The shop had lots of farming customers and as they were buying their clothes I would ask them if they had any German Occupation items in their barn – “Oh but yes” – so we would arrange a swap, perhaps a couple of pairs of trousers in exchange for a German helmet.’ Asked whether he intended to continue keeping the Museum open – tourist numbers are not what they were 30 years ago – he replied: ‘I’m 55 – I have another ten years or so before I reach retirement. Collecting and researching is what I do. I can’t see myself re-training to go and work in an office now. ‘For me, collecting is akin to breathing. I find it interesting and think it’s important: it is part of the bigger picture of Jersey’s history.’ * Damien is always looking for any bits and pieces that might still be out there, such as paperwork or helmets. All items are of interest. If anyone has anything, could they contact him on 07797 732072. SPRING 2019

- 65


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

Villedieu may be the town of copper, with tourists by the thousand stopping to look and buy, but that is under threat. The problem is the autoroute linking Caen to Avranches and the South West. The old main road would pass through Villedieu, but now the motorway gives it a wide berth. True, there is an exit with a large sign advising drivers they are approaching, at 100 kph, the famous town of coppersmiths. ‘How interesting,’ they say, as they accelerate onwards. Takings are down. Those familiar with the Autoroute de Soleil will recognise that Villedieu is suffering from the Montélimar effect.

R

eligion and tax avoidance were the building blocks in the founding of Villedieu Les Poêles. south of Bayeux and Caen, on the road to Avranches and Mont St Michel, lies this ancient town that was founded in 1130 by Henry 1st , King of England and Duke of Normandy (called ‘Henry Beauclerk’ – unusually for the times, he was literate).

The land was granted to the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem to build a hospice. Favoured with numerous privileges, the order established a colony of coppersmiths and so Villedieu’s traditions of copper, bronze, and pewter were born. At the beginning of the 20th Century the word Poêles (pans) was added to the name of the town. To English ears, the name sounds better in French. The original area of the mediaeval town is very small, with buildings huddled together within the confines of the original grant of land, thus exempting the occupants from paying tax. ‘Twas ever thus; give someone a legal excuse not to pay tax, and the offer will be gladly accepted. Villedieu was a mediaeval tax haven, a concept not just reserved for the 20th century. Artisans who could work copper and bronze increased in number, and a bell-making tradition was born here in the middle ages. Opening off the main thoroughfare, there are a number of alleys opening on to interior courtyards, medieval stairways, obscure workshops such as, obviously, for copper smiths

66

- SPRING 2019

and lace makers. The common theme is a workshop, then an apartment at the first level with external stairs and a storehouse at the top. Beyond these, alleys boarded by small houses, in a combination of shapes and styles, head down the hill to the little river. In the main street, the shops seem to be entirely devoted to selling copper with an astonishing range of pans, each one for a different purpose. Saucepans of all sizes, casseroles, saucières, mijoteuses, fish poachers, kettles, frying pans, and even a pan specifically for a teurgoule, guaranteed to cook your slowly simmering rice pudding to perfection. Bad cooks watch out; you can’t blame your tools here.

And that’s the problem repeated everywhere. The western world has towns mortally wounded by a combination of the by-pass and the out of town shopping centre. Villedieu needs tourists to keep these ancient artisanal traditions genuinely alive; visitors pump in the oxygen this town needs. It is a community of traditions with skills in copper and bronze handed down over generations; so, make a point of visiting, otherwise the copper industry will end up in a museum, as has been the fate of lace making. Our modern world can ill afford to turn its back on this type of heritage; in Villedieu, the past lives on through its local industry.

LA SABLONNERIE First established in 1948, La Sablonnerie retains the characteristics of an old farmhouse built some 400 years ago and is situated on the lovely island of Sark.

L

a Sablonnerie is owned and managed by Elizabeth Perrée. Guests return year-after-year to recapture the beauty of the island and to enjoy the excellent cuisine, wine, cosiness and friendliness that is evident at the hotel. Of course being so close to the sea, freshly caught fish and famous Sark lobsters are popular specialities of the hotel. La Sablonnerie has been featured by the Which? Hotel Guide as ‘The place to stay in the Channel Islands’, and also received the highly coveted award from Condé Nast Johansen - ‘Small Hotel of the Year’ as well as being nominated as their ‘Most Romantic Hotel’ and now Les Routiers Hotel of the Year Award. Nestled in gorgeous gardens, a haven for lovers of peace and tranquillity; birds,

butterflies and flowers - how could one not enjoy this amazing paradise? The bar with its roaring log fire is a convivial meeting place. After dining, some guests take advantage of Little Sark as the perfect place for a moonlit walk or simply gazing at star-studded skies. Sark offers exceptional star-gazing due to its lack of light pollution. La Sablonnerie is a hotel of rare quality situated in a time warp of simplicity on the tiny, idyllic Channel Island of Sark, where no motor cars are allowed. The hotel has an enviable reputation for its superb food and wines; local butter, fresh cream, meat, fruit and vegetables which, where possible, are sourced from the hotel’s own farm and gardens.

It has a strong international clientele who visit regularly... it is like having friends to stay, and of course, picking up a string of awards and accolades is terrific. The hotel has been extended and discreetly modernised to provide 22 rooms, each individual in style and décor, including a delightful Honeymoon Suite. Immaculate comfort, lovely linen, fresh flowers and fruit. Excellent food and service, have ample staff that are courteous and a joy to be with, creating lots of fun and a real joie de vivre for everyone. Our motto is ‘Nothing is impossible at La Sablonnerie - the show must go on –and everything must be tickety-boo.’ Tel +44 (0) 1481 832061 reservations@sablonneriesark.com sablonneriesark.com

Villedieu maintains its high reputation with the help of its own official mark, a stamp in the copper giving the town’s name, always worth checking its presence elsewhere in Normandy before paying. It may be more expensive, but quality will last. So Villedieu acts as a sort of guardian for a complete industrial history, as it were, of one process; and that patrimony is important to those who live and work here. As the owner of a recently purchased and re-invigorated copper enterprise told me, he was proud that, in saving the company, he was preserving its traditions and very special savoir faire. The client list is truly international with, I was assured, a thriving market in America. The shop has around 25,000 visitors a year on average.

