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JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #27 - AUTUMN 2019

From Jersey Flour to Jersey Bread Local bread from local flour for local people

Food for Thought Join India Hamilton and RURAL magazine for a very special meal

The Landscapes of Rural Jersey A new art competition is born

AUTUMN 2019

- 1


FOR BEAUTIFUL GARDENS...

TH I N K TR E E S

Planting trees helps to clean the air and also helps

FIGHT CLI MATE C HANGE & LI MIT G LOB AL WA RMING 22kg OF CA RB ON DIOXIDE

At Andrew Le Maistre Landscapes, we have a

W I DE R AN G E OF MAT U R E TR EES AVAI L A BLE

AU T U MN IS TH E I DEA L TI ME

can be consumed by a mature tree every year

Each mature tree produces enough oxygen for a human to breathe for a full

TWO YE A RS

for mature trees to have been planted

We feel it’s our social duty to safeguard our way of life, and have put together a package to

HE LP P ROTECT OUR E NVIRON ME NT FOR FUTURE GENE RATIONS

Trees are a cost-effective and ecologically sound way of

I M P ROV I N G P R I VAC Y & H O ME S EC UR ITY

Planting trees is also an excellent means of 2

SOI L STAB ILISATION

- AUTUMN 2019

N O MAT TE R YO U R MOTI VATI ON TO P LA NT M ORE TRE ES , TH E B E S T TI M E OF Y E A R TO P LA NT TH E M I S NOW

For more information about our services visit:

www.andrewlemaistre.com or call 867021

AUTUMN 2019

- 3


FOR BEAUTIFUL GARDENS...

TH I N K TR E E S

Planting trees helps to clean the air and also helps

FIGHT CLI MATE C HANGE & LI MIT G LOB AL WA RMING 22kg OF CA RB ON DIOXIDE

At Andrew Le Maistre Landscapes, we have a

W I DE R AN G E OF MAT U R E TR EES AVAI L A BLE

AU T U MN IS TH E I DEA L TI ME

can be consumed by a mature tree every year

Each mature tree produces enough oxygen for a human to breathe for a full

TWO YE A RS

for mature trees to have been planted

We feel it’s our social duty to safeguard our way of life, and have put together a package to

HE LP P ROTECT OUR E NVIRON ME NT FOR FUTURE GENE RATIONS

Trees are a cost-effective and ecologically sound way of

I M P ROV I N G P R I VAC Y & H O ME S EC UR ITY

Planting trees is also an excellent means of 2

SOI L STAB ILISATION

- AUTUMN 2019

N O MAT TE R YO U R MOTI VATI ON TO P LA NT M ORE TRE ES , TH E B E S T TI M E OF Y E A R TO P LA NT TH E M I S NOW

For more information about our services visit:

www.andrewlemaistre.com or call 867021

AUTUMN 2019

- 3


Welcome ‘W

Energy for Bliss & Becky

hat’s for Dinner?’ That interesting question was asked by RURAL magazine over three years from 2016 to 2018 in a series of 12 quarterly public lectures that it organised on the three intertwined subjects of farming, food production and the rural environment. At the end of 2018 we drew the series to a close but the series has evolved: over the weekend of 5 and 6 October RURAL will be running a miniconference titled ‘What’s for Dinner?’ at the same time and place as the RJA&HS will be holding its Autumn Festival and cattle show. On Saturday 5 October there will be a series of talks, starting with Mike Stentiford reflecting on the decade since the ‘Line in the Sand’ massive public demonstration. One of the best attended and inspiring in the lecture series was Andrew Mitchell, the ecologist and campaigner. He is returning to speak on the subject of ‘Food, Forests and Fire How can changing what we eat save the planet?’ There will be contributions from Glyn Mitchell on regenerative farming and from the two companies with which he works: Jersey Hemp and the Jersey Tea Company.

She’ll say this till the cows come home Becky loves her job. But it’s many hours work to get a return. Every penny counts. So to keep her business fluid (rich Jersey milk) thank goodness the Island has some of the cheapest electricity in the EU. Energy for everyone.

Find out more online - EnergyForEveryone.je

Jersey’s electricity is

15% CHEAPER than the EU average

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #27 - AUTUMN 2019

Peter Le Maistre, president of the Jersey Farmers Union in this its centenary year, thinks about the future of farming in Jersey and David Hambrook of the RJA&HS informs us how the Jersey breed of cattle is changing lives for the better in Africa.

From Jersey Flour to Jersey Bread Local bread from local flour for local people

Food for Thought Join India Hamilton and RURAL magazine for a very special meal

India Hamilton of SCOOP (Sustainable Co-Operative) is cooking a meal with the interesting title of ‘The Taste of Carbon’ see article on page 58 and Oliver Rowe, the chef and author, will be cooking up local foraged products in a demonstration of how they can be viable ingredients for meals. All these events, with one exception, are free of charge and open to anybody visiting the RJAHS Festival. Booking is only necessary for The Taste of Carbon meal (‘first come, first served’ – literally!) but at the bargain price of £25, thanks to the sponsorship of ArtHouse Jersey. For further information, see our e-mail newsletter: RURAL POST (www. ruraljersey.co.uk/rural-post); for booking, contact events@ruraljersey.co.uk. See you there.

The Landscapes of Rural Jersey A new art competition is born

SPRING 2019

- 1

Front cover image: Charles Le Maistre Photo by Gary Grimshaw (See pages 13-17) RURAL magazine can be collected free of charge from any number of places around the island. If you are unable to find a copy, please contact us on 865334 and we will ensure that you receive a copy directly. www.ruraljersey.co.uk

R URAL

Business Development: Philippa Evans Bevan eb.springvalley@gmail.com T: 07708 649332

Advertising Sales: Rebecca Harrington rebecca@getrefined.com T: 01534 720200

Editor: Alasdair Crosby editorial@ruraljersey.co.uk

Published by: Crosby Media and Publishing Ltd La Cohue, St John JE3 4FN T 01534 865334 M 07797 773880

Social Media & Sales: Sebastian Wysmuller seb_wysmuller@hotmail.co.uk T: 07707 888125

Design: Eunice Fromage eunice@getrefined.com

Photographer: Gary Grimshaw info@photoreportage.co.uk

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. Disclaimer While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies, however caused. No liability can be accepted for copy, illustrations, photographs, artwork or advertising material while in transmission or with the publisher or their agents. All information is correct at time of going to print.

AUTUMN 2019

- 5


Welcome ‘W

Energy for Bliss & Becky

hat’s for Dinner?’ That interesting question was asked by RURAL magazine over three years from 2016 to 2018 in a series of 12 quarterly public lectures that it organised on the three intertwined subjects of farming, food production and the rural environment. At the end of 2018 we drew the series to a close but the series has evolved: over the weekend of 5 and 6 October RURAL will be running a miniconference titled ‘What’s for Dinner?’ at the same time and place as the RJA&HS will be holding its Autumn Festival and cattle show. On Saturday 5 October there will be a series of talks, starting with Mike Stentiford reflecting on the decade since the ‘Line in the Sand’ massive public demonstration. One of the best attended and inspiring in the lecture series was Andrew Mitchell, the ecologist and campaigner. He is returning to speak on the subject of ‘Food, Forests and Fire How can changing what we eat save the planet?’ There will be contributions from Glyn Mitchell on regenerative farming and from the two companies with which he works: Jersey Hemp and the Jersey Tea Company.

She’ll say this till the cows come home Becky loves her job. But it’s many hours work to get a return. Every penny counts. So to keep her business fluid (rich Jersey milk) thank goodness the Island has some of the cheapest electricity in the EU. Energy for everyone.

Find out more online - EnergyForEveryone.je

Jersey’s electricity is

15% CHEAPER than the EU average

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #27 - AUTUMN 2019

Peter Le Maistre, president of the Jersey Farmers Union in this its centenary year, thinks about the future of farming in Jersey and David Hambrook of the RJA&HS informs us how the Jersey breed of cattle is changing lives for the better in Africa.

From Jersey Flour to Jersey Bread Local bread from local flour for local people

Food for Thought Join India Hamilton and RURAL magazine for a very special meal

India Hamilton of SCOOP (Sustainable Co-Operative) is cooking a meal with the interesting title of ‘The Taste of Carbon’ see article on page 58 and Oliver Rowe, the chef and author, will be cooking up local foraged products in a demonstration of how they can be viable ingredients for meals. All these events, with one exception, are free of charge and open to anybody visiting the RJAHS Festival. Booking is only necessary for The Taste of Carbon meal (‘first come, first served’ – literally!) but at the bargain price of £25, thanks to the sponsorship of ArtHouse Jersey. For further information, see our e-mail newsletter: RURAL POST (www. ruraljersey.co.uk/rural-post); for booking, contact events@ruraljersey.co.uk. See you there.

The Landscapes of Rural Jersey A new art competition is born

SPRING 2019

- 1

Front cover image: Charles Le Maistre Photo by Gary Grimshaw (See pages 13-17) RURAL magazine can be collected free of charge from any number of places around the island. If you are unable to find a copy, please contact us on 865334 and we will ensure that you receive a copy directly. www.ruraljersey.co.uk

R URAL

Business Development: Philippa Evans Bevan eb.springvalley@gmail.com T: 07708 649332

Advertising Sales: Rebecca Harrington rebecca@getrefined.com T: 01534 720200

Editor: Alasdair Crosby editorial@ruraljersey.co.uk

Published by: Crosby Media and Publishing Ltd La Cohue, St John JE3 4FN T 01534 865334 M 07797 773880

Social Media & Sales: Sebastian Wysmuller seb_wysmuller@hotmail.co.uk T: 07707 888125

Design: Eunice Fromage eunice@getrefined.com

Photographer: Gary Grimshaw info@photoreportage.co.uk

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. Disclaimer While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies, however caused. No liability can be accepted for copy, illustrations, photographs, artwork or advertising material while in transmission or with the publisher or their agents. All information is correct at time of going to print.

AUTUMN 2019

- 5


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Contents 9 - Over The Wall

42 - How to make a Dog wag its Tail

A RURAL view

How are animals re-homed from the Animal Shelter? Kieranne Grimshaw discovered

10 - A Jersey Salmagundi A mixed salad of Jersey life and events

FOOD AND KITCHEN

58 - Food for Thought A special dinner in October is an opportunity to combine gastronomy and ecology. Alasdair Crosby spoke to India Hamilton of ‘SCOOP’

OUT AND ABOUT SPORT

13 - From Jersey Flour to Jersey Bread

65 - Riding fun and riding therapy

Use your loaf – it’s local. Report by Chloë Bowler

Ruth Le Cocq visited the Jersey group of ‘Riding for the Disabled’

FARM AND GARDEN

23 - Meet the Farmer Peter Le Maistre is president of the Jersey Farmers Union in its centenary year. He talked to Alasdair Crosby

30 - Nature has all the Answers Diana Mossop writes on natural health

33 - *New series: Your Garden Gill Maccabe share her passion for gardening and gives some helpful hints

18 - A Walk in the Country The 2019 Scenic Lane completion, as ‘observed’ by Alasdair Crosby

6

36 - The Story of the Ship’s Cow Philippa Evans Bevan tells the story of Jersey traders, their ships and their cows THE FUR SIDE

19 - Ten Years and Counting

40 - Help – for the Sake of Sick Animals

Were you part of ‘The Line in the Sand’ on St Ouen’s beach? Mike Stentiford updates us on its results a decade later

Elisabeth ‘Bunny’ Roberts coordinates the work of the Animal Health Trust in Jersey. She spoke to Chloë Bowler

- AUTUMN 2019

63 - Health And Fitness in The Island 44 - Walkie Talkies

By wellbeing expert Chloë Bowler

HERITAGE

BUSINESS

71 - Weathervanes

76 - Signs of Things to Come

They have been a feature on Island buildings for centuries, as Frank Le Blancq describes

Kieranne Grimshaw shared a walk with Rusty and his owner, Deputy Rob Ward

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

ART AND CULTURE

72 - Thalassotherapy in Dinard

48 - Art, Inspired By Nature

Kieranne Grimshaw enjoyed staying at the four-star Thalassa Novotel in Dinard

We feature Grosnez Castle by Stephen Morley

50 - The Signtech Rural Jersey Landscape Award A new Jersey art competition is born

52 - The Landscapes of rural Jersey

67 - In Pursuit of Pigeons (clay ones)

From a talk by Doug Ford, given at the RURAL Landscape Awards Evening

The sport of shooting fast moving – but inanimate things. By Sebastian Wysmuller

54 - Jersey’s Sunken Treasures

69 - RURAL Property

75 - Bells, and Old Lace

Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s asks whether it is time to make the conditions on land transaction less restrictive

Two of the historic industries of Villedieu-les-Poêles in Normandy, by Hamish Marett-Crosby

Book review by James Le Cocq

Terry Neale spoke to Sean Guegan, MD of Signtech Ltd, sponsors of the Rural Jersey Landscape Awards

78 - In-action is a Weapon of Mass Destruction David Warr has the last word

Contributors Tommy A’Court Chloë Bowler William Church Philippa Evans Bevan Doug Ford Kieranne Grimshaw Frank Le Blancq James Le Cocq Ruth Le Cocq Gill Maccabe Hamish Marett-Crosby Diana Mossop Terry Neale Mike Stentiford David Warr Sebastian Wysmuller AUTUMN 2019

- 7


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Contents 9 - Over The Wall

42 - How to make a Dog wag its Tail

A RURAL view

How are animals re-homed from the Animal Shelter? Kieranne Grimshaw discovered

10 - A Jersey Salmagundi A mixed salad of Jersey life and events

FOOD AND KITCHEN

58 - Food for Thought A special dinner in October is an opportunity to combine gastronomy and ecology. Alasdair Crosby spoke to India Hamilton of ‘SCOOP’

OUT AND ABOUT SPORT

13 - From Jersey Flour to Jersey Bread

65 - Riding fun and riding therapy

Use your loaf – it’s local. Report by Chloë Bowler

Ruth Le Cocq visited the Jersey group of ‘Riding for the Disabled’

FARM AND GARDEN

23 - Meet the Farmer Peter Le Maistre is president of the Jersey Farmers Union in its centenary year. He talked to Alasdair Crosby

30 - Nature has all the Answers Diana Mossop writes on natural health

33 - *New series: Your Garden Gill Maccabe share her passion for gardening and gives some helpful hints

18 - A Walk in the Country The 2019 Scenic Lane completion, as ‘observed’ by Alasdair Crosby

6

36 - The Story of the Ship’s Cow Philippa Evans Bevan tells the story of Jersey traders, their ships and their cows THE FUR SIDE

19 - Ten Years and Counting

40 - Help – for the Sake of Sick Animals

Were you part of ‘The Line in the Sand’ on St Ouen’s beach? Mike Stentiford updates us on its results a decade later

Elisabeth ‘Bunny’ Roberts coordinates the work of the Animal Health Trust in Jersey. She spoke to Chloë Bowler

- AUTUMN 2019

63 - Health And Fitness in The Island 44 - Walkie Talkies

By wellbeing expert Chloë Bowler

HERITAGE

BUSINESS

71 - Weathervanes

76 - Signs of Things to Come

They have been a feature on Island buildings for centuries, as Frank Le Blancq describes

Kieranne Grimshaw shared a walk with Rusty and his owner, Deputy Rob Ward

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

ART AND CULTURE

72 - Thalassotherapy in Dinard

48 - Art, Inspired By Nature

Kieranne Grimshaw enjoyed staying at the four-star Thalassa Novotel in Dinard

We feature Grosnez Castle by Stephen Morley

50 - The Signtech Rural Jersey Landscape Award A new Jersey art competition is born

52 - The Landscapes of rural Jersey

67 - In Pursuit of Pigeons (clay ones)

From a talk by Doug Ford, given at the RURAL Landscape Awards Evening

The sport of shooting fast moving – but inanimate things. By Sebastian Wysmuller

54 - Jersey’s Sunken Treasures

69 - RURAL Property

75 - Bells, and Old Lace

Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s asks whether it is time to make the conditions on land transaction less restrictive

Two of the historic industries of Villedieu-les-Poêles in Normandy, by Hamish Marett-Crosby

Book review by James Le Cocq

Terry Neale spoke to Sean Guegan, MD of Signtech Ltd, sponsors of the Rural Jersey Landscape Awards

78 - In-action is a Weapon of Mass Destruction David Warr has the last word

Contributors Tommy A’Court Chloë Bowler William Church Philippa Evans Bevan Doug Ford Kieranne Grimshaw Frank Le Blancq James Le Cocq Ruth Le Cocq Gill Maccabe Hamish Marett-Crosby Diana Mossop Terry Neale Mike Stentiford David Warr Sebastian Wysmuller AUTUMN 2019

- 7


Over the wall.

INTRODUCING THE NEW CASCADE COLLECTION

A RURAL view.

be ignored, with deleterious effect on the Jersey breed in its historic Island home.

‘To be interested in food but not in food production is clearly absurd.’

T

his very true reflection comes from the American farmer, writer and philosopher Wendell Berry. We are all interested in food, so the subject of farming and the production of food in Jersey should be of interest of all Islanders, equally for those connected with the land as much as for ‘townees’. So let us look at the current state of farming in the Island. Island farming, of course, means predominantly dairy production and growing the Jersey Royal potato for export. Anything else is definitely in the second division. Both these sectors are very historical, of course, but farmers and growers of even 25 years ago would find it hard to recognise the modern versions of their industries. Currently there are 15 commercial dairy farmers and only a dozen or so growers; exporting potatoes is almost entirely in the hands of two packing, marketing and exporting entities.

f R E E f I R E D E A RT H PA I N T W I T H E V E R y PURCHASE fROM THE CASCADE COLLECTION

Professional service and expert advice

For those of us who prefer looking at half full glasses, one positive thing is that ‘Brexit’ is not really an issue for either sector. Most dairy produce is consumed in the Island; exports go the UK and nowadays also to the Far East. Most Jersey Royals are exported to the UK, so any Brexit impact is going to be negligible. Indeed there might be a positive factor in that other crops such as calabrese could once again be viable to grow, if imports to the UK from the EU become more expensive.

C a r r e f o u r S e l o u s , S t L a w r e n c e | Te l e p h o n e 8 6 5 9 6 5 | E m a i l : s a l e s @ d a v i d h i c k . c o | Vi s i t : w w w. d a v i d h i c k . c o

Another positive aspect is that the much

O p e n Tu e s t o S a t 9 . 3 0 a m - 5 . 0 0 p m , l a t e n i g h t T h u r s u n t i l 6 . 3 0 p m . Promotion available for a limited time only. Terms and conditions apply.

decreased number of farming units has resulted in a far closer cooperation between growers and farmers. To misquote the words of the song from Oklahoma, ‘the farmer and the cowman are indeed friends’ – something that has not invariably been the case in times past. Land is shared, the farming sector (such as it is) speaks with one voice; a good relationship exists between farmers and their political representatives and civil service administrators. The potato sector is getting to grips with the issues of water pollution that have made so many headlines in recent times. And in the words of an official of the RJA&HS: ‘We would rather see 15 profitable dairy farms than 50 unprofitable ones.’ The profitability has been enhanced by the greater volume of milk per cow obtained from the ‘smarter’ breeding made possible by the use of international genetics. Even more pertinent to the ‘glass half full’ view of things, is that more money could be made available for the farming community through the Rural Economy Strategy if the States agree.’ The agriculture budget had not been increased for many a long year. All seems sweetness and light – but now let’s look at the ‘glass half empty’ side of the equation. The present number of 15 dairy farms is not an end to the decline in recent years. More farmers will leave the industry as they retire with no willing successor wanting to take their place. Suppose milk production does not suffice to supply the market for liquid milk in the Island – that will mean that calls to import cheaper milk from the UK can no longer

For all farmers, the dearth of migrant labourers is a constant headache. The economies of Portugal and Poland have improved whereas the economic future of Britain, be it in or out of the EU, is uncertain. Why leave hearth and home to work in Jersey when work in your own home country is now so much easier to obtain? Indeed, the future of the use of migrant labourers is something that seems to be coming to an end – even if efforts are being made to attract workers from places like Nepal… it seems to suggest a measure of desperation. Technological innovation that minimises the use of manpower might seem to be the way forward. Early potato exports are holding up well and this year’s season has been a good one. But the Jersey Royal is not the only early potato crop available to supermarket buyers and their customers. At the same time, there is a bizarre preference in the modern era for pasta among much of the buying public that will continue to depress sales of potatoes from any source. There have been great efforts to trial pharmaceutical plants in recent years. This is still work in progress and there are indeed interesting opportunities for the production of medical cannabis. However, apart from hemp and its innumerable potential products (definitely in the glass half full side of the equation), the investment needed to process pharmaceutical products will deter many farmers from growing the plants. Space does not permit, in this present article, to detail all the various farming diversifications and smallholding ventures that are now emerging. Their exponents might suggest that these are the pioneers of a new way of farming, with more personal satisfaction for the farmer than just being part of an impersonal agri-industry. Smallholding was the norm in historical times – perhaps the pendulum is poised to turn back towards that once again? AUTUMN 2019

- 9


Over the wall.

INTRODUCING THE NEW CASCADE COLLECTION

A RURAL view.

be ignored, with deleterious effect on the Jersey breed in its historic Island home.

‘To be interested in food but not in food production is clearly absurd.’

T

his very true reflection comes from the American farmer, writer and philosopher Wendell Berry. We are all interested in food, so the subject of farming and the production of food in Jersey should be of interest of all Islanders, equally for those connected with the land as much as for ‘townees’. So let us look at the current state of farming in the Island. Island farming, of course, means predominantly dairy production and growing the Jersey Royal potato for export. Anything else is definitely in the second division. Both these sectors are very historical, of course, but farmers and growers of even 25 years ago would find it hard to recognise the modern versions of their industries. Currently there are 15 commercial dairy farmers and only a dozen or so growers; exporting potatoes is almost entirely in the hands of two packing, marketing and exporting entities.

f R E E f I R E D E A RT H PA I N T W I T H E V E R y PURCHASE fROM THE CASCADE COLLECTION

Professional service and expert advice

For those of us who prefer looking at half full glasses, one positive thing is that ‘Brexit’ is not really an issue for either sector. Most dairy produce is consumed in the Island; exports go the UK and nowadays also to the Far East. Most Jersey Royals are exported to the UK, so any Brexit impact is going to be negligible. Indeed there might be a positive factor in that other crops such as calabrese could once again be viable to grow, if imports to the UK from the EU become more expensive.

C a r r e f o u r S e l o u s , S t L a w r e n c e | Te l e p h o n e 8 6 5 9 6 5 | E m a i l : s a l e s @ d a v i d h i c k . c o | Vi s i t : w w w. d a v i d h i c k . c o

Another positive aspect is that the much

O p e n Tu e s t o S a t 9 . 3 0 a m - 5 . 0 0 p m , l a t e n i g h t T h u r s u n t i l 6 . 3 0 p m . Promotion available for a limited time only. Terms and conditions apply.

decreased number of farming units has resulted in a far closer cooperation between growers and farmers. To misquote the words of the song from Oklahoma, ‘the farmer and the cowman are indeed friends’ – something that has not invariably been the case in times past. Land is shared, the farming sector (such as it is) speaks with one voice; a good relationship exists between farmers and their political representatives and civil service administrators. The potato sector is getting to grips with the issues of water pollution that have made so many headlines in recent times. And in the words of an official of the RJA&HS: ‘We would rather see 15 profitable dairy farms than 50 unprofitable ones.’ The profitability has been enhanced by the greater volume of milk per cow obtained from the ‘smarter’ breeding made possible by the use of international genetics. Even more pertinent to the ‘glass half full’ view of things, is that more money could be made available for the farming community through the Rural Economy Strategy if the States agree.’ The agriculture budget had not been increased for many a long year. All seems sweetness and light – but now let’s look at the ‘glass half empty’ side of the equation. The present number of 15 dairy farms is not an end to the decline in recent years. More farmers will leave the industry as they retire with no willing successor wanting to take their place. Suppose milk production does not suffice to supply the market for liquid milk in the Island – that will mean that calls to import cheaper milk from the UK can no longer

For all farmers, the dearth of migrant labourers is a constant headache. The economies of Portugal and Poland have improved whereas the economic future of Britain, be it in or out of the EU, is uncertain. Why leave hearth and home to work in Jersey when work in your own home country is now so much easier to obtain? Indeed, the future of the use of migrant labourers is something that seems to be coming to an end – even if efforts are being made to attract workers from places like Nepal… it seems to suggest a measure of desperation. Technological innovation that minimises the use of manpower might seem to be the way forward. Early potato exports are holding up well and this year’s season has been a good one. But the Jersey Royal is not the only early potato crop available to supermarket buyers and their customers. At the same time, there is a bizarre preference in the modern era for pasta among much of the buying public that will continue to depress sales of potatoes from any source. There have been great efforts to trial pharmaceutical plants in recent years. This is still work in progress and there are indeed interesting opportunities for the production of medical cannabis. However, apart from hemp and its innumerable potential products (definitely in the glass half full side of the equation), the investment needed to process pharmaceutical products will deter many farmers from growing the plants. Space does not permit, in this present article, to detail all the various farming diversifications and smallholding ventures that are now emerging. Their exponents might suggest that these are the pioneers of a new way of farming, with more personal satisfaction for the farmer than just being part of an impersonal agri-industry. Smallholding was the norm in historical times – perhaps the pendulum is poised to turn back towards that once again? AUTUMN 2019

- 9


SALMAGUNDI

A JERSEY SALMAGUNDI A mixed salad of Jersey life and events

Food critics, chef, cooks, restaurateurs and food writers were among the 500 judges who carried out blind taste tests of products, remarking on Fluffy Fuhka that: ‘This is a pretty little cheese on the board - snowy white with the ash collar. The cheese brings a delicate opening with a flavour that builds well with salt and lactic and grass and chalky delight. Well done!

The sales and marketing director of the Jersey Royal Company, William Church, updates us as on this year’s season.

Indoor lifting began slightly ahead of forecast, and it wasn’t long before growers moved outdoors on to the côtils where yields were good. The transition from the steeper slopes to the flatter ground and using harvesters was seamless, and early availability was good. No two years are ever the same, and this year while the crops were growing brilliantly with good yields, the weather turned against

us from a selling perspective as it was cold and wet on the mainland throughout the majority of May and June. As every good Jersey person knows, our famous Royals are synonymous with the start of spring and summer, and more importantly barbeques, but if the sun doesn’t shine then folk don’t go shopping in quite the same way! The real success story of the summer has to be the way that farmers were able to capitalise on an export opportunity into Eastern Europe for oversize potatoes. This came about due to a shortage that had arisen from the difficult season in 2018 across the whole of Europe, and although

not a great earner, it helped to clear fields and contribute to overheads. Retail sales were again extended into July to help clear the later-planted fields and bring in extra revenue. The seed crop grew well and was all safely gathered in by the end of July when the majority of staff returned home for the summer break, leaving just the mini-tuber harvest from the greenhouse to do.

CANTABILE SINGS COMPLINE AT ST PETER LA ROCQUE hall) in the grounds of his property Val la Give, and the girls’ orphanage (later Grouville Annexe) upon which site Le Clos de l’Eglise housing estate now stands. Stanley Payn, writing in Grouville’s millennium book, recounts that the local fishermen provided the carpentry expertise, working during the winter months laying the floor boards and making the pews and panelling. The Cantabile choir will be visiting the small church of St Peter La Rocque for the first time to sing this candlelit service, the final one of the day in the monastic tradition, on Wednesday 16 October at 9pm. Situated at the junction of Rue du Puits Mahaut and Rue du Pont, a few yards up from La Rocque harbour, St Peter

10

- AUTUMN 2019

Jerriaise d’Or goat cheese has received a two-star rating in this year’s prestigious Great Taste Awards. The judges singled out the ‘Fluffy Fuhka’ cheese from the St Ouen’s Farm, dubbing it ‘beyond delicious!’ 12,772 products were sent in to the Great Taste Awards from over 100 different countries, with only 10% being recognised as worthy of a two-star rating.

ROYAL PROGRESS

The 2019 season was an incredible one in so many ways. Following a dry winter crops were planted into an amazing seed bed and with equal measures of sun and rain to follow, they all established early and grew well.

GOLDEN GOATS

La Rocque was built between 1852 and 1853 as a daughter church or chapel of ease to Grouville Parish Church, at the instigation of the then rector Rev’d Abraham Le Sueur in order to minister to the busy fishing community at La Rocque. The rector was a remarkably energetic and benevolent man, not only funding this project but also establishing a church school (now the site of the present parish

On Wednesday 16 October at dusk, the church will be filled with candlelight setting the scene for the choir to sing the evening liturgy of Compline. In addition to beautiful Gregorian plainsong, the choir will also sing some fine polyphonic music from the 16th century by Palestrina, Tallis, Blitheman & Gibbons, ending the service with Stravinsky’s Ave Maria. The service lasts just over half-an-hour. A perfect end to the day.

Beautifully made, pale ashy rind, pure white paste and with such presence on the board - diminutive but delightful. Great length and depth of flavour.’ Jerriaise d’Or is currently the only goat cheese produced in the Island and is a hand-crafted product from the herd of Golden Guernsey goats owned by John

CCA GALLERIES Exhibition Schedule Autumn 2019 Until 10 October

Hot off the Press: new silk screen prints by Sir Peter Blake and Bruce McLean

6 September - 4 October

Graham Bannister: Wild new paintings inspired by nature and endangered species. With guest artists Nicolas Guéguen (sculpture) and Bella Harvey (botanical paintings)

11 October – 18 November

Louise Cattrell: Light in Time – recent landscapes in oil, etching and drawings reflecting different times of the day

Sowerby and Angela Harvey-Jones. The humorously named ‘Fluffy Fuhka’ is a ripened goat cheese that delivers a complex and fuller flavour, which improves over time.

Apart from at the farm gate in St Ouens, the winning cheese can be purchased exclusively from Relish delicatessen in Halkett Street and found on the cheese trolley at Longueville Manor.

Angela, the cheesemaker, said: ‘It took a long time to develop the recipes and although our customers consistently give us excellent feed-back on how much they love our cheese, we decided to subject ourselves to the independent and slightly scary scrutiny of the prestigious Great Taste awards to get an expert independent view of our cheese. My husband John and I will be celebrating with our Golden Guernsey girls giving them extra special treats for all their good work.’

Great Taste is the largest and most trusted accreditation scheme for fine food and drink. Established in 1994, it encourages and mentor’s artisan food producers, offering a unique benchmarking and product evaluation service leading to an independent accreditation that enables small food and drink businesses to compete against supermarket premium own label brands.

11 October 10.00 – 4.00

Artist workshop with Louise Cattrell. Louise has taught extensively at Barbican and Haywood Galleries in London. Known for her generosity in sharing her extensive expertise, Louise will be running a practical workshop imparting her knowledge and experience of painting outdoors. Tickets cost £35.00 ea. and include a light lunch.

12 October 11.00 – 2.00

Graham Bannister, Macaques, Fools Gold

Saturday Gallery opening

29 November, 5.00 – 6.00 Drinks and ‘in conversation’ with legendary 12 October 11.00 – 12.00 designer and artist Nicole Farhi. Tickets Gallery talk with Louise Cattrell should be booked from the gallery in advance 29 November – 31 January Folds: sculpture by Nicole Farhi with 30 November, 11.00 – 2.00 archive prints by Eduardo Paolozzi and Saturday Gallery opening Bruce McLean

Please call the gallery for tickets and further details t: 01534 739900 or visit www.ccagalleriesinternational.com AUTUMN 2019

- 11


SALMAGUNDI

A JERSEY SALMAGUNDI A mixed salad of Jersey life and events

Food critics, chef, cooks, restaurateurs and food writers were among the 500 judges who carried out blind taste tests of products, remarking on Fluffy Fuhka that: ‘This is a pretty little cheese on the board - snowy white with the ash collar. The cheese brings a delicate opening with a flavour that builds well with salt and lactic and grass and chalky delight. Well done!

The sales and marketing director of the Jersey Royal Company, William Church, updates us as on this year’s season.

Indoor lifting began slightly ahead of forecast, and it wasn’t long before growers moved outdoors on to the côtils where yields were good. The transition from the steeper slopes to the flatter ground and using harvesters was seamless, and early availability was good. No two years are ever the same, and this year while the crops were growing brilliantly with good yields, the weather turned against

us from a selling perspective as it was cold and wet on the mainland throughout the majority of May and June. As every good Jersey person knows, our famous Royals are synonymous with the start of spring and summer, and more importantly barbeques, but if the sun doesn’t shine then folk don’t go shopping in quite the same way! The real success story of the summer has to be the way that farmers were able to capitalise on an export opportunity into Eastern Europe for oversize potatoes. This came about due to a shortage that had arisen from the difficult season in 2018 across the whole of Europe, and although

not a great earner, it helped to clear fields and contribute to overheads. Retail sales were again extended into July to help clear the later-planted fields and bring in extra revenue. The seed crop grew well and was all safely gathered in by the end of July when the majority of staff returned home for the summer break, leaving just the mini-tuber harvest from the greenhouse to do.

