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JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL ISSUE #26 - SPRING 2019

Horses In Hand

Growing Our Security

Barette’s carriage driving hobby

How can Jersey safeguard its own food security?

A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Are there solutions to the JSPCA’s problems?

SPRING 2019

- 1


Welcome S

What is important to stress is that there has been no change whatsoever in the general philosophy of the magazine or in its breadth of content. Yes, we do have two new regular columnists: Sasha Gibb (of CCA Galleries) writing on art and culture in Jersey and Joseph Baker (No 10 Restaurant) on ‘food for thought’. A warm welcome to them both. But these new additions to the RURAL family of contributors are still very much ‘on theme’ of the magazine’s core content… which is?

The second aim of RURAL is to provide a magazine for grown-ups, with something actually between its covers to read, rather than to skim through and then to cast aside.’

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL

Find out more about our 100% efficient heating solutions at Smarter Living, The Powerhouse.

S M A R T E R L I V I N G . J E | T H E P O W E R H O U S E , Q U E E N ’ S R O A D J E 4 8 N Y | T: 5 0 5 6 0 0 |

Growing Our Security

Carriage driving in Jersey and the UK

How can Jersey safeguard its own food security?

A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Are there solutions to the JSPCA’s problems?

Proverbially, fine feathers do not make fine birds – or, if you prefer – ‘do not judge a book by its cover’. But the feathers and covers do help to make the tastier or more interesting bit inside them rather more appealing – and so we hope you agree that we have succeeded there. So welcome to the ‘new look’ RURAL magazine. I hope you like it and I would welcome your thoughts if you would like to let me know.

SPRING 2019

- 1

Front cover image: Ivor and Carole Barette while carriage driving. Picture by Gary Grimshaw RURAL magazine can be collected free of charge from any number of places around the island. If you are unable to find a copy, please contact us on 864344 and we will ensure that you receive a copy directly. www.ruraljersey.co.uk

Sales: Rebecca Harrington rebecca@getrefined.com T: 01534 720200 Design: Eunice Santos eunice@getrefined.com

Published by: Crosby Media and Publishing Ltd La Chue, St John JE3 4FN T 01534 865334 M 07797 773880

Echoes of the Past

So, no change to any of that, I’m glad to say.

I make no apology for repeating what I wrote recently about the purpose of RURAL magazine: to ‘promote the often neglected rural, traditional and cultural aspects of the Island, local life and localism. By doing so, it also promotes the best of Jersey, its countryside and culture, both within the Island and to those living in the wider world beyond it.

Electricity is the cleaner, greener alternative to oil and gas and it’s easy to switch with our interest free credit and payment plans. Reduce your footprint with smart technology, lower carbon emissions and one third of your energy from tidal power. Good for you, good for the planet.

R URAL ISSUE #26 - SPRING 2019

pring cleaning is not called that for nothing: spring is a time of renewal, repair and getting ready for the year ahead. So it is no accident that we have chosen this time of year to ‘spring clean’ RURAL magazine. Not that it was getting shabby, but we have now been publishing it for six years, and a ‘makeover’ was overdue.

A greener future is a smarter future.

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

Editor: Alasdair Crosby editorial@ruraljersey.co.uk Photographer: Gary Grimshaw info@photoreportage.co.uk

©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. Disclaimer While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies, however caused. No liability can be accepted for copy, illustrations, photographs, artwork or advertising material while in transmission or with the publisher or their agents. All information is correct at time of going to print.

@SMARTERLIVI NGJ E SPRING 2019

- 3


Welcome S

What is important to stress is that there has been no change whatsoever in the general philosophy