SPRING 2019

- 67


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

Villedieu may be the town of copper, with tourists by the thousand stopping to look and buy, but that is under threat. The problem is the autoroute linking Caen to Avranches and the South West. The old main road would pass through Villedieu, but now the motorway gives it a wide berth. True, there is an exit with a large sign advising drivers they are approaching, at 100 kph, the famous town of coppersmiths. ‘How interesting,’ they say, as they accelerate onwards. Takings are down. Those familiar with the Autoroute de Soleil will recognise that Villedieu is suffering from the Montélimar effect.

R

eligion and tax avoidance were the building blocks in the founding of Villedieu Les Poêles. south of Bayeux and Caen, on the road to Avranches and Mont St Michel, lies this ancient town that was founded in 1130 by Henry 1st , King of England and Duke of Normandy (called ‘Henry Beauclerk’ – unusually for the times, he was literate).

The land was granted to the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem to build a hospice. Favoured with numerous privileges, the order established a colony of coppersmiths and so Villedieu’s traditions of copper, bronze, and pewter were born. At the beginning of the 20th Century the word Poêles (pans) was added to the name of the town. To English ears, the name sounds better in French. The original area of the mediaeval town is very small, with buildings huddled together within the confines of the original grant of land, thus exempting the occupants from paying tax. ‘Twas ever thus; give someone a legal excuse not to pay tax, and the offer will be gladly accepted. Villedieu was a mediaeval tax haven, a concept not just reserved for the 20th century. Artisans who could work copper and bronze increased in number, and a bell-making tradition was born here in the middle ages. Opening off the main thoroughfare, there are a number of alleys opening on to interior courtyards, medieval stairways, obscure workshops such as, obviously, for copper smiths

66

- SPRING 2019

and lace makers. The common theme is a workshop, then an apartment at the first level with external stairs and a storehouse at the top. Beyond these, alleys boarded by small houses, in a combination of shapes and styles, head down the hill to the little river. In the main street, the shops seem to be entirely devoted to selling copper with an astonishing range of pans, each one for a different purpose. Saucepans of all sizes, casseroles, saucières, mijoteuses, fish poachers, kettles, frying pans, and even a pan specifically for a teurgoule, guaranteed to cook your slowly simmering rice pudding to perfection. Bad cooks watch out; you can’t blame your tools here.

And that’s the problem repeated everywhere. The western world has towns mortally wounded by a combination of the by-pass and the out of town shopping centre. Villedieu needs tourists to keep these ancient artisanal traditions genuinely alive; visitors pump in the oxygen this town needs. It is a community of traditions with skills in copper and bronze handed down over generations; so, make a point of visiting, otherwise the copper industry will end up in a museum, as has been the fate of lace making. Our modern world can ill afford to turn its back on this type of heritage; in Villedieu, the past lives on through its local industry.

LA SABLONNERIE First established in 1948, La Sablonnerie retains the characteristics of an old farmhouse built some 400 years ago and is situated on the lovely island of Sark.

L

a Sablonnerie is owned and managed by Elizabeth Perrée. Guests return year-after-year to recapture the beauty of the island and to enjoy the excellent cuisine, wine, cosiness and friendliness that is evident at the hotel. Of course being so close to the sea, freshly caught fish and famous Sark lobsters are popular specialities of the hotel. La Sablonnerie has been featured by the Which? Hotel Guide as ‘The place to stay in the Channel Islands’, and also received the highly coveted award from Condé Nast Johansen - ‘Small Hotel of the Year’ as well as being nominated as their ‘Most Romantic Hotel’ and now Les Routiers Hotel of the Year Award. Nestled in gorgeous gardens, a haven for lovers of peace and tranquillity; birds,

butterflies and flowers - how could one not enjoy this amazing paradise? The bar with its roaring log fire is a convivial meeting place. After dining, some guests take advantage of Little Sark as the perfect place for a moonlit walk or simply gazing at star-studded skies. Sark offers exceptional star-gazing due to its lack of light pollution. La Sablonnerie is a hotel of rare quality situated in a time warp of simplicity on the tiny, idyllic Channel Island of Sark, where no motor cars are allowed. The hotel has an enviable reputation for its superb food and wines; local butter, fresh cream, meat, fruit and vegetables which, where possible, are sourced from the hotel’s own farm and gardens.

It has a strong international clientele who visit regularly... it is like having friends to stay, and of course, picking up a string of awards and accolades is terrific. The hotel has been extended and discreetly modernised to provide 22 rooms, each individual in style and décor, including a delightful Honeymoon Suite. Immaculate comfort, lovely linen, fresh flowers and fruit. Excellent food and service, have ample staff that are courteous and a joy to be with, creating lots of fun and a real joie de vivre for everyone. Our motto is ‘Nothing is impossible at La Sablonnerie - the show must go on –and everything must be tickety-boo.’ Tel +44 (0) 1481 832061 reservations@sablonneriesark.com sablonneriesark.com

Villedieu maintains its high reputation with the help of its own official mark, a stamp in the copper giving the town’s name, always worth checking its presence elsewhere in Normandy before paying. It may be more expensive, but quality will last. So Villedieu acts as a sort of guardian for a complete industrial history, as it were, of one process; and that patrimony is important to those who live and work here. As the owner of a recently purchased and re-invigorated copper enterprise told me, he was proud that, in saving the company, he was preserving its traditions and very special savoir faire. The client list is truly international with, I was assured, a thriving market in America. The shop has around 25,000 visitors a year on average.