CANTABILE SINGS COMPLINE AT ST PETER LA ROCQUE hall) in the grounds of his property Val la Give, and the girls’ orphanage (later Grouville Annexe) upon which site Le Clos de l’Eglise housing estate now stands. Stanley Payn, writing in Grouville’s millennium book, recounts that the local fishermen provided the carpentry expertise, working during the winter months laying the floor boards and making the pews and panelling. The Cantabile choir will be visiting the small church of St Peter La Rocque for the first time to sing this candlelit service, the final one of the day in the monastic tradition, on Wednesday 16 October at 9pm. Situated at the junction of Rue du Puits Mahaut and Rue du Pont, a few yards up from La Rocque harbour, St Peter

10

- AUTUMN 2019

Jerriaise d’Or goat cheese has received a two-star rating in this year’s prestigious Great Taste Awards. The judges singled out the ‘Fluffy Fuhka’ cheese from the St Ouen’s Farm, dubbing it ‘beyond delicious!’ 12,772 products were sent in to the Great Taste Awards from over 100 different countries, with only 10% being recognised as worthy of a two-star rating.

ROYAL PROGRESS

The 2019 season was an incredible one in so many ways. Following a dry winter crops were planted into an amazing seed bed and with equal measures of sun and rain to follow, they all established early and grew well.

GOLDEN GOATS

La Rocque was built between 1852 and 1853 as a daughter church or chapel of ease to Grouville Parish Church, at the instigation of the then rector Rev’d Abraham Le Sueur in order to minister to the busy fishing community at La Rocque. The rector was a remarkably energetic and benevolent man, not only funding this project but also establishing a church school (now the site of the present parish

On Wednesday 16 October at dusk, the church will be filled with candlelight setting the scene for the choir to sing the evening liturgy of Compline. In addition to beautiful Gregorian plainsong, the choir will also sing some fine polyphonic music from the 16th century by Palestrina, Tallis, Blitheman & Gibbons, ending the service with Stravinsky’s Ave Maria. The service lasts just over half-an-hour. A perfect end to the day.

Beautifully made, pale ashy rind, pure white paste and with such presence on the board - diminutive but delightful. Great length and depth of flavour.’ Jerriaise d’Or is currently the only goat cheese produced in the Island and is a hand-crafted product from the herd of Golden Guernsey goats owned by John

CCA GALLERIES Exhibition Schedule Autumn 2019 Until 10 October

Hot off the Press: new silk screen prints by Sir Peter Blake and Bruce McLean

6 September - 4 October

Graham Bannister: Wild new paintings inspired by nature and endangered species. With guest artists Nicolas Guéguen (sculpture) and Bella Harvey (botanical paintings)

11 October – 18 November

Louise Cattrell: Light in Time – recent landscapes in oil, etching and drawings reflecting different times of the day

Sowerby and Angela Harvey-Jones. The humorously named ‘Fluffy Fuhka’ is a ripened goat cheese that delivers a complex and fuller flavour, which improves over time.

Apart from at the farm gate in St Ouens, the winning cheese can be purchased exclusively from Relish delicatessen in Halkett Street and found on the cheese trolley at Longueville Manor.

Angela, the cheesemaker, said: ‘It took a long time to develop the recipes and although our customers consistently give us excellent feed-back on how much they love our cheese, we decided to subject ourselves to the independent and slightly scary scrutiny of the prestigious Great Taste awards to get an expert independent view of our cheese. My husband John and I will be celebrating with our Golden Guernsey girls giving them extra special treats for all their good work.’

Great Taste is the largest and most trusted accreditation scheme for fine food and drink. Established in 1994, it encourages and mentor’s artisan food producers, offering a unique benchmarking and product evaluation service leading to an independent accreditation that enables small food and drink businesses to compete against supermarket premium own label brands.

11 October 10.00 – 4.00

Artist workshop with Louise Cattrell. Louise has taught extensively at Barbican and Haywood Galleries in London. Known for her generosity in sharing her extensive expertise, Louise will be running a practical workshop imparting her knowledge and experience of painting outdoors. Tickets cost £35.00 ea. and include a light lunch.

12 October 11.00 – 2.00

Graham Bannister, Macaques, Fools Gold

Saturday Gallery opening

29 November, 5.00 – 6.00 Drinks and ‘in conversation’ with legendary 12 October 11.00 – 12.00 designer and artist Nicole Farhi. Tickets Gallery talk with Louise Cattrell should be booked from the gallery in advance 29 November – 31 January Folds: sculpture by Nicole Farhi with 30 November, 11.00 – 2.00 archive prints by Eduardo Paolozzi and Saturday Gallery opening Bruce McLean

Please call the gallery for tickets and further details t: 01534 739900 or visit www.ccagalleriesinternational.com AUTUMN 2019

- 11


OUT & ABOUT

FromJersey R U O L F toJersey EAD BR

Save money on your household bills with a more energy efficient home. A Home Energy Audit offers tailored advice to help you identify home improvements that deliver energy, cost and environmental savings. In 2019 the Government of Jersey is offering a time-limited subsidy of up to £200 towards the cost of a Home Energy Audit.

‘Think twice, buy local’ – it has become a popular slogan. For a long time it has been difficult if not impossible, to make Jersey bread from Jersey-grown flour. The times they are a-changing – as Chloё Bowler reports

A

s we move into the Autumn months, many people will start to pack away their barbeques and return to their kitchens, as thoughts turn to creating more warming meals and baking delicious-smelling goodies. Jersey offers such an array of seasonal culinary produce. It is already well known for its shellfish, potatoes and much more; a good deal of which is locally produced and internationally

appreciated. One thing that may not be as widely known is the milling of flour in Jersey. Flour is the ingredient at the very heart of baking. Centuries ago, wheat imported from Europe was milled in Jersey and exported internationally. In fact, milling was a thriving business for many, many years. The earliest records of flour milling in Jersey date back to the early 1300s. At this point in time, all mills on the Island

were controlled either by the Crown or a Seigneur. In the 1340s there were 30 mills in operation on the island, and due to the increasing popularity of flour as an export product, by the mid-19th century the number of local mills had increased to 46. This flour was being exported as far afield as North America and Canada, and business boomed. One such mill - today the only remaining, fully working water mill in

Find out more at gov.je/energyaudit AUTUMN 2019

- 13


OUT & ABOUT

FromJersey R U O L F toJersey EAD BR

Save money on your household bills with a more energy efficient home. A Home Energy Audit offers tailored advice to help you identify home improvements that deliver energy, cost and environmental savings. In 2019 the Government of Jersey is offering a time-limited subsidy of up to £200 towards the cost of a Home Energy Audit.

‘Think twice, buy local’ – it has become a popular slogan. For a long time it has been difficult if not impossible, to make Jersey bread from Jersey-grown flour. The times they are a-changing – as Chloё Bowler reports

A

s we move into the Autumn months, many people will start to pack away their barbeques and return to their kitchens, as thoughts turn to creating more warming meals and baking delicious-smelling goodies. Jersey offers such an array of seasonal culinary produce. It is already well known for its shellfish, potatoes and much more; a good deal of which is locally produced and internationally

appreciated. One thing that may not be as widely known is the milling of flour in Jersey. Flour is the ingredient at the very heart of baking. Centuries ago, wheat imported from Europe was milled in Jersey and exported internationally. In fact, milling was a thriving business for many, many years. The earliest records of flour milling in Jersey date back to the early 1300s. At this point in time, all mills on the Island

were controlled either by the Crown or a Seigneur. In the 1340s there were 30 mills in operation on the island, and due to the increasing popularity of flour as an export product, by the mid-19th century the number of local mills had increased to 46. This flour was being exported as far afield as North America and Canada, and business boomed. One such mill - today the only remaining, fully working water mill in

Find out more at gov.je/energyaudit AUTUMN 2019

- 13


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

the Island - is Le Moulin de Quétivel, in St Peter’s Valley. This mill changed ownership and was rebuilt many times throughout the centuries, and indeed continued to operate as a business until the 20th Century. However, this was during the time of transition from water power to steam power, and although the mill was briefly brought back into operation during the German Occupation, after the war potatoes and tomatoes became the main produce of the Island. Subsequently, the mill, having been closed for a number of years, fell into disrepair, and unfortunately burnt down in 1969. At this time the National Trust was in the process of negotiating a long lease from Jersey Water in order to restore the mill. Thankfully, despite this immense set back, the National Trust began the huge task of restoring the mill during the 1970s. This was achieved; and the mill was finally returned to full, working order in 1979, with the National Trust earning an Award from the Civic Trust for their work. The National Trust have done an amazing job with Le Moulin de Quétivel. Not only have they renovated it to working order, but also offer visitors an entire experience; giving a real insight into the mill as a building, its history, and the milling process from start to finish. The two-storey building hosts a film and displays depicting the history of the mill, in addition to serving refreshments on the ground floor. During summer months, the mill is open to the public two days per week, and

Our Jersey showroom is now open. Showcasing our collection of kitchens and furniture, handmade in the UK. We deliver bespoke craftsmanship and a personalised service from planning, through to fitting.

Our new showroom is situated at Holme Grown, La Rue Au Long, Grouville.

Michael Peterson Tel: 07797741226 michaelp@handcraftedkitchensdirect.com

DESIGNED IN JERSEY MADE IN ENGLAND

14

- AUTUMN 2019

handcraftedkitchensdirect.com

twice a year, the National Trust opens Le Quétivel for an Open Milling Day, where you can watch the water travelling downhill from the mill pond along the ancient leat to the mill wheel, witness the huge mill stones in operation, and finally see some Jersey flour being milled - from Jersey wheat. During these open days there are experts on hand to guide you through the journey from wheat to flour, and to explain how the machinery operates, and the importance of the mill in Jersey’s history of agriculture and industry. You can enjoy a woodland walk, a herb garden, and there is even a new cycle path linking the mill with St Helier. The Jersey wheat milled at Le Quétivel is no longer imported, but is farmed traditionally by the Le Maistre family at Le Tacheron Farm in Trinity. The Le Maistre family have a long history in the Island and a passion for traditional farming methods, and are intent on preserving the farming heritage of Jersey.

Coming from long-standing farming stock, the three brothers decided that they wanted to keep the old traditions alive, not purely for sentimental reasons, but also because they want to reduce their carbon footprint and encourage wildlife to flourish. By not using modern, heavy machinery, they are able to minimise soil compaction, and protect the natural habitats of many animals. The Le Tacheron fields are also bordered by a beautiful array of cornfield annuals, creating a natural border to protect the crops and house a host of insects and wildlife. Some of these borders have been lost over the years in mainstream farming, largely due to the intensification of cultivation and the use of chemicals, which has made some of these species of flowers extremely rare. If allowed to, these plants will naturally grow alongside crops, and include some added colour from cornflowers and corn marigolds. They are also a wonderful reminder of how wheat fields looked just less than a century ago.

The Le Maistre family grow heritage varieties of spelt, wheat and barley. No chemicals are used, and they harvest and thresh the grains with vintage equipment, helped by their impressive and enormous Shire Horses, Ben and Ringo. Farming the old-fashioned way is a very physical job, with the wheat being harvested at just the right time, stacked by hand and loaded up on to trailers to be taken away. It is a beautiful sight, and one that is very fitting to the rural landscape of Jersey. The cereals grown by Le Tacheron are some of the most ancient, heirloom grains ever cultivated. There are a variety of grains including Einkorn, which is the oldest cultivated grain known to scientists. This is a very pure grain, and has gained in popularity as people find it easier to digest than some of the modern, gluten-heavy grains around today. Spelt is another of the earliest crops known to man, which was quickly overtaken in popularity by wheat.

AUTUMN 2019

- 15


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

the Island - is Le Moulin de Quétivel, in St Peter’s Valley. This mill changed ownership and was rebuilt many times throughout the centuries, and indeed continued to operate as a business until the 20th Century. However, this was during the time of transition from water power to steam power, and although the mill was briefly brought back into operation during the German Occupation, after the war potatoes and tomatoes became the main produce of the Island. Subsequently, the mill, having been closed for a number of years, fell into disrepair, and unfortunately burnt down in 1969. At this time the National Trust was in the process of negotiating a long lease from Jersey Water in order to restore the mill. Thankfully, despite this immense set back, the National Trust began the huge task of restoring the mill during the 1970s. This was achieved; and the mill was finally returned to full, working order in 1979, with the National Trust earning an Award from the Civic Trust for their work. The National Trust have done an amazing job with Le Moulin de Quétivel. Not only have they renovated it to working order, but also offer visitors an entire experience; giving a real insight into the mill as a building, its history, and the milling process from start to finish. The two-storey building hosts a film and displays depicting the history of the mill, in addition to serving refreshments on the ground floor. During summer months, the mill is open to the public two days per week, and

Our Jersey showroom is now open. Showcasing our collection of kitchens and furniture, handmade in the UK. We deliver bespoke craftsmanship and a personalised service from planning, through to fitting.

Our new showroom is situated at Holme Grown, La Rue Au Long, Grouville.

Michael Peterson Tel: 07797741226 michaelp@handcraftedkitchensdirect.com

DESIGNED IN JERSEY MADE IN ENGLAND

14

- AUTUMN 2019

handcraftedkitchensdirect.com

twice a year, the National Trust opens Le Quétivel for an Open Milling Day, where you can watch the water travelling downhill from the mill pond along the ancient leat to the mill wheel, witness the huge mill stones in operation, and finally see some Jersey flour being milled - from Jersey wheat. During these open days there are experts on hand to guide you through the journey from wheat to flour, and to explain how the machinery operates, and the importance of the mill in Jersey’s history of agriculture and industry. You can enjoy a woodland walk, a herb garden, and there is even a new cycle path linking the mill with St Helier. The Jersey wheat milled at Le Quétivel is no longer imported, but is farmed traditionally by the Le Maistre family at Le Tacheron Farm in Trinity. The Le Maistre family have a long history in the Island and a passion for traditional farming methods, and are intent on preserving the farming heritage of Jersey.

Coming from long-standing farming stock, the three brothers decided that they wanted to keep the old traditions alive, not purely for sentimental reasons, but also because they want to reduce their carbon footprint and encourage wildlife to flourish. By not using modern, heavy machinery, they are able to minimise soil compaction, and protect the natural habitats of many animals. The Le Tacheron fields are also bordered by a beautiful array of cornfield annuals, creating a natural border to protect the crops and house a host of insects and wildlife. Some of these borders have been lost over the years in mainstream farming, largely due to the intensification of cultivation and the use of chemicals, which has made some of these species of flowers extremely rare. If allowed to, these plants will naturally grow alongside crops, and include some added colour from cornflowers and corn marigolds. They are also a wonderful reminder of how wheat fields looked just less than a century ago.

The Le Maistre family grow heritage varieties of spelt, wheat and barley. No chemicals are used, and they harvest and thresh the grains with vintage equipment, helped by their impressive and enormous Shire Horses, Ben and Ringo. Farming the old-fashioned way is a very physical job, with the wheat being harvested at just the right time, stacked by hand and loaded up on to trailers to be taken away. It is a beautiful sight, and one that is very fitting to the rural landscape of Jersey. The cereals grown by Le Tacheron are some of the most ancient, heirloom grains ever cultivated. There are a variety of grains including Einkorn, which is the oldest cultivated grain known to scientists. This is a very pure grain, and has gained in popularity as people find it easier to digest than some of the modern, gluten-heavy grains around today. Spelt is another of the earliest crops known to man, which was quickly overtaken in popularity by wheat.

AUTUMN 2019

- 15


OUT & ABOUT

The flour produced at Le Moulin de Quétivel is a dense, wholewheat flour, making it perfect for baking wholemeal breads.

OUT & ABOUT

However, it is experiencing something of a resurgence, due to its being a nutritional powerhouse, more so than wheat, as well as acknowledged claims of lowering cholesterol. The spelt, along with the other cereals cultivated here, are grown in their purest form. Modern, hybrid descendants have become much shorter, so it is incredible to see fields of six foot high wheat swaying in the breeze. The wheat, which is lovingly grown and harvested at Le Tacheron, is taken to the National Trust’s Le Moulin de Quétivel. As it would have been centuries ago, the wheat is then milled into flour, and packaged up. Visitors to the mill, can purchase packets of this flour thereby taking away their own piece of history. The National Trust also holds masterclass sessions throughout the year where, using the flour, you are able not only to learn how to bake bread but so

much more. It is a great way to pick up tips, and acquire new skills in some wonderful surroundings. There is a long tradition of bakeries in Jersey, with some still to be found in the Jersey Markets. Home baking has become increasingly popular, due in no small part to programmes such as the Great British Bake Off, and the surge from America of cupcakes and celebration cakes. The flour produced at Le Moulin de Quétivel is a dense, whole-wheat flour, making it perfect for baking wholemeal breads. One of the most traditional is the Cabbage Loaf, which is usually a round loaf wrapped and baked in cabbage leaves. Although this may not spring to mind as something to cook bread with, the cabbage leaf provides a valuable source of moisture and protection from the intense heat of the oven. This easy recipe uses flour supplied from Le Moulin de Quétivel, and cabbage leaves from Le Tacheron Farm. Makes 1 Loaf: 500g Flour 50g Melted Butter or Margarine ½ tsp Salt 1 tsp Sugar 1 Sachet of Instant Yeast 2 Cabbage Leaves Method: Sieve the flour into a large mixing bowl. Stir in the butter, salt and sugar. Mix in the yeast. Knead well by machine or by hand for at least 10 minutes. Mould into a round, loaf shape. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth or cling film and place in a warm area (over an Aga or in a boiler room is ideal). Leave to rise for at least 2 hours. Brush a little melted butter or margarine on to the cabbage leaves so that they stick to the dough. Place on a baking tray sandwiched between the two cabbage leaves. Bake at 200C for 20-30 minutes until cooked through. To test, turn the loaf upside down and knock the bottom. If it sounds hollow it is ready. *For more information on Le Moulin de Quétivel please visit nationaltrust.je Charles Le Maistre

16

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

- 17


OUT & ABOUT

The flour produced at Le Moulin de Quétivel is a dense, wholewheat flour, making it perfect for baking wholemeal breads.

OUT & ABOUT

However, it is experiencing something of a resurgence, due to its being a nutritional powerhouse, more so than wheat, as well as acknowledged claims of lowering cholesterol. The spelt, along with the other cereals cultivated here, are grown in their purest form. Modern, hybrid descendants have become much shorter, so it is incredible to see fields of six foot high wheat swaying in the breeze. The wheat, which is lovingly grown and harvested at Le Tacheron, is taken to the National Trust’s Le Moulin de Quétivel. As it would have been centuries ago, the wheat is then milled into flour, and packaged up. Visitors to the mill, can purchase packets of this flour thereby taking away their own piece of history. The National Trust also holds masterclass sessions throughout the year where, using the flour, you are able not only to learn how to bake bread but so

much more. It is a great way to pick up tips, and acquire new skills in some wonderful surroundings. There is a long tradition of bakeries in Jersey, with some still to be found in the Jersey Markets. Home baking has become increasingly popular, due in no small part to programmes such as the Great British Bake Off, and the surge from America of cupcakes and celebration cakes. The flour produced at Le Moulin de Quétivel is a dense, whole-wheat flour, making it perfect for baking wholemeal breads. One of the most traditional is the Cabbage Loaf, which is usually a round loaf wrapped and baked in cabbage leaves. Although this may not spring to mind as something to cook bread with, the cabbage leaf provides a valuable source of moisture and protection from the intense heat of the oven. This easy recipe uses flour supplied from Le Moulin de Quétivel, and cabbage leaves from Le Tacheron Farm. Makes 1 Loaf: 500g Flour 50g Melted Butter or Margarine ½ tsp Salt 1 tsp Sugar 1 Sachet of Instant Yeast 2 Cabbage Leaves Method: Sieve the flour into a large mixing bowl. Stir in the butter, salt and sugar. Mix in the yeast. Knead well by machine or by hand for at least 10 minutes. Mould into a round, loaf shape. Cover the bowl with a damp cloth or cling film and place in a warm area (over an Aga or in a boiler room is ideal). Leave to rise for at least 2 hours. Brush a little melted butter or margarine on to the cabbage leaves so that they stick to the dough. Place on a baking tray sandwiched between the two cabbage leaves. Bake at 200C for 20-30 minutes until cooked through. To test, turn the loaf upside down and knock the bottom. If it sounds hollow it is ready. *For more information on Le Moulin de Quétivel please visit nationaltrust.je Charles Le Maistre

16

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

- 17


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

A Walk in the Country The annual 2019 Scenic Lanes Competition took place in August. Alasdair Crosby joined the judges as an ‘observer’

A

walk down some Jersey country lanes on a warm August day? A great idea. I was grateful to Clare Cornick, the administrative secretary or the Société Jersiaise, for the invitation to join the judges as an ‘observer’. Who are the judges? Representatives from non-commercial organisations, such as Jersey Trees for Life, National Trust for Jersey and the Department of the Environment. The judging takes place over most of the day and it was at The Elms, the headquarters of the National Trust for Jersey, that I caught up with the judges as they were enjoying their lunchtime sandwiches. They were by then around halfway through their work, travelling from one lane to the next by minibus. This year there were eight submissions and by lunchtime they had done the first five: Grouville’s Le Chemin du Radier, St Helier’s Mont Neron, St Martin’s Rue de Scez, St Lawrence’s Les Charrières Malorey and St John’s Rue du Pont. How does one actually judge a ‘scenic’ lane? Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder, after all and one person’s scenic lane could well be another person’s boring trudge. The judges, I was told, had criteria that they followed as best they could: general ambience; general appearance; walls, banques, constructed features; trees and hedges and wildlife. There must also be vehicular access (thinking particularly of disabled people) and it must go from

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- AUTUMN 2019

somewhere to somewhere else – not just end as a cul de sac or diminish into a cliff path. The state of the branchage is important – has it been systematically managed? Are there signs of damage to trees, banks, hedges? This is the first year that the judging has taken place after the branchage rather than before it, and tellingly there was less birdsong than in previous years. Also, the parishes cannot enter the same lane year after year – their entry cannot have won an award in the previous five years. After the lunchtime sandwiches it was on to Le Mourier Valley – a very pleasant lane through woodland shade, but it spoiled its chances by (a) going nowhere in particular and (b) it was an unmade lane – lots of ruts and potholes. Suitable for someone in a wheelchair? Hmm – they would have to be fairly brave to want to try. In St Ouen – the little lane behind St Ouen’s Manor called Les Charrières – was very appealing, despite extensive roadworks and lots of bollards. But these were only temporary impediments, so they didn’t count. Finally, St Brelade: Mont au Roux… did the Parish really mean this road, or had they got muddled up? The judges trembled by the side of the road – no verge, nowhere to walk and cars whizzing speedily around bends. Well, whether

Ten years and counting

the Parish did or didn’t mean this lane, this is where the judges agreed that anybody attempting to walk along it was taking their life in their hands – and they certainly did not want to do that, so there! Nul points. As it was now tea time, it was on to The Harbour Gallery tearooms for tea, cakes and scoring. Overall impressions? The judges were surprised at how much rubbish there was lying about. Perhaps they should ‘name and shame’ in future years? Scores were collated and the tension mounted…. well, a bit of poetic licence there. But it was certainly all done conscientiously and seriously. Third place: Les Charrières de Malorey, St Lawrence. Second place: Les Charrières, St Ouen. And the winner? (Imagine a drum roll here…): La Rue de Scez, St Martin. The Parish receives a handmade wooden post complete with rondels from the supporting organisations, Rotary de la Manche, Société Jersiaise and the Department of the Environment to display at the start of their lane and, of course, the accolade of being a ‘Scenic Lane’! There are future plans to create walking routes where possible to link the lanes, and perhaps cycling ones too. Certainly a winning Scenic Lane is ‘worth a detour’, as Le Guide Michelin puts it.

Mike Stentiford celebrates the 10th anniversary of ‘The Line in the Sand’ peaceful demonstration

I

t’s hard to believe that an entire decade has already passed since thousands of Islanders joined hands along St Ouen’s Bay clearly showing their dismay at the increase in inappropriate coastal development. Despite it now being tucked away, possibly in the ‘environmental folklore’ file, ‘The Line in the Sand’ demonstration on Sunday 4 October 2009 proved a brief but wonderfully unique event that changed the rules within certain aspects of coastal planning and development. Even now, it remains an event that the organisers, The National Trust for Jersey, fondly remember with pride and, more

likely as not, with a certain measure of nostalgia. To say that planning this public show of solidarity was a gamble would be a blatant understatement but, unlike many other speculative events, ‘the line’ was timed to absolute perfection.

To comply with the Island’s strict planning laws, these restrictions also saw the emergence of the Jersey Coastal National Park where, within its designated boundaries, there is now ‘the strongest presumption against new development’.

Quite clearly, it proved something of a unique opportunity for Islanders publicly to show their protective loyalty towards the undoubted beauty, vulnerability and character of Jersey’s coastline.

While accepting that designating vulnerable parts of the Island’s coastline is primarily a planning issue, a desire to add more ‘flesh to the bone’ resulted, in June 2014, in the formation of the Jersey National Park interim working group.

Within two years of this peaceful demonstration, robust restrictions on new coastal development were officially endorsed by the States of Jersey and lodged within the Island Plan 2011.

Since then, much has been quietly achieved behind the scenes in order to fulfil the ‘Park’s’ official political objectives.

AUTUMN 2019

- 19


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

A Walk in the Country The annual 2019 Scenic Lanes Competition took place in August. Alasdair Crosby joined the judges as an ‘observer’

A

walk down some Jersey country lanes on a warm August day? A great idea. I was grateful to Clare Cornick, the administrative secretary or the Société Jersiaise, for the invitation to join the judges as an ‘observer’. Who are the judges? Representatives from non-commercial organisations, such as Jersey Trees for Life, National Trust for Jersey and the Department of the Environment. The judging takes place over most of the day and it was at The Elms, the headquarters of the National Trust for Jersey, that I caught up with the judges as they were enjoying their lunchtime sandwiches. They were by then around halfway through their work, travelling from one lane to the next by minibus. This year there were eight submissions and by lunchtime they had done the first five: Grouville’s Le Chemin du Radier, St Helier’s Mont Neron, St Martin’s Rue de Scez, St Lawrence’s Les Charrières Malorey and St John’s Rue du Pont. How does one actually judge a ‘scenic’ lane? Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder, after all and one person’s scenic lane could well be another person’s boring trudge. The judges, I was told, had criteria that they followed as best they could: general ambience; general appearance; walls, banques, constructed features; trees and hedges and wildlife. There must also be vehicular access (thinking particularly of disabled people) and it must go from

18

- AUTUMN 2019

somewhere to somewhere else – not just end as a cul de sac or diminish into a cliff path. The state of the branchage is important – has it been systematically managed? Are there signs of damage to trees, banks, hedges? This is the first year that the judging has taken place after the branchage rather than before it, and tellingly there was less birdsong than in previous years. Also, the parishes cannot enter the same lane year after year – their entry cannot have won an award in the previous five years. After the lunchtime sandwiches it was on to Le Mourier Valley – a very pleasant lane through woodland shade, but it spoiled its chances by (a) going nowhere in particular and (b) it was an unmade lane – lots of ruts and potholes. Suitable for someone in a wheelchair? Hmm – they would have to be fairly brave to want to try. In St Ouen – the little lane behind St Ouen’s Manor called Les Charrières – was very appealing, despite extensive roadworks and lots of bollards. But these were only temporary impediments, so they didn’t count. Finally, St Brelade: Mont au Roux… did the Parish really mean this road, or had they got muddled up? The judges trembled by the side of the road – no verge, nowhere to walk and cars whizzing speedily around bends. Well, whether

Ten years and counting

the Parish did or didn’t mean this lane, this is where the judges agreed that anybody attempting to walk along it was taking their life in their hands – and they certainly did not want to do that, so there! Nul points. As it was now tea time, it was on to The Harbour Gallery tearooms for tea, cakes and scoring. Overall impressions? The judges were surprised at how much rubbish there was lying about. Perhaps they should ‘name and shame’ in future years? Scores were collated and the tension mounted…. well, a bit of poetic licence there. But it was certainly all done conscientiously and seriously. Third place: Les Charrières de Malorey, St Lawrence. Second place: Les Charrières, St Ouen. And the winner? (Imagine a drum roll here…): La Rue de Scez, St Martin. The Parish receives a handmade wooden post complete with rondels from the supporting organisations, Rotary de la Manche, Société Jersiaise and the Department of the Environment to display at the start of their lane and, of course, the accolade of being a ‘Scenic Lane’! There are future plans to create walking routes where possible to link the lanes, and perhaps cycling ones too. Certainly a winning Scenic Lane is ‘worth a detour’, as Le Guide Michelin puts it.

Mike Stentiford celebrates the 10th anniversary of ‘The Line in the Sand’ peaceful demonstration

I

t’s hard to believe that an entire decade has already passed since thousands of Islanders joined hands along St Ouen’s Bay clearly showing their dismay at the increase in inappropriate coastal development. Despite it now being tucked away, possibly in the ‘environmental folklore’ file, ‘The Line in the Sand’ demonstration on Sunday 4 October 2009 proved a brief but wonderfully unique event that changed the rules within certain aspects of coastal planning and development. Even now, it remains an event that the organisers, The National Trust for Jersey, fondly remember with pride and, more

likely as not, with a certain measure of nostalgia. To say that planning this public show of solidarity was a gamble would be a blatant understatement but, unlike many other speculative events, ‘the line’ was timed to absolute perfection.

To comply with the Island’s strict planning laws, these restrictions also saw the emergence of the Jersey Coastal National Park where, within its designated boundaries, there is now ‘the strongest presumption against new development’.

Quite clearly, it proved something of a unique opportunity for Islanders publicly to show their protective loyalty towards the undoubted beauty, vulnerability and character of Jersey’s coastline.

While accepting that designating vulnerable parts of the Island’s coastline is primarily a planning issue, a desire to add more ‘flesh to the bone’ resulted, in June 2014, in the formation of the Jersey National Park interim working group.

Within two years of this peaceful demonstration, robust restrictions on new coastal development were officially endorsed by the States of Jersey and lodged within the Island Plan 2011.

Since then, much has been quietly achieved behind the scenes in order to fulfil the ‘Park’s’ official political objectives.

AUTUMN 2019

- 19


Porcelanosa marble ceramic tile available from stock and on view in our showroom

OUT & ABOUT

These were ‘Robustly to protect, conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the National Park ‘To encourage further public appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of the many special qualities existing within the National Park.’ As a stark reminder of these commitments, and to raise a robust cheer for the National Trust’s 10th Anniversary of ‘The Line in the Sand’ event, a day of joint celebration is being planned for Sunday 6 October at the Frances Le Sueur Centre in St Ouen’s Bay. The event will coincide with the ‘relaunch’ of the Frances Le Sueur Centre as ‘The Jersey National Park Information, Education and Events Centre’. In addition to photographic reminders of ‘the line’ event ten years ago, further information and videos will be recognising the Park’s past achievements and details of its future aspirations.

Also included in this day of joint celebration will be the official launch of a brand new National Trust publication, ‘Saving Plémont for the People’. This ‘pop-in’ event runs from 10am to 5pm and a warm welcome is extended to all those who continue to support the protective environmental endeavours and values of both the National Trust for Jersey and of The Jersey National Park.

Charles Yorke timeless and versatile Shaker style kitchen

u know? #DYK ...Did yo

WE PROVIDE PRODUCTS FOR ALL GARDENS

Normans can help you to create beautiful, colourful gardens, abundant vegetable patches and lush lawns! Our Agricultural department at Five Oaks offer a comprehensive selection of products. From composts and fertilizers, including organic and peat free options to lawn seed mixes and pollinator-friendly wild flower bulbs as well as seeds, planters, trellises, sleepers and fencing. COMPOSTS & FERTILISERS

GARDENING TOOLS

LAWN SEEDS & FEEDS

FENCING

AGRICULTURAL FIVE OAKS

WILD FLOWER SEEDS AGRICULTURAL FIVE OAKS

BUILDING CENTRE

AGRICULTURAL FIVE OAKS

BUILDING CENTRE FIVE OAKS

TIMBER DEPARTMENT FIVE OAKS

Bathroom. Kitchen. Tiles. Bedrooms.

Five Oaks

tel 883333

www.normans.je

Opening hours: Monday – Saturday 8.30am - 5.00pm

20

- AUTUMN 2019

Retail showroom at Five Oaks


Porcelanosa marble ceramic tile available from stock and on view in our showroom

OUT & ABOUT

These were ‘Robustly to protect, conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural heritage of the National Park ‘To encourage further public appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of the many special qualities existing within the National Park.’ As a stark reminder of these commitments, and to raise a robust cheer for the National Trust’s 10th Anniversary of ‘The Line in the Sand’ event, a day of joint celebration is being planned for Sunday 6 October at the Frances Le Sueur Centre in St Ouen’s Bay. The event will coincide with the ‘relaunch’ of the Frances Le Sueur Centre as ‘The Jersey National Park Information, Education and Events Centre’. In addition to photographic reminders of ‘the line’ event ten years ago, further information and videos will be recognising the Park’s past achievements and details of its future aspirations.

Also included in this day of joint celebration will be the official launch of a brand new National Trust publication, ‘Saving Plémont for the People’. This ‘pop-in’ event runs from 10am to 5pm and a warm welcome is extended to all those who continue to support the protective environmental endeavours and values of both the National Trust for Jersey and of The Jersey National Park.

Charles Yorke timeless and versatile Shaker style kitchen

u know? #DYK ...Did yo

WE PROVIDE PRODUCTS FOR ALL GARDENS

Normans can help you to create beautiful, colourful gardens, abundant vegetable patches and lush lawns! Our Agricultural department at Five Oaks offer a comprehensive selection of products. From composts and fertilizers, including organic and peat free options to lawn seed mixes and pollinator-friendly wild flower bulbs as well as seeds, planters, trellises, sleepers and fencing. COMPOSTS & FERTILISERS

GARDENING TOOLS

LAWN SEEDS & FEEDS

FENCING

AGRICULTURAL FIVE OAKS

WILD FLOWER SEEDS AGRICULTURAL FIVE OAKS

BUILDING CENTRE

AGRICULTURAL FIVE OAKS

BUILDING CENTRE FIVE OAKS

TIMBER DEPARTMENT FIVE OAKS

Bathroom. Kitchen. Tiles. Bedrooms.

Five Oaks

tel 883333

www.normans.je

Opening hours: Monday – Saturday 8.30am - 5.00pm

20

- AUTUMN 2019

Retail showroom at Five Oaks


OUT & ABOUT

Travellers’ Tales The annual meeting of the Jersey Scientific Exploration Society takes place in October

I

slanders have an opportunity to experience travelling by elephant through the forests and grasslands of Nepal and hiking through unforgiving terrain in the jungles of Papua, Indonesia, without even leaving their comfortable seats this October. Intrepid explorer, Colonel John BlashfordSnell CBE, will be at St Lawrence Parish Hall talking about his latest expedition to the Bardia National Park in West Nepal, where his group were charged by a Royal Bengal Tigress while riding on elephants. Fortunately, the majestic beasts made a fast retreat leaving the snarling tigress to disappear into the long grass.

along the Moni Trail in the interior of Papua, the remote easternmost frontier province of Indonesia. John began exploring the area in 2003 and was introduced to the Moni Tribe, an indigenous group of people who are hunter gatherers and subsistence farmers and who had, until recently, little contact with the outside world. He has returned several times over the years, each time completing another section of the Moni Trail, and has witnessed huge changes in the Moni way of life, particularly in the last five years.

Enchanting and Peaceful Estate St. Brelade, Jersey St Helier: 3.9 miles

About 3 acres | Guide £3.15 million

Geri O’Brien Savills Jersey 01534 722 227 gobrien@savills.com

He will be joined by Jersey geologist, John Carlile, who will be sharing the extreme physical and emotional challenges he and his companions faced as they walked, hiked and waded through the jungle and

- AUTUMN 2019

The JSES evening takes place at St Lawrence Parish Hall on Friday 25 October starting at 6.30pm. No tickets are required. For more information please contact Kate Davis on katiekarting29@ gmail.com

A substantial Jersey estate purported to date from the fifteenth century, recognised at the time as one of the most prestigious examples of a granite country residence on the Island. Having been in the same ownership for almost sixty years, the affection and charm throughout the property and its’ surroundings is certainly admirable. 7 reception rooms, 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms.

John, who was educated at Victoria College, will be speaking at the invitation of the Jersey Scientific Exploration Society, which is affiliated to the Scientific Exploration Society (SES), a non-profit organisation, which he founded in 1969. It initiated a worldwide programme of expeditions focusing on scientific, conservation, education and community aid projects.

22

‘What started as a walk expanded and evolved beyond the physical challenge of walking around the mountains to documenting the unique and fascinating Moni way of life,’ said John. ‘For better or worse, the traditional Moni ways will soon disappear. This is why it has to be recorded “now”, while it is still possible.’

savills John Carlile in Papua

savills.je


OUT & ABOUT

Travellers’ Tales The annual meeting of the Jersey Scientific Exploration Society takes place in October

I

slanders have an opportunity to experience travelling by elephant through the forests and grasslands of Nepal and hiking through unforgiving terrain in the jungles of Papua, Indonesia, without even leaving their comfortable seats this October. Intrepid explorer, Colonel John BlashfordSnell CBE, will be at St Lawrence Parish Hall talking about his latest expedition to the Bardia National Park in West Nepal, where his group were charged by a Royal Bengal Tigress while riding on elephants. Fortunately, the majestic beasts made a fast retreat leaving the snarling tigress to disappear into the long grass.

along the Moni Trail in the interior of Papua, the remote easternmost frontier province of Indonesia. John began exploring the area in 2003 and was introduced to the Moni Tribe, an indigenous group of people who are hunter gatherers and subsistence farmers and who had, until recently, little contact with the outside world. He has returned several times over the years, each time completing another section of the Moni Trail, and has witnessed huge changes in the Moni way of life, particularly in the last five years.

Enchanting and Peaceful Estate St. Brelade, Jersey St Helier: 3.9 miles

About 3 acres | Guide £3.15 million

Geri O’Brien Savills Jersey 01534 722 227 gobrien@savills.com

He will be joined by Jersey geologist, John Carlile, who will be sharing the extreme physical and emotional challenges he and his companions faced as they walked, hiked and waded through the jungle and

- AUTUMN 2019

The JSES evening takes place at St Lawrence Parish Hall on Friday 25 October starting at 6.30pm. No tickets are required. For more information please contact Kate Davis on katiekarting29@ gmail.com

A substantial Jersey estate purported to date from the fifteenth century, recognised at the time as one of the most prestigious examples of a granite country residence on the Island. Having been in the same ownership for almost sixty years, the affection and charm throughout the property and its’ surroundings is certainly admirable. 7 reception rooms, 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms.

John, who was educated at Victoria College, will be speaking at the invitation of the Jersey Scientific Exploration Society, which is affiliated to the Scientific Exploration Society (SES), a non-profit organisation, which he founded in 1969. It initiated a worldwide programme of expeditions focusing on scientific, conservation, education and community aid projects.

22

‘What started as a walk expanded and evolved beyond the physical challenge of walking around the mountains to documenting the unique and fascinating Moni way of life,’ said John. ‘For better or worse, the traditional Moni ways will soon disappear. This is why it has to be recorded “now”, while it is still possible.’

savills John Carlile in Papua

savills.je


FARM & GARDEN

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Two Contrasting Works by the Same Great Artist, Edmund Blampied by Stephen Cohu

W

Edmund Blampied, Watercolour on paper of a farmhand with horses

e feature here two contrasting works created by arguably Jersey’s most celebrated 20th century artist, Edmund Blampied. Born in March 1886 in St Martin 5 days after the death of his father John, Edmund grew up surrounded by the sights he would later reproduce in his many artworks. At Trinity School he was often found distracted from his lessons sketching the farmworkers and farm animals and the characters that came in to his mother’s shop at Augrés. He received no formal art training until the age of 16 and when he obtained a scholarship to attend the Lambeth School of Art he left for London speaking virtually no English his first language being Jérriais. Here he began illustrating for various magazines and publications and went on to train at Bolt Court where he learned the technique of dry point etching for which he became internationally celebrated. During his time as an etcher he also produced many atmospheric watercolours but it wasn’t until later in his career that he concentrated more on oils. Edmund returned to Jersey in 1939 with his wife Marianne before the German Occupation and remained in the island for the rest of his life. He died in August 1966 aged 80. The two works featured show his range and skill and his incredible ability to capture a moment with great speed and accomplish. WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER OF A FARMHAND WITH HORSES

Edmund Blampied, oil on canvas of old ladies in conversation

24

- AUTUMN 2019

This exceptional watercolour captures a scene of great intensity, with an illustrative fantasy or fairy-tale feel to it, indeed almost magical. It shows Edmund’s ability with a limited range of colour to create a scene with electric atmosphere. We purchased this work in America and before we bought it we were unsure whether the work had discoloured as the images we saw were not too good. When it arrived and was unpacked it was shown to be in entirely the condition as painted

by Blampied, exactly as he intended. In mainly shades of grey and brown the only splash of colour is the blue of the shirt. The movement he has captured of the horses demonstrates the enormous skill he developed as a draughtsman growing up surrounded by such scenes. Although the painting bears no date it was almost certainly painted in the early years of the 1930s when Blampied’s works were exhibited and highly regarded on the international stage. In this period his works were exhibited in New York alongside those of Matisse and Picasso. OIL ON CANVAS OF OLD LADIES IN CONVERSATION This painting is interesting in two ways. Firstly it was painted on a stretched canvas where Edmund normally painted on some form of board, not always of the best quality! Secondly it was painted in 1965, the year before his death by which time he was suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease which lead to his work becoming more abstract. This work harks back to his brilliant ability to capture old Jersey characters just going about their everyday lives and the viewer cannot help to feel uplifted by the joyful elderly characters portrayed. After the death of his father before Edmund’s birth he was raised by his mother and his father’s two sisters Tante Rachel and Tante Elizabeth who went on to feature in many of his works. Anyone growing up in Jersey at this time will remember these scenes which have now all but disappeared. I for one remember visiting my great grandmother in her advanced years with her bonnet, bristly chin and chopping between Jerriais and English. The two works couldn’t be more different, the watercolour being dark, almost foreboding and the oil relaxed and amusing. If you wish to see more of Edmund Blampied’s vast range of work, these two pictures and dozens of others are on display in our St Lawrence showroom.

Meet the farmer Jersey Farmers’ Union in its centenary year. Alasdair Crosby talked to the current president, Peter Le Maistre

AUTUMN 2019

- 25


FARM & GARDEN

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Two Contrasting Works by the Same Great Artist, Edmund Blampied by Stephen Cohu

W

Edmund Blampied, Watercolour on paper of a farmhand with horses

e feature here two contrasting works created by arguably Jersey’s most celebrated 20th century artist, Edmund Blampied. Born in March 1886 in St Martin 5 days after the death of his father John, Edmund grew up surrounded by the sights he would later reproduce in his many artworks. At Trinity School he was often found distracted from his lessons sketching the farmworkers and farm animals and the characters that came in to his mother’s shop at Augrés. He received no formal art training until the age of 16 and when he obtained a scholarship to attend the Lambeth School of Art he left for London speaking virtually no English his first language being Jérriais. Here he began illustrating for various magazines and publications and went on to train at Bolt Court where he learned the technique of dry point etching for which he became internationally celebrated. During his time as an etcher he also produced many atmospheric watercolours but it wasn’t until later in his career that he concentrated more on oils. Edmund returned to Jersey in 1939 with his wife Marianne before the German Occupation and remained in the island for the rest of his life. He died in August 1966 aged 80. The two works featured show his range and skill and his incredible ability to capture a moment with great speed and accomplish. WATERCOLOUR ON PAPER OF A FARMHAND WITH HORSES

Edmund Blampied, oil on canvas of old ladies in conversation

24

- AUTUMN 2019

This exceptional watercolour captures a scene of great intensity, with an illustrative fantasy or fairy-tale feel to it, indeed almost magical. It shows Edmund’s ability with a limited range of colour to create a scene with electric atmosphere. We purchased this work in America and before we bought it we were unsure whether the work had discoloured as the images we saw were not too good. When it arrived and was unpacked it was shown to be in entirely the condition as painted

by Blampied, exactly as he intended. In mainly shades of grey and brown the only splash of colour is the blue of the shirt. The movement he has captured of the horses demonstrates the enormous skill he developed as a draughtsman growing up surrounded by such scenes. Although the painting bears no date it was almost certainly painted in the early years of the 1930s when Blampied’s works were exhibited and highly regarded on the international stage. In this period his works were exhibited in New York alongside those of Matisse and Picasso. OIL ON CANVAS OF OLD LADIES IN CONVERSATION This painting is interesting in two ways. Firstly it was painted on a stretched canvas where Edmund normally painted on some form of board, not always of the best quality! Secondly it was painted in 1965, the year before his death by which time he was suffering from advanced Parkinson’s disease which lead to his work becoming more abstract. This work harks back to his brilliant ability to capture old Jersey characters just going about their everyday lives and the viewer cannot help to feel uplifted by the joyful elderly characters portrayed. After the death of his father before Edmund’s birth he was raised by his mother and his father’s two sisters Tante Rachel and Tante Elizabeth who went on to feature in many of his works. Anyone growing up in Jersey at this time will remember these scenes which have now all but disappeared. I for one remember visiting my great grandmother in her advanced years with her bonnet, bristly chin and chopping between Jerriais and English. The two works couldn’t be more different, the watercolour being dark, almost foreboding and the oil relaxed and amusing. If you wish to see more of Edmund Blampied’s vast range of work, these two pictures and dozens of others are on display in our St Lawrence showroom.

Meet the farmer Jersey Farmers’ Union in its centenary year. Alasdair Crosby talked to the current president, Peter Le Maistre

AUTUMN 2019

- 25


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

‘D

efence not defiance’ is the motto of the Jersey Farmers Union. In 1919, at the inaugural meeting, the object of the JFU was set as being ‘for the purpose of watching over and defending matters affecting farmers and growers and to further their interests.’ In that respect, nothing has changed over the past century. In every other way, of course, Jersey and its farming industry has changed beyond recognition. As the current president, Peter Le Maistre, said: ‘Even I am staggered by the figures for the decreased number of farms. I started farming in 1975 when there were 475 herds. Today there are less than 20. And there were about 20 young farmers of roughly my own age in my home parish of Grouville; now I am the only commercial farmer in the parish.’ In July the JFU held its centenary celebrations. The union began in February 1919 following the decision by the Jersey dockers union to ban cattle exports, because of a meat and milk shortage following the Spanish flu epidemic of a few months previously. In those days, by far the biggest moneyspinner was the export of cattle and to stop that would have spelled difficulties for

26

- AUTUMN 2019

The sourcing of labour is a constantly recurring theme, be it from Brittany, Madeira or Poland and over the past 12 months it has become a major challenge.

many farmers. So farmers got together to form a union to fight the dockers. There was a meeting at the Oddfellows Hall – it was standing room only. Within two days delegates had been appointed to meet the dockers’ union. This particular problem was solved within four weeks by agreeing a quota system for cattle export. So it was straight into business from the very start – no hanging around – and it has been much the same since. Ten days after the inaugural meeting, 1,200 farmers had joined. One of the original members of the 36-strong JFU Council was Grouville farmer John William Labey – Peter’s great-grandfather. Another great-grandfather, Peter Charles Le Maistre, joined the JFU in its first month of existence. ‘Today’s’ Peter is the JFU’s 17th president, elected in 2017. Many issues have risen and receded again over the past 100 years. The sourcing of labour is a constantly recurring theme, be it from Brittany, Madeira or Poland and over the past 12 months it has become a major challenge. The Polish economy is improving, so not so many Poles want to travel to work in Jersey. With Brexit in the offing, the Pound fell by 23%, so the value of their wages fell overnight, exacerbating

The agricultural budget decreased every year for 25 years and a point has now been reached where it becomes critical that more money is put in by government.

an understandable disinclination to work for long periods away from home. Nepal is now being considered as a source of labour, but it is far away from Jersey and the bureaucracy involved in settling the transportation of the workers from there to here is time-consuming, to say the least. When (or if) Brexit happens – ‘everyone will be on a permit, no matter where they come from! It will give us a chance to bring out all the old permits from the early 1970s! The quicker we have a permit system, the better.’ Another current issue is to secure a better deal and a measure of stability for farming businesses. The agricultural budget decreased every year for 25 years and a point has now been reached where it becomes critical that more money is put in by government. This is recommended in the Rural Economy Strategy and it is hoped that it will be supported in the States. The minimum wage has been very difficult for the industry. There was a 6.9% wage rise last year and the year before that it was 5.8%. A States proposition was passed that the minimum

AUTUMN 2019

- 27


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

‘D

efence not defiance’ is the motto of the Jersey Farmers Union. In 1919, at the inaugural meeting, the object of the JFU was set as being ‘for the purpose of watching over and defending matters affecting farmers and growers and to further their interests.’ In that respect, nothing has changed over the past century. In every other way, of course, Jersey and its farming industry has changed beyond recognition. As the current president, Peter Le Maistre, said: ‘Even I am staggered by the figures for the decreased number of farms. I started farming in 1975 when there were 475 herds. Today there are less than 20. And there were about 20 young farmers of roughly my own age in my home parish of Grouville; now I am the only commercial farmer in the parish.’ In July the JFU held its centenary celebrations. The union began in February 1919 following the decision by the Jersey dockers union to ban cattle exports, because of a meat and milk shortage following the Spanish flu epidemic of a few months previously. In those days, by far the biggest moneyspinner was the export of cattle and to stop that would have spelled difficulties for

26

- AUTUMN 2019

The sourcing of labour is a constantly recurring theme, be it from Brittany, Madeira or Poland and over the past 12 months it has become a major challenge.

many farmers. So farmers got together to form a union to fight the dockers. There was a meeting at the Oddfellows Hall – it was standing room only. Within two days delegates had been appointed to meet the dockers’ union. This particular problem was solved within four weeks by agreeing a quota system for cattle export. So it was straight into business from the very start – no hanging around – and it has been much the same since. Ten days after the inaugural meeting, 1,200 farmers had joined. One of the original members of the 36-strong JFU Council was Grouville farmer John William Labey – Peter’s great-grandfather. Another great-grandfather, Peter Charles Le Maistre, joined the JFU in its first month of existence. ‘Today’s’ Peter is the JFU’s 17th president, elected in 2017. Many issues have risen and receded again over the past 100 years. The sourcing of labour is a constantly recurring theme, be it from Brittany, Madeira or Poland and over the past 12 months it has become a major challenge. The Polish economy is improving, so not so many Poles want to travel to work in Jersey. With Brexit in the offing, the Pound fell by 23%, so the value of their wages fell overnight, exacerbating

The agricultural budget decreased every year for 25 years and a point has now been reached where it becomes critical that more money is put in by government.

an understandable disinclination to work for long periods away from home. Nepal is now being considered as a source of labour, but it is far away from Jersey and the bureaucracy involved in settling the transportation of the workers from there to here is time-consuming, to say the least. When (or if) Brexit happens – ‘everyone will be on a permit, no matter where they come from! It will give us a chance to bring out all the old permits from the early 1970s! The quicker we have a permit system, the better.’ Another current issue is to secure a better deal and a measure of stability for farming businesses. The agricultural budget decreased every year for 25 years and a point has now been reached where it becomes critical that more money is put in by government. This is recommended in the Rural Economy Strategy and it is hoped that it will be supported in the States. The minimum wage has been very difficult for the industry. There was a 6.9% wage rise last year and the year before that it was 5.8%. A States proposition was passed that the minimum

AUTUMN 2019

- 27


FARM & GARDEN

Building on firm foundations. Our only aim is to make buying and selling your home as simple and straightforward as possible. We do that by providing a blend of expertise and service we feel no other Jersey Law firm can match.

wage should be 45% of average Island wages – but the very high wages paid to workers in the finance sector - more than £10,000 higher than in the UK - distorts that average. Then every demand from civil servants or teachers for pay rises means that ‘the average’ continues to rise – and consequently so does the minimum wage that farmers need to pay out. Pollution has been in the headlines for years, but Peter said that there had been ‘huge’ progress in dealing both with nitrates in the past 20 years and, more

recently, oxadixyl in the water - ‘in short, pollution statistics decrease every year.’

that government supports them so that farming can carry on.

So - what of the Future?

‘Looking to the future, developments such as drones being used on farms for spraying, or robots used in pack houses… it is actually an exciting time to be in agriculture.

‘It’s very difficult to attract young people into farming and to keep them - as an industry we work too many hours compared to non-farming employment. Of course, it is demotivating, when everyone you mix with finishes while you are still working. But we have some young people who are passionate about farming and we want to make sure

‘And after all, we have a great advantage: how many other places have two worldclass products – the Jersey Royal and the Jersey cow? So yes, there could be a future for farming in Jersey.’

Contact Michelle Leverington +44 (0) 1534 760 867 michelle.leverington@bcrlawjersey.com 12 Hill Street, St Helier, JE2 4UA www.bcrlawjersey.com 28

- AUTUMN 2019


FARM & GARDEN

Building on firm foundations. Our only aim is to make buying and selling your home as simple and straightforward as possible. We do that by providing a blend of expertise and service we feel no other Jersey Law firm can match.

wage should be 45% of average Island wages – but the very high wages paid to workers in the finance sector - more than £10,000 higher than in the UK - distorts that average. Then every demand from civil servants or teachers for pay rises means that ‘the average’ continues to rise – and consequently so does the minimum wage that farmers need to pay out. Pollution has been in the headlines for years, but Peter said that there had been ‘huge’ progress in dealing both with nitrates in the past 20 years and, more

recently, oxadixyl in the water - ‘in short, pollution statistics decrease every year.’

that government supports them so that farming can carry on.

So - what of the Future?

‘Looking to the future, developments such as drones being used on farms for spraying, or robots used in pack houses… it is actually an exciting time to be in agriculture.

‘It’s very difficult to attract young people into farming and to keep them - as an industry we work too many hours compared to non-farming employment. Of course, it is demotivating, when everyone you mix with finishes while you are still working. But we have some young people who are passionate about farming and we want to make sure

‘And after all, we have a great advantage: how many other places have two worldclass products – the Jersey Royal and the Jersey cow? So yes, there could be a future for farming in Jersey.’

Contact Michelle Leverington +44 (0) 1534 760 867 michelle.leverington@bcrlawjersey.com 12 Hill Street, St Helier, JE2 4UA www.bcrlawjersey.com 28

- AUTUMN 2019


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

that it is possible to use any part of a plant. But flowers are so beautiful and hold the key to the support of spiritual and emotional issues, whilst bark, lichen, nuts, fruits and seeds often have more physical benefits.

NATURE HAS ALL THE ANSWERS

The first simple rule is to think about what you require from your flower. How does it make you feel? Do you love the colour, the size, the smell or the texture? Are you drawn to a tiny little wild flower or a massive big colourful garden flower? Are you feeling sad or do you have a more physical condition? Remember that a physical condition is probably the result of an emotional issue which needs to be addressed. Some flowers are so beautiful like roses and brambles, with soft, gentle petals but then have nasty sharp little thorns. Sweet Violets are so small and shy and then vibrant violet. Thistles are strong, structural and prickly. All flowers have different healing powers depending on their size, shape, number of petals and of course their colour! When nature holds so many powers isn’t it vital to teach children to resonate

with it? With the rising level of mental health problems one sure way of helping children to recover, rather than giving them drugs, must be showing them how spectacular nature can be. This must be preferable and also so much more beneficial. It stuns me when children come to the garden and they simply are astonished to see cherries on a tree, raspberries and strawberries growing on a bush! They have only ever seen them in punnets at the supermarket. A garden provides a healing aspect for children to experience nature first hand as well as relieving their fear of global catastrophes. Special needs children receive particular healing from a garden but everyone can benefit. Behind the wall lies The Secret Garden ! * Diana Mossop’s beautiful book called Island Flower Essences. The Vibrational Power of Plants, explains in detail about the healing power of the Jersey wild flowers as well as a detailed chapter about making flower essences. Available from Waterstones and Diana’s Website www.phytob.com or telephone 01534 738737.

Jersey’s noted health therapist, Diana Mossop, writes on natural health

M

My garden is a rich tapestry of organic vegetables, exquisite flowering and fruiting trees as well as a myriad of different shrubs and flowers.

To be able to go out into the garden whether it is sunny, shady or raining gives a different perspective to life. Every child should have the experience of planting seeds and watching them grow and being able to harvest fruits from the garden.

I had a plan for my 60th Birthday. I asked my friends to give me fruit trees and so I planted my orchard. Twelve years later these stunning trees offer me a creative spectacle of blossom in the spring and a stunning harvest festival in late summer and autumn.

y garden is a gift from God. No matter how large or small. To watch flowers and plants grow throughout the seasons is one of the most amazing privileges.

How astonishing that a beautiful little white blossom should turn into an apple. How miraculous is that. How wonderful to stretch up and pluck cherries off the branches and pop them into your mouth. How blessed to experience the stunning variety of colours, scents and sounds of bird song and bumble bees! If a small patch of ground is worth its weight in gold then I am a multibilliongardenaire.

30

- AUTUMN 2019

A garden should be shared. What to do with all the surplus produce. Sell it? No - give it! There is an invitation to bring your baskets and harvest your own plums, pears and apples. The branches are so heavy that they are breaking! My garden is so beautiful that I long to share it with everyone. The St John Ambulance children are invited regularly to hold their functions here.

I hold regular workshops to teach children about flowers and how to make ‘Flower Medicine’. They pick their chosen flowers and place them into glasses of blessed water which are then left in the sun to activate. To make a flower essence is so simple but you must follow the rules. One of the most exciting aspects of flower essences is that anyone can make one. A flower, water, sunshine and a glass container are all that is needed to make a powerful and personal flower essence. The intention to create something special is really the most important ingredient. I have always been fascinated that children often make the most magical essences but there are some important rules that need to be followed. The really exciting aspect of making essences is

PHYTOBIOPHYSICS® MENTAL HEALTH The Family Dynamics of the Heart A series of talks Diana Mossop is holding a series of lectures to help and support parents and carers dealing with the complex issues of mental health within their families Venue: Caldwell Hall, St Clements Friday: 6pm-8pm Cost: £15 October 4th Friday - Special Needs October 11th Friday - Autism November 22nd Friday - Teenagers November 29th Friday - Dementia Tel: 01534 738737 to book a place or email info@phytob.com The Institute of Phytobiophysics Le Prevot, La Grande Route De St Clement, Jersey JE2 6QQ

AUTUMN 2019

- 31


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

that it is possible to use any part of a plant. But flowers are so beautiful and hold the key to the support of spiritual and emotional issues, whilst bark, lichen, nuts, fruits and seeds often have more physical benefits.

NATURE HAS ALL THE ANSWERS

The first simple rule is to think about what you require from your flower. How does it make you feel? Do you love the colour, the size, the smell or the texture? Are you drawn to a tiny little wild flower or a massive big colourful garden flower? Are you feeling sad or do you have a more physical condition? Remember that a physical condition is probably the result of an emotional issue which needs to be addressed. Some flowers are so beautiful like roses and brambles, with soft, gentle petals but then have nasty sharp little thorns. Sweet Violets are so small and shy and then vibrant violet. Thistles are strong, structural and prickly. All flowers have different healing powers depending on their size, shape, number of petals and of course their colour! When nature holds so many powers isn’t it vital to teach children to resonate

with it? With the rising level of mental health problems one sure way of helping children to recover, rather than giving them drugs, must be showing them how spectacular nature can be. This must be preferable and also so much more beneficial. It stuns me when children come to the garden and they simply are astonished to see cherries on a tree, raspberries and strawberries growing on a bush! They have only ever seen them in punnets at the supermarket. A garden provides a healing aspect for children to experience nature first hand as well as relieving their fear of global catastrophes. Special needs children receive particular healing from a garden but everyone can benefit. Behind the wall lies The Secret Garden ! * Diana Mossop’s beautiful book called Island Flower Essences. The Vibrational Power of Plants, explains in detail about the healing power of the Jersey wild flowers as well as a detailed chapter about making flower essences. Available from Waterstones and Diana’s Website www.phytob.com or telephone 01534 738737.

Jersey’s noted health therapist, Diana Mossop, writes on natural health

M

My garden is a rich tapestry of organic vegetables, exquisite flowering and fruiting trees as well as a myriad of different shrubs and flowers.

To be able to go out into the garden whether it is sunny, shady or raining gives a different perspective to life. Every child should have the experience of planting seeds and watching them grow and being able to harvest fruits from the garden.

I had a plan for my 60th Birthday. I asked my friends to give me fruit trees and so I planted my orchard. Twelve years later these stunning trees offer me a creative spectacle of blossom in the spring and a stunning harvest festival in late summer and autumn.

y garden is a gift from God. No matter how large or small. To watch flowers and plants grow throughout the seasons is one of the most amazing privileges.

How astonishing that a beautiful little white blossom should turn into an apple. How miraculous is that. How wonderful to stretch up and pluck cherries off the branches and pop them into your mouth. How blessed to experience the stunning variety of colours, scents and sounds of bird song and bumble bees! If a small patch of ground is worth its weight in gold then I am a multibilliongardenaire.

30

- AUTUMN 2019

A garden should be shared. What to do with all the surplus produce. Sell it? No - give it! There is an invitation to bring your baskets and harvest your own plums, pears and apples. The branches are so heavy that they are breaking! My garden is so beautiful that I long to share it with everyone. The St John Ambulance children are invited regularly to hold their functions here.

I hold regular workshops to teach children about flowers and how to make ‘Flower Medicine’. They pick their chosen flowers and place them into glasses of blessed water which are then left in the sun to activate. To make a flower essence is so simple but you must follow the rules. One of the most exciting aspects of flower essences is that anyone can make one. A flower, water, sunshine and a glass container are all that is needed to make a powerful and personal flower essence. The intention to create something special is really the most important ingredient. I have always been fascinated that children often make the most magical essences but there are some important rules that need to be followed. The really exciting aspect of making essences is

PHYTOBIOPHYSICS® MENTAL HEALTH The Family Dynamics of the Heart A series of talks Diana Mossop is holding a series of lectures to help and support parents and carers dealing with the complex issues of mental health within their families Venue: Caldwell Hall, St Clements Friday: 6pm-8pm Cost: £15 October 4th Friday - Special Needs October 11th Friday - Autism November 22nd Friday - Teenagers November 29th Friday - Dementia Tel: 01534 738737 to book a place or email info@phytob.com The Institute of Phytobiophysics Le Prevot, La Grande Route De St Clement, Jersey JE2 6QQ

AUTUMN 2019

- 31


FARM & GARDEN

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Your Garden

VISIONS OF LIVING A new eco-house situated in Saint Brélade Jersey, is the first contribution to the Island architecture of the German house builders, Baufritz.

T

he house consists of an insulated, modular timber framed prefabricated construction, resulting in excellent energy efficiency ratings. Extensive use of triple glazed glass provides outstanding views and an abundance of natural light.

as its main furniture. On a three meter turntable, you may sit on different levels, as in a cinema, either facing into the room or towards the media wall. Thanks to a variable table and various seating options a multitude of arrangements are possible for the family and guests.

The house was modelled on the German Baufritz show house, Haussicht, which was designed by the internationally renowned Swiss architect, Alfredo Haeberli.

Naturally, Haussicht delivers the highest standards in terms of building

Alfredo’s motto is ‘people and residents, at the heart of the design.’ Consequently, he developed the building starting with the core - the inside. In the process the designer put the usual concept of ‘living downstairs, sleeping upstairs’ on its head: in Haussicht the children’s and parents’ bedrooms are on the ground floor, cooking, dining and living happen under the roof. The ‘relaxation zone’ concept for the parents’ bedroom is defined by a double bed, bathtub and open fireplace.

Grandstand views On entering the cooking and dining area you feel halfway outdoors. Just one step puts you on the terrace that surrounds the interior, mimicking a sweeping ship’s bow. The highlight in the living room is a seating island that defines the room

32

- AUTUMN 2019

ecology, healthy living and sustainability. The specialised elements of the house are just what might be expected from a Baufritz construction. The eco-design house showcases novelties such as the steel balustrade for balconies, the continuous perpendicular cladding for facades, the open elevator and the especially efficient heating system. Oliver Rehm, CEO Baufritz UK and Channel Islands said: ‘I hope that our show house “Haussicht” will create astonishment and will have people asking: “Is this a wooden house? Is this an eco-house?” Baufritz are committed to building homes that minimise adverse effects on both the environment and the well-being of those who occupy them. As timber is a renewable resource, it means that by owning a Baufritz house, nature’s cycle is preserved. The company supports national and European re-forestation programmes and ensures that the environment is protected throughout the building process of each house. Baufritz

does not use chemically treated building materials and makes regular tests to ensure they are not present. The construction process is extremely efficient with the initial watertight building being completed in just a few days. The fast design and construction process ensures end-to- end project duration, usually nine to twelve months, although timings will vary according to exact specifications. By comparison, a traditional house takes approximately three times as long to build. Based in Girton near Cambridge, their vision is to build homes that combine an unrivalled level of comfort and luxury with an abundance of natural materials. Every Baufritz home is different, as each one is individually created through collaboration with one of their in-house architects and interior designers. A family run company that has been building beautiful timber framed houses in Germany for more than a century, Baufritz has built a reputation for exceptional quality and reliability and has been building houses in the UK for over a decade. All houses are prefabricated at their state-of-the-art factory in Erkheim, Germany and then assembled on site. See their website: www.baufritz.co.uk Phone contact: 01223 235 632 or e-mail: enquiries@baufritz.co.uk

Keen amateur gardener Gill Maccabe shares her passion for gardening at the start of our new series. She starts by showing how composting can save waste and money and giving a recipe for ‘tulip lasagne’ (no, not what you think)

Y

ou don’t have to have a large garden to make your own compost.

For less than the price of a takeaway pizza, you can buy a compost bin the same size as your regular wheelie bin. Your vegetables will taste better, your flowers will look brighter and you will be richer too - as much of your household waste is being recycled for free. One of my favourite kitchen items is the little red bin marked ‘compost’ next to the kitchen sink. It matches the washing up bowl and together they have helped provide if not tons, then a few hundredweight, of natural

fertiliser and soil enricher for our garden. Being a largely vegetarian and increasingly organic household, we produce a lot of vegetable waste. Our little red bin is emptied at least twice a day and more often when the house is full. If I didn’t have a compost bin I would go demented with not knowing what to do with all the kitchen waste. Take an average weekend with family and friends visiting. A hearty breakfast will produce egg shells and egg cartons, ground coffee from the pot, tea leaves, tomato stalks and avocado skins. Then there may be orange and citrus

skins, which first make good slug traps and can be composted after. Inevitably, there will be a few soiled brown paper bags from the farm shop; stray hairs from the long-haired orange cat; perhaps someone’s nail clippings (slow releases of nitrogen); fluff from the tumble dryer; toilet roll middles; wood ash from the log burner; shredded documents; new cut flower stalks; old dead flower blooms. If the heap needs it, we will add worn out cotton or woollen clothes and human urine - our gardeners never ask to use the loo so guess they are doing their bit. Even the contents of the vacuum cleaner bag which is mostly hair, lint fluff and human skin cells - will compost rapidly.

AUTUMN 2019

- 33


FARM & GARDEN

ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Your Garden

VISIONS OF LIVING A new eco-house situated in Saint Brélade Jersey, is the first contribution to the Island architecture of the German house builders, Baufritz.