SPRING 2019

- 67


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

BUSINESS

BRINGING HOLIDAYS UP TO DATE Which date would You choose for a bank holiday? asks Sean Guegan.

celebrates our multi-cultural differences, a celebration of how wonderfully diverse the 7.7 billion people that inhabit this world truly are … an explosion of colours, beliefs, stories, foods, traditions that make each of us unique? With rising figures in reported ‘hate crimes’ (2017/2018 saw 94,098 reported ‘hate crimes’ in the UK, with 76% of these reported crimes being ‘race’ related), is it not time to fight back with a positive global movement that embraces our diversity as a race, instead of germinating more fear of our neighbours?

A

s this issue of RURAL goes to press, we shall have just emerged from the season or extra, magical days we call ‘Public’ of ‘Bank’ holidays. May is a stellar month in the ‘holiday’ calendar with three in total – 6 May (aka May Day, established in 1978 as a way to mark International Workers’ Day), 9 May (Liberation Day) and 27 May (officially known as the Spring Bank Holiday). Bank holidays were first introduced by the Bank Holidays Act in 1871, which designated four holidays in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and five in Scotland. As an employer, May not only brings magic, but a certain amount of juggling and mayhem too (as we attempt to accommodate 4 weeks’ work into a reduced working month), so this time of year often gets me thinking, and several

68

- SPRING 2019

thoughts come back to me year after year … how many people actually know what these ‘days off’ represent? Are they still relevant in today’s world? Why don’t we have more? In relation to other countries, the UK is ‘public holiday poor’ with just eight (nine in Jersey, if you include Liberation Day), compared with other countries, such as Cambodia which celebrates 28! Most European countries vary between 11 and 15 annual celebrations, so what happened to us and why haven’t we demanded more? This year my mind has brought a new question to the party … why can’t we create some new public holidays, bring things up to date and introduce holidays with relevance to the era we’re living in? Holidays that can create a positive shift and unite us not only locally but globally. Why not establish a holiday that

In 1981, the United Nations General Assembly acknowledged the creation of ‘International Peace Day’ to be celebrated annually on 21 September … a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. If this were to become a ‘public holiday’, would people not stop and think about its significance and create a moment of change?

RURAL PROPERTY

Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates reports on glasshouses and on old country properties that continue to attract considerable interest After years of decline during which many glasshouse units have no longer been operated for growing traditional indoor tomatoes, there is new demand to acquire units that are still capable of producing crops.

A typical Maillard’s property was recently offered for sale on behalf of a charity and attracted considerable interest, with some 30 potential buyers attending an open viewing one Saturday morning.

Much of this demand comes is due to an increasing interest in alternative crops. Typically, we see enquiries for space in which to cultivate medical grade Cannabis – as this has recently been approved/licenced by the States.

Within three weeks, nine offers were submitted from a mix of owner occupiers and developers. With such strong demand the interested parties were requested to submit best bids. A sale has been agreed subject to lawyers checking title.

Some sites have been standing idle with the owners endeavouring to obtain planning permission for residential development; others are used for growing one crop of early ‘Jersey Royals’. Such alternative crops may signal the revival of some of the larger glass house sites. Maillard’s Estates have negotiated the sale of one small horticultural unit but have clients interested in acquiring any glasshouse units irrespective of size and condition. Maillard’s sister company, Buckley and Company Limited (CRECA), are actively involved in some of the larger sites.

This modest period dwelling with attached outbuildings was available with 27 vergées of surrounding agricultural land. The property’s appeal was due to the splendid rural location, set back from the public road in the depths of the Trinity countryside, yet with excellent access to main roads and to St Helier.

It is amazing that these ‘gems’ are still available and Maillard’s Estates continue to specialise in these old properties where our expertise and experience is required to market real estate of this nature. This particular property is owned by a UK Charity and in appointing an agent to represent them they had to have regard to the Charities Act which required the services of a Chartered Surveyor. The surveyors’ role includes providing an initial assessment of the property and its value, recommends formal marketing and disposal process and prior to completion, a formal Charitie’s Act compliant report. As Chartered Surveyors we can provide this level of service to clients thus differentiating ourselves from many of our competitors.

Only recently it was announced to Austrians that they will be granted an annual ‘personal bank holiday’ on a date of their choosing to make up for new rule changes. In the UK around 7 million people work the Easter public holidays and the days when everything would shut on a ‘public holiday’ are long gone, which leaves me feeling kind of sad. In a world where everything seems to be moving at an increasingly busier and faster pace, we should honour these days by slowing down and focusing on things that truly matter. So maybe over one of the remaining bank holidays this year give a thought to which ‘public holiday’ you would create if you had a choice.

SPRING 2019

- 69


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

BUSINESS

BRINGING HOLIDAYS UP TO DATE Which date would You choose for a bank holiday? asks Sean Guegan.

celebrates our multi-cultural differences, a celebration of how wonderfully diverse the 7.7 billion people that inhabit this world truly are … an explosion of colours, beliefs, stories, foods, traditions that make each of us unique? With rising figures in reported ‘hate crimes’ (2017/2018 saw 94,098 reported ‘hate crimes’ in the UK, with 76% of these reported crimes being ‘race’ related), is it not time to fight back with a positive global movement that embraces our diversity as a race, instead of germinating more fear of our neighbours?

A

s this issue of RURAL goes to press, we shall have just emerged from the season or extra, magical days we call ‘Public’ of ‘Bank’ holidays. May is a stellar month in the ‘holiday’ calendar with three in total – 6 May (aka May Day, established in 1978 as a way to mark International Workers’ Day), 9 May (Liberation Day) and 27 May (officially known as the Spring Bank Holiday). Bank holidays were first introduced by the Bank Holidays Act in 1871, which designated four holidays in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and five in Scotland. As an employer, May not only brings magic, but a certain amount of juggling and mayhem too (as we attempt to accommodate 4 weeks’ work into a reduced working month), so this time of year often gets me thinking, and several

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thoughts come back to me year after year … how many people actually know what these ‘days off’ represent? Are they still relevant in today’s world? Why don’t we have more? In relation to other countries, the UK is ‘public holiday poor’ with just eight (nine in Jersey, if you include Liberation Day), compared with other countries, such as Cambodia which celebrates 28! Most European countries vary between 11 and 15 annual celebrations, so what happened to us and why haven’t we demanded more? This year my mind has brought a new question to the party … why can’t we create some new public holidays, bring things up to date and introduce holidays with relevance to the era we’re living in? Holidays that can create a positive shift and unite us not only locally but globally. Why not establish a holiday that

In 1981, the United Nations General Assembly acknowledged the creation of ‘International Peace Day’ to be celebrated annually on 21 September … a day devoted to strengthening the ideals of peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. If this were to become a ‘public holiday’, would people not stop and think about its significance and create a moment of change?