T

he house consists of an insulated, modular timber framed prefabricated construction, resulting in excellent energy efficiency ratings. Extensive use of triple glazed glass provides outstanding views and an abundance of natural light.

as its main furniture. On a three meter turntable, you may sit on different levels, as in a cinema, either facing into the room or towards the media wall. Thanks to a variable table and various seating options a multitude of arrangements are possible for the family and guests.

The house was modelled on the German Baufritz show house, Haussicht, which was designed by the internationally renowned Swiss architect, Alfredo Haeberli.

Naturally, Haussicht delivers the highest standards in terms of building

Alfredo’s motto is ‘people and residents, at the heart of the design.’ Consequently, he developed the building starting with the core - the inside. In the process the designer put the usual concept of ‘living downstairs, sleeping upstairs’ on its head: in Haussicht the children’s and parents’ bedrooms are on the ground floor, cooking, dining and living happen under the roof. The ‘relaxation zone’ concept for the parents’ bedroom is defined by a double bed, bathtub and open fireplace.

Grandstand views On entering the cooking and dining area you feel halfway outdoors. Just one step puts you on the terrace that surrounds the interior, mimicking a sweeping ship’s bow. The highlight in the living room is a seating island that defines the room

32

- AUTUMN 2019

ecology, healthy living and sustainability. The specialised elements of the house are just what might be expected from a Baufritz construction. The eco-design house showcases novelties such as the steel balustrade for balconies, the continuous perpendicular cladding for facades, the open elevator and the especially efficient heating system. Oliver Rehm, CEO Baufritz UK and Channel Islands said: ‘I hope that our show house “Haussicht” will create astonishment and will have people asking: “Is this a wooden house? Is this an eco-house?” Baufritz are committed to building homes that minimise adverse effects on both the environment and the well-being of those who occupy them. As timber is a renewable resource, it means that by owning a Baufritz house, nature’s cycle is preserved. The company supports national and European re-forestation programmes and ensures that the environment is protected throughout the building process of each house. Baufritz

does not use chemically treated building materials and makes regular tests to ensure they are not present. The construction process is extremely efficient with the initial watertight building being completed in just a few days. The fast design and construction process ensures end-to- end project duration, usually nine to twelve months, although timings will vary according to exact specifications. By comparison, a traditional house takes approximately three times as long to build. Based in Girton near Cambridge, their vision is to build homes that combine an unrivalled level of comfort and luxury with an abundance of natural materials. Every Baufritz home is different, as each one is individually created through collaboration with one of their in-house architects and interior designers. A family run company that has been building beautiful timber framed houses in Germany for more than a century, Baufritz has built a reputation for exceptional quality and reliability and has been building houses in the UK for over a decade. All houses are prefabricated at their state-of-the-art factory in Erkheim, Germany and then assembled on site. See their website: www.baufritz.co.uk Phone contact: 01223 235 632 or e-mail: enquiries@baufritz.co.uk

Keen amateur gardener Gill Maccabe shares her passion for gardening at the start of our new series. She starts by showing how composting can save waste and money and giving a recipe for ‘tulip lasagne’ (no, not what you think)

Y

ou don’t have to have a large garden to make your own compost.

For less than the price of a takeaway pizza, you can buy a compost bin the same size as your regular wheelie bin. Your vegetables will taste better, your flowers will look brighter and you will be richer too - as much of your household waste is being recycled for free. One of my favourite kitchen items is the little red bin marked ‘compost’ next to the kitchen sink. It matches the washing up bowl and together they have helped provide if not tons, then a few hundredweight, of natural

fertiliser and soil enricher for our garden. Being a largely vegetarian and increasingly organic household, we produce a lot of vegetable waste. Our little red bin is emptied at least twice a day and more often when the house is full. If I didn’t have a compost bin I would go demented with not knowing what to do with all the kitchen waste. Take an average weekend with family and friends visiting. A hearty breakfast will produce egg shells and egg cartons, ground coffee from the pot, tea leaves, tomato stalks and avocado skins. Then there may be orange and citrus

skins, which first make good slug traps and can be composted after. Inevitably, there will be a few soiled brown paper bags from the farm shop; stray hairs from the long-haired orange cat; perhaps someone’s nail clippings (slow releases of nitrogen); fluff from the tumble dryer; toilet roll middles; wood ash from the log burner; shredded documents; new cut flower stalks; old dead flower blooms. If the heap needs it, we will add worn out cotton or woollen clothes and human urine - our gardeners never ask to use the loo so guess they are doing their bit. Even the contents of the vacuum cleaner bag which is mostly hair, lint fluff and human skin cells - will compost rapidly.

AUTUMN 2019

- 33


FARM & GARDEN

As the afternoon wears on, a few banana skins and apple cores will appear, or someone might clear out the vegetable drawer and so a few wilting greens will be thrown in. Another meal will produce masses more vegetable peelings, and as they’re full of micro-organisms, fermenting liquids are especially useful - so the red bin is a natural home for wine and beer dregs, should there be any.

HOW TO MAKE A TULIP LASAGNE If you want your spring bulbs to really stand out next spring you need to start creating what the Dutch producers call a Bulb Lasagne. In essence, it’s a form of layering in one large pot, and is particularly effective with daffodils and tulips, which flower at different times. Get a deep pot - the bigger the better - and put the largest and latest flowering bulbs in the bottom. Gradually fill with compost and layer your bulbs, placing the smallest and earliest flowering bulbs near the top. The latest larger bulbs just seem to push through bending around anything in their way.

Think Rayburn. Think Rubis. Install | Fuel | Maintain

Try a triple lasagne using crocus also. You will be amazed at the result and the display can go on for around a month or more. This year I left the bulbs in the pots once they had died down and simply added another layer of compost and planted some colourful annuals with shallow roots for summer colour. They are still giving value but come October will be in the compost heap and the lasagne, which I prepared earlier, will start cooking again. Basically, anything that has ever lived will compost – and that includes meat bones. They are important as they contain phosphorous, combined with lime, which is valuable for promoting root growth. And all that is just inside the house.

Products are available to purchase from Sarah Raven, at www.sarahraven.com

Out in the garden, the greater the variety of source materials the better. Think of composting as making a fruit salad and chop up all the ingredients to a manageable size.

If you own or are buying a Rayburn for your home, Rubis is the only accredited Rayburn Heat Centre in the Channel Islands.

You want half and half ‘green’ and ‘brown’ material. ‘Green’ includes vegetable trimmings and soft prunings, certain weeds but not bindweed.

Speak to us about installation and maintenance and find out more about our Thermo Premium kerosene to keep your stove in top condition.

‘Brown’ includes paper, leaves, straw and eggshells, for example. If it’s slow to get started, add an activator: farm manure, rabbit droppings, nettles, seaweed and urine are good. The States are trying to encourage Islanders to recycle by offering compost bins for £12, and the price includes the kitchen caddy. Stockists include Le Quesne’s Garden centre, Bonny’s Country Garden and Ransoms Garden Centre.

34

- AUTUMN 2019

01534 709 800 enquiries@rubis-ci.co.uk Photography © Jonathan Buckley

rubis-ci.co.uk


FARM & GARDEN

As the afternoon wears on, a few banana skins and apple cores will appear, or someone might clear out the vegetable drawer and so a few wilting greens will be thrown in. Another meal will produce masses more vegetable peelings, and as they’re full of micro-organisms, fermenting liquids are especially useful - so the red bin is a natural home for wine and beer dregs, should there be any.

HOW TO MAKE A TULIP LASAGNE If you want your spring bulbs to really stand out next spring you need to start creating what the Dutch producers call a Bulb Lasagne. In essence, it’s a form of layering in one large pot, and is particularly effective with daffodils and tulips, which flower at different times. Get a deep pot - the bigger the better - and put the largest and latest flowering bulbs in the bottom. Gradually fill with compost and layer your bulbs, placing the smallest and earliest flowering bulbs near the top. The latest larger bulbs just seem to push through bending around anything in their way.

Think Rayburn. Think Rubis. Install | Fuel | Maintain

Try a triple lasagne using crocus also. You will be amazed at the result and the display can go on for around a month or more. This year I left the bulbs in the pots once they had died down and simply added another layer of compost and planted some colourful annuals with shallow roots for summer colour. They are still giving value but come October will be in the compost heap and the lasagne, which I prepared earlier, will start cooking again. Basically, anything that has ever lived will compost – and that includes meat bones. They are important as they contain phosphorous, combined with lime, which is valuable for promoting root growth. And all that is just inside the house.

Products are available to purchase from Sarah Raven, at www.sarahraven.com

Out in the garden, the greater the variety of source materials the better. Think of composting as making a fruit salad and chop up all the ingredients to a manageable size.

If you own or are buying a Rayburn for your home, Rubis is the only accredited Rayburn Heat Centre in the Channel Islands.

You want half and half ‘green’ and ‘brown’ material. ‘Green’ includes vegetable trimmings and soft prunings, certain weeds but not bindweed.

Speak to us about installation and maintenance and find out more about our Thermo Premium kerosene to keep your stove in top condition.

‘Brown’ includes paper, leaves, straw and eggshells, for example. If it’s slow to get started, add an activator: farm manure, rabbit droppings, nettles, seaweed and urine are good. The States are trying to encourage Islanders to recycle by offering compost bins for £12, and the price includes the kitchen caddy. Stockists include Le Quesne’s Garden centre, Bonny’s Country Garden and Ransoms Garden Centre.

34

- AUTUMN 2019

01534 709 800 enquiries@rubis-ci.co.uk Photography © Jonathan Buckley

rubis-ci.co.uk


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

The Story of ‘The Ship’s Cow’ How did the diaspora of the Jersey cow extend over the world? The answer is a story of pioneering Jersey traders, the Jersey cow and ships. Ambassador for the charity ’Send a Cow’, Philippa Evans Bevan, recounts both a dairy tale and a true-life fairy ‘tail’ attached to the Island’s very own cattle breed

the Mediterranean ports. Without modern refrigeration the best way to preserve the fresh fish for such an ambitious transportation to hotter climes was to dry and salt the fish with their stocks of salt on board from France, so it would last for weeks and even months. The salted fish was in great demand in the Roman Catholic countries of the Mediterranean. Not missing an opportunity, cargoes of wine, brandy, dried fruit, citrus fruit, olive oil, pottery, linen and also (a great sign of prosperity) quantities of young fruit trees such as peach, and nectarine plus more salt would be brought back and often traded and sold straight into English or northern European ports. After their epic round trip they would return home to Jersey with a final cargo such as flour and coal from England. Some Jersey ships sailed right down to Brazil to sell the salted fish and returned with mahogany, coffee, rum and sugar that, remarkably, they then took to Scandinavia and traded for masts and spars (a pole of wood used in the rigging of sails). With all the successful and entrepreneurial trading, the market for shipbuilding in Jersey by now was booming. So too was the building of fine houses for wealthy merchants in Jersey

and these were known as Cod Houses. Jersey shipwrights like the Allix family built shipyards and ships with oak timber from St Peter’s Valley and St Lawrence. They were mighty crafts too; such as the 280-ton ship built at Bel Royal in 1789 called ‘Elisha Tupper’. By the 1860s there were 18 shipyards operating along the shores of Jersey. The biggest boats were built at Havre de Pas and St Aubin, such as the 1,000 ton vessel, the ‘Evening Star’. As time rolled on, some Jersey folk settled in the destination countries, many of them in the Americas. In 1657 George Poingdestre, his wife Susanna and their children moved from Swan Farm in St Saviour and settled in Williamsburg Virginia, taking with them several Jersey cows. Many sea captains would occasionally ask their wives and children to accompany them on long voyages, establishing a floating home and it was said that where there is a home there must be a cow. On arriving on foreign shores, some of these cows would be sold or given away. By now, the Jersey Cow was in demand. Besides her lovely appearance and

docile temperament, the ship’s cow had proved that she could adapt to different temperatures and climates and still produce high quality milk. Over time the Jersey breed itself became a valuable export as a prized dairy cow to build herds all over the world. It was perhaps unplanned, but Jersey traders voyaging across the seas with their Ship’s Cow effectively built a brand dream, a bit like leaving a 4-legged calling card all over the world from a small, unknown island. She has been a trump card for Jersey and makes a great impression. The Jersey Cow is a quality, performance ambassador for Jersey of pure goodness. She continues to adapt and endure; her supreme genetics and milk quality have a unique place in today’s world where she combines nutrition, health and resource for rural economies with a low carbon footprint. The famous children’s fairy tale of the Goose that laid the Golden Egg comes to mind, and a bovine version: ‘The Jersey Cow that gave the golden milk.’ Except - this is a true story not a fairytale. The remarkable travels of the Jersey cow during past centuries, her legacy, her migration and recognition across the world is phenomenal.

NEPTUNE

T

oday the Jersey Cow is a golden ambassador of goodness providing nutrition, health and improving the livelihoods of thousands of poor and hungry children and their families who live in remote parts of rural Rwanda in Africa and elsewhere.

Jersey was 22,000 people. So, if you are a small island with a small home market, but have productive rich soils and fishing, sailing, boat building and agricultural skills there is both the strong need and the ability to travel further afield to sell your products, to build trade and to maximize your assets.

How does the Jersey Cow cope with the intense heat and a terrain so different from her Island home? The answer is remarkably well. Africa’s heat and terrain are very different from Jersey’s, yet the Jersey cow has a unique ability to perform well in extreme temperatures both hot and cold and she is flourishing from Canada to Costa Rica. How did this diaspora come about? Perhaps surprisingly, it all started with sheep, rather than cows.

Jersey people of the time were amazing in the way they did this: super- determined, brave and resourceful. They built ships, set sail – and to provide creamy nourishment on their trade voyages, they would take with them on board their ships, a Jersey cow – ‘the ship’s cow’.

To set the scene, remember that Jersey is a small island with an area of just 46 square miles (compared to London’s 607 square miles). In the year 1800 the population of

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- AUTUMN 2019

She would also have been a heartwarming emblem of home. Her sensible temperament and neat size was practical on board and her food conversion efficient. From the mid 1500s Jersey men became sea-roving traders, and so began some of the earliest migrating records of the famous Jersey Cow.

ESTABLISHED 1909

So what did they export? In the late 1500s Jersey was home to many sheep flocks and prolific wool production and knitting was in full swing. Socks, stockings and of course the legendary Jersey jumper. Jersey woollen cargoes set sail down to French fishing ports. Sometimes the transaction was in exchange for sea salt from the coastal salt mines around La Rochelle. Salt was a very valuable commodity to Jersey traders. The reason it was so important was because they were off next on a major fishing expedition. Merchants like Charles and Philip Robin from St Aubin sailed across the Atlantic to Newfoundland to the Gaspé Peninsula where there were rich cod fishing grounds. There they would fish cod from June to October. The Jersey cow would have grazed the summer pastures of Nova Scotia while the fishermen hauled their catches. Then it was time to load the cow again and set off on the high seas. Destination:

RETIREMENT SALE NOW ON

CLOSING END 2019

New Autumn Collections Ladies fashions, accessories and men’s casual wear Open 7 days a week

Traditional services still available Repairs - Engraving - Restringing - Valuations Gorey Pier, Jersey - T: 01534 851243 - www.neptunejersey.je

3 King Street, St Helier, Jersey. JE2 4WF Tel: 01534 722536 www.pearcejewellers.co.uk

AUTUMN 2019

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FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

The Story of ‘The Ship’s Cow’ How did the diaspora of the Jersey cow extend over the world? The answer is a story of pioneering Jersey traders, the Jersey cow and ships. Ambassador for the charity ’Send a Cow’, Philippa Evans Bevan, recounts both a dairy tale and a true-life fairy ‘tail’ attached to the Island’s very own cattle breed

the Mediterranean ports. Without modern refrigeration the best way to preserve the fresh fish for such an ambitious transportation to hotter climes was to dry and salt the fish with their stocks of salt on board from France, so it would last for weeks and even months. The salted fish was in great demand in the Roman Catholic countries of the Mediterranean. Not missing an opportunity, cargoes of wine, brandy, dried fruit, citrus fruit, olive oil, pottery, linen and also (a great sign of prosperity) quantities of young fruit trees such as peach, and nectarine plus more salt would be brought back and often traded and sold straight into English or northern European ports. After their epic round trip they would return home to Jersey with a final cargo such as flour and coal from England. Some Jersey ships sailed right down to Brazil to sell the salted fish and returned with mahogany, coffee, rum and sugar that, remarkably, they then took to Scandinavia and traded for masts and spars (a pole of wood used in the rigging of sails). With all the successful and entrepreneurial trading, the market for shipbuilding in Jersey by now was booming. So too was the building of fine houses for wealthy merchants in Jersey

and these were known as Cod Houses. Jersey shipwrights like the Allix family built shipyards and ships with oak timber from St Peter’s Valley and St Lawrence. They were mighty crafts too; such as the 280-ton ship built at Bel Royal in 1789 called ‘Elisha Tupper’. By the 1860s there were 18 shipyards operating along the shores of Jersey. The biggest boats were built at Havre de Pas and St Aubin, such as the 1,000 ton vessel, the ‘Evening Star’. As time rolled on, some Jersey folk settled in the destination countries, many of them in the Americas. In 1657 George Poingdestre, his wife Susanna and their children moved from Swan Farm in St Saviour and settled in Williamsburg Virginia, taking with them several Jersey cows. Many sea captains would occasionally ask their wives and children to accompany them on long voyages, establishing a floating home and it was said that where there is a home there must be a cow. On arriving on foreign shores, some of these cows would be sold or given away. By now, the Jersey Cow was in demand. Besides her lovely appearance and

docile temperament, the ship’s cow had proved that she could adapt to different temperatures and climates and still produce high quality milk. Over time the Jersey breed itself became a valuable export as a prized dairy cow to build herds all over the world. It was perhaps unplanned, but Jersey traders voyaging across the seas with their Ship’s Cow effectively built a brand dream, a bit like leaving a 4-legged calling card all over the world from a small, unknown island. She has been a trump card for Jersey and makes a great impression. The Jersey Cow is a quality, performance ambassador for Jersey of pure goodness. She continues to adapt and endure; her supreme genetics and milk quality have a unique place in today’s world where she combines nutrition, health and resource for rural economies with a low carbon footprint. The famous children’s fairy tale of the Goose that laid the Golden Egg comes to mind, and a bovine version: ‘The Jersey Cow that gave the golden milk.’ Except - this is a true story not a fairytale. The remarkable travels of the Jersey cow during past centuries, her legacy, her migration and recognition across the world is phenomenal.

NEPTUNE

T

oday the Jersey Cow is a golden ambassador of goodness providing nutrition, health and improving the livelihoods of thousands of poor and hungry children and their families who live in remote parts of rural Rwanda in Africa and elsewhere.

Jersey was 22,000 people. So, if you are a small island with a small home market, but have productive rich soils and fishing, sailing, boat building and agricultural skills there is both the strong need and the ability to travel further afield to sell your products, to build trade and to maximize your assets.

How does the Jersey Cow cope with the intense heat and a terrain so different from her Island home? The answer is remarkably well. Africa’s heat and terrain are very different from Jersey’s, yet the Jersey cow has a unique ability to perform well in extreme temperatures both hot and cold and she is flourishing from Canada to Costa Rica. How did this diaspora come about? Perhaps surprisingly, it all started with sheep, rather than cows.

Jersey people of the time were amazing in the way they did this: super- determined, brave and resourceful. They built ships, set sail – and to provide creamy nourishment on their trade voyages, they would take with them on board their ships, a Jersey cow – ‘the ship’s cow’.

To set the scene, remember that Jersey is a small island with an area of just 46 square miles (compared to London’s 607 square miles). In the year 1800 the population of

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She would also have been a heartwarming emblem of home. Her sensible temperament and neat size was practical on board and her food conversion efficient. From the mid 1500s Jersey men became sea-roving traders, and so began some of the earliest migrating records of the famous Jersey Cow.

ESTABLISHED 1909

So what did they export? In the late 1500s Jersey was home to many sheep flocks and prolific wool production and knitting was in full swing. Socks, stockings and of course the legendary Jersey jumper. Jersey woollen cargoes set sail down to French fishing ports. Sometimes the transaction was in exchange for sea salt from the coastal salt mines around La Rochelle. Salt was a very valuable commodity to Jersey traders. The reason it was so important was because they were off next on a major fishing expedition. Merchants like Charles and Philip Robin from St Aubin sailed across the Atlantic to Newfoundland to the Gaspé Peninsula where there were rich cod fishing grounds. There they would fish cod from June to October. The Jersey cow would have grazed the summer pastures of Nova Scotia while the fishermen hauled their catches. Then it was time to load the cow again and set off on the high seas. Destination:

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AUTUMN 2019

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The focus of this work was the main venue hall, once the centre of the winemaking facility. In short, a space, one that had been turned into a venue but which perhaps lacked a personality in keeping with the wider beauty of the Estate. The question, then that faced the team at La Mare was how to turn a sympathetically converted shed into a state of the art, rural venue. Although many wedding parties will testify to the transformations that have been achieved over the years with careful dressing, the room still felt like a converted space.

La Mare Wine Estate, re-imagined venue hall

CREATING A RURAL GEM

La Mare Wine Estate, venue hall before

When you think of wedding and corporate event venues it is difficult to imagine past the conventional option of a hotel, purpose built and largely in or around town. You might stretch to consider the more quirky options that Jersey has to offer but then these were built for another reason so the options can be rather restrictive. If you want something different, then the potential to excite and delight guests might seem limited. That is until the emergence of a re-imagined La Mare Wine Estate.

lcvinteriors.com

The Estate and staff are no strangers to hosting events with sprawling grounds of vines, orchards and the magnificent farmhouse at its centre. Already known for the uniquely rural setting, the peace and tranquillity has long been a selling point. Despite these qualities there was perhaps something missing, something that could combine the countryside context with the technical and visual ambitions of customers wanting an outstanding experience.

Enter LCV Interiors, one of Jersey’s leading fit-out contractors, working closely with Axis Mason and a UK interior designer, specialising in hotel and venue creation. ‘We knew our ambition was to offer our clients something exceptional but ultimately we are wine and cider making experts, chocolatiers and distillers of subtle spirits. Designers we are not said Tim Crowley, Managing Director of La Mare Wine Estate. ‘There was a clear vision but we needed that external expertise to deliver on the project, to create a true rural gem.’

never going to be about metal and harsh lines. It was all wood and light. We understood the ambition to take the venue offering from four to five stars and that meant meeting the client’s ambitions with bespoke solutions. The beginning for us was to integrate the space with the estate outside. We were not designing a room within the Estate, rather we were going to be seamlessly marrying the space with the rural environment that makes the Estate so special.’ The result? Huge windows that dominate the side looking out into the grounds, pouring light into the room, and metal girders encased in a rustic oak finish, all made locally in the LCV workshops to bespoke specifications. ‘The technical elements might have been where this integration fell down. However, working closely with POS Interiors Guernsey we installed new acoustic ceiling panelling. All the mechanical and electrical services were then cleverly incorporated into the ceiling without compromising the oak infused look. The result is truly unique to Jersey,’ said Phil.

Phil McLaughlin of LCV Interiors understood that vision from the first meeting; ‘this project was

Before

After

To discuss any project with LCV Interiors call Phil on 07797 755373 or Lee on 07797 711174

There was a clear vision but we needed that external expertise to deliver on the project, to create a true rural gem.

Tim Crowley, Managing Director of La Mare Wine Estate Working in concert, all those involved have not only delivered on La Mare’s vision they have also brought two specific benefits to the venue offering: ‘For the first time we can bring the various elemental room costs under one sum, critical for many of our clients. In addition, and supporting Visit Jersey’s work to develop a year round destination, we have been able to extend our season to run from March to Christmas week,’ said Tim. And it is something to behold. At a time when Brexit appears to be stalling investment, even in Jersey, La Mare is bucking the trend, creating a hidden gem in the heart of St Mary.


The focus of this work was the main venue hall, once the centre of the winemaking facility. In short, a space, one that had been turned into a venue but which perhaps lacked a personality in keeping with the wider beauty of the Estate. The question, then that faced the team at La Mare was how to turn a sympathetically converted shed into a state of the art, rural venue. Although many wedding parties will testify to the transformations that have been achieved over the years with careful dressing, the room still felt like a converted space.

La Mare Wine Estate, re-imagined venue hall

CREATING A RURAL GEM

La Mare Wine Estate, venue hall before

When you think of wedding and corporate event venues it is difficult to imagine past the conventional option of a hotel, purpose built and largely in or around town. You might stretch to consider the more quirky options that Jersey has to offer but then these were built for another reason so the options can be rather restrictive. If you want something different, then the potential to excite and delight guests might seem limited. That is until the emergence of a re-imagined La Mare Wine Estate.

lcvinteriors.com

The Estate and staff are no strangers to hosting events with sprawling grounds of vines, orchards and the magnificent farmhouse at its centre. Already known for the uniquely rural setting, the peace and tranquillity has long been a selling point. Despite these qualities there was perhaps something missing, something that could combine the countryside context with the technical and visual ambitions of customers wanting an outstanding experience.

Enter LCV Interiors, one of Jersey’s leading fit-out contractors, working closely with Axis Mason and a UK interior designer, specialising in hotel and venue creation. ‘We knew our ambition was to offer our clients something exceptional but ultimately we are wine and cider making experts, chocolatiers and distillers of subtle spirits. Designers we are not said Tim Crowley, Managing Director of La Mare Wine Estate. ‘There was a clear vision but we needed that external expertise to deliver on the project, to create a true rural gem.’

never going to be about metal and harsh lines. It was all wood and light. We understood the ambition to take the venue offering from four to five stars and that meant meeting the client’s ambitions with bespoke solutions. The beginning for us was to integrate the space with the estate outside. We were not designing a room within the Estate, rather we were going to be seamlessly marrying the space with the rural environment that makes the Estate so special.’ The result? Huge windows that dominate the side looking out into the grounds, pouring light into the room, and metal girders encased in a rustic oak finish, all made locally in the LCV workshops to bespoke specifications. ‘The technical elements might have been where this integration fell down. However, working closely with POS Interiors Guernsey we installed new acoustic ceiling panelling. All the mechanical and electrical services were then cleverly incorporated into the ceiling without compromising the oak infused look. The result is truly unique to Jersey,’ said Phil.

Phil McLaughlin of LCV Interiors understood that vision from the first meeting; ‘this project was

Before

After

To discuss any project with LCV Interiors call Phil on 07797 755373 or Lee on 07797 711174

There was a clear vision but we needed that external expertise to deliver on the project, to create a true rural gem.

Tim Crowley, Managing Director of La Mare Wine Estate Working in concert, all those involved have not only delivered on La Mare’s vision they have also brought two specific benefits to the venue offering: ‘For the first time we can bring the various elemental room costs under one sum, critical for many of our clients. In addition, and supporting Visit Jersey’s work to develop a year round destination, we have been able to extend our season to run from March to Christmas week,’ said Tim. And it is something to behold. At a time when Brexit appears to be stalling investment, even in Jersey, La Mare is bucking the trend, creating a hidden gem in the heart of St Mary.


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

HELP - FOR THE SAKE OF SICK ANIMALS Elisabeth ‘Bunny’ Roberts has been co-ordinating the activities of the Animal Health Trust in Jersey for over twenty years. Chloё Bowler spoke to her about the Trust and her part in its work

improve diagnosis, prevention and cure of disease and injury among animals. In fact, every penny of profit made from the veterinary and diagnostic services at the AHT is re-invested back into research to help improve the health and wellbeing of animals. As well as treating individual cases, the AHT helps breeds of dogs and cats through genetic testing, and industries as a whole. 2019 is an important year for the Animal Health Trust, as it marks ten years of partnership with the Kennel Club to improve the health of dogs. Over this time, 20 DNA tests have been developed for over 50 breeds of dogs, which has helped nearly 200,000 hereditarily clear puppies being born free from debilitating or blinding inherited conditions. The Jersey Race Club and horses in general have also benefitted from the AHT’s work. The outbreak of the equine

influenza virus at the beginning of this year saw the Animal Health Trust being called upon to provide expert advice and testing thousands of samples in just one week in order to help save British Racing. This meant that horses could travel to and from Jersey, aiding Jersey Racing and the equine industry to continue to function as normal. From the Animal Health Trust have regularly visited Jersey to help perform operations on animals at Durrell, and have worked closely with local vets such as New Era to diagnose and treat pets in need. As Bunny explains, the AHT work closely with the network of vets on the island, ‘We are so lucky in Jersey to have amazing vets here, and the equipment we have here is constantly improving. By working with specialist vets and being able to utilise the state of the art equipment the AHT have, we can all work together to help more animals’. For this reason,

Bunny felt that it was even more important to fundraise locally, and give something back to the charity. For the past twenty years, Bunny Roberts has organised and hosted a Charity Golf Day in aid of the Animal Health Trust at the Royal Jersey Golf Club. Held in September, this has proved to be a hugely popular event, and well supported by the local community. Last year it raised over £30,000 and Bunny is hoping that this year will be an even greater success. Bunny is thrilled to have His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor of Jersey as Patron of the Animal Health Trust in Jersey, and he heads up the Animal Health Trust team at this year’s event on Friday 20th September. For sponsorship opportunities or to learn more about the Animal Health Trust visit aht.org. uk or contact Bunny directly on bunnyjersey@gmail.com

www.maillards.je T: 01534 713600

I

f you have a dog, cat, horse or even a more exotic pet, the chances are you will have benefitted from the wonderful work the Animal Health Trust does. The Animal Health Trust (AHT) is a UK-based Charity, which helps animals across the World by fighting disease and injury, and it needs the support of Islanders to continue its great work. Bunny Roberts, a well-known Island face in the world of Horse Racing and Golf, and life-long horse and dog owner, well understands the great work this charity does, and has been looking after its efforts in the Channel Islands for over twenty years. Bunny has helped fly dogs from Jersey to the AHT in Newmarket for treatment; no mean feat with the costs

40

- AUTUMN 2019

involved. As Bunny explains, ‘The AHT receives no Government funding, so relies on fundraising and generous donors. To this extent, Bunny makes sure the AHT has a presence in the Island, including at the Racecourse, and spreading the word within the local community through vets and pet owners. Bunny is incredibly modest about her voluntary work, but it has reaped benefits for the AHT. In the last twenty years of her involvement, Bunny has raised over £2 million for the Charity.

events in London for the charity. As Bunny says, she understood the impact the great work the charity does in Jersey as well as throughout the world, and wanted to spread the word locally. As Bunny says, ‘I have seen first-hand how the AHT can improve the lives of animals, saving sight, helping animals to walk again, and performing life-saving operations using ground-breaking techniques. I wanted to make sure this Charity stays on the map, and in the Channel Islands, as we are an island of animal lovers’.

Bunny and her family are all animal lovers, and have been involved in the Animal Health Trust, with her son Nicholas acting as a trustee, and his partner Chloë organising fundraising

As well as being a World-class Veterinary Referral Centre, the vets at the Animal Health Trust look after Olympic equestrians and Crufts Dogs, there is a huge emphasis on research to help

Country House Sales

Farmsteads

Land Sales

Valuations

Maillard’s Estates are pleased to continue serving the rural community through Tommy A’Court, our agricultural land specialist and the team. Ring us today to discuss your property requirements in confidence. Serving the Island of Jersey since the 1920s.

AUTUMN 2019

- 41


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

HELP - FOR THE SAKE OF SICK ANIMALS Elisabeth ‘Bunny’ Roberts has been co-ordinating the activities of the Animal Health Trust in Jersey for over twenty years. Chloё Bowler spoke to her about the Trust and her part in its work

improve diagnosis, prevention and cure of disease and injury among animals. In fact, every penny of profit made from the veterinary and diagnostic services at the AHT is re-invested back into research to help improve the health and wellbeing of animals. As well as treating individual cases, the AHT helps breeds of dogs and cats through genetic testing, and industries as a whole. 2019 is an important year for the Animal Health Trust, as it marks ten years of partnership with the Kennel Club to improve the health of dogs. Over this time, 20 DNA tests have been developed for over 50 breeds of dogs, which has helped nearly 200,000 hereditarily clear puppies being born free from debilitating or blinding inherited conditions. The Jersey Race Club and horses in general have also benefitted from the AHT’s work. The outbreak of the equine

influenza virus at the beginning of this year saw the Animal Health Trust being called upon to provide expert advice and testing thousands of samples in just one week in order to help save British Racing. This meant that horses could travel to and from Jersey, aiding Jersey Racing and the equine industry to continue to function as normal. From the Animal Health Trust have regularly visited Jersey to help perform operations on animals at Durrell, and have worked closely with local vets such as New Era to diagnose and treat pets in need. As Bunny explains, the AHT work closely with the network of vets on the island, ‘We are so lucky in Jersey to have amazing vets here, and the equipment we have here is constantly improving. By working with specialist vets and being able to utilise the state of the art equipment the AHT have, we can all work together to help more animals’. For this reason,

Bunny felt that it was even more important to fundraise locally, and give something back to the charity. For the past twenty years, Bunny Roberts has organised and hosted a Charity Golf Day in aid of the Animal Health Trust at the Royal Jersey Golf Club. Held in September, this has proved to be a hugely popular event, and well supported by the local community. Last year it raised over £30,000 and Bunny is hoping that this year will be an even greater success. Bunny is thrilled to have His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor of Jersey as Patron of the Animal Health Trust in Jersey, and he heads up the Animal Health Trust team at this year’s event on Friday 20th September. For sponsorship opportunities or to learn more about the Animal Health Trust visit aht.org. uk or contact Bunny directly on bunnyjersey@gmail.com

www.maillards.je T: 01534 713600

I

f you have a dog, cat, horse or even a more exotic pet, the chances are you will have benefitted from the wonderful work the Animal Health Trust does. The Animal Health Trust (AHT) is a UK-based Charity, which helps animals across the World by fighting disease and injury, and it needs the support of Islanders to continue its great work. Bunny Roberts, a well-known Island face in the world of Horse Racing and Golf, and life-long horse and dog owner, well understands the great work this charity does, and has been looking after its efforts in the Channel Islands for over twenty years. Bunny has helped fly dogs from Jersey to the AHT in Newmarket for treatment; no mean feat with the costs

40

- AUTUMN 2019

involved. As Bunny explains, ‘The AHT receives no Government funding, so relies on fundraising and generous donors. To this extent, Bunny makes sure the AHT has a presence in the Island, including at the Racecourse, and spreading the word within the local community through vets and pet owners. Bunny is incredibly modest about her voluntary work, but it has reaped benefits for the AHT. In the last twenty years of her involvement, Bunny has raised over £2 million for the Charity.

events in London for the charity. As Bunny says, she understood the impact the great work the charity does in Jersey as well as throughout the world, and wanted to spread the word locally. As Bunny says, ‘I have seen first-hand how the AHT can improve the lives of animals, saving sight, helping animals to walk again, and performing life-saving operations using ground-breaking techniques. I wanted to make sure this Charity stays on the map, and in the Channel Islands, as we are an island of animal lovers’.

Bunny and her family are all animal lovers, and have been involved in the Animal Health Trust, with her son Nicholas acting as a trustee, and his partner Chloë organising fundraising

As well as being a World-class Veterinary Referral Centre, the vets at the Animal Health Trust look after Olympic equestrians and Crufts Dogs, there is a huge emphasis on research to help

Country House Sales

Farmsteads

Land Sales

Valuations

Maillard’s Estates are pleased to continue serving the rural community through Tommy A’Court, our agricultural land specialist and the team. Ring us today to discuss your property requirements in confidence. Serving the Island of Jersey since the 1920s.

AUTUMN 2019

- 41


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

‘We recommend taking dogs, especially rescues, to dog training classes as it is good for socialisation and also a great opportunity for owners to meet other doggy people.’

HOW TO MAKE A DOG WAG IT'S TAIL

Babs explained the check-back process once a dog is re-homed: ‘We used to do a check after two weeks, but the staff are so closely bonded with the dogs, I know the kennel staff have given owners their mobile numbers for the last few dogs who’ve been re-homed – and have made friends with both dog and owner!’ Social media also enables kennel staff to receive photos and updates from the new owners, she said.

How is an animal re-homed from the Animal Shelter? Kieranne Grimshaw went to the JSPCA and spoke with their Babs Keywood

‘M

oney,’ it has been said, ‘can buy a fine dog, but only love can make him wag his tail.’ How often have you seen a picture of an abandoned dog, or other animal, for re-homing and felt great empathy and compassion? Jersey is fortunate to have its own Animal Shelter, but finding the right home for an animal is complex. Babs Keywood of the JSPCA explained the steps required to re-home an animal: ‘Firstly, the owners bring the animal to reception. Often people may have a change in circumstances, such as moving house, having a baby or simply can’t afford medical care. ‘We have to ask a lot of important questions, it’s the same for cats and dogs – is the animal used to being with children? How does it cope in different situations? etc. Every dog is assessed and the more we know, the best home we can find for it.’

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- AUTUMN 2019

There are a variety of animals to rehome, from terrapins to snakes and the more conventional cats, rabbits and guinea pigs. Pets are handed back for many reasons.

She continued ‘If it’s registered with a vet, we would contact them for details of its medical history, vaccinations and if it’s microchipped – we need as much information as possible to continue the treatment with our on-site vet.’ For a healthy dog, the process is quick: ‘We recently had one, which was already neutered and up to date with its vaccinations, so we gave him a quick health check, flea’d and wormed him, and were able to find a home within a couple of weeks – we’ve just had some photos sent in from the new home, which was nice.’ If somebody wants a dog from the Shelter, there’s a certain process. ‘People can complete an application form for any animal, but the demand is highest for dogs. We ask if there is an outside area - is it secure? What hours do people work? and other relevant information.’

There’s currently a waiting list of more than 150 people, although Babs would like anyone who has bought or re-homed a dog in the meantime to let them know. When a dog comes in and a suitable person from the list is found, reception and kennel staff will contact them to come in to see it. ’They must return three times and bring any family members with them,’ said Babs. ‘If we’re satisfied, then I’ll receive the paperwork and arrange a home visit, normally within a few days. I check the garden is enclosed, if applicable, offer advice and generally get a feel for where the dog will live and have access.’ Babs stressed the importance of ensuring a dog will fit in with your lifestyle and that you will have enough time to spend with it. Researching for a suitable breed and considering all the extra costs of vet’s bills, food, grooming and kennels are all vital for a successful re-homing.

Scratch a dog and you find a permanent job’

” ‘Keeka is one of our most recent success stories,’ explained Babs ‘She was classed as abandoned and arrived in a horrible state at the beginning of April. She was very matted and we appealed for information. Fortunately, she soon became a staff favourite and you could see her change from a scared little dog to bonding with the staff over the following weeks.’ In short, the JSPCA staff gave her lots of TLC.

Babs continued: ‘Keeka was in our care for just over two months and was recently re-homed to a lady, Sue, who had re-homed two dogs from us about four to five years ago. She has also been renamed Flossy and loves it!’ Sue admitted that Flossy seemed to choose her the moment she went up to the Shelter: ‘she jumped straight on the sofa and buried herself in my coat – I was smitten. You can’t get a dog for your benefit, I believe, but it may work out that way in the end – they are just amazing and always making me laugh – all three of them, Bella, Darcey and Flossy.’ Matching dogs and owners is key. Babs explained ‘We do have occasions where there’s a child in a family who’s scared and unsure about dogs. We may then have to have a discussion to see if it’s the right time for them. We also ask if any neighbouring properties have animals, as a reactive dog would be better in a quieter neighbourhood.’ She continued: ‘Some dogs are not ready for re-homing for a few months as we’re carrying out training. We write a plan for them to establish what sort of home would be suitable. When an owner is found, they have the training plan with various scenarios of different situations and how the dog should behave.

With the smaller animals, it could just be the different seasons, when people don’t feel like going out into the cold to clean a hutch, for example. The Shelter currently only has one or two dogs and two or three cats but it’s perhaps hard to believe it has nine terrapins and three musk turtles – ‘we really struggle to re-home them’ said Babs. ‘After the film Teenage Ninja Turtles people bought them from pet shops. Fortunately they’ve now stopped selling them. It’s quite a big responsibility as they live around 40 years in captivity.’ The Shelter is constantly evolving. ‘We started the Dog Guardian Scheme in 2017,’ Babs said, ‘it’s like a foster family, where they have a dog temporarily in their home and it comes back for regular training or any appointments until a permanent home is found.’ You can also now register online to adopt an animal or join the Scheme. Pets are very rewarding and loyal companions but it’s vital to choose the right one for you. The Animal Shelter will provide any advice and support you need, but be warned – ‘Scratch a dog and you find a permanent job’ (American journalist Franklin P. Jones) Website www.jspca.org.je Tel: 724331

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THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

‘We recommend taking dogs, especially rescues, to dog training classes as it is good for socialisation and also a great opportunity for owners to meet other doggy people.’

HOW TO MAKE A DOG WAG IT'S TAIL

Babs explained the check-back process once a dog is re-homed: ‘We used to do a check after two weeks, but the staff are so closely bonded with the dogs, I know the kennel staff have given owners their mobile numbers for the last few dogs who’ve been re-homed – and have made friends with both dog and owner!’ Social media also enables kennel staff to receive photos and updates from the new owners, she said.

How is an animal re-homed from the Animal Shelter? Kieranne Grimshaw went to the JSPCA and spoke with their Babs Keywood

‘M

oney,’ it has been said, ‘can buy a fine dog, but only love can make him wag his tail.’ How often have you seen a picture of an abandoned dog, or other animal, for re-homing and felt great empathy and compassion? Jersey is fortunate to have its own Animal Shelter, but finding the right home for an animal is complex. Babs Keywood of the JSPCA explained the steps required to re-home an animal: ‘Firstly, the owners bring the animal to reception. Often people may have a change in circumstances, such as moving house, having a baby or simply can’t afford medical care. ‘We have to ask a lot of important questions, it’s the same for cats and dogs – is the animal used to being with children? How does it cope in different situations? etc. Every dog is assessed and the more we know, the best home we can find for it.’

42

- AUTUMN 2019

There are a variety of animals to rehome, from terrapins to snakes and the more conventional cats, rabbits and guinea pigs. Pets are handed back for many reasons.

She continued ‘If it’s registered with a vet, we would contact them for details of its medical history, vaccinations and if it’s microchipped – we need as much information as possible to continue the treatment with our on-site vet.’ For a healthy dog, the process is quick: ‘We recently had one, which was already neutered and up to date with its vaccinations, so we gave him a quick health check, flea’d and wormed him, and were able to find a home within a couple of weeks – we’ve just had some photos sent in from the new home, which was nice.’ If somebody wants a dog from the Shelter, there’s a certain process. ‘People can complete an application form for any animal, but the demand is highest for dogs. We ask if there is an outside area - is it secure? What hours do people work? and other relevant information.’

There’s currently a waiting list of more than 150 people, although Babs would like anyone who has bought or re-homed a dog in the meantime to let them know. When a dog comes in and a suitable person from the list is found, reception and kennel staff will contact them to come in to see it. ’They must return three times and bring any family members with them,’ said Babs. ‘If we’re satisfied, then I’ll receive the paperwork and arrange a home visit, normally within a few days. I check the garden is enclosed, if applicable, offer advice and generally get a feel for where the dog will live and have access.’ Babs stressed the importance of ensuring a dog will fit in with your lifestyle and that you will have enough time to spend with it. Researching for a suitable breed and considering all the extra costs of vet’s bills, food, grooming and kennels are all vital for a successful re-homing.

Scratch a dog and you find a permanent job’

” ‘Keeka is one of our most recent success stories,’ explained Babs ‘She was classed as abandoned and arrived in a horrible state at the beginning of April. She was very matted and we appealed for information. Fortunately, she soon became a staff favourite and you could see her change from a scared little dog to bonding with the staff over the following weeks.’ In short, the JSPCA staff gave her lots of TLC.

Babs continued: ‘Keeka was in our care for just over two months and was recently re-homed to a lady, Sue, who had re-homed two dogs from us about four to five years ago. She has also been renamed Flossy and loves it!’ Sue admitted that Flossy seemed to choose her the moment she went up to the Shelter: ‘she jumped straight on the sofa and buried herself in my coat – I was smitten. You can’t get a dog for your benefit, I believe, but it may work out that way in the end – they are just amazing and always making me laugh – all three of them, Bella, Darcey and Flossy.’ Matching dogs and owners is key. Babs explained ‘We do have occasions where there’s a child in a family who’s scared and unsure about dogs. We may then have to have a discussion to see if it’s the right time for them. We also ask if any neighbouring properties have animals, as a reactive dog would be better in a quieter neighbourhood.’ She continued: ‘Some dogs are not ready for re-homing for a few months as we’re carrying out training. We write a plan for them to establish what sort of home would be suitable. When an owner is found, they have the training plan with various scenarios of different situations and how the dog should behave.

With the smaller animals, it could just be the different seasons, when people don’t feel like going out into the cold to clean a hutch, for example. The Shelter currently only has one or two dogs and two or three cats but it’s perhaps hard to believe it has nine terrapins and three musk turtles – ‘we really struggle to re-home them’ said Babs. ‘After the film Teenage Ninja Turtles people bought them from pet shops. Fortunately they’ve now stopped selling them. It’s quite a big responsibility as they live around 40 years in captivity.’ The Shelter is constantly evolving. ‘We started the Dog Guardian Scheme in 2017,’ Babs said, ‘it’s like a foster family, where they have a dog temporarily in their home and it comes back for regular training or any appointments until a permanent home is found.’ You can also now register online to adopt an animal or join the Scheme. Pets are very rewarding and loyal companions but it’s vital to choose the right one for you. The Animal Shelter will provide any advice and support you need, but be warned – ‘Scratch a dog and you find a permanent job’ (American journalist Franklin P. Jones) Website www.jspca.org.je Tel: 724331

AUTUMN 2019

- 43


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

Walkie Talkies Kieranne Grimshaw shared a walk with Rusty and his owner, Deputy Rob Ward (St Helier No 2)

Millennium Town Park and St Helier in Bloom. ‘We also provide a lot of support in terms of case work for individuals who need help with issues such as housing or income support’ he said. ‘We’ve just started a help-line to point people in the right direction, and this gives them a real relationship with us as individuals – their communications help us, as politicians, to direct our own policies and see what needs to be corrected.’ Deputy Ward recognises the need for young people’s involvement in politics: ‘At present, one of the chances we’ve got is the issue over climate change. Young people are really aware of this, and that’s one of the factors that drove the proposition to a Climate Emergency debate that I took,’ he explained. ‘We ignore young people at our peril.’ Some positive steps have already been made. ‘I’ve already proposed an amendment to the Common Strategic Policy to commit to a £5 million Centre and Community for youth facility right in the heart of my district. It’s been lacking for many years and I’d expect it to come to fruition in the next few years.’ He continued ‘The other thing was to get climate change and our effect on our environment squarely on the agenda. I’m pleased to be involved in the sittings and ask lots of questions.’

T

he States of Jersey has had a new influx of Politicians. Among them, Deputy Rob Ward of St Helier No 2, chairman of both Education and Home Affairs Scrutiny Panel and of the Care of Children in Jersey Review Panel. Walking along the Waterfront with him and his rescue dog, Rusty, he spoke about his first year in the States and of the future. ‘I believe having the time, flexibility, and patience as well as doing good research are all qualities needed for a successful politician’ said the Deputy. Having always been interested in current affairs, Deputy Ward felt it was a natural progression into politics for him. Timing is key: ‘I was a Trade Unionist and I’d been teaching Science and Psychology for 25 years in London and

44

- AUTUMN 2019

I believe having the time, flexibility, and patience as well as doing good research are all qualities needed for a successful politician.

Jersey. The Election came round and I got involved with Reform Jersey – I realised talking from the side lines wasn’t enough and I wanted a new challenge.’ ‘Our children had just gone to University, the time was right and with the support of my wife I stood for the States. Shortly after, we adopted Rusty from Jersey Rescue Dogs. He’s a Labrador cross with a suggestion of Chesapeake Bay Retriever, from Ireland. He’d been kennelled for two years.’ Deputy Ward believes his former teaching career gave him many transferable skills. ‘We don’t have a problem with standing up and speaking in front of an audience, we’re also used to preparing for debates and for all the reading needed for Scrutiny.’ Community is important to Deputy Ward who’s recently been involved in the

Deputy Ward admits the recent Transport Policy was only successful ‘to a degree’ although is very pleased the debate has begun. On population matters, the Deputy believes the key is to invest in lifelong education and give people the opportunity to change careers and develop new skills. ‘Unless we address

our skills, the continuing increase will be inevitable’ he said. ‘And with high rents and cost of living, we won’t attract locals back to the island.’ Costs of his second degree with the Open University ‘went through the roof ’ and the Deputy doesn’t feel others should be put into debt if they can’t afford it: ‘That’s narrow sighted,’ he said. More optimistically, the Deputy feels there’s a growing awareness of environmental issues, together with a growing will for change, as people realise the impact and cost of their actions. It’s not just monetary cost,’ said the Deputy, ‘everything seems to have a cost, but nothing seems to have a value. Deputy Ward was initially surprised at the lack of resources for States members, particularly backbenchers – ‘Where do you meet people? Especially if you’re vulnerable, you want somewhere decent & private to meet.’ He continued: ‘It’s also quite different from teaching, which was very structured. I was used to a bell ringing, when we then changed classes – although for both teachers and politicians it can be hard to unwind and you need to do so.’ Compared with the UK, the Deputy believes we are fortunate to be able to debate a topic within six weeks of lodging it. ‘In the UK legislation could take years – and if people realised that politicians can actually promote change, they would be more likely to get involved in politics.’ In his spare time Deputy Ward enjoys playing drums in two bands: ‘It keeps me sane. Like most middle aged men, I just want to be a Rock Star!’

Inevitably, Rusty takes up the rest of the Deputy’s spare time. ‘He’s been a fantastic addition to our lives. Since, we got him, he’s eaten two remote controls and a box of my pringles. Luckily he’s not interested in paperwork – he’s an intelligent dog’ he finished. The Deputy admits most people recognise his dog before him – ‘He loves the beach and walking him with my wife, we get to know people through Rusty and he gets to socialise with people. To have a rescue dog, you need both time and patience, but you get way more back – it’s worth a couple of remote controls.’

Protein keeps you fuller for longer, at breakfast you can easily find it in your milk or yogurt

#BringBackBreakfast

AUTUMN 2019

- 45


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

Walkie Talkies Kieranne Grimshaw shared a walk with Rusty and his owner, Deputy Rob Ward (St Helier No 2)

Millennium Town Park and St Helier in Bloom. ‘We also provide a lot of support in terms of case work for individuals who need help with issues such as housing or income support’ he said. ‘We’ve just started a help-line to point people in the right direction, and this gives them a real relationship with us as individuals – their communications help us, as politicians, to direct our own policies and see what needs to be corrected.’ Deputy Ward recognises the need for young people’s involvement in politics: ‘At present, one of the chances we’ve got is the issue over climate change. Young people are really aware of this, and that’s one of the factors that drove the proposition to a Climate Emergency debate that I took,’ he explained. ‘We ignore young people at our peril.’ Some positive steps have already been made. ‘I’ve already proposed an amendment to the Common Strategic Policy to commit to a £5 million Centre and Community for youth facility right in the heart of my district. It’s been lacking for many years and I’d expect it to come to fruition in the next few years.’ He continued ‘The other thing was to get climate change and our effect on our environment squarely on the agenda. I’m pleased to be involved in the sittings and ask lots of questions.’

T

he States of Jersey has had a new influx of Politicians. Among them, Deputy Rob Ward of St Helier No 2, chairman of both Education and Home Affairs Scrutiny Panel and of the Care of Children in Jersey Review Panel. Walking along the Waterfront with him and his rescue dog, Rusty, he spoke about his first year in the States and of the future. ‘I believe having the time, flexibility, and patience as well as doing good research are all qualities needed for a successful politician’ said the Deputy. Having always been interested in current affairs, Deputy Ward felt it was a natural progression into politics for him. Timing is key: ‘I was a Trade Unionist and I’d been teaching Science and Psychology for 25 years in London and

44

- AUTUMN 2019

I believe having the time, flexibility, and patience as well as doing good research are all qualities needed for a successful politician.

Jersey. The Election came round and I got involved with Reform Jersey – I realised talking from the side lines wasn’t enough and I wanted a new challenge.’ ‘Our children had just gone to University, the time was right and with the support of my wife I stood for the States. Shortly after, we adopted Rusty from Jersey Rescue Dogs. He’s a Labrador cross with a suggestion of Chesapeake Bay Retriever, from Ireland. He’d been kennelled for two years.’ Deputy Ward believes his former teaching career gave him many transferable skills. ‘We don’t have a problem with standing up and speaking in front of an audience, we’re also used to preparing for debates and for all the reading needed for Scrutiny.’ Community is important to Deputy Ward who’s recently been involved in the

Deputy Ward admits the recent Transport Policy was only successful ‘to a degree’ although is very pleased the debate has begun. On population matters, the Deputy believes the key is to invest in lifelong education and give people the opportunity to change careers and develop new skills. ‘Unless we address

our skills, the continuing increase will be inevitable’ he said. ‘And with high rents and cost of living, we won’t attract locals back to the island.’ Costs of his second degree with the Open University ‘went through the roof ’ and the Deputy doesn’t feel others should be put into debt if they can’t afford it: ‘That’s narrow sighted,’ he said. More optimistically, the Deputy feels there’s a growing awareness of environmental issues, together with a growing will for change, as people realise the impact and cost of their actions. It’s not just monetary cost,’ said the Deputy, ‘everything seems to have a cost, but nothing seems to have a value. Deputy Ward was initially surprised at the lack of resources for States members, particularly backbenchers – ‘Where do you meet people? Especially if you’re vulnerable, you want somewhere decent & private to meet.’ He continued: ‘It’s also quite different from teaching, which was very structured. I was used to a bell ringing, when we then changed classes – although for both teachers and politicians it can be hard to unwind and you need to do so.’ Compared with the UK, the Deputy believes we are fortunate to be able to debate a topic within six weeks of lodging it. ‘In the UK legislation could take years – and if people realised that politicians can actually promote change, they would be more likely to get involved in politics.’ In his spare time Deputy Ward enjoys playing drums in two bands: ‘It keeps me sane. Like most middle aged men, I just want to be a Rock Star!’

Inevitably, Rusty takes up the rest of the Deputy’s spare time. ‘He’s been a fantastic addition to our lives. Since, we got him, he’s eaten two remote controls and a box of my pringles. Luckily he’s not interested in paperwork – he’s an intelligent dog’ he finished. The Deputy admits most people recognise his dog before him – ‘He loves the beach and walking him with my wife, we get to know people through Rusty and he gets to socialise with people. To have a rescue dog, you need both time and patience, but you get way more back – it’s worth a couple of remote controls.’

Protein keeps you fuller for longer, at breakfast you can easily find it in your milk or yogurt

#BringBackBreakfast

AUTUMN 2019

- 45


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Jersey Lasting Powers of Attorney A

re you worried about who would make decisions on your behalf if you were no longer capable of doing so or do you have a loved one who may require assistance in the future? If so, then Jersey’s “Capacity and SelfDetermination (Jersey) Law 2016” may be of assistance to you.   Amongst other changes in the way legal aspects of mental health are dealt with, the new Law introduced lasting powers of attorney (LPA) to Jersey.  LPAs allow a person (Donor) to appoint another individual (Attorney) to make decisions on their behalf.   LPAs allow those resident in Jersey to plan for the risk of future mental incapacity by recording their decisions and intentions about their assets and welfare in advance of the loss of mental capacity.  There are two types of LPAs: •

Health and Welfare: This covers wishes in respect of medical treatment, care and life-sustaining treatment, including the refusal of such treatment. It can only be used once a Donor is no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. Whether or not a Donor retains mental capacity is a medical matter and it should be borne in mind that capacity may fluctuate from time to time. •Property and Affairs: This second type gives the Attorney the power to deal with the Donor’s assets and affairs within the limits set out by the Donor in the LPA. It is possible for the Attorney to act under the LPA whilst the Donor still has mental capacity if this power has been included on their application form.  The Attorney can also be given the power to sell land or property on behalf of the Donor.

Anyone may be appointed as an Attorney; it does not have to be a lawyer or a Jersey resident. Indeed, a trusted loved one or friend will often be chosen.

46

- AUTUMN 2019

It is important however to choose an Attorney carefully because they will have power to make crucial decisions about the Donor’s affairs and welfare in the future if capacity is lost.   Before countersigning an LPA to accept the role as Attorney an individual should ensure they fully understand the extent of their powers as well as any restrictions or guidance given to them in relation to decisions they make.  An Attorney must take decisions which are in the best interests of the Donor, and must always take the wishes of the Donor into account when making a decision.   Once the LPA has been prepared through the government’s online system it is submitted to the Court. The Donor and their Attorneys need to sign it in front of an authorised witness such as a lawyer, doctor or other medical professional. If there is any doubt about the Donor’s mental capacity at the time the LPA is being signed it is advisable to have the Donor’s doctor as the witness in case any queries arise afterwards. The Donor will then need to deliver the original signed LPA to the Court. An LPA will terminate upon the death of the Donor or following its revocation by the Donor (before a loss of mental capacity). It is possible for the Court to terminate an LPA if it finds that it is in the best interests of the Donor or because an Attorney has acted inappropriately. LPAs promote personal autonomy by giving an individual the ability to choose who manages their affairs or makes decisions concerning their welfare. They are binding and create powers in relation to crucial matters and so should be considered carefully before being entered into.  It is recommended that legal advice is taken to ensure that an individual’s wishes and intentions are properly reflected in the LPA. For any advice relating to lasting powers of attorney please contact Michelle Leverington on michelle.leverington@ bcrlawjersey.com or call 01534 760860.

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Jersey Lasting Powers of Attorney A

re you worried about who would make decisions on your behalf if you were no longer capable of doing so or do you have a loved one who may require assistance in the future? If so, then Jersey’s “Capacity and SelfDetermination (Jersey) Law 2016” may be of assistance to you.   Amongst other changes in the way legal aspects of mental health are dealt with, the new Law introduced lasting powers of attorney (LPA) to Jersey.  LPAs allow a person (Donor) to appoint another individual (Attorney) to make decisions on their behalf.   LPAs allow those resident in Jersey to plan for the risk of future mental incapacity by recording their decisions and intentions about their assets and welfare in advance of the loss of mental capacity.  There are two types of LPAs: •

Health and Welfare: This covers wishes in respect of medical treatment, care and life-sustaining treatment, including the refusal of such treatment. It can only be used once a Donor is no longer capable of making decisions for themselves. Whether or not a Donor retains mental capacity is a medical matter and it should be borne in mind that capacity may fluctuate from time to time. •Property and Affairs: This second type gives the Attorney the power to deal with the Donor’s assets and affairs within the limits set out by the Donor in the LPA. It is possible for the Attorney to act under the LPA whilst the Donor still has mental capacity if this power has been included on their application form.  The Attorney can also be given the power to sell land or property on behalf of the Donor.

Anyone may be appointed as an Attorney; it does not have to be a lawyer or a Jersey resident. Indeed, a trusted loved one or friend will often be chosen.

46

- AUTUMN 2019

It is important however to choose an Attorney carefully because they will have power to make crucial decisions about the Donor’s affairs and welfare in the future if capacity is lost.   Before countersigning an LPA to accept the role as Attorney an individual should ensure they fully understand the extent of their powers as well as any restrictions or guidance given to them in relation to decisions they make.  An Attorney must take decisions which are in the best interests of the Donor, and must always take the wishes of the Donor into account when making a decision.   Once the LPA has been prepared through the government’s online system it is submitted to the Court. The Donor and their Attorneys need to sign it in front of an authorised witness such as a lawyer, doctor or other medical professional. If there is any doubt about the Donor’s mental capacity at the time the LPA is being signed it is advisable to have the Donor’s doctor as the witness in case any queries arise afterwards. The Donor will then need to deliver the original signed LPA to the Court. An LPA will terminate upon the death of the Donor or following its revocation by the Donor (before a loss of mental capacity). It is possible for the Court to terminate an LPA if it finds that it is in the best interests of the Donor or because an Attorney has acted inappropriately. LPAs promote personal autonomy by giving an individual the ability to choose who manages their affairs or makes decisions concerning their welfare. They are binding and create powers in relation to crucial matters and so should be considered carefully before being entered into.  It is recommended that legal advice is taken to ensure that an individual’s wishes and intentions are properly reflected in the LPA. For any advice relating to lasting powers of attorney please contact Michelle Leverington on michelle.leverington@ bcrlawjersey.com or call 01534 760860.

Excellent Value

mercurydeliver.com offers real value on everyday essentials

Big Brands

Order Online

A wide range of your favorite brands delivered direct to your door

Place your order Online in minutes. Ideal for those heavy bulky items


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

ART, INSPIRED BY NATURE In each issue we profile works by contemporary Jersey artists who draw their inspiration from Jersey’s landscapes or natural environment. In July, RURAL magazine organised the Rural Jersey Landscape Awards of the Jersey Summer Exhibition, hosted by CCA Galleries International. The first prize was Grosnez Castle, painted by Stephen Morley. Mr Morley trained and received a degree from the Slade School of Fine Art and was awarded a Boise Travel Scholarship to Florence in 1989. He was Visiting Lecturer in Landscape Painting at Canterbury Christchurch University, New Zealand. He has previously exhibited at Bedford School (1986) and London (1989). His other work is on display at Studio 18 in Beresford Street. He is available to be commissioned for landscape and portrait pictures: smorleycez1906@gmail.com The paintings of the runners-up are featured in the following article: The Landscapes of Rural Jersey, on the following page.

48

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

- 49


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

ART, INSPIRED BY NATURE In each issue we profile works by contemporary Jersey artists who draw their inspiration from Jersey’s landscapes or natural environment. In July, RURAL magazine organised the Rural Jersey Landscape Awards of the Jersey Summer Exhibition, hosted by CCA Galleries International. The first prize was Grosnez Castle, painted by Stephen Morley. Mr Morley trained and received a degree from the Slade School of Fine Art and was awarded a Boise Travel Scholarship to Florence in 1989. He was Visiting Lecturer in Landscape Painting at Canterbury Christchurch University, New Zealand. He has previously exhibited at Bedford School (1986) and London (1989). His other work is on display at Studio 18 in Beresford Street. He is available to be commissioned for landscape and portrait pictures: smorleycez1906@gmail.com The paintings of the runners-up are featured in the following article: The Landscapes of Rural Jersey, on the following page.

48

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

- 49


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

The Signtech

but so much of Jersey art is influenced by the sea – and artists like seascapes, of course. So we took the view that if an artist painted a scene, perhaps at low tide, with his back to the sea looking inland, or had stood looking along the coastline that was a rural view in local terms. Terra Firma – and plenty of it, was the key.

RURAL JERSEY LANDSCAPE AWARD

A new Jersey art competition is born: The RURAL Jersey Landscape Awards

A

hot evening in July at the CCA Galleries International in Hill Street. Very warm, but bearable enough not to dissuade some 40 people to come to what, it is to be hoped, was the inaugural awards evening of the RURAL Jersey Landscape awards. The art gallery was exhibiting pictures and other works of art submitted to it by artists selected for the Jersey Summer Exhibition. Earlier, a group of judges, chaired by CCA’s Sasha Gibb, had selected all the paintings that showed a ‘rural Jersey landscape theme’ and these were judged separately; the winner

‘By contrast, a seascape looking outwards from the Island with only the sea in view… well, perhaps the Jersey Fisherman’s Association or St Helier Yacht Club might like to care to accept

The winning artist of the competition was Stephen Morley, for his painting Grosnez Castle. Joint second were Anna Frances Le Moine’s Yarrow and Graham Tovey’s ‘Cider Orchard’. Joint third were Debbie Crane’s ‘Off Rozel’ and Patrick Malacarnet’s Last light, Portelet.

2nd Place: Anna Frances Le Moine’s Yarrow

3nd Place: Debbie Crane’s ‘Off Rozel’

‘The competition’s title – “RURAL Jersey landscape awards” begs the question: What in Jersey is a “rural landscape?” In the UK, the question hardly needs to be asked: think of Constable’s haywains, Flatford Mill, water meadows by Salisbury Cathedral etc.

50

- AUTUMN 2019

‘Yes, we have got rural views in Jersey – secret valleys, old farmhouses and so on,

‘There were about two dozen of the pictures from the Summer Exhibition on display to consider, of various styles and media, so it was a good competition in terms of the number of entrants and the variety of paintings.

‘But there is a bit more to it than that: it is said that the location of the soul of any community, great or small, is in its traditional, typical countryside. England’s rural landscapes have always defined its idea of itself as a nation, rather more than might motorways or urban sprawl or any of the other unpleasant manifestations of modernity.

‘We hope the awards will continue in future years and that the 2020 competition will be an enlarged one, perhaps not limited just to exhibitors of

the Summer Exhibition and perhaps including categories such as school students’ art, or, for example, farm and domestic animals (or even seascapes!) – reflecting the regular contents and interests of RURAL magazine. Two questions about the competition might well be begging for answers, the first being: Why Signtech Ltd as sponsors of an exhibition of rural landscape paintings? They are better known as creators of signage or liveries for commercial vehicles, so no obvious connection on the face of it.

The following is adapted from the introductory speech by RURAL magazine’s owner and editor, Alasdair Crosby:

Left to right: winning artist Stephen Morley, Alasdair Crosby of RURAL magazine, Sasha Gibb of CCA Galleries International, Sarah Taylor and Sean Guegan of sponsoring company Signtech Ltd, standing in front of Mr Morley's winning picture

potatoes - we aim to strike a balance with our features on local art and culture as well.

2nd Place: Graham Tovey’s ‘Cider Orchard’

being awarded a £600 prize generously sponsored by Signtech Ltd. Its MD, Sean Guegan, was one of the judges. The judging also panel consisted of: Sarah Taylor of Signtech; Charles Alluto of the National Trust for Jersey; Alastair Best of the Société Jersiaise; Robert Perchard of the Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society; environmentalist Mike Stentiford; local author Alan Le Rossignol and RURAL magazine’s Alasdair Crosby.

the challenge of sponsoring a seascape competition in future years.

3nd Place: Patrick Malacarnet’s Last light, Portelet.