RURAL PROPERTY

Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates reports on glasshouses and on old country properties that continue to attract considerable interest After years of decline during which many glasshouse units have no longer been operated for growing traditional indoor tomatoes, there is new demand to acquire units that are still capable of producing crops.

A typical Maillard’s property was recently offered for sale on behalf of a charity and attracted considerable interest, with some 30 potential buyers attending an open viewing one Saturday morning.

Much of this demand comes is due to an increasing interest in alternative crops. Typically, we see enquiries for space in which to cultivate medical grade Cannabis – as this has recently been approved/licenced by the States.

Within three weeks, nine offers were submitted from a mix of owner occupiers and developers. With such strong demand the interested parties were requested to submit best bids. A sale has been agreed subject to lawyers checking title.

Some sites have been standing idle with the owners endeavouring to obtain planning permission for residential development; others are used for growing one crop of early ‘Jersey Royals’. Such alternative crops may signal the revival of some of the larger glass house sites. Maillard’s Estates have negotiated the sale of one small horticultural unit but have clients interested in acquiring any glasshouse units irrespective of size and condition. Maillard’s sister company, Buckley and Company Limited (CRECA), are actively involved in some of the larger sites.

This modest period dwelling with attached outbuildings was available with 27 vergées of surrounding agricultural land. The property’s appeal was due to the splendid rural location, set back from the public road in the depths of the Trinity countryside, yet with excellent access to main roads and to St Helier.

It is amazing that these ‘gems’ are still available and Maillard’s Estates continue to specialise in these old properties where our expertise and experience is required to market real estate of this nature. This particular property is owned by a UK Charity and in appointing an agent to represent them they had to have regard to the Charities Act which required the services of a Chartered Surveyor. The surveyors’ role includes providing an initial assessment of the property and its value, recommends formal marketing and disposal process and prior to completion, a formal Charitie’s Act compliant report. As Chartered Surveyors we can provide this level of service to clients thus differentiating ourselves from many of our competitors.

Only recently it was announced to Austrians that they will be granted an annual ‘personal bank holiday’ on a date of their choosing to make up for new rule changes. In the UK around 7 million people work the Easter public holidays and the days when everything would shut on a ‘public holiday’ are long gone, which leaves me feeling kind of sad. In a world where everything seems to be moving at an increasingly busier and faster pace, we should honour these days by slowing down and focusing on things that truly matter. So maybe over one of the remaining bank holidays this year give a thought to which ‘public holiday’ you would create if you had a choice.

SPRING 2019

- 69


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

THE HERO OF THE POT What could be more of a genuine Jersey product than a pot made from Jersey clay? Claire Haithwaite talked about her clay and her craft (and why it involves endurance trekking at low tide) to Alasdair Crosby.

I

n July, the Genuine Jersey organisation will welcome its newest member: Claire Haithwaite, whose new business activity is Claire Haithwaite Ceramics. Claire has always loved design; originally from Jersey, she trained and obtained a degree as a graphic designer and lived with her husband and young family for 20 years in Amsterdam, during which time they renovated successively two beautiful 18th Century canal houses to much acclaim.

‘We were in many home interior magazines, Dutch and English, and on the front cover of Livingetc, much to my excitement. Amsterdam is very pretty and I was just surrounded by all this loveliness! I think that’s where the seed was planted for my love of ceramics and I learned to love beautiful things for use around the home.’ When they moved back to Jersey nearly four years ago, her husband gave her a ceramics class at Highlands for a birthday present. ‘That was it. I fell for it hook, line and sinker – thanks to my patient teachers, David Brown and then Ray Ubsdell. I just sleep pottery – I just love it. When I wake up at night with a worry, I just think “pot” in my head and it sends me off to sleep again. It’s just heaven.’ Then her husband built a studio for her in their garden (doing pottery inside the home tends to make a room a bit mucky); she got her wheel and last year got her kiln – quite an investment, but, as she said: ‘Now I can start making pots in a more serious fashion rather than just playing!’ She has started to make pots commercially for the very good reason that it’s quite nice for a hobby to pay its way and also her shed is not too large, so she has to sell pots in order to make more of them. It was the Jersey artist Nick Parlett, a friend and fellow Grouville parishioner, who, knowing of her interest in ceramics, told her that there were seams of clay visible at low tide, far out in Grouville Bay. ‘He put the thought in my head to look for it and one day we went walking near

70

- SPRING 2019

Seymour Tower. Suddenly, there it was we saw this clay.’ The first step in making a pot? In her case, that meant digging up the raw material and then carrying it, in a rucksack, two miles back to the parked car near the slipway. ‘It was quite a “to do” to transform this gritty, sandy slop into clay,’ she said. ‘Bringing it back to shore was an effort – clay is so heavy! I could hardly pick up the rucksack – it weighed 12 and half kilos! ‘Then you have to process the clay, which is a horrible job. It’s wet, really mucky, and takes a lot of drying out, a lot of filtering… I’m not too worried about competition; I can’t see many people wanting to do it. But finally you have got some clay that you can work with and you can make your pot.’ She added: ‘I think it’s nice that it really is a genuine part of Jersey - you can almost see the colour of the beach. Jersey used to have a really large brick-making industry, so I’m not the first to think of using Jersey clay! Brick clay is not very glamorous clay; it’s just what you do with it that counts. ‘Clay is basically ground-down, decomposing rock – so where there’s rock, there’s clay.’

Using her Jersey clay she has made small table receptacles for condiments, such as pinch-pots for salt – Jersey sea-salt would be ideal, of course – and mustard, or little traditional pots for serving little measures of calvados – or better still, for Jersey apple brandy - as well as larger items. ‘Many of my items are more pieces of art to decorate the home. A lot of work goes into making them: if you saw them in a shop, you might think “There must be cheaper pots elsewhere”. But if you know the story about getting the clay, and transporting it, and transforming the gritty slop into workable clay, you would appreciate why it’s not a run-of-the-mill cheap product.’ She continued: ‘The design lines are very clean. The clay is the hero of the pot. I don’t want lots of fussy detail, which will detract from the loveliness of the texture.’ Claire has just had her first exhibition at the Harbour Gallery, where her products were very well received. She does not just use Jersey clay – she orders potter’s clay for other earthenware and stoneware items she creates. But, in the tradition of William Morris, all her items are created ‘for making the everyday beautiful’. * Haithwaite Ceramics are on Facebook and Instagram, also on her web page: Haithwaiteceramics.com

STOP OFF ANY TIME AND BUY ONE The installation of a milk vending machine at the Classic Herd farm in St Peter has cut down on waste and plastic packaging.

J

The cutting-edge technology has been installed at the farm in an effort to become as plastic-free as possible and to offer a natural product with zero food miles. Julia Quenault of Classic Herd was keen to offer a vending option for her milk produce after viewing the technology in Aberdeen. The facility is only just taking off around the UK, with Alderney also trialling similar machines under a pilot scheme.

The machine delivers whole, pasteurised, un-homogenised cow’s milk, inviting customers to bring along a reusable vessel in an effort to cut down on waste and plastic packaging.

Julia said: ‘We are committed to prioritising the well-being of our cows and delivering top quality and eco-friendly produce. Being able to buy milk so fresh and local means there is less processing that takes place, enhancing the flavour from our famous cows. We invite islanders to come and try out the fresh milk to taste the difference.’

The vending machine is now open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, dispensing volumes of one or two litres, with no limit to how much you can purchase.

‘We hope this vending machine will not only encourage more people to buy their milk locally, but to reduce single-use plastic and eliminate waste.’

ersey’s first milk vending machine has been installed at the Classic Herd farm in St Peter.

To accompany the service the farm shop is selling Classic Herd branded eco-friendly milk bottles which can be re-used to hold one litre of the milk. The milk has a shelf life of around four days after purchase, clean bottles and refrigeration offering the longest possible storage. All plastic bottles sold in the farm shop are also recyclable demonstrating their commitment to being an eco-friendly farm. Classic Herd was the first farm on the Island to install a robotic milking system in 2017, allowing the cows to control when their milking occurs. This technology is believed to be much kinder to the animal and makes the milking process more efficient and economical.

SPRING 2019

- 71


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

THE HERO OF THE POT What could be more of a genuine Jersey product than a pot made from Jersey clay? Claire Haithwaite talked about her clay and her craft (and why it involves endurance trekking at low tide) to Alasdair Crosby.

I

n July, the Genuine Jersey organisation will welcome its newest member: Claire Haithwaite, whose new business activity is Claire Haithwaite Ceramics. Claire has always loved design; originally from Jersey, she trained and obtained a degree as a graphic designer and lived with her husband and young family for 20 years in Amsterdam, during which time they renovated successively two beautiful 18th Century canal houses to much acclaim.

‘We were in many home interior magazines, Dutch and English, and on the front cover of Livingetc, much to my excitement. Amsterdam is very pretty and I was just surrounded by all this loveliness! I think that’s where the seed was planted for my love of ceramics and I learned to love beautiful things for use around the home.’ When they moved back to Jersey nearly four years ago, her husband gave her a ceramics class at Highlands for a birthday present. ‘That was it. I fell for it hook, line and sinker – thanks to my patient teachers, David Brown and then Ray Ubsdell. I just sleep pottery – I just love it. When I wake up at night with a worry, I just think “pot” in my head and it sends me off to sleep again. It’s just heaven.’ Then her husband built a studio for her in their garden (doing pottery inside the home tends to make a room a bit mucky); she got her wheel and last year got her kiln – quite an investment, but, as she said: ‘Now I can start making pots in a more serious fashion rather than just playing!’ She has started to make pots commercially for the very good reason that it’s quite nice for a hobby to pay its way and also her shed is not too large, so she has to sell pots in order to make more of them. It was the Jersey artist Nick Parlett, a friend and fellow Grouville parishioner, who, knowing of her interest in ceramics, told her that there were seams of clay visible at low tide, far out in Grouville Bay. ‘He put the thought in my head to look for it and one day we went walking near

70

- SPRING 2019

Seymour Tower. Suddenly, there it was we saw this clay.’ The first step in making a pot? In her case, that meant digging up the raw material and then carrying it, in a rucksack, two miles back to the parked car near the slipway. ‘It was quite a “to do” to transform this gritty, sandy slop into clay,’ she said. ‘Bringing it back to shore was an effort – clay is so heavy! I could hardly pick up the rucksack – it weighed 12 and half kilos! ‘Then you have to process the clay, which is a horrible job. It’s wet, really mucky, and takes a lot of drying out, a lot of filtering… I’m not too worried about competition; I can’t see many people wanting to do it. But finally you have got some clay that you can work with and you can make your pot.’ She added: ‘I think it’s nice that it really is a genuine part of Jersey - you can almost see the colour of the beach. Jersey used to have a really large brick-making industry, so I’m not the first to think of using Jersey clay! Brick clay is not very glamorous clay; it’s just what you do with it that counts. ‘Clay is basically ground-down, decomposing rock – so where there’s rock, there’s clay.’