‘The answer to that is the very strong interest and commitment of Sean Guegan and Sarah Taylor of Signtech to the natural environment and to the local community. Sean is a regular columnist in RURAL; Sarah originated the Simply Christmas and Simply Spring craft markets, displaying all sorts of goods created by small, local artisan businesses. So this art competition was a good fit for them. ‘The second question: Why should a magazine be pushing a journalistic snout into the unfamiliar realm of art and art judging? The answer to that, of course, is the magazine’s title, which should provide a useful clue to its interest in rural Jersey. We are not just about farming and the countryside, not just about cows and

‘The same goes for any other community elsewhere – as it does in Jersey. ‘The soul of Jersey – meaning its essential characteristics and character as a place and as a community - seems more likely to be found in its countryside, its coastline, its old farmhouses and valleys, than in the banks and offices of the finance sector. ‘One mustn’t go overboard on this theme: a Jersey farmer once told me that where I might see a lovely and inspiring view he saw his own factory floor; which, of course, is very true. “The countryside” is as much an artificial man-made construction as any inner-city or built-up environment. ‘But it is an artificial construction that, on a banausic level, not only attracts visitors and thus benefits the local economy, but also – and more importantly - uplifts the spirit, provides inspiration, consolation and relaxation and, in general, directs us all, especially through its representation in the arts, in the direction of the good, the true and the beautiful… which should also be the aspiration of any self-respecting publication, including RURAL magazine. And supporting this event, which brings together the arts and the countryside, is for us, a step along this road. Thank-you to all the artists who have put their works forward for the Exhibition and made this event possible.’ AUTUMN 2019

- 51


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

The Signtech

but so much of Jersey art is influenced by the sea – and artists like seascapes, of course. So we took the view that if an artist painted a scene, perhaps at low tide, with his back to the sea looking inland, or had stood looking along the coastline that was a rural view in local terms. Terra Firma – and plenty of it, was the key.

RURAL JERSEY LANDSCAPE AWARD

A new Jersey art competition is born: The RURAL Jersey Landscape Awards

A

hot evening in July at the CCA Galleries International in Hill Street. Very warm, but bearable enough not to dissuade some 40 people to come to what, it is to be hoped, was the inaugural awards evening of the RURAL Jersey Landscape awards. The art gallery was exhibiting pictures and other works of art submitted to it by artists selected for the Jersey Summer Exhibition. Earlier, a group of judges, chaired by CCA’s Sasha Gibb, had selected all the paintings that showed a ‘rural Jersey landscape theme’ and these were judged separately; the winner

‘By contrast, a seascape looking outwards from the Island with only the sea in view… well, perhaps the Jersey Fisherman’s Association or St Helier Yacht Club might like to care to accept

The winning artist of the competition was Stephen Morley, for his painting Grosnez Castle. Joint second were Anna Frances Le Moine’s Yarrow and Graham Tovey’s ‘Cider Orchard’. Joint third were Debbie Crane’s ‘Off Rozel’ and Patrick Malacarnet’s Last light, Portelet.

2nd Place: Anna Frances Le Moine’s Yarrow

3nd Place: Debbie Crane’s ‘Off Rozel’

‘The competition’s title – “RURAL Jersey landscape awards” begs the question: What in Jersey is a “rural landscape?” In the UK, the question hardly needs to be asked: think of Constable’s haywains, Flatford Mill, water meadows by Salisbury Cathedral etc.

50

- AUTUMN 2019

‘Yes, we have got rural views in Jersey – secret valleys, old farmhouses and so on,

‘There were about two dozen of the pictures from the Summer Exhibition on display to consider, of various styles and media, so it was a good competition in terms of the number of entrants and the variety of paintings.

‘But there is a bit more to it than that: it is said that the location of the soul of any community, great or small, is in its traditional, typical countryside. England’s rural landscapes have always defined its idea of itself as a nation, rather more than might motorways or urban sprawl or any of the other unpleasant manifestations of modernity.

‘We hope the awards will continue in future years and that the 2020 competition will be an enlarged one, perhaps not limited just to exhibitors of

the Summer Exhibition and perhaps including categories such as school students’ art, or, for example, farm and domestic animals (or even seascapes!) – reflecting the regular contents and interests of RURAL magazine. Two questions about the competition might well be begging for answers, the first being: Why Signtech Ltd as sponsors of an exhibition of rural landscape paintings? They are better known as creators of signage or liveries for commercial vehicles, so no obvious connection on the face of it.

The following is adapted from the introductory speech by RURAL magazine’s owner and editor, Alasdair Crosby:

Left to right: winning artist Stephen Morley, Alasdair Crosby of RURAL magazine, Sasha Gibb of CCA Galleries International, Sarah Taylor and Sean Guegan of sponsoring company Signtech Ltd, standing in front of Mr Morley's winning picture

potatoes - we aim to strike a balance with our features on local art and culture as well.

2nd Place: Graham Tovey’s ‘Cider Orchard’

being awarded a £600 prize generously sponsored by Signtech Ltd. Its MD, Sean Guegan, was one of the judges. The judging also panel consisted of: Sarah Taylor of Signtech; Charles Alluto of the National Trust for Jersey; Alastair Best of the Société Jersiaise; Robert Perchard of the Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society; environmentalist Mike Stentiford; local author Alan Le Rossignol and RURAL magazine’s Alasdair Crosby.

the challenge of sponsoring a seascape competition in future years.

3nd Place: Patrick Malacarnet’s Last light, Portelet.

‘The answer to that is the very strong interest and commitment of Sean Guegan and Sarah Taylor of Signtech to the natural environment and to the local community. Sean is a regular columnist in RURAL; Sarah originated the Simply Christmas and Simply Spring craft markets, displaying all sorts of goods created by small, local artisan businesses. So this art competition was a good fit for them. ‘The second question: Why should a magazine be pushing a journalistic snout into the unfamiliar realm of art and art judging? The answer to that, of course, is the magazine’s title, which should provide a useful clue to its interest in rural Jersey. We are not just about farming and the countryside, not just about cows and

‘The same goes for any other community elsewhere – as it does in Jersey. ‘The soul of Jersey – meaning its essential characteristics and character as a place and as a community - seems more likely to be found in its countryside, its coastline, its old farmhouses and valleys, than in the banks and offices of the finance sector. ‘One mustn’t go overboard on this theme: a Jersey farmer once told me that where I might see a lovely and inspiring view he saw his own factory floor; which, of course, is very true. “The countryside” is as much an artificial man-made construction as any inner-city or built-up environment. ‘But it is an artificial construction that, on a banausic level, not only attracts visitors and thus benefits the local economy, but also – and more importantly - uplifts the spirit, provides inspiration, consolation and relaxation and, in general, directs us all, especially through its representation in the arts, in the direction of the good, the true and the beautiful… which should also be the aspiration of any self-respecting publication, including RURAL magazine. And supporting this event, which brings together the arts and the countryside, is for us, a step along this road. Thank-you to all the artists who have put their works forward for the Exhibition and made this event possible.’ AUTUMN 2019

- 51


ART & CULTURE

JERSEY’S SUNKEN TREASURES Jersey-Secrets of the Sea by Paul Darroch - Review by James Le Cocq

R

eading Paul Darroch’s latest novel felt like walking through the Jersey Maritime Museum. Each new section of the book was a new room and age, and every short story a glimpse into the lives of Islanders caught up in the eternal tides of Jersey’s history. After reading of Denis Vibert’s daring escape from the Island under German occupation, it was as if I’d stepped back into the present day after embarking on an epic journey through Jersey’s past.

The author utilises a blend of language and description to create truly beautiful imagery that helps the reader to visualise what is happening. This is a quality that is able to raise their hopes high with the promise of progress and new possibilities, while also taking them down to the depths of melancholy and painful hindsight. This is especially the case with the story of Red Letter Day and the gradual march of young Islanders towards the First World War.

Jersey Secrets of the Sea blends nonfiction history with fictionalised accounts from the people who were there to experience it. Every new perspective offers a new insight into life in Jersey and at sea, whether set in the near-mythical Norman times or within the Victorian era. Exploring such a vast reservoir of information could have left the narrative disjointed, but the author bridges the gaps between each new tale with passages that provide an overview of history as it progressed. In this way, the overall structure of the book carries the reader comfortably across leagues of past adventures and is easy to read at a leisurely pace.

Because the novel covers such a wide range of Jersey’s maritime past, there are times where it appears that the narrative skims through it, pushing through events in broad strokes. The first-person accounts, while colourful in their language, can be prone to telling the reader a lot of information rather than showing them and allowing them the chance to experience events. Since each story is also relatively short, this all combines to generate a sense of detachment between the reader and the narrative, meaning they cannot easily become immersed in the story or attached to the people telling them.

- AUTUMN 2019

We are the Channel Islands’ leading purchaser of antiques, jewellery and effects. These, together with my extensive experience and knowledge enable us to offer the most comprehensive service in the Islands, whether buying or selling.

However, there are multiple sections throughout Mr Darroch’s work where I forgot this was an issue and found myself fully invested in a particular individual’s tale. T.B. Davis’ story, for example had me silently rooting for him, especially after he is punished by the Jurat, whereupon he vows to destroy his home ‘stone by stone, brick by bloody brick.’ It is these moments, where the author focuses at length on a single event, that I feel his writing truly shines through, and I only wish there were more of these instances. Jersey has such a rich tapestry to explore, and Darroch’s novel provides a fresh and original opportunity to witness first-hand the Island’s story through the lives of its past inhabitants. From legends concerning sunken ships to voyages around the world, Secrets of the Sea bristles with fascinating insights into the treasure that is our Island’s maritime history.

54

DEALERS IN FINE ANTIQUES, WORKS OF ART, JEWELLERY AND OBJECTS

A large selection of decorative garden furnishings now on display at The Hidden Garden Company, St Lawrence

La Grande Route De St Laurent • Jersey • JE3 1NJ Tel: 01534 485177 • www.stephencohuantiques.com Open Wednesday to Saturday 10am - 5pm. Anytime by appointment. Resident on premises.


ART & CULTURE

JERSEY’S SUNKEN TREASURES Jersey-Secrets of the Sea by Paul Darroch - Review by James Le Cocq

R

eading Paul Darroch’s latest novel felt like walking through the Jersey Maritime Museum. Each new section of the book was a new room and age, and every short story a glimpse into the lives of Islanders caught up in the eternal tides of Jersey’s history. After reading of Denis Vibert’s daring escape from the Island under German occupation, it was as if I’d stepped back into the present day after embarking on an epic journey through Jersey’s past.

The author utilises a blend of language and description to create truly beautiful imagery that helps the reader to visualise what is happening. This is a quality that is able to raise their hopes high with the promise of progress and new possibilities, while also taking them down to the depths of melancholy and painful hindsight. This is especially the case with the story of Red Letter Day and the gradual march of young Islanders towards the First World War.

Jersey Secrets of the Sea blends nonfiction history with fictionalised accounts from the people who were there to experience it. Every new perspective offers a new insight into life in Jersey and at sea, whether set in the near-mythical Norman times or within the Victorian era. Exploring such a vast reservoir of information could have left the narrative disjointed, but the author bridges the gaps between each new tale with passages that provide an overview of history as it progressed. In this way, the overall structure of the book carries the reader comfortably across leagues of past adventures and is easy to read at a leisurely pace.

Because the novel covers such a wide range of Jersey’s maritime past, there are times where it appears that the narrative skims through it, pushing through events in broad strokes. The first-person accounts, while colourful in their language, can be prone to telling the reader a lot of information rather than showing them and allowing them the chance to experience events. Since each story is also relatively short, this all combines to generate a sense of detachment between the reader and the narrative, meaning they cannot easily become immersed in the story or attached to the people telling them.

- AUTUMN 2019

We are the Channel Islands’ leading purchaser of antiques, jewellery and effects. These, together with my extensive experience and knowledge enable us to offer the most comprehensive service in the Islands, whether buying or selling.

However, there are multiple sections throughout Mr Darroch’s work where I forgot this was an issue and found myself fully invested in a particular individual’s tale. T.B. Davis’ story, for example had me silently rooting for him, especially after he is punished by the Jurat, whereupon he vows to destroy his home ‘stone by stone, brick by bloody brick.’ It is these moments, where the author focuses at length on a single event, that I feel his writing truly shines through, and I only wish there were more of these instances. Jersey has such a rich tapestry to explore, and Darroch’s novel provides a fresh and original opportunity to witness first-hand the Island’s story through the lives of its past inhabitants. From legends concerning sunken ships to voyages around the world, Secrets of the Sea bristles with fascinating insights into the treasure that is our Island’s maritime history.

54

DEALERS IN FINE ANTIQUES, WORKS OF ART, JEWELLERY AND OBJECTS

A large selection of decorative garden furnishings now on display at The Hidden Garden Company, St Lawrence

La Grande Route De St Laurent • Jersey • JE3 1NJ Tel: 01534 485177 • www.stephencohuantiques.com Open Wednesday to Saturday 10am - 5pm. Anytime by appointment. Resident on premises.


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

MORE PEOPLE H AV E B E E N I N TO S PAC E THAN H AV E PA S S E D THE MASTER OF WINE EXAM

Support & Guidance every step of the way. Maillards was established in 1928 and is one of Jersey’s oldest funeral directors offering advice and guidance to families for over 90 years.

Julian de la Cour

I

n 1968, due to an increase in business, new premises were required and so Maillards moved to 34 Great Union Road, St. Helier where it is still run from to this day.

Meet Pierpaolo, he’s one of three Masters of Wine here at Waitrose & Partners. He and his team spend their lives searching the planet to find the best wines for our customers. Think of them as your very own sommeliers. Because every single wine we sell has been hand-picked by them.

- ASU, T IUTM’ NS 2P 0 1E9R S O N A L F O5 R6 U

In 2017 Maillards was bought by local businessman Mark Reynolds who is also managing director of Jersey Monumental Co Ltd. (JMCo.) At the beginning of 2018 Julian de la Cour joined the business as managing funeral director.

Pierpaolo, Partner & Head of Wine Buying

When a loved one passes away you need make only one call to Maillards Funerals. From that point onwards we will be there to support you and endeavour to take away as much stress as possible regarding the funeral arrangements.

Both Mark and Julian, being true Jerseymen, are proud to say that Maillards, after over 90 years, is now Jersey’s only family owned and fully independent funeral directors.

We are very fortunate to have amongst our team a fully qualified grave digger and celebrant who can conduct nonreligious services. Curwoods Limousines are part of the Maillards group and have stylish Daimler hearse’s and limousines. Available is the elegance of a horse drawn hearse and soon we will be adding to our fleet a new hearse and limousines. We will therefore be able to offer both traditional and modern transport.

We pride ourselves on the exceptional level of care we offer our clients which is achieved through our attention to detail and the desire to serve each and every family with our time, dedication and empathy.

We have our own monumental masonry department and can offer a wide range of new memorials, traditional headstones, vases, kerb sets and plaques which can be supplied in a variety of colours and materials.

At Maillards we are encouraging people to consider what they would like for their own funeral. Taking control of your own wishes while you are able to do so will reduce the stress and worry for those left behind, enabling you to have the send off you want, in the way you want it. This has the added benefit of enabling you to keep control of the costs. We can send you a lasting wishes form or we will be delighted to come to see you to talk you through it. Maillards can now offer you four funeral plans. There are a range of prices and formats and each one details what is available in each plan. There is always the option of a bespoke funeral, tailored to your specific requirements. Maillards are here to give you support and guidance every step of the way.

AUTUMN 2019

- 57


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

MORE PEOPLE H AV E B E E N I N TO S PAC E THAN H AV E PA S S E D THE MASTER OF WINE EXAM

Support & Guidance every step of the way. Maillards was established in 1928 and is one of Jersey’s oldest funeral directors offering advice and guidance to families for over 90 years.

Julian de la Cour

I

n 1968, due to an increase in business, new premises were required and so Maillards moved to 34 Great Union Road, St. Helier where it is still run from to this day.

Meet Pierpaolo, he’s one of three Masters of Wine here at Waitrose & Partners. He and his team spend their lives searching the planet to find the best wines for our customers. Think of them as your very own sommeliers. Because every single wine we sell has been hand-picked by them.

- ASU, T IUTM’ NS 2P 0 1E9R S O N A L F O5 R6 U

In 2017 Maillards was bought by local businessman Mark Reynolds who is also managing director of Jersey Monumental Co Ltd. (JMCo.) At the beginning of 2018 Julian de la Cour joined the business as managing funeral director.

Pierpaolo, Partner & Head of Wine Buying

When a loved one passes away you need make only one call to Maillards Funerals. From that point onwards we will be there to support you and endeavour to take away as much stress as possible regarding the funeral arrangements.

Both Mark and Julian, being true Jerseymen, are proud to say that Maillards, after over 90 years, is now Jersey’s only family owned and fully independent funeral directors.

We are very fortunate to have amongst our team a fully qualified grave digger and celebrant who can conduct nonreligious services. Curwoods Limousines are part of the Maillards group and have stylish Daimler hearse’s and limousines. Available is the elegance of a horse drawn hearse and soon we will be adding to our fleet a new hearse and limousines. We will therefore be able to offer both traditional and modern transport.

We pride ourselves on the exceptional level of care we offer our clients which is achieved through our attention to detail and the desire to serve each and every family with our time, dedication and empathy.

We have our own monumental masonry department and can offer a wide range of new memorials, traditional headstones, vases, kerb sets and plaques which can be supplied in a variety of colours and materials.

At Maillards we are encouraging people to consider what they would like for their own funeral. Taking control of your own wishes while you are able to do so will reduce the stress and worry for those left behind, enabling you to have the send off you want, in the way you want it. This has the added benefit of enabling you to keep control of the costs. We can send you a lasting wishes form or we will be delighted to come to see you to talk you through it. Maillards can now offer you four funeral plans. There are a range of prices and formats and each one details what is available in each plan. There is always the option of a bespoke funeral, tailored to your specific requirements. Maillards are here to give you support and guidance every step of the way.

AUTUMN 2019

- 57


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

supplies from the store room or to deal with the delivery of more fresh, organic vegetables from Justin Le Gresley’s Anneville Farm, or… or… In short, she is quite a busy person. India is the cofounding Member of the Sustainable Cooperative. She is a Cordon Bleu-trained chef and she started her career working in London for chefs that she respected – Oliver Rowe, in particular, for whom local sourcing of supplies was a key consideration. After a few years she started her own catering company, focusing on bespoke and charitable events and delivering food projects focused on specific aspects to do with waste, surplus and education. An example of her interest in such things: ‘On the borders of America and Mexico is a fungus that grows over corn, termed “corn smut”. In America they spend

India Hamilton is a cordon bleu chef but, perhaps more importantly, she is a philosopher of food. On 5th October she is preparing a dinner themed: ‘The Taste of Carbon’. Sounds delicious? She explained all to Alasdair Crosby

58

- AUTUMN 2019

thousands of dollars trying to get rid of it, in Mexico it’s a valuable delicacy within the corn. So you have two widely differing mentalities, approaches, cultures and ways of looking at so-called parasites. It’s a form of symbiotic relationship.’ In 2017 India (the person) worked in India (the country) as a consultant for Sage Sustainable Living, a farm to table business in Hyderabad. While working for Sage, she saw the potential of combining good farming practices with an integrated supply chain. She says she learned a lot there about the principles of a circular economy. Her experiences have influenced the creation of SCOOP, which she describes as ‘an integrated supply chain devised to promote agricultural diversity and a market for local and imported organic food.’

I

t is quite a feat to interview India Hamilton at her ‘Sustainable CoOperative’ (‘SCOOP’) in St Lawrence. There is not a lot of space and each time the interview gets going, along comes a customer trying to get at the brown rice or whatever, which we have inadvertently blocked off from public access. While talking, she is keeping an eye on the shop, which, despite the rain pouring down outside is thronged with customers. Now and then she breaks off in mid-sentence to help a customer wanting to know how to help themselves to eco-washing up liquid, or to fetch more

AUTUMN 2019

- 59


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

supplies from the store room or to deal with the delivery of more fresh, organic vegetables from Justin Le Gresley’s Anneville Farm, or… or… In short, she is quite a busy person. India is the cofounding Member of the Sustainable Cooperative. She is a Cordon Bleu-trained chef and she started her career working in London for chefs that she respected – Oliver Rowe, in particular, for whom local sourcing of supplies was a key consideration. After a few years she started her own catering company, focusing on bespoke and charitable events and delivering food projects focused on specific aspects to do with waste, surplus and education. An example of her interest in such things: ‘On the borders of America and Mexico is a fungus that grows over corn, termed “corn smut”. In America they spend

India Hamilton is a cordon bleu chef but, perhaps more importantly, she is a philosopher of food. On 5th October she is preparing a dinner themed: ‘The Taste of Carbon’. Sounds delicious? She explained all to Alasdair Crosby

58

- AUTUMN 2019

thousands of dollars trying to get rid of it, in Mexico it’s a valuable delicacy within the corn. So you have two widely differing mentalities, approaches, cultures and ways of looking at so-called parasites. It’s a form of symbiotic relationship.’ In 2017 India (the person) worked in India (the country) as a consultant for Sage Sustainable Living, a farm to table business in Hyderabad. While working for Sage, she saw the potential of combining good farming practices with an integrated supply chain. She says she learned a lot there about the principles of a circular economy. Her experiences have influenced the creation of SCOOP, which she describes as ‘an integrated supply chain devised to promote agricultural diversity and a market for local and imported organic food.’

I

t is quite a feat to interview India Hamilton at her ‘Sustainable CoOperative’ (‘SCOOP’) in St Lawrence. There is not a lot of space and each time the interview gets going, along comes a customer trying to get at the brown rice or whatever, which we have inadvertently blocked off from public access. While talking, she is keeping an eye on the shop, which, despite the rain pouring down outside is thronged with customers. Now and then she breaks off in mid-sentence to help a customer wanting to know how to help themselves to eco-washing up liquid, or to fetch more

AUTUMN 2019

- 59


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

Menu Re - wilding

A process of improving the natural environment by protecting and enhance wild areas, as part of a rural and agricultural landscape. Late Summer Branchage Cocktail

Carbon Sequestration

The systematic use of photosynthesis within the economic market place in agriculture. Fresh Cheese and Ceviche Beets served with Cover-crop Salad, Late Toms, Fermented Summer Vines and Waste Bread

Soil Microbiology

‘I have always enjoyed cooking,’ she said, ‘especially the act of feeding people and serving them. I think what I enjoy most of all is creating a plate of food or a meal that is suitable for a particular situation and that answers the need of that situation. ‘I think I have started to have an artistic understanding of food and I am learning how to address serious issues of food supply in a cultural and artistic way and how to make these challenging questions accessible in an affordable way. Back in Jersey and looking for something to do that engaged her interests and experience, she created events centred on local produce (‘Eat Your Own Island’ in 2014) and which reflected local culture; she realised that there was a conversation to be had in the Island around regenerative farming. She combines her work at SCOOP with studying for a Master’s degree in food and development, which give her the opportunity to think about and to analyse questions on the intersection of society and ecology. And for relaxation? ‘Story telling through food – the sensory and emotional

dimension of food.’ Hence the event on 5 October, ‘The Taste of Carbon’. She described it as ‘exploring what changing agricultural practices can look and taste like on our plates. It will be an evening of edible stories and unique table settings and an investigation into how farming is adapting to the pressures of climate change. The food is sourced mainly from local, organic or surplus ingredients.’ So what’s for dinner? Le Chef propose:

A transition from chemistry to microbial understanding of soil management. Fire cooked Jersey Beef with Buckwheat Groats, honey soaked fungus, Autumn Vegetable & Mustard Seed Oil or

Burnt Cauliflower with Buckwheat Groats, honey soaked fungus, Autumn Vegetables & Pickled Horse Radish Leaf

Diversification

The transition away from monocrops to integrated or rotational farming and accessing new markets Tea soaked Apple and Hemp Posset with a CBD Oil Biscuit

Collaboration

Building relationships along the supply chain that protect your value. Wine tasting of Orange and Red Natural Wines from France selected by Daxivin Wines, Amsterdam.

Decomposition

The first rule of sustainable agriculture is the building of organic matter.

All food waste is segregated for compost

This event is part of the ‘What’s for Dinner’ series of talks and events on food, farming and the environment, organised by RURAL magazine. It has been subsidised by the Art House, Jersey so that the cost is reachable for as many people as possible: £25 a ticket, which includes one cocktail and two glasses of wine served with dinner (there will be more wine available to purchase). Space is limited, so literally ‘first come first served’. Booking can be made by e-mailing events@ruraljersey.co.uk Apart from the meal there is a programme of lectures throughout Saturday 5 October and a cookery demonstration of wild and foraged food by acclaimed chef Oliver Rowe on 6 October. Full details available: e-mail events@ruraljersey.co.uk. These take place at the RJA&HS, Royal Jersey Showground, Trinity, during the course of the society’s annual Autumn Festival and cattle show. All events, apart from the Taste of Carbon meal, are free and the public may pick and choose which talks they wish to attend. The full programme has been organised by RURAL magazine.

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

ed t a re C in

Jersey.

Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become objects of desire. Available across the Island, a purchase supports local craftspeople and supports the local economy.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

60

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

- 61


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

Menu Re - wilding

A process of improving the natural environment by protecting and enhance wild areas, as part of a rural and agricultural landscape. Late Summer Branchage Cocktail

Carbon Sequestration

The systematic use of photosynthesis within the economic market place in agriculture. Fresh Cheese and Ceviche Beets served with Cover-crop Salad, Late Toms, Fermented Summer Vines and Waste Bread

Soil Microbiology

‘I have always enjoyed cooking,’ she said, ‘especially the act of feeding people and serving them. I think what I enjoy most of all is creating a plate of food or a meal that is suitable for a particular situation and that answers the need of that situation. ‘I think I have started to have an artistic understanding of food and I am learning how to address serious issues of food supply in a cultural and artistic way and how to make these challenging questions accessible in an affordable way. Back in Jersey and looking for something to do that engaged her interests and experience, she created events centred on local produce (‘Eat Your Own Island’ in 2014) and which reflected local culture; she realised that there was a conversation to be had in the Island around regenerative farming. She combines her work at SCOOP with studying for a Master’s degree in food and development, which give her the opportunity to think about and to analyse questions on the intersection of society and ecology. And for relaxation? ‘Story telling through food – the sensory and emotional

dimension of food.’ Hence the event on 5 October, ‘The Taste of Carbon’. She described it as ‘exploring what changing agricultural practices can look and taste like on our plates. It will be an evening of edible stories and unique table settings and an investigation into how farming is adapting to the pressures of climate change. The food is sourced mainly from local, organic or surplus ingredients.’ So what’s for dinner? Le Chef propose:

A transition from chemistry to microbial understanding of soil management. Fire cooked Jersey Beef with Buckwheat Groats, honey soaked fungus, Autumn Vegetable & Mustard Seed Oil or

Burnt Cauliflower with Buckwheat Groats, honey soaked fungus, Autumn Vegetables & Pickled Horse Radish Leaf

Diversification

The transition away from monocrops to integrated or rotational farming and accessing new markets Tea soaked Apple and Hemp Posset with a CBD Oil Biscuit

Collaboration

Building relationships along the supply chain that protect your value. Wine tasting of Orange and Red Natural Wines from France selected by Daxivin Wines, Amsterdam.

Decomposition

The first rule of sustainable agriculture is the building of organic matter.

All food waste is segregated for compost

This event is part of the ‘What’s for Dinner’ series of talks and events on food, farming and the environment, organised by RURAL magazine. It has been subsidised by the Art House, Jersey so that the cost is reachable for as many people as possible: £25 a ticket, which includes one cocktail and two glasses of wine served with dinner (there will be more wine available to purchase). Space is limited, so literally ‘first come first served’. Booking can be made by e-mailing events@ruraljersey.co.uk Apart from the meal there is a programme of lectures throughout Saturday 5 October and a cookery demonstration of wild and foraged food by acclaimed chef Oliver Rowe on 6 October. Full details available: e-mail events@ruraljersey.co.uk. These take place at the RJA&HS, Royal Jersey Showground, Trinity, during the course of the society’s annual Autumn Festival and cattle show. All events, apart from the Taste of Carbon meal, are free and the public may pick and choose which talks they wish to attend. The full programme has been organised by RURAL magazine.

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

ed t a re C in

Jersey.

Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become objects of desire. Available across the Island, a purchase supports local craftspeople and supports the local economy.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

60

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

- 61


FOOD & KITCHEN

No Sugar Banana Muffin Receipe by Chloë Bowler Ingredients (serves 8):

100g Butter

2 bananas

200g Plain Flour

1 egg

1 tsp baking powder

50ml milk

SPORT

HEALTH AND FITNESS IN THE ISLAND Chloë Bowler who looks after her clients’ complete wellbeing including fitness, nutrition and emotional wellbeing

1. Melt the butter, and mash the bananas into the butter bowl. 2. Weigh out the flour, and add the baking powder and egg. 3. Stir in the melted butter and banana into the flour bowl. 4. Slowly add the milk as you stir to create an even mixture. 5. Spoon into muffin cases and place in the oven at 180°C for 20 minutes or until baked through. (Test with a cocktail stick to make sure it comes out clean).

Want to live “The Good Life”?

Owing to the planned retirement of the current owners expressions of interest are sought from individuals that would like to take over and develop our successful and award-winning Artisan Cheese Business, building on our success and take it forward to the next stage. We are an established and successful rural enterprise making a range of goat milk dairy products from our Jersey-bred rare breed pedigree goats. With a solid reputation and enormous potential for an enthusiastic and passionate person that sees their future in a sustainable rural business. The sale price for this viable business includes a Jersey-bred Pedigree milking herd of rare breed goats, (in kid at time of sale), two proven stud goats, full line of equipment, cheese inventory, proven recipes and existing and loyal prestigious accounts. It is anticipated that the new owners would work alongside us to ensure the continuity of the brand and the quality of the produce for up to 12 weeks for training, mentoring and ongoing support. Potential buyers don’t need a lot of land or buildings and we could offer stock sheds and milking facilities and 5 verges of excellent grazing at a low rent if the new buyer wishes to continue operating from the present location. Expressions of interest and or to arrange an informal meeting to: gggoatsjersey@gmail.com

62

- AUTUMN 2019

W

hat a glorious summer we have had! When the sun is shining and the weather is warm, it is easy to find things to do outside, such as cliff path walking, or tennis, but these activities can taper off as the evenings draw in, and the temperatures drop.

memory. However, the sea here is often warm enough to get in without a wetsuit, and the feeling of swimming in the sea is so exhilarating. You really feel alive and at one with nature. You also get some amazing views of the island from the water.

One of my favourite activities for me and my clients is swimming. It is such a good exercise for nearly everyone, as it is not weight-bearing. It does not put pressure on the joints in the same way as running or most other exercises, but the water still provides natural resistance to work against.

Safety has to be of paramount importance, so I would always encourage people to have swimming lessons if need be, and to always swim with a friend, and in front of the lifeguards on the beaches. The flags tell you where the safe places to swim are, so make sure you put safety first, and enjoy your swim. Buy a brightly coloured swimming hat, and a float to attach to yourself.

Jersey has some of the most beautiful beaches and bays which offer a wonderful place to swim in the sea. Sea swimming can be daunting to some, especially if it is now nothing more than a childhood

Even in the Autumn months, on a calm day, if you fancy donning a wetsuit, sea swimming can be invigorating, and being

able to do such natural exercise is such a wonderful benefit to living on an island. There are many swimming groups around the island which you can join. A wonderful fundraising initiative is the 30 Bays in 30 Days, encouraging people to dip their toes in some of the most scenic bays across the Island. If sea swimming is not for you, or you want to continue your swimming in the winter, find an indoor pool, grab a float and start swimming. You can walk and run in the water, try different strokes to work different areas of the body, or join an aqua-aerobics class for some fun-filled exercise. A great post-swim snack would be a banana muffin (see my no-sugar recipe on previous page). AUTUMN 2019

- 63


FOOD & KITCHEN

No Sugar Banana Muffin Receipe by Chloë Bowler Ingredients (serves 8):

100g Butter

2 bananas

200g Plain Flour

1 egg

1 tsp baking powder

50ml milk

SPORT

HEALTH AND FITNESS IN THE ISLAND Chloë Bowler who looks after her clients’ complete wellbeing including fitness, nutrition and emotional wellbeing

1. Melt the butter, and mash the bananas into the butter bowl. 2. Weigh out the flour, and add the baking powder and egg. 3. Stir in the melted butter and banana into the flour bowl. 4. Slowly add the milk as you stir to create an even mixture. 5. Spoon into muffin cases and place in the oven at 180°C for 20 minutes or until baked through. (Test with a cocktail stick to make sure it comes out clean).

Want to live “The Good Life”?

Owing to the planned retirement of the current owners expressions of interest are sought from individuals that would like to take over and develop our successful and award-winning Artisan Cheese Business, building on our success and take it forward to the next stage. We are an established and successful rural enterprise making a range of goat milk dairy products from our Jersey-bred rare breed pedigree goats. With a solid reputation and enormous potential for an enthusiastic and passionate person that sees their future in a sustainable rural business. The sale price for this viable business includes a Jersey-bred Pedigree milking herd of rare breed goats, (in kid at time of sale), two proven stud goats, full line of equipment, cheese inventory, proven recipes and existing and loyal prestigious accounts. It is anticipated that the new owners would work alongside us to ensure the continuity of the brand and the quality of the produce for up to 12 weeks for training, mentoring and ongoing support. Potential buyers don’t need a lot of land or buildings and we could offer stock sheds and milking facilities and 5 verges of excellent grazing at a low rent if the new buyer wishes to continue operating from the present location. Expressions of interest and or to arrange an informal meeting to: gggoatsjersey@gmail.com

62

- AUTUMN 2019

W

hat a glorious summer we have had! When the sun is shining and the weather is warm, it is easy to find things to do outside, such as cliff path walking, or tennis, but these activities can taper off as the evenings draw in, and the temperatures drop.

memory. However, the sea here is often warm enough to get in without a wetsuit, and the feeling of swimming in the sea is so exhilarating. You really feel alive and at one with nature. You also get some amazing views of the island from the water.