Using her Jersey clay she has made small table receptacles for condiments, such as pinch-pots for salt – Jersey sea-salt would be ideal, of course – and mustard, or little traditional pots for serving little measures of calvados – or better still, for Jersey apple brandy - as well as larger items. ‘Many of my items are more pieces of art to decorate the home. A lot of work goes into making them: if you saw them in a shop, you might think “There must be cheaper pots elsewhere”. But if you know the story about getting the clay, and transporting it, and transforming the gritty slop into workable clay, you would appreciate why it’s not a run-of-the-mill cheap product.’ She continued: ‘The design lines are very clean. The clay is the hero of the pot. I don’t want lots of fussy detail, which will detract from the loveliness of the texture.’ Claire has just had her first exhibition at the Harbour Gallery, where her products were very well received. She does not just use Jersey clay – she orders potter’s clay for other earthenware and stoneware items she creates. But, in the tradition of William Morris, all her items are created ‘for making the everyday beautiful’. * Haithwaite Ceramics are on Facebook and Instagram, also on her web page: Haithwaiteceramics.com

STOP OFF ANY TIME AND BUY ONE The installation of a milk vending machine at the Classic Herd farm in St Peter has cut down on waste and plastic packaging.

J

The cutting-edge technology has been installed at the farm in an effort to become as plastic-free as possible and to offer a natural product with zero food miles. Julia Quenault of Classic Herd was keen to offer a vending option for her milk produce after viewing the technology in Aberdeen. The facility is only just taking off around the UK, with Alderney also trialling similar machines under a pilot scheme.

The machine delivers whole, pasteurised, un-homogenised cow’s milk, inviting customers to bring along a reusable vessel in an effort to cut down on waste and plastic packaging.

Julia said: ‘We are committed to prioritising the well-being of our cows and delivering top quality and eco-friendly produce. Being able to buy milk so fresh and local means there is less processing that takes place, enhancing the flavour from our famous cows. We invite islanders to come and try out the fresh milk to taste the difference.’

The vending machine is now open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, dispensing volumes of one or two litres, with no limit to how much you can purchase.

‘We hope this vending machine will not only encourage more people to buy their milk locally, but to reduce single-use plastic and eliminate waste.’

ersey’s first milk vending machine has been installed at the Classic Herd farm in St Peter.

To accompany the service the farm shop is selling Classic Herd branded eco-friendly milk bottles which can be re-used to hold one litre of the milk. The milk has a shelf life of around four days after purchase, clean bottles and refrigeration offering the longest possible storage. All plastic bottles sold in the farm shop are also recyclable demonstrating their commitment to being an eco-friendly farm. Classic Herd was the first farm on the Island to install a robotic milking system in 2017, allowing the cows to control when their milking occurs. This technology is believed to be much kinder to the animal and makes the milking process more efficient and economical.

SPRING 2019

- 71


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Matthew has worked on many prestigious projects over the years but the one that stands out in his memory is Le Petit Fort, an old run-down fort at L’Etacq in which – by a strange coincidence – he actually lived for a while when he was just seven years of age. ‘I had my childhood there and then finished up developing the place.

A chip off the old block.

‘The contract was to develop the property. We had to keep the outside walls – which still had slits in them for firing arrows – and build a new house inside. It is a raised construction commanding spectacular views over St Ouen’s Bay.’

Matthew Thébault has his father to thank for setting him on the road to a career which is truly set in stone. He talked to Terry Neale

G

ranite. It is impossible to travel more than a few paces in Jersey without encountering a house, boundary wall or intricate garden feature which incorporates this beautiful stone. And behind every edifice constructed from this quartz-infused igneous rock is a master craftsman with an impressive array of skills in his armoury. Leading the field in his art is stonemason Matthew Thébault, a man whose background suggests that he was always likely to find himself engaged in such work. ‘My father is a stonemason, still active in the trade, and I served my apprenticeship working alongside him. I worked with dad for 17 years and I have been on my own now for 15 – it is all I have ever done.’ My meeting with Matthew takes place at a property buried deep in the St John countryside. The building is a traditional granite house which is undergoing complete renovation. Inside, a granite fireplace has been carefully rebuilt by Matthew; the giant corbels, which support a massive oak lintel, have both been painstakingly cut and shaped by hand. ‘Every job is very different but my real preference is for restoration projects such as this one. There is a boom in the construction industry at the moment and that includes a lot of new buildings – including my own house which is all granite with some interior feature walls – but restoration offers a more interesting challenge.’ Most of the granite used by Matthew and his team is locally sourced. In the past, the Island boasted over 50 quarries

72

- SPRING 2019

The project led to an important moment of fame for Matthew and his business.

all supplying quality stone to the trade. Today, however, only La Saline remains and, as a match frequently has to be made, it is not always possible to use the quarry’s stone in restoration work. ‘In those cases, we have to use reclaimed granite,’ Matthew explained. ‘This can come from old buildings which have been demolished or from walls or redundant barns. Many people have a cache of old granite lying unused in their garden, so we try to acquire it and match the stone accordingly. We have a yard at Five Oaks where we store as much as we can.’ Jersey may be a small island, but the many quarries that were once dotted around – principally in the coastal areas – all produced their own distinctive stone. ‘Corbière granite, for instance, is a big-grained brown stone,’ Matthew explained. ‘Mont Mado granite is pink while that from L’Etacq is a light grey. Granite from Ronez, on the other hand, is a dark blue. ‘Granite is made up of minerals including quartz and iron ore, which makes it very hard to cut. The quartz is what you see glistening in the stone in bright sunlight. You certainly learn a lot about the geology of Jersey in this job. A large part of the centre of the Island is made up of shale and that is why the quarries tended to be located largely on the coast.’ Granite is also, of course, a very weighty material and in earlier times, before the era of lorries and heavy lifting equipment, builders tried to avoid transporting the stone any further than was strictly necessary. For this reason,

Stonemasonry is a rewarding career but it is also extremely hard work.

granite used in construction work almost always came from the quarry nearest to the site. But with only one quarry supplying stonemasons today, the craftsmen often have to look further afield for the material they need – particularly for new buildings. ‘A lot of granite is imported now,’ Matthew said, ‘and it comes from France, Spain, Portugal and even as far away as China. Because of its higher quartz content, Spanish granite is a cleaner, gleaming stone. Its French equivalent is a lot softer, so it is therefore a lot more porous and soaks in more water. But the Jersey stone is of a far higher quality. It has a fine grain which is easier to work with and I always try to find granite that comes as near as possible to the local standard.’

‘The property was featured on the television programme Grand Designs and I was filmed at work there. It went on to be rated 16th in the list of top houses in the UK. It really helped to transform my business.’ Today, eight people are employed in Matthew’s firm; seven stonemasons, including himself, and his wife who looks after the office and the social media side of the business. ‘I would be absolutely lost without her,’ Matthew confides. ‘Work-wise we are booked up to 2021 at the moment. We are in a construction boom, but at least that gives you the luxury of being able to choose the projects that you want to take on. The problem is that I am struggling to find young people to train up – which is something that I would very much like to do.’ Stonemasonry is a rewarding career but it is also extremely hard work; a factor which Matthew believes may well deter youngsters from entering the profession. ‘Granite is quarried using explosives and then it is drilled and split. After that it is sold on to stonemasons and we give it a nice flat face. Every stone is hand cut and dressed using tools tipped with tungsten – which is much harder than steel. We do it by the skip load. ‘The preparation work can take a lot longer than the actual construction. It takes time to cut granite and it is quite a craft.’ Evidence of that time-served craft is visible throughout the St John restoration work. ‘I have about another five weeks here,’ said Matthew, ‘and then it will be on to the next project.’ SPRING 2019

- 73


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Matthew has worked on many prestigious projects over the years but the one that stands out in his memory is Le Petit Fort, an old run-down fort at L’Etacq in which – by a strange coincidence – he actually lived for a while when he was just seven years of age. ‘I had my childhood there and then finished up developing the place.

A chip off the old block.

‘The contract was to develop the property. We had to keep the outside walls – which still had slits in them for firing arrows – and build a new house inside. It is a raised construction commanding spectacular views over St Ouen’s Bay.’

Matthew Thébault has his father to thank for setting him on the road to a career which is truly set in stone. He talked to Terry Neale

G

ranite. It is impossible to travel more than a few paces in Jersey without encountering a house, boundary wall or intricate garden feature which incorporates this beautiful stone. And behind every edifice constructed from this quartz-infused igneous rock is a master craftsman with an impressive array of skills in his armoury. Leading the field in his art is stonemason Matthew Thébault, a man whose background suggests that he was always likely to find himself engaged in such work. ‘My father is a stonemason, still active in the trade, and I served my apprenticeship working alongside him. I worked with dad for 17 years and I have been on my own now for 15 – it is all I have ever done.’ My meeting with Matthew takes place at a property buried deep in the St John countryside. The building is a traditional granite house which is undergoing complete renovation. Inside, a granite fireplace has been carefully rebuilt by Matthew; the giant corbels, which support a massive oak lintel, have both been painstakingly cut and shaped by hand. ‘Every job is very different but my real preference is for restoration projects such as this one. There is a boom in the construction industry at the moment and that includes a lot of new buildings – including my own house which is all granite with some interior feature walls – but restoration offers a more interesting challenge.’ Most of the granite used by Matthew and his team is locally sourced. In the past, the Island boasted over 50 quarries

72

- SPRING 2019

The project led to an important moment of fame for Matthew and his business.

all supplying quality stone to the trade. Today, however, only La Saline remains and, as a match frequently has to be made, it is not always possible to use the quarry’s stone in restoration work. ‘In those cases, we have to use reclaimed granite,’ Matthew explained. ‘This can come from old buildings which have been demolished or from walls or redundant barns. Many people have a cache of old granite lying unused in their garden, so we try to acquire it and match the stone accordingly. We have a yard at Five Oaks where we store as much as we can.’ Jersey may be a small island, but the many quarries that were once dotted around – principally in the coastal areas – all produced their own distinctive stone. ‘Corbière granite, for instance, is a big-grained brown stone,’ Matthew explained. ‘Mont Mado granite is pink while that from L’Etacq is a light grey. Granite from Ronez, on the other hand, is a dark blue. ‘Granite is made up of minerals including quartz and iron ore, which makes it very hard to cut. The quartz is what you see glistening in the stone in bright sunlight. You certainly learn a lot about the geology of Jersey in this job. A large part of the centre of the Island is made up of shale and that is why the quarries tended to be located largely on the coast.’ Granite is also, of course, a very weighty material and in earlier times, before the era of lorries and heavy lifting equipment, builders tried to avoid transporting the stone any further than was strictly necessary. For this reason,

Stonemasonry is a rewarding career but it is also extremely hard work.

granite used in construction work almost always came from the quarry nearest to the site. But with only one quarry supplying stonemasons today, the craftsmen often have to look further afield for the material they need – particularly for new buildings. ‘A lot of granite is imported now,’ Matthew said, ‘and it comes from France, Spain, Portugal and even as far away as China. Because of its higher quartz content, Spanish granite is a cleaner, gleaming stone. Its French equivalent is a lot softer, so it is therefore a lot more porous and soaks in more water. But the Jersey stone is of a far higher quality. It has a fine grain which is easier to work with and I always try to find granite that comes as near as possible to the local standard.’