One of my favourite activities for me and my clients is swimming. It is such a good exercise for nearly everyone, as it is not weight-bearing. It does not put pressure on the joints in the same way as running or most other exercises, but the water still provides natural resistance to work against.

Safety has to be of paramount importance, so I would always encourage people to have swimming lessons if need be, and to always swim with a friend, and in front of the lifeguards on the beaches. The flags tell you where the safe places to swim are, so make sure you put safety first, and enjoy your swim. Buy a brightly coloured swimming hat, and a float to attach to yourself.

Jersey has some of the most beautiful beaches and bays which offer a wonderful place to swim in the sea. Sea swimming can be daunting to some, especially if it is now nothing more than a childhood

Even in the Autumn months, on a calm day, if you fancy donning a wetsuit, sea swimming can be invigorating, and being

able to do such natural exercise is such a wonderful benefit to living on an island. There are many swimming groups around the island which you can join. A wonderful fundraising initiative is the 30 Bays in 30 Days, encouraging people to dip their toes in some of the most scenic bays across the Island. If sea swimming is not for you, or you want to continue your swimming in the winter, find an indoor pool, grab a float and start swimming. You can walk and run in the water, try different strokes to work different areas of the body, or join an aqua-aerobics class for some fun-filled exercise. A great post-swim snack would be a banana muffin (see my no-sugar recipe on previous page). AUTUMN 2019

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SPORT

SPORT

Swimming Workout

RIDING FUN AND RIDING THERAPY

In the water, walk up and down on the spot, bringing one knee up into the chest, then repeating with the other leg x 20. Continue this as a quicker running motion, so using your arms as well to run on the spot with high knees. Front Crawl with Float. Holding the float out in front of you, kick with the legs to move forward on your front. This is a great exercise for the legs and glutes. x 10 lengths. Back Crawl with Float. Continue as above but on your back, holding the float into your chest. x 10 lengths. Breaststroke. This is a wonderful full body exercise. Take deep breaths, and large strokes. x 10 lengths. Chloë Bowler is a Wellbeing Expert, looking after her clients’ complete wellbeing including fitness, nutrition and emotional wellbeing. Her services include Personal Training, Nutrition & Meal Delivery as well as Sports Massage. With over ten years experience working in central London, looking after a host of celebrity clients, Chloë now lives and works in Jersey. She loves helping people to learn to enjoy exercise and good nutrition in a comfortable and friendly environment. For more information on personal training, and meal delivery packages see chloebowler.com

The ‘Riding for the Disabled’ charity celebrates its 50th anniversary in September. Ruth Le Cocq visited the Jersey group

S

eeing the joy on a person’s face as they discover what it feels like to sit on the back of a pony as it moves freely, when perhaps they cannot, is just one aspect motivating a group of committed volunteers at Jersey’s Riding for the Disabled. ‘It’s really amazing,’ said Kerri Correia, the RDA Jersey Group’s Publicity Officer, who began volunteering two years ago after witnessing the transformational effects horse riding had on her son. ‘We had one little boy who came and he was petrified to get on the horse. Everyone took the time he needed there’s no pressure and it’s all very controlled - and eventually he got on the horse and he loved it. ‘Within ten minutes he shouted: “I love my life I do!” I think it was just the joy of being on a horse, of trying something new, of being pleased with himself. That’s why I volunteer.’

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65

- SPRING 2019

Rachel Andrews, who shares the role of Joint Group Organiser with Cathy Fricker, wholeheartedly agreed. ‘For youngsters and adults who are confined to using a walker or even a wheelchair, there is a liberating feeling of being on a pony because they physically don’t have to move and they can just sit there and enjoy it,’ she said. However, Rachel emphasised that there is a lot more going on during the riding sessions than pure enjoyment. ‘The aim of riding therapy is to provide physiotherapy on the move; the warmth and three-dimensional movement of the horse is transmitted through the body of the rider helping the body to relax and strengthen core muscles. Riders also find it helps to improve their posture, balance and coordination as well as hugely improving their wellbeing and selfconfidence.’ She added that ten minutes on a pony is equivalent to 30 minutes of physio.

‘Riding also offers challenge, often denied to many people, especially those who have been affected by an accident or serious illness. Meeting the challenge and succeeding gives them a chance to improve mobility and a sense of freedom and achievement. Many riders’ progression can be astounding even after a short period of time. The volunteers are involved at all stages of the rider’s journey and we all enjoy the improvement in skills and wellbeing; that is why we are here.’ The Riding for the Disabled Jersey Group has been making a difference to people’s lives for over 40 years and welcomes children and adults with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities. Fifty volunteers, some of whom have been involved for over 35 years, support ten rides a week based at Le Claire Riding Stables in St John. Up to 60 people ride each week with the youngest being just three years old. And, as Rachel encouraged a young

AUTUMN 2019

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SPORT

SPORT

Swimming Workout

RIDING FUN AND RIDING THERAPY

In the water, walk up and down on the spot, bringing one knee up into the chest, then repeating with the other leg x 20. Continue this as a quicker running motion, so using your arms as well to run on the spot with high knees. Front Crawl with Float. Holding the float out in front of you, kick with the legs to move forward on your front. This is a great exercise for the legs and glutes. x 10 lengths. Back Crawl with Float. Continue as above but on your back, holding the float into your chest. x 10 lengths. Breaststroke. This is a wonderful full body exercise. Take deep breaths, and large strokes. x 10 lengths. Chloë Bowler is a Wellbeing Expert, looking after her clients’ complete wellbeing including fitness, nutrition and emotional wellbeing. Her services include Personal Training, Nutrition & Meal Delivery as well as Sports Massage. With over ten years experience working in central London, looking after a host of celebrity clients, Chloë now lives and works in Jersey. She loves helping people to learn to enjoy exercise and good nutrition in a comfortable and friendly environment. For more information on personal training, and meal delivery packages see chloebowler.com

The ‘Riding for the Disabled’ charity celebrates its 50th anniversary in September. Ruth Le Cocq visited the Jersey group

S

eeing the joy on a person’s face as they discover what it feels like to sit on the back of a pony as it moves freely, when perhaps they cannot, is just one aspect motivating a group of committed volunteers at Jersey’s Riding for the Disabled. ‘It’s really amazing,’ said Kerri Correia, the RDA Jersey Group’s Publicity Officer, who began volunteering two years ago after witnessing the transformational effects horse riding had on her son. ‘We had one little boy who came and he was petrified to get on the horse. Everyone took the time he needed there’s no pressure and it’s all very controlled - and eventually he got on the horse and he loved it. ‘Within ten minutes he shouted: “I love my life I do!” I think it was just the joy of being on a horse, of trying something new, of being pleased with himself. That’s why I volunteer.’

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- AUTUMN 2019

Rachel Andrews, who shares the role of Joint Group Organiser with Cathy Fricker, wholeheartedly agreed. ‘For youngsters and adults who are confined to using a walker or even a wheelchair, there is a liberating feeling of being on a pony because they physically don’t have to move and they can just sit there and enjoy it,’ she said. However, Rachel emphasised that there is a lot more going on during the riding sessions than pure enjoyment. ‘The aim of riding therapy is to provide physiotherapy on the move; the warmth and three-dimensional movement of the horse is transmitted through the body of the rider helping the body to relax and strengthen core muscles. Riders also find it helps to improve their posture, balance and coordination as well as hugely improving their wellbeing and selfconfidence.’ She added that ten minutes on a pony is equivalent to 30 minutes of physio.

‘Riding also offers challenge, often denied to many people, especially those who have been affected by an accident or serious illness. Meeting the challenge and succeeding gives them a chance to improve mobility and a sense of freedom and achievement. Many riders’ progression can be astounding even after a short period of time. The volunteers are involved at all stages of the rider’s journey and we all enjoy the improvement in skills and wellbeing; that is why we are here.’ The Riding for the Disabled Jersey Group has been making a difference to people’s lives for over 40 years and welcomes children and adults with a range of physical and/or learning disabilities. Fifty volunteers, some of whom have been involved for over 35 years, support ten rides a week based at Le Claire Riding Stables in St John. Up to 60 people ride each week with the youngest being just three years old. And, as Rachel encouraged a young

AUTUMN 2019

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SPORT

participant to watch a horse being shod in the background, she explained RDA is not just about riding. ‘There are a number of ponies at these stables and they are especially chosen for their temperament and movement to assist the specialist needs of the riders. The benefit of using a working stable is that the riders can see where the ponies live, what they eat, help to clean tack and groom them,’ she said. The riders, if they wish, can be tested for grading in Horsecare and Riding; this achievement cannot be underestimated and the smiles receiving badges and certificates are very special. However, with each rider needing up to three people to support them during the session, the RDA is keen to encourage more people to become involved, whether they have horse experience or not. Volunteers are trained in a variety of roles including helping riders to mount and dismount (sometimes using a hydraulic lift), leading the pony and

walking alongside the rider and pony. Rachel added that the Group is also keen to find a pony or horse capable of carrying slightly heavier riders. ‘An RDA pony or horse is an exceptional one. They have to be completely bombproof, they must be kind, they have to be tolerant. You can’t expect them to do RDA all the time as they need the variety so that’s why this riding school is ideal because the ponies do a few hours of RDA a week and then they benefit from other things,’ she explained. In the meantime, the local group will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the UK’s RDA during a ‘golden week’ in September when all the riders will have fun with gymkhana style games and a countryside challenge. ‘We have volunteers who have been involved for many years and there is a real sense of community. We all just love it and I think that is the secret of volunteering – to do something that you really enjoy,’ said Rachel.

In Pursuit of Pigeons

* To find out more about volunteering with Riding for Disabled Jersey Group contact rda.jersey@gmail.com or take a look at the website www.rda.org.je

(Clay Ones)

beautiful hand crafted interiors Get in touch today to discover how the team at Matthew Thebault Stonemasons can transform your interior space into something truly special. 01534 738 358

07797 750 820

www.mtstonemasons.com

66

- AUTUMN 2019

MEMBER OF THE

Ever thought of taking up shooting as a sport? Sebastian Wijsmuller suggests ways to enable you to train and to enjoy clay pigeon shooting in Jersey

S

hooting any sort of animal is not a universally popular sport; many people would indeed take marked exception to using the word ‘sport’ in this context and their opinion is to be respected. But shooting clay pigeons destroys nothing more than an inanimate (although fast moving) clay object, and makes the shooting experience simply an enjoyable test of eye and hand coordination and skill.

instance to contact Lecq Clay Target Club. For a small fee that includes the use of a club gun, cartridges, clays and tuition, a beginner can have an introductory couple of hours behind the gun.

So anyone who would like to take up shooting, whether they already have experience or are new to the sport, would be well advised in the first

As Jack Hanby, the club’s secretary, said: Since we refurbished the club house in time for the Island games and Home Internationals we’ve been

The Club, at Lecq Farm, St Ouen* has recently been refurbished and extended and new shooters are made to feel very welcome.

inundated with corporate events. Many Island firms have team building or inter-departmental competitions up here. We’ve never seen anyone leave disappointed - in fact most have smiles from ear to ear, especially the ladies!’ No licence is required just to visit the club and have a go. The guns provided do not “kick hard”, as beginners are started on sub-sonic cartridges that produce very little recoil. Nor need they worry that it will be easier for men to handle a shotgun that it is for women, since the guns aren’t really heavy (about 6 lbs) and the ladies are well represented up to and including Olympic level. The club is delighted if potential new members bring a friend - the more the merrier. The club is open almost every day after 10am by appointment and every Sunday without one. On a first visit, beginners will be greeted by an instructor who will select a suitable gun. They will be shown how to “mount” (which means how you hold the gun (nothing to do with horses!) and there is a brief safety talk to ensure they don’t kill themselves or anybody else. Receiving a lesson early on is vital – it’s important that beginners don’t pick up any bad habits. The best shots in the

AUTUMN 2019

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SPORT

participant to watch a horse being shod in the background, she explained RDA is not just about riding. ‘There are a number of ponies at these stables and they are especially chosen for their temperament and movement to assist the specialist needs of the riders. The benefit of using a working stable is that the riders can see where the ponies live, what they eat, help to clean tack and groom them,’ she said. The riders, if they wish, can be tested for grading in Horsecare and Riding; this achievement cannot be underestimated and the smiles receiving badges and certificates are very special. However, with each rider needing up to three people to support them during the session, the RDA is keen to encourage more people to become involved, whether they have horse experience or not. Volunteers are trained in a variety of roles including helping riders to mount and dismount (sometimes using a hydraulic lift), leading the pony and

walking alongside the rider and pony. Rachel added that the Group is also keen to find a pony or horse capable of carrying slightly heavier riders. ‘An RDA pony or horse is an exceptional one. They have to be completely bombproof, they must be kind, they have to be tolerant. You can’t expect them to do RDA all the time as they need the variety so that’s why this riding school is ideal because the ponies do a few hours of RDA a week and then they benefit from other things,’ she explained. In the meantime, the local group will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the UK’s RDA during a ‘golden week’ in September when all the riders will have fun with gymkhana style games and a countryside challenge. ‘We have volunteers who have been involved for many years and there is a real sense of community. We all just love it and I think that is the secret of volunteering – to do something that you really enjoy,’ said Rachel.

In Pursuit of Pigeons

* To find out more about volunteering with Riding for Disabled Jersey Group contact rda.jersey@gmail.com or take a look at the website www.rda.org.je

(Clay Ones)

beautiful hand crafted interiors Get in touch today to discover how the team at Matthew Thebault Stonemasons can transform your interior space into something truly special. 01534 738 358

07797 750 820

www.mtstonemasons.com

66

- AUTUMN 2019

MEMBER OF THE

Ever thought of taking up shooting as a sport? Sebastian Wijsmuller suggests ways to enable you to train and to enjoy clay pigeon shooting in Jersey

S

hooting any sort of animal is not a universally popular sport; many people would indeed take marked exception to using the word ‘sport’ in this context and their opinion is to be respected. But shooting clay pigeons destroys nothing more than an inanimate (although fast moving) clay object, and makes the shooting experience simply an enjoyable test of eye and hand coordination and skill.

instance to contact Lecq Clay Target Club. For a small fee that includes the use of a club gun, cartridges, clays and tuition, a beginner can have an introductory couple of hours behind the gun.

So anyone who would like to take up shooting, whether they already have experience or are new to the sport, would be well advised in the first

As Jack Hanby, the club’s secretary, said: Since we refurbished the club house in time for the Island games and Home Internationals we’ve been

The Club, at Lecq Farm, St Ouen* has recently been refurbished and extended and new shooters are made to feel very welcome.

inundated with corporate events. Many Island firms have team building or inter-departmental competitions up here. We’ve never seen anyone leave disappointed - in fact most have smiles from ear to ear, especially the ladies!’ No licence is required just to visit the club and have a go. The guns provided do not “kick hard”, as beginners are started on sub-sonic cartridges that produce very little recoil. Nor need they worry that it will be easier for men to handle a shotgun that it is for women, since the guns aren’t really heavy (about 6 lbs) and the ladies are well represented up to and including Olympic level. The club is delighted if potential new members bring a friend - the more the merrier. The club is open almost every day after 10am by appointment and every Sunday without one. On a first visit, beginners will be greeted by an instructor who will select a suitable gun. They will be shown how to “mount” (which means how you hold the gun (nothing to do with horses!) and there is a brief safety talk to ensure they don’t kill themselves or anybody else. Receiving a lesson early on is vital – it’s important that beginners don’t pick up any bad habits. The best shots in the

AUTUMN 2019

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

SPORT

world still receive regular lessons. ‘Try to relax,’ the instructor says, ‘don’t be discouraged if you don’t hit much to begin with.’ Don’t be afraid to ask your instructor any questions; no question is a stupid one. Jack continued: ‘It’s important not to rush things, you won’t get it straight away so try and have a goal for every lesson you have; for example one lesson you might want to focus mainly on perfecting your stance or working on how much lead to give the clay.’ ‘On top of all of that it’s good fun, a great day out with your friends and probably something a bit different to how you usually might spend a Saturday or Sunday.’ What’s the best first gun to buy? The most important thing to do before you buy your first gun is to try an array of different makes. It’s not a ‘one size fits all’ when it comes to shooting. The standard and most common first gun to buy is a second-hand Berretta silver pigeon. It will cost around £1,000 and it will last for ever. Also very popular is the Browning 525. Most shooting mechanisms are exactly the same and it’s

only the wood and engraving that makes a difference to the price. When trying out the size of a gun, a helpful tip to see if it fits, is to put the butt of the weapon in your elbow crook, the trigger should be running across between your second and third knuckle. And what’s best to wear? Well, as the saying goes: ‘there is no such thing as bad weather, only inappropriate clothing.’ You need to get the right clothes and find equipment that works for you. It always manages to be either sweltering or freezing at Lecq - mostly freezing. So buy a good pair of wellies, an insulating hat and good thick coat (ideally tweed - try Oliver Brown) with deep pockets to hold cartridges and gloves. Fiddling around with cartridges, bags and guns when you can’t feel your fingers isn’t very pleasant. So you might be interested in getting thin gloves that have the option of being fingerless. It’s worth getting decent kit. As in any sport, if you invest time, effort and money you will reap the rewards. * Lecq Clay Target Club, Lecq Farm, La Rue de Lecq, St Ouen. 01534 484396

glanville_Layout 1 29/08/2019 10:28 Page 1

For Ladies who lol! From front to back, top to bottom, inside and out - Glanville Home for ladies provides the comfort, care, consideration and conviviality that ladies of a certain age enjoy.

As a charitable organisation Glanville Home, an elegant period building, provides short stay, respite care for any period, and ongoing permanent care. Residents benefit from many mod-cons in this highly considered facility and are cared for, and included in decision making, by friendly, experienced staff. Home cooked meals, often using produce from the on-site fruit and veg gardens are always on the menu - as are regular movie nights, outings to the Opera House, cinema, garden centres and Durrell, which often end with a delightful ice cream or afternoon tea.

Beautiful gardens, a delightful conservatory and two lounges allow ladies time and space to enjoy activity, conversation, or simply lol about!

RURAL PROPERTY

Times in the countryside they are a-changing, as they are everywhere else; Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates asks: is it time now to make the conditions on land transactions less restrictive I have dealt with many land transactions since Agricultural conditions were imposed in 1974; since that time the traditional type of family farming and grower business has virtually disappeared. Very rarely do we encounter the farming family occupying a granite farmhouse with 19th Century outbuildings and a more recently constructed agricultural shed surrounded by its own fields under the supervision of a father and son partnership. I would imagine many residents drive around the island and see fields being cultivated with Jersey Royal potatoes or grazed by cattle - but do they any idea about the changing background of the local agricultural industry? Young men and women who would have been working away on the land are now sitting at their stations taping away on laptops in office blocks on the Esplanade - previously the hub of the agricultural industry where produce merchants operated in their large warehouses. So, when we offer land for sale many enquiries are from people who are not bona fide local agriculturalists or horticulturalists.

One has to explain that if they wish to acquire good agricultural land we have to submit an application to Land Controls at Howard Davis Farm. The consent issued will state they cannot occupy the land nor can it be used for ‘grazing of equine animals or growing of trees’. This obviously frustrates many interested parties who fancy the idea of having a piece of their own land to grow vegetables, plant fruit trees, keep chickens and, in general, practise living ‘the good life.’ However, if one is serious, one can apply for a smallholder’s license which involves the submission of an application form along with a business plan and cash flow forecast. Further information can be obtained from John Vautier, Rural Business Advisor at Howard Davis Farm. As most of the farm holdings are now large concerns, smaller fields, especially côtils, are becoming neglected. So, is it time the regulations became less restrictive?

If would-be smallholders are unrealistic, the downside of changing the regulations might mean that they are unable to tend the land successfully; they could construct small sheds, park vehicles and boats and fail to comply with the branchage law. In addition, many hope one day that the land will yield a dwelling rather than a crop! But the advantage of changing the law is that, should a smallholder be successful, it would bring great satisfaction and enjoyment to the occupant, keep land in good use and produce crops for the local market. The regulations are administered by John Vautier, Simon Surcouf and Richard Huelin. All come from farming families and are employed by Growth, Housing and Environment at Howard Davis Farm. Final policy decisions are with the politicians, who will have to react to the changing of the structure of the rural economy in the Island. For further information contact ruraleconomy@gov.je

For further information or to arrange a visit, contact Andrea Hughes, Head of Glanville Home, 70 - 74 St Marks Road. JE2 7LD Tel: 733528 email: andrea@glanville.je

www.glanvillehome.com 68

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

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SPORT

world still receive regular lessons. ‘Try to relax,’ the instructor says, ‘don’t be discouraged if you don’t hit much to begin with.’ Don’t be afraid to ask your instructor any questions; no question is a stupid one. Jack continued: ‘It’s important not to rush things, you won’t get it straight away so try and have a goal for every lesson you have; for example one lesson you might want to focus mainly on perfecting your stance or working on how much lead to give the clay.’ ‘On top of all of that it’s good fun, a great day out with your friends and probably something a bit different to how you usually might spend a Saturday or Sunday.’ What’s the best first gun to buy? The most important thing to do before you buy your first gun is to try an array of different makes. It’s not a ‘one size fits all’ when it comes to shooting. The standard and most common first gun to buy is a second-hand Berretta silver pigeon. It will cost around £1,000 and it will last for ever. Also very popular is the Browning 525. Most shooting mechanisms are exactly the same and it’s

only the wood and engraving that makes a difference to the price. When trying out the size of a gun, a helpful tip to see if it fits, is to put the butt of the weapon in your elbow crook, the trigger should be running across between your second and third knuckle. And what’s best to wear? Well, as the saying goes: ‘there is no such thing as bad weather, only inappropriate clothing.’ You need to get the right clothes and find equipment that works for you. It always manages to be either sweltering or freezing at Lecq - mostly freezing. So buy a good pair of wellies, an insulating hat and good thick coat (ideally tweed - try Oliver Brown) with deep pockets to hold cartridges and gloves. Fiddling around with cartridges, bags and guns when you can’t feel your fingers isn’t very pleasant. So you might be interested in getting thin gloves that have the option of being fingerless. It’s worth getting decent kit. As in any sport, if you invest time, effort and money you will reap the rewards. * Lecq Clay Target Club, Lecq Farm, La Rue de Lecq, St Ouen. 01534 484396

glanville_Layout 1 29/08/2019 10:28 Page 1

For Ladies who lol! From front to back, top to bottom, inside and out - Glanville Home for ladies provides the comfort, care, consideration and conviviality that ladies of a certain age enjoy.

As a charitable organisation Glanville Home, an elegant period building, provides short stay, respite care for any period, and ongoing permanent care. Residents benefit from many mod-cons in this highly considered facility and are cared for, and included in decision making, by friendly, experienced staff. Home cooked meals, often using produce from the on-site fruit and veg gardens are always on the menu - as are regular movie nights, outings to the Opera House, cinema, garden centres and Durrell, which often end with a delightful ice cream or afternoon tea.

Beautiful gardens, a delightful conservatory and two lounges allow ladies time and space to enjoy activity, conversation, or simply lol about!

RURAL PROPERTY

Times in the countryside they are a-changing, as they are everywhere else; Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates asks: is it time now to make the conditions on land transactions less restrictive I have dealt with many land transactions since Agricultural conditions were imposed in 1974; since that time the traditional type of family farming and grower business has virtually disappeared. Very rarely do we encounter the farming family occupying a granite farmhouse with 19th Century outbuildings and a more recently constructed agricultural shed surrounded by its own fields under the supervision of a father and son partnership. I would imagine many residents drive around the island and see fields being cultivated with Jersey Royal potatoes or grazed by cattle - but do they any idea about the changing background of the local agricultural industry? Young men and women who would have been working away on the land are now sitting at their stations taping away on laptops in office blocks on the Esplanade - previously the hub of the agricultural industry where produce merchants operated in their large warehouses. So, when we offer land for sale many enquiries are from people who are not bona fide local agriculturalists or horticulturalists.

One has to explain that if they wish to acquire good agricultural land we have to submit an application to Land Controls at Howard Davis Farm. The consent issued will state they cannot occupy the land nor can it be used for ‘grazing of equine animals or growing of trees’. This obviously frustrates many interested parties who fancy the idea of having a piece of their own land to grow vegetables, plant fruit trees, keep chickens and, in general, practise living ‘the good life.’ However, if one is serious, one can apply for a smallholder’s license which involves the submission of an application form along with a business plan and cash flow forecast. Further information can be obtained from John Vautier, Rural Business Advisor at Howard Davis Farm. As most of the farm holdings are now large concerns, smaller fields, especially côtils, are becoming neglected. So, is it time the regulations became less restrictive?

If would-be smallholders are unrealistic, the downside of changing the regulations might mean that they are unable to tend the land successfully; they could construct small sheds, park vehicles and boats and fail to comply with the branchage law. In addition, many hope one day that the land will yield a dwelling rather than a crop! But the advantage of changing the law is that, should a smallholder be successful, it would bring great satisfaction and enjoyment to the occupant, keep land in good use and produce crops for the local market. The regulations are administered by John Vautier, Simon Surcouf and Richard Huelin. All come from farming families and are employed by Growth, Housing and Environment at Howard Davis Farm. Final policy decisions are with the politicians, who will have to react to the changing of the structure of the rural economy in the Island. For further information contact ruraleconomy@gov.je

For further information or to arrange a visit, contact Andrea Hughes, Head of Glanville Home, 70 - 74 St Marks Road. JE2 7LD Tel: 733528 email: andrea@glanville.je

www.glanvillehome.com 68

- AUTUMN 2019

AUTUMN 2019

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ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

HERITAGE

LE MAISTRE ESTATES

Weathervanes Frank Le Blancq, the Chairman of the Société Jersiaise Meteorology Section talks about weathervanes.

T

he Le Maistre family first appeared in Jersey records in the 14th Century and they have been at the forefront of local business ever since - from farming to tree surgery, garden landscaping and machinery and now - Estate Agency. Michael Le Maistre brings long standing ties amalgamated over hundreds of years to create well established relationships with the Island’s community to this new company. Catherine has nearly 20 years’ experience under her belt. She has built up a real estate network that would rival anyone’s. Both benefit from an enormous property network and ties cultivated over centuries. Now the co-founders of Le Maistre Estates, Catherine and Michael combine their knowledge and honesty to create a personable experience designed to make buying and selling as stress free an experience as possible.

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W “Catherine has been professional, very approachable and made us feel extremely valued. She kept us informed and managed our expectations” “Michael made the Despite it being in its infancy Le Maistre whole process stress estates boasts close working relationships with local developers offering everything free and went the extra from one bed apartments to land to family homes to country estates. mile with a smile on For all your property requirements please his face.” contact Michael and Catherine at Le Maistre estates on 737716, info@estates.je or at www.estates.je

eathervanes have been a feature of the landscape and skyline for centuries and today they adorn churches, public buildings, houses, farms, schools and even garden sheds. Some are simple, others ornate, with a variety of designs and sometimes splendid wrought ironwork too, but we tend to take them for granted. Driving along with eyes glued to the road, sadly they often go unnoticed. It is only when you start looking that you realise how many there are, some tucked away and not easily seen. Those atop churches are perhaps best known because since they are more visible and nearly always depict a cockerel. To the ancients, winds had divine powers so weathervanes have a long history. Dating back to ancient Greece and beyond, weathervanes depicting wind gods such as Boreas, Notos and Zephyrus decorated the villas of wealthy landowners. The octagonal Tower of the Winds built in Athens over 2,000 years ago can still be seen today, though without the vane.

The word ‘vane’ comes from the Anglo-Saxon word ‘fana’ meaning a flag, because in mediaeval times fabric pennants were used for archers to see the direction of the wind. Later, the cloth flags were replaced by metal ones, often decorated with an insignia or coats of arms. Archaeologists have discovered bronze Viking weathervanes from the 9th century, usually surmounted by an animal or creature from Norse fable. Being skilled seamen the Vikings commonly used them on their ships, no doubt on their initial forays to this Island as well. A 9th century Pope decreed that every church in Europe should show a cock on its dome or steeple. It was a reminder of Jesus’ prophecy that the cock would not crow the morning after the Last Supper until Peter had denounced him three times. That is why weathercocks are found on many church steeples. The 11th Century Bayeux Tapestry also shows a scene of a craftsman attaching a rooster vane to Westminster Abbey in 1065. Weathervanes in centuries past were often in the form of a pennant and had a practical use, providing a rudimentary

guide to the weather each day. In the age of sail, from the Vikings onward, when ships could not sail close to the wind, knowing the wind direction was a vital piece of information by which to navigate and perhaps gain advantage over enemy vessels or commercial rivals. Today, weathervanes have generally lost their original purpose so are largely decorative, but we should not forget that no weathervane was put in place by accident – someone made a deliberate choice to buy or have one made. Some old pennant style vanes remain to remind us of yesteryear, such as at La Houge Bie, but gradually other forms have taken over and are more common today. Cockerels are probably the most common, followed by simple arrow pointers. Some hint at a profession, hobby or business, while others depict domestic pets and wild animals. A few are difficult to categorise at all. In keeping with the heritage of our Island, ships and boats are quite common and so are cattle. Enjoy this small sample of the hundreds which can be seen around Jersey and which will come to form a part of our heritage, for very few modern buildings have a weathervane nowadays. AUTUMN 2019

- 71


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

HERITAGE

LE MAISTRE ESTATES

Weathervanes Frank Le Blancq, the Chairman of the Société Jersiaise Meteorology Section talks about weathervanes.

T

he Le Maistre family first appeared in Jersey records in the 14th Century and they have been at the forefront of local business ever since - from farming to tree surgery, garden landscaping and machinery and now - Estate Agency. Michael Le Maistre brings long standing ties amalgamated over hundreds of years to create well established relationships with the Island’s community to this new company. Catherine has nearly 20 years’ experience under her belt. She has built up a real estate network that would rival anyone’s. Both benefit from an enormous property network and ties cultivated over centuries. Now the co-founders of Le Maistre Estates, Catherine and Michael combine their knowledge and honesty to create a personable experience designed to make buying and selling as stress free an experience as possible.

70

- AUTUMN 2019

W “Catherine has been professional, very approachable and made us feel extremely valued. She kept us informed and managed our expectations” “Michael made the Despite it being in its infancy Le Maistre whole process stress estates boasts close working relationships with local developers offering everything free and went the extra from one bed apartments to land to family homes to country estates. mile with a smile on For all your property requirements please his face.” contact Michael and Catherine at Le Maistre estates on 737716, info@estates.je or at www.estates.je

eathervanes have been a feature of the landscape and skyline for centuries and today they adorn churches, public buildings, houses, farms, schools and even garden sheds. Some are simple, others ornate, with a variety of designs and sometimes splendid wrought ironwork too, but we tend to take them for granted. Driving along with eyes glued to the road, sadly they often go unnoticed. It is only when you start looking that you realise how many there are, some tucked away and not easily seen. Those atop churches are perhaps best known because since they are more visible and nearly always depict a cockerel. To the ancients, winds had divine powers so weathervanes have a long history. Dating back to ancient Greece and beyond, weathervanes depicting wind gods such as Boreas, Notos and Zephyrus decorated the villas of wealthy landowners. The octagonal Tower of the Winds built in Athens over 2,000 years ago can still be seen today, though without the vane.

The word ‘vane’ comes from the Anglo-Saxon word ‘fana’ meaning a flag, because in mediaeval times fabric pennants were used for archers to see the direction of the wind. Later, the cloth flags were replaced by metal ones, often decorated with an insignia or coats of arms. Archaeologists have discovered bronze Viking weathervanes from the 9th century, usually surmounted by an animal or creature from Norse fable. Being skilled seamen the Vikings commonly used them on their ships, no doubt on their initial forays to this Island as well. A 9th century Pope decreed that every church in Europe should show a cock on its dome or steeple. It was a reminder of Jesus’ prophecy that the cock would not crow the morning after the Last Supper until Peter had denounced him three times. That is why weathercocks are found on many church steeples. The 11th Century Bayeux Tapestry also shows a scene of a craftsman attaching a rooster vane to Westminster Abbey in 1065. Weathervanes in centuries past were often in the form of a pennant and had a practical use, providing a rudimentary

guide to the weather each day. In the age of sail, from the Vikings onward, when ships could not sail close to the wind, knowing the wind direction was a vital piece of information by which to navigate and perhaps gain advantage over enemy vessels or commercial rivals. Today, weathervanes have generally lost their original purpose so are largely decorative, but we should not forget that no weathervane was put in place by accident – someone made a deliberate choice to buy or have one made. Some old pennant style vanes remain to remind us of yesteryear, such as at La Houge Bie, but gradually other forms have taken over and are more common today. Cockerels are probably the most common, followed by simple arrow pointers. Some hint at a profession, hobby or business, while others depict domestic pets and wild animals. A few are difficult to categorise at all. In keeping with the heritage of our Island, ships and boats are quite common and so are cattle. Enjoy this small sample of the hundreds which can be seen around Jersey and which will come to form a part of our heritage, for very few modern buildings have a weathervane nowadays. AUTUMN 2019

- 71


NNE EXXTT DDOOOORR NNE EI G GH HB BO OU UR R SS

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

Thalassotherapy in Dinard the three individual restaurants offer completely different choices – over a week’s stay you can have gourmet cuisine, a delicious authentic meal in the Restaurant O’Sens or a more simple dish at Bar L’Albatros overlooking the ocean – all traditional cuisine using local products – there’s even oysters for breakfast!

Did you know there’s a maritime Paradise just across the water? Kieranne Grimshaw found it at the 4-star Thalassa Novotel in Dinard.