‘The property was featured on the television programme Grand Designs and I was filmed at work there. It went on to be rated 16th in the list of top houses in the UK. It really helped to transform my business.’ Today, eight people are employed in Matthew’s firm; seven stonemasons, including himself, and his wife who looks after the office and the social media side of the business. ‘I would be absolutely lost without her,’ Matthew confides. ‘Work-wise we are booked up to 2021 at the moment. We are in a construction boom, but at least that gives you the luxury of being able to choose the projects that you want to take on. The problem is that I am struggling to find young people to train up – which is something that I would very much like to do.’ Stonemasonry is a rewarding career but it is also extremely hard work; a factor which Matthew believes may well deter youngsters from entering the profession. ‘Granite is quarried using explosives and then it is drilled and split. After that it is sold on to stonemasons and we give it a nice flat face. Every stone is hand cut and dressed using tools tipped with tungsten – which is much harder than steel. We do it by the skip load. ‘The preparation work can take a lot longer than the actual construction. It takes time to cut granite and it is quite a craft.’ Evidence of that time-served craft is visible throughout the St John restoration work. ‘I have about another five weeks here,’ said Matthew, ‘and then it will be on to the next project.’ SPRING 2019

- 73


LAST WORD

SUSTAINABLE FARMING David Warr has the last word

I

n late December 2018 I saw a real ‘temps passé’ image of Charles Le Maistre using a horse rather than a tractor to help him work the soil. It wasn’t a picture taken 50 years ago; Mr. Le Maistre is very much a modern day farmer who chooses to use horses rather than tractors to cultivate the soil. In a day and age when mechanisation seems to be the only way forward it was an arresting image of a time when we used to be so much more respectful of the soil that feeds us. Mechanisation has of course brought food prices down and raised millions of people out of poverty; however it’s not a nil sum game. How we look after those 6 inches of fertile top soil is crucial to the long term sustainability of life on this planet. Here in Jersey I believe it’s an area in which we could lead the world if only we had the mind to do so. Bigger and heavier machinery that reduces the need for manpower and in turn lowers the cost of production makes sense economically but not environmentally. Soil compaction reduces its ability to absorb water. Thus when it rains water runs off the soil rather than percolating through it. This results in soil erosion and the need for more irrigation during dry periods. This is where the light hooves of the horse comes into its own. Where is the mechanised equivalent of the light touch of the steed? Jersey of course isn’t alone, every year an estimated 24 billion tonnes of fertile soil

Porcelanosa Starwood the beauty of natural wood in a porcelain tile

are lost due to erosion. That’s 3.4 tonnes lost every year for every person on the planet. (UCCD 2014). Given that it takes 500 years to make 2.5cm of fertile top soil this is an unsustainable rate of loss of a vital resource. Given these horrific statistics why aren’t we, in an island the size of Jersey, leading the way when it comes to innovative ideas for developing sustainable farming practices? Personally I believe there is a complete lack of strategic thinking at Government level. Our economy is increasingly finance, finance and more finance - and as a result, those outside of this obviously important industry are marginalised rather than embraced. We need to recognise the premium that ‘Brand Jersey’ brings to our agriculture

and leverage it much more that is currently the case. We need to recognise that we have the privilege of being in an added value market, where quality trumps price. We should be encouraging those young people wishing to study engineering to consider as part of their degree course new ways of farming in this small Island. There should be financial incentives to enable this to happen. Jersey should and can become a world leader when it comes to sustainable and innovative methods of agricultural practices, it just needs vision. In a quirky way Mr. Le Maistre was being innovative by harking back to past agricultural practices, something that is very ‘on trend’ with our millennial generation. We need though hundreds of Le Maistre’s using the past to help inform future innovation.

Bathroom. Kitchen. Tiles. Bedrooms. Opening hours: Monday – Saturday 8.30am - 5.00pm

74

- SPRING 2019

Retail showroom at Five Oaks


LAST WORD

SUSTAINABLE FARMING David Warr has the last word

I

n late December 2018 I saw a real ‘temps passé’ image of Charles Le Maistre using a horse rather than a tractor to help him work the soil. It wasn’t a picture taken 50 years ago; Mr. Le Maistre is very much a modern day farmer who chooses to use horses rather than tractors to cultivate the soil. In a day and age when mechanisation seems to be the only way forward it was an arresting image of a time when we used to be so much more respectful of the soil that feeds us. Mechanisation has of course brought food prices down and raised millions of people out of poverty; however it’s not a nil sum game. How we look after those 6 inches of fertile top soil is crucial to the long term sustainability of life on this planet. Here in Jersey I believe it’s an area in which we could lead the world if only we had the mind to do so. Bigger and heavier machinery that reduces the need for manpower and in turn lowers the cost of production makes sense economically but not environmentally. Soil compaction reduces its ability to absorb water. Thus when it rains water runs off the soil rather than percolating through it. This results in soil erosion and the need for more irrigation during dry periods. This is where the light hooves of the horse comes into its own. Where is the mechanised equivalent of the light touch of the steed? Jersey of course isn’t alone, every year an estimated 24 billion tonnes of fertile soil

Porcelanosa Starwood the beauty of natural wood in a porcelain tile

are lost due to erosion. That’s 3.4 tonnes lost every year for every person on the planet. (UCCD 2014). Given that it takes 500 years to make 2.5cm of fertile top soil this is an unsustainable rate of loss of a vital resource. Given these horrific statistics why aren’t we, in an island the size of Jersey, leading the way when it comes to innovative ideas for developing sustainable farming practices? Personally I believe there is a complete lack of strategic thinking at Government level. Our economy is increasingly finance, finance and more finance - and as a result, those outside of this obviously important industry are marginalised rather than embraced. We need to recognise the premium that ‘Brand Jersey’ brings to our agriculture

and leverage it much more that is currently the case. We need to recognise that we have the privilege of being in an added value market, where quality trumps price. We should be encouraging those young people wishing to study engineering to consider as part of their degree course new ways of farming in this small Island. There should be financial incentives to enable this to happen. Jersey should and can become a world leader when it comes to sustainable and innovative methods of agricultural practices, it just needs vision. In a quirky way Mr. Le Maistre was being innovative by harking back to past agricultural practices, something that is very ‘on trend’ with our millennial generation. We need though hundreds of Le Maistre’s using the past to help inform future innovation.

Bathroom. Kitchen. Tiles. Bedrooms. Opening hours: Monday – Saturday 8.30am - 5.00pm

74

- SPRING 2019

Retail showroom at Five Oaks


RJA&HS

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