The French certainly seem to know how to relax and unwind and it’s at the 4- Star Thalassa Novotel in Dinard that this happens – a place where you can experience unique treatments and superb gourmet dining all in one location. And it’s only a 5 minute drive or a pleasant 20 minute seaside walk along the coast from Dinard town. Thalassotherapy is an ancient healing treatment dating back 5000 years – being the therapeutic use of seawater in cosmetic and health therapy. The French coined the phrase in the 18th Century from the Greek – Thalassa (water) and Therapy (healing), when France was becoming renowned for its seawater Spa Centres. As you enter the spacious hotel foyer, the relaxed decor with natural lighting is all things maritime – sea blues and pastel greens compliment light wooden flooring and walls. The mood is calm and there’s no-one rushing about here. Looking straight ahead, the panoramic ocean view catches your eye – with the Bar L’Albatros’ large bay windows and open plan, it feels like being on a cruise ship – but with more space.

72

- AUTUMN 2019

If you choose a sea facing room, the views are breath-taking – the balconies face directly over the lawns, cliffs and ocean. With a garden view, amongst the Palm trees, the recent extension in 2000 offers a complete contrast. The beautiful, Swedish style accommodation has light wood on the corridor walls, giving a feeling of immense space with its fresh contemporary decor. There are currently 173 rooms either sea or garden – a difficult choice, perhaps a few days in each? The entire hotel has a serene and welcoming feel – major works were undertaken in 2011 and in December 2017 an extension to the bar and renovations to the Restaurant O’Sens were completed. In February 2018 the new gastronomic Restaurant L’Arsaour was opened – this really is outstanding dining in a magnificent location. One of the main driving forces behind the business is Mme Joelle Colin, Hotel Director, who’s been with the group 18 years and is 100% committed to its continuing success. She’s responsible for creating a programme of targeted treatments and assures us any hotel renovations are done tastefully without changing the basic structure of this traditional building. Together with her

team of 94% French staff, Mme Colin is instrumental in creating a professional and relaxed ambiance – and totally French!

in Pilates or just a swim in the heated seawater pool surrounded by natural light and enjoy an amazing view of the ocean as you do your lengths!

The beauty of staying here is the unique variety of experiences available – you can just have a bed for the night, pop in for a gourmet dinner or decide on one of the bespoke packages. If you’re feeling indulgent, you could have a relaxing weekend or entire week of seawater spa treatments – make time to take time just for you – It’s the perfect way to melt away the stress. The French seem to do this well, they make up 94% of visitors here; perhaps the English could learn from them.

In between treatments is almost a therapy itself. Quiet areas overlooking the ocean are perfect to sit in your white robe and sip a complimentary Tisane (herb tea) whilst simply gazing out at the sea – and not a mobile phone in sight.

A favourite is the purifying seaweed wrap (definitely sounds better in French – l’enveloppement d’algues) – lying on a comfortable massage table, the body is covered in a clay or mud-like substance, so the skin can absorb minerals and nutrients from the seaweed – it’s surprisingly warm and you really do feel invigorated and glowing at the end when it’s all washed off – and the seaweed is from Brittany.

Mme Colin admits she gets total job satisfaction when customers arrive feeling stressed after rushing about, and then just seem to be transformed. ‘They simply need to take a break,’ she said ‘and here they become totally relaxed in their own world.’ Some visitors come here just for the dining and it’s understandable why. France is a nation of food lovers and

For alfresco lovers, the restaurants have access to a superb terrace with panoramic ocean views – a perfect place to savour a fruit cocktail or two for that special hen do or anniversary treat. The sea is on your doorstep – just a small footpath leads down to the beach and rocks below. Despite the traditional feel to this place, Mme Colin assures us there are still plans for the future. ‘We intend to install French windows in all the sea facing rooms’ she confirmed. ‘And also completely redecorate the interiors. This should be ready for 2021.’ she finished – It will definitely be worth another visit – à bientôt! * Contact details: 1 Avenue du Chateau Hébert, Dinard; Tel (00 33) 2 99 16 78 10 Website: www.accorhotels.com Email: H1114-RE@accor.com

For further indulgence and a totally soporific experience, the Calming Sea Water Bath (Bain de la Mer Serenité) is pure heaven – you simply have to sit back and relax with a supportive neck pillow. In a decent size bath, jets massage your body, finishing off with bubbles – all in a low light with soft music – this is pampering at its best and perfect during a cold winter break. There’s a treatment for everyone. The active can benefit from aqua biking or the aqua gym, whilst anyone can join

AUTUMN 2019

- 73


NNE EXXTT DDOOOORR NNE EI G GH HB BO OU UR R SS

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

Thalassotherapy in Dinard the three individual restaurants offer completely different choices – over a week’s stay you can have gourmet cuisine, a delicious authentic meal in the Restaurant O’Sens or a more simple dish at Bar L’Albatros overlooking the ocean – all traditional cuisine using local products – there’s even oysters for breakfast!

Did you know there’s a maritime Paradise just across the water? Kieranne Grimshaw found it at the 4-star Thalassa Novotel in Dinard.

The French certainly seem to know how to relax and unwind and it’s at the 4- Star Thalassa Novotel in Dinard that this happens – a place where you can experience unique treatments and superb gourmet dining all in one location. And it’s only a 5 minute drive or a pleasant 20 minute seaside walk along the coast from Dinard town. Thalassotherapy is an ancient healing treatment dating back 5000 years – being the therapeutic use of seawater in cosmetic and health therapy. The French coined the phrase in the 18th Century from the Greek – Thalassa (water) and Therapy (healing), when France was becoming renowned for its seawater Spa Centres. As you enter the spacious hotel foyer, the relaxed decor with natural lighting is all things maritime – sea blues and pastel greens compliment light wooden flooring and walls. The mood is calm and there’s no-one rushing about here. Looking straight ahead, the panoramic ocean view catches your eye – with the Bar L’Albatros’ large bay windows and open plan, it feels like being on a cruise ship – but with more space.

72

- AUTUMN 2019

If you choose a sea facing room, the views are breath-taking – the balconies face directly over the lawns, cliffs and ocean. With a garden view, amongst the Palm trees, the recent extension in 2000 offers a complete contrast. The beautiful, Swedish style accommodation has light wood on the corridor walls, giving a feeling of immense space with its fresh contemporary decor. There are currently 173 rooms either sea or garden – a difficult choice, perhaps a few days in each? The entire hotel has a serene and welcoming feel – major works were undertaken in 2011 and in December 2017 an extension to the bar and renovations to the Restaurant O’Sens were completed. In February 2018 the new gastronomic Restaurant L’Arsaour was opened – this really is outstanding dining in a magnificent location. One of the main driving forces behind the business is Mme Joelle Colin, Hotel Director, who’s been with the group 18 years and is 100% committed to its continuing success. She’s responsible for creating a programme of targeted treatments and assures us any hotel renovations are done tastefully without changing the basic structure of this traditional building. Together with her

team of 94% French staff, Mme Colin is instrumental in creating a professional and relaxed ambiance – and totally French!

in Pilates or just a swim in the heated seawater pool surrounded by natural light and enjoy an amazing view of the ocean as you do your lengths!

The beauty of staying here is the unique variety of experiences available – you can just have a bed for the night, pop in for a gourmet dinner or decide on one of the bespoke packages. If you’re feeling indulgent, you could have a relaxing weekend or entire week of seawater spa treatments – make time to take time just for you – It’s the perfect way to melt away the stress. The French seem to do this well, they make up 94% of visitors here; perhaps the English could learn from them.

In between treatments is almost a therapy itself. Quiet areas overlooking the ocean are perfect to sit in your white robe and sip a complimentary Tisane (herb tea) whilst simply gazing out at the sea – and not a mobile phone in sight.

A favourite is the purifying seaweed wrap (definitely sounds better in French – l’enveloppement d’algues) – lying on a comfortable massage table, the body is covered in a clay or mud-like substance, so the skin can absorb minerals and nutrients from the seaweed – it’s surprisingly warm and you really do feel invigorated and glowing at the end when it’s all washed off – and the seaweed is from Brittany.

Mme Colin admits she gets total job satisfaction when customers arrive feeling stressed after rushing about, and then just seem to be transformed. ‘They simply need to take a break,’ she said ‘and here they become totally relaxed in their own world.’ Some visitors come here just for the dining and it’s understandable why. France is a nation of food lovers and

For alfresco lovers, the restaurants have access to a superb terrace with panoramic ocean views – a perfect place to savour a fruit cocktail or two for that special hen do or anniversary treat. The sea is on your doorstep – just a small footpath leads down to the beach and rocks below. Despite the traditional feel to this place, Mme Colin assures us there are still plans for the future. ‘We intend to install French windows in all the sea facing rooms’ she confirmed. ‘And also completely redecorate the interiors. This should be ready for 2021.’ she finished – It will definitely be worth another visit – à bientôt! * Contact details: 1 Avenue du Chateau Hébert, Dinard; Tel (00 33) 2 99 16 78 10 Website: www.accorhotels.com Email: H1114-RE@accor.com

For further indulgence and a totally soporific experience, the Calming Sea Water Bath (Bain de la Mer Serenité) is pure heaven – you simply have to sit back and relax with a supportive neck pillow. In a decent size bath, jets massage your body, finishing off with bubbles – all in a low light with soft music – this is pampering at its best and perfect during a cold winter break. There’s a treatment for everyone. The active can benefit from aqua biking or the aqua gym, whilst anyone can join

AUTUMN 2019

- 73


NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

BELLS AND OLD LACE

The bell is hoisted out of the pit, and as the final coating of earth and clay is chipped away, this archetypal instrument emerges; it is like an act of creation and the result is made visible for the first time. So, the foundry owners, the Bergamo family, act as a sort of guardian for a complete industrial history of one process which makes a visit to this town fascinating. There are regular tours most days and these can be checked out at www.cornille-havard. com Before the foundry arrived, the men in the town worked the copper and the women found their own work in lacemaking, so bringing more wealth to the town. It is said that there were once two noises which distinguished Villedieu, the sound of the hammers beating out the copper, and the click-clack of the bobbins of the lacemakers. These ladies used to gather and, while working on auto pilot, would enjoy a good gossip (un caquet). There was, I am assured, a Place de Caquet in Villedieu; it might in English be translated as ‘gossipshop square’.

The last professional lace maker in Villedieu died in 1952, but a group of ladies meet regularly to keep the traditions alive and make souvenirs for the tourists such as bookmarks or small napkins. Some are sold at the museum of lace, just off the main street, but its continued production is a labour of love to preserve the local heritage. There will never again be a mass market for handmade lace, I was told, as the process is too expensive and time consuming, other than for the top fashion houses whose customers don’t mind spending a fortune on lace. A community of any age will (should) always care for its traditions as, I am sure, understanding yesterday will help explain who we are today. Of course, museums have their place in this process, but how much more pleasing is it to have preserved the past as a vital present, away from a somewhat sterile display case, no matter how well designed the exhibit happens to be.

But maybe that’s wishful thinking. Villedieu has a patrimony set in stone, housing an extraordinary history of local production. The stone may last, but economic sustainability is much more fragile.

M A R K E T S | FA R M S H O P S | R E S TA U R A N T S

Continuing his two-part series on the living museum that is Villedieu-les-Poêles, Hamish Marett-Crosby describes two of the town’s historic industries: bells and lace

T

he modern car with its climate conditioners, entertainment centres, GPS and all other mod cons (a package now a sine qua non for the modern driver) has an effect reaching far beyond the windscreen. A bubble now engulfs the occupants who, sacrificing all to the gods of average speed, fail to notice, let alone appreciate, the world passing by. Thus it is that Villedieu-les-Poêles is victim to a motorway by-pass. It is a living, working, and still (just) flourishing, museum to generations of skill and workmanship in so many ways. So be brave: take the slow road and explore outside that driving cocoon.

74

- AUTUMN 2019

The town’s main fame comes from its production of copper and, by the 19th Century the copper pan-making industry employed 700 families in the town. Today its reputation rests also on a new (to Villedieu) technology which came to town in 1865. The setting may be 19th Century but the technology dates from the dawn of Mediterranean civilisation and the sound of a bell ringing is as old as the technology of metal working. Universally understood to mark various emotions, not least joy and celebration as well as danger, or a calling to worship; and to many, the tolling bell marks a rite of passage.

The history of bell making is ancient and the basic technology hasn’t actually changed that much. It all starts with the three basic materials for mixing the mould in which the bell will be made, clay, horse dung and goat hair. But the most important part of the process is the furnace; previously bells were cast and fired at their destination in a bell pit. However, the railways provided transportation of the finished bells from a well-run factory and a stable production meant an increase in consistent quality; foundries were established and prospered. Villedieu is one of three in France; there are two in England.

e t a n io s s a P about food.

Whether it’s reared, grown, caught or made in Jersey, Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of local provenance. In a nutshell, the Mark allows you to make an informed choice to support the local economy, embrace seasonality and reduce your food miles.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

AUTUMN 2019

- 75


NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

BELLS AND OLD LACE

The bell is hoisted out of the pit, and as the final coating of earth and clay is chipped away, this archetypal instrument emerges; it is like an act of creation and the result is made visible for the first time. So, the foundry owners, the Bergamo family, act as a sort of guardian for a complete industrial history of one process which makes a visit to this town fascinating. There are regular tours most days and these can be checked out at www.cornille-havard. com Before the foundry arrived, the men in the town worked the copper and the women found their own work in lacemaking, so bringing more wealth to the town. It is said that there were once two noises which distinguished Villedieu, the sound of the hammers beating out the copper, and the click-clack of the bobbins of the lacemakers. These ladies used to gather and, while working on auto pilot, would enjoy a good gossip (un caquet). There was, I am assured, a Place de Caquet in Villedieu; it might in English be translated as ‘gossipshop square’.

The last professional lace maker in Villedieu died in 1952, but a group of ladies meet regularly to keep the traditions alive and make souvenirs for the tourists such as bookmarks or small napkins. Some are sold at the museum of lace, just off the main street, but its continued production is a labour of love to preserve the local heritage. There will never again be a mass market for handmade lace, I was told, as the process is too expensive and time consuming, other than for the top fashion houses whose customers don’t mind spending a fortune on lace. A community of any age will (should) always care for its traditions as, I am sure, understanding yesterday will help explain who we are today. Of course, museums have their place in this process, but how much more pleasing is it to have preserved the past as a vital present, away from a somewhat sterile display case, no matter how well designed the exhibit happens to be.

But maybe that’s wishful thinking. Villedieu has a patrimony set in stone, housing an extraordinary history of local production. The stone may last, but economic sustainability is much more fragile.

M A R K E T S | FA R M S H O P S | R E S TA U R A N T S

Continuing his two-part series on the living museum that is Villedieu-les-Poêles, Hamish Marett-Crosby describes two of the town’s historic industries: bells and lace

T

he modern car with its climate conditioners, entertainment centres, GPS and all other mod cons (a package now a sine qua non for the modern driver) has an effect reaching far beyond the windscreen. A bubble now engulfs the occupants who, sacrificing all to the gods of average speed, fail to notice, let alone appreciate, the world passing by. Thus it is that Villedieu-les-Poêles is victim to a motorway by-pass. It is a living, working, and still (just) flourishing, museum to generations of skill and workmanship in so many ways. So be brave: take the slow road and explore outside that driving cocoon.

74

- AUTUMN 2019

The town’s main fame comes from its production of copper and, by the 19th Century the copper pan-making industry employed 700 families in the town. Today its reputation rests also on a new (to Villedieu) technology which came to town in 1865. The setting may be 19th Century but the technology dates from the dawn of Mediterranean civilisation and the sound of a bell ringing is as old as the technology of metal working. Universally understood to mark various emotions, not least joy and celebration as well as danger, or a calling to worship; and to many, the tolling bell marks a rite of passage.

The history of bell making is ancient and the basic technology hasn’t actually changed that much. It all starts with the three basic materials for mixing the mould in which the bell will be made, clay, horse dung and goat hair. But the most important part of the process is the furnace; previously bells were cast and fired at their destination in a bell pit. However, the railways provided transportation of the finished bells from a well-run factory and a stable production meant an increase in consistent quality; foundries were established and prospered. Villedieu is one of three in France; there are two in England.

e t a n io s s a P about food.

Whether it’s reared, grown, caught or made in Jersey, Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of local provenance. In a nutshell, the Mark allows you to make an informed choice to support the local economy, embrace seasonality and reduce your food miles.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

AUTUMN 2019

- 75


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Signs of things to come? Terry Neale met Sean Guegan, MD of Signtech Ltd, the company that sponsored the Rural Jersey Landscape Awards

‘I think that it is good to support the arts – we also support the Christmas Market with branding and advertising. It’s all about supporting the local community. The nature of our business is artistic and creative and as a Jersey company we like to give something back in a creative way.’ Sean launched Signtech in 1986 and it functioned originally as a sign-writing business. His two sons work for the firm and his partner takes care of the accounts. In the early days, the artwork was all hand drawn with the bus company a major client. Transport, of course, also has a major impact on the environment and Sean has clear ideas on how he would like to see the way we move around the Island evolve.

A craft.

t first sight, there is no obvious connection between the environment and the sign-maker’s

But look again. Whether they are informing us, advising us, warning us or instructing us, signs are everywhere and their impact on the environment is considerable.

‘At Amsterdam Airport, all taxis have to be electric in order to keep the airport’s carbon footprint down. Jersey is a good location for electric vehicles but we are nowhere near embracing these initiatives.’

And the Island’s environment is something that Sean Guegan, boss of Signtech, is passionate about. ‘It is a personal interest of ours as a family,’ he said. ‘We cycle, bus or walk to work from Gorey; in fact, out of the 30 members of staff on the company, only two or three drive to work.’

‘I would love to see that happening here, but there has to be better communication from the government to make people see the sense of doing it. Other countries have made these changes work and an island of just nine miles by five should be able to do the same.’

Keeping an environmentalist mentality, then, is of great importance to Sean, and his travels to other countries are a constant source of inspiration. He believes that Jersey could and should be doing more. ‘France, for example, has stopped household rubbish collections. Each area has a drop-off point where people take their refuse. Since this scheme was

76

introduced it is reckoned that some 70 per cent of landfill has been saved. Thirty per cent of all farms over there are also now organic.’

- AUTUMN 2019

Viewing the environment through the eyes of artists also fascinates Sean, and Signtech was proud to sponsor the recent RURAL Jersey Landscape Award. ‘When you look at a painting it reflects Jersey and how you might visualise it,’ he said. ‘The winning picture, by Stephen Morley, was a landscape of Grosnez. It was his first entry. I was very impressed by the quantity and quality of the entries, with so many techniques and skill-sets on show.’

Meanwhile, back in the world of signs, Sean reveals that the trade is very different from how it was when he set up his company 33 years ago. Client expectations have also moved on. ‘In those days, all that was usually required was a sign bearing a big name and a telephone number. Now they want visuals to help

market the business correctly. Technology has allowed us to produce more creative work – there are so many materials that we can use and literally thousands of fonts. ‘Signs are everywhere, so it is a very good profession for people to come into. Business is very good – we have always grown but things have really accelerated over the last few years. We are always training young local people and I think that the future is really exciting. We “wrap” vehicles today, rather than just sign-writing them, and with video walls and media screens technology has given us so many new ways of promoting a business.’ ‘I went to a show recently looking at the future of signage and it is really quite mind-boggling to see where it can go. But a balance must be maintained. Some of the world’s most beautiful cities try to keep it simple. You don’t want to see signage overtaking architecture – it has to complement it and keep in tune with the environment.’

Signs, of course, require permission before they can be installed and Sean confirmed that his company has a very good relationship with the Island’s Planning Department. He feels sorry, though, for traders who often suffer a lengthy wait for the signage needed to make their presence known. ‘Drawings have to be signed off and then it can be up to eight weeks before Planning permission is received. After that, we have to make and install the signage. For someone opening a shop, a third of their first year’s lease could pass before the signs go up to tell the public they are there.’ ‘Faster planning permission would help these businesses to get started. We need to encourage more people to open shops and make the town a social hub; it has to be a social area that people want to visit to shop and eat. Otherwise, the town will die.’ And when it comes to how we journey to enjoy that social hub, Sean still has the environment uppermost in his mind. ‘More e-bikes, electric cars and gasdriven buses,’ he stresses. ‘That is the way forward.’

‘The population is pushing towards 110,000 and we need to start changing our mindset on transport. We should provide out-of-town car parks with buses bringing people into St Helier. I think that gas-driven buses, such as they have in Bristol, are the way forward for Jersey. More buses and more cycle lanes are what we need.’ ‘In Scandinavian countries you see so many people on bikes – and it is a lot colder there!’ But attitudes need to change. Sean believes that if people are to be persuaded to take public transport into town, it must be made easier for them to carry out their errands when they get there. ‘Everything is too spread out in Jersey. If you get off the bus in town and need to visit the Passport Office, the Tax Office and pay an electricity bill, you have to walk miles – and how many places in the world don’t even have a bus that takes you to the harbour?’ ‘Providing a safe infrastructure for bikes would also encourage more people to ride and enjoy the fresh air and a healthier lifestyle. Room can be created with a little imagination on the part of the government.’

AUTUMN 2019

- 77


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Signs of things to come? Terry Neale met Sean Guegan, MD of Signtech Ltd, the company that sponsored the Rural Jersey Landscape Awards

‘I think that it is good to support the arts – we also support the Christmas Market with branding and advertising. It’s all about supporting the local community. The nature of our business is artistic and creative and as a Jersey company we like to give something back in a creative way.’ Sean launched Signtech in 1986 and it functioned originally as a sign-writing business. His two sons work for the firm and his partner takes care of the accounts. In the early days, the artwork was all hand drawn with the bus company a major client. Transport, of course, also has a major impact on the environment and Sean has clear ideas on how he would like to see the way we move around the Island evolve.

A craft.

t first sight, there is no obvious connection between the environment and the sign-maker’s

But look again. Whether they are informing us, advising us, warning us or instructing us, signs are everywhere and their impact on the environment is considerable.

‘At Amsterdam Airport, all taxis have to be electric in order to keep the airport’s carbon footprint down. Jersey is a good location for electric vehicles but we are nowhere near embracing these initiatives.’

And the Island’s environment is something that Sean Guegan, boss of Signtech, is passionate about. ‘It is a personal interest of ours as a family,’ he said. ‘We cycle, bus or walk to work from Gorey; in fact, out of the 30 members of staff on the company, only two or three drive to work.’

‘I would love to see that happening here, but there has to be better communication from the government to make people see the sense of doing it. Other countries have made these changes work and an island of just nine miles by five should be able to do the same.’

Keeping an environmentalist mentality, then, is of great importance to Sean, and his travels to other countries are a constant source of inspiration. He believes that Jersey could and should be doing more. ‘France, for example, has stopped household rubbish collections. Each area has a drop-off point where people take their refuse. Since this scheme was

76

introduced it is reckoned that some 70 per cent of landfill has been saved. Thirty per cent of all farms over there are also now organic.’

- AUTUMN 2019

Viewing the environment through the eyes of artists also fascinates Sean, and Signtech was proud to sponsor the recent RURAL Jersey Landscape Award. ‘When you look at a painting it reflects Jersey and how you might visualise it,’ he said. ‘The winning picture, by Stephen Morley, was a landscape of Grosnez. It was his first entry. I was very impressed by the quantity and quality of the entries, with so many techniques and skill-sets on show.’

Meanwhile, back in the world of signs, Sean reveals that the trade is very different from how it was when he set up his company 33 years ago. Client expectations have also moved on. ‘In those days, all that was usually required was a sign bearing a big name and a telephone number. Now they want visuals to help

market the business correctly. Technology has allowed us to produce more creative work – there are so many materials that we can use and literally thousands of fonts. ‘Signs are everywhere, so it is a very good profession for people to come into. Business is very good – we have always grown but things have really accelerated over the last few years. We are always training young local people and I think that the future is really exciting. We “wrap” vehicles today, rather than just sign-writing them, and with video walls and media screens technology has given us so many new ways of promoting a business.’ ‘I went to a show recently looking at the future of signage and it is really quite mind-boggling to see where it can go. But a balance must be maintained. Some of the world’s most beautiful cities try to keep it simple. You don’t want to see signage overtaking architecture – it has to complement it and keep in tune with the environment.’

Signs, of course, require permission before they can be installed and Sean confirmed that his company has a very good relationship with the Island’s Planning Department. He feels sorry, though, for traders who often suffer a lengthy wait for the signage needed to make their presence known. ‘Drawings have to be signed off and then it can be up to eight weeks before Planning permission is received. After that, we have to make and install the signage. For someone opening a shop, a third of their first year’s lease could pass before the signs go up to tell the public they are there.’ ‘Faster planning permission would help these businesses to get started. We need to encourage more people to open shops and make the town a social hub; it has to be a social area that people want to visit to shop and eat. Otherwise, the town will die.’ And when it comes to how we journey to enjoy that social hub, Sean still has the environment uppermost in his mind. ‘More e-bikes, electric cars and gasdriven buses,’ he stresses. ‘That is the way forward.’

‘The population is pushing towards 110,000 and we need to start changing our mindset on transport. We should provide out-of-town car parks with buses bringing people into St Helier. I think that gas-driven buses, such as they have in Bristol, are the way forward for Jersey. More buses and more cycle lanes are what we need.’ ‘In Scandinavian countries you see so many people on bikes – and it is a lot colder there!’ But attitudes need to change. Sean believes that if people are to be persuaded to take public transport into town, it must be made easier for them to carry out their errands when they get there. ‘Everything is too spread out in Jersey. If you get off the bus in town and need to visit the Passport Office, the Tax Office and pay an electricity bill, you have to walk miles – and how many places in the world don’t even have a bus that takes you to the harbour?’ ‘Providing a safe infrastructure for bikes would also encourage more people to ride and enjoy the fresh air and a healthier lifestyle. Room can be created with a little imagination on the part of the government.’

AUTUMN 2019

- 77


LAST WORD

IN-ACTION IS A WEAPON OF MASS DESTRUCTION David Warr has the last word

I

n a previous article in this publication I wrote about the extraordinary Bosco verticale residential towers in the Porta Nuova district of Milan and mused as to why Jersey is not equally adventurous when it comes to new buildings in St Helier. According to a UN report, twothirds of the world’s population will be living in an urban environment by the year 2050, so clearly green spaces in our towns and cities will come under more pressure than ever before. It made me wonder if part of the problem is the perceived immensity of the changes required. When your every waking hour is one of work, making sure the kids get to school on time etc etc, it’s easier to leave the big picture stuff to others. But what happens if ‘the others’ won’t make those big decisions for fear of getting it wrong or not being re-elected? I was reminded the other day by remarks made by Deputy Hugh Raymond about all the reports that have been produced on the future of our very own Fort Regent. Thousands spent and diddly squat to show for it. It seems the moment it comes to making a major financial decision noone is willing to sign the cheque for fear of being castigated in the media and their political career being destroyed whilst attempting to do the right thing. But big decisions will have to be taken if we are to avert what Greta Thunberg describes as the ‘existential crisis’ that is climate change. Yet Miss Thunberg is just picking up on something we’ve known about for decades. The German industrial designer, Dieter Rams, has for at least 40 years been preaching the ethos of ‘less but better’. Not that the message is getting through, there are some startling statistics that show that if everyone consumed resources at the level of the average American citizen we would need another 3 worlds!

78

- AUTUMN 2019

It can all be truly overwhelming, yet in Jersey we not only have the ability to make impactful changes quickly we also have the people with the brains and contacts to deliver. We just need action. As someone who believes (maybe slightly naively) in the mantra ‘if not you, who, if not now, when’, I’ve decided to take the bull by the horns and build a ‘green wall’ in our next café adventure. It came about from a conversation I had with Derek Mason, a well-known local architect with some very strong views on the built environment of Jersey. He now works with Nick Socrates, a relatively new practice based in Bond Street. I spoke about my article in this magazine and my frustration about the lack of a vision for the greening of St. Helier. A few weeks later Derek passed me the business card of one Dominic Clyde-Smith, a Trinity resident who is Head of Research for ‘We design for…’ He has written extensively about air quality in urban areas and the health benefits both physical and mental of material improvements both inside and outside the workplace. So the germ of the idea of building a ‘green wall’ came about. Like most people, I’m sure I had thought that building a 3-metre high green wall in a relatively small café would be way beyond our resources, but through Dominic’s contacts we were put in touch with Armando Raish of Tree Box, who build modular green walls. They are, I believe, a game-changing company in this field making green walls affordable for small businesses like mine. And so last week we started to build that green wall. Of course you also need a good plants person. I called upon the expertise of Francis Le Quesne and now I await delivery of some 260 plants that will go to make up this amazing feature.

We have a lot to learn: which plants will thrive and which mightr suffer? Can we successfully grow some vegetables for our café? How do we manage the maintenance? Really though, these are just small hurdles, I’m much more interested in the wider impact such a project might have on St Helier. I’ve been talking about the project with St Helier parks and gardens as I believe they should be in a position to deliver such schemes in public spaces and I hope, going forward, that green walls become a major feature in Jersey’s built environment. What we’re doing is a drop in the ocean, but it’s quite incredible what has come out of four conversations. I’m reminded of a song from my youth by a group called Faithless, - ‘inaction is a weapon of mass destruction’.

PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY THIS WINTER Don’t get caught out by frozen pipes this winter. If a frozen pipe bursts it will cause flooding in your home when it defrosts. Taking a few simple precautions now can avoid the headache of an unexpected burst pipe and subsequent damage to your home.

Find the main water stop valve in your house and make sure it works in case the water supply has to be turned off in an emergency. Insulate all pipework and storage cisterns in unheated areas such as lofts, roofs, outbuildings and garages. For more information speak to a qualified plumber or go to:

www.jerseywater.je

Quite a visionary statement really. Find us on Facebook


LAST WORD

IN-ACTION IS A WEAPON OF MASS DESTRUCTION David Warr has the last word

I

n a previous article in this publication I wrote about the extraordinary Bosco verticale residential towers in the Porta Nuova district of Milan and mused as to why Jersey is not equally adventurous when it comes to new buildings in St Helier. According to a UN report, twothirds of the world’s population will be living in an urban environment by the year 2050, so clearly green spaces in our towns and cities will come under more pressure than ever before. It made me wonder if part of the problem is the perceived immensity of the changes required. When your every waking hour is one of work, making sure the kids get to school on time etc etc, it’s easier to leave the big picture stuff to others. But what happens if ‘the others’ won’t make those big decisions for fear of getting it wrong or not being re-elected? I was reminded the other day by remarks made by Deputy Hugh Raymond about all the reports that have been produced on the future of our very own Fort Regent. Thousands spent and diddly squat to show for it. It seems the moment it comes to making a major financial decision noone is willing to sign the cheque for fear of being castigated in the media and their political career being destroyed whilst attempting to do the right thing. But big decisions will have to be taken if we are to avert what Greta Thunberg describes as the ‘existential crisis’ that is climate change. Yet Miss Thunberg is just picking up on something we’ve known about for decades. The German industrial designer, Dieter Rams, has for at least 40 years been preaching the ethos of ‘less but better’. Not that the message is getting through, there are some startling statistics that show that if everyone consumed resources at the level of the average American citizen we would need another 3 worlds!

78

- AUTUMN 2019

It can all be truly overwhelming, yet in Jersey we not only have the ability to make impactful changes quickly we also have the people with the brains and contacts to deliver. We just need action. As someone who believes (maybe slightly naively) in the mantra ‘if not you, who, if not now, when’, I’ve decided to take the bull by the horns and build a ‘green wall’ in our next café adventure. It came about from a conversation I had with Derek Mason, a well-known local architect with some very strong views on the built environment of Jersey. He now works with Nick Socrates, a relatively new practice based in Bond Street. I spoke about my article in this magazine and my frustration about the lack of a vision for the greening of St. Helier. A few weeks later Derek passed me the business card of one Dominic Clyde-Smith, a Trinity resident who is Head of Research for ‘We design for…’ He has written extensively about air quality in urban areas and the health benefits both physical and mental of material improvements both inside and outside the workplace. So the germ of the idea of building a ‘green wall’ came about. Like most people, I’m sure I had thought that building a 3-metre high green wall in a relatively small café would be way beyond our resources, but through Dominic’s contacts we were put in touch with Armando Raish of Tree Box, who build modular green walls. They are, I believe, a game-changing company in this field making green walls affordable for small businesses like mine. And so last week we started to build that green wall. Of course you also need a good plants person. I called upon the expertise of Francis Le Quesne and now I await delivery of some 260 plants that will go to make up this amazing feature.

We have a lot to learn: which plants will thrive and which mightr suffer? Can we successfully grow some vegetables for our café? How do we manage the maintenance? Really though, these are just small hurdles, I’m much more interested in the wider impact such a project might have on St Helier. I’ve been talking about the project with St Helier parks and gardens as I believe they should be in a position to deliver such schemes in public spaces and I hope, going forward, that green walls become a major feature in Jersey’s built environment. What we’re doing is a drop in the ocean, but it’s quite incredible what has come out of four conversations. I’m reminded of a song from my youth by a group called Faithless, - ‘inaction is a weapon of mass destruction’.

PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY THIS WINTER Don’t get caught out by frozen pipes this winter. If a frozen pipe bursts it will cause flooding in your home when it defrosts. Taking a few simple precautions now can avoid the headache of an unexpected burst pipe and subsequent damage to your home.

Find the main water stop valve in your house and make sure it works in case the water supply has to be turned off in an emergency. Insulate all pipework and storage cisterns in unheated areas such as lofts, roofs, outbuildings and garages. For more information speak to a qualified plumber or go to:

www.jerseywater.je

Quite a visionary statement really. Find us on Facebook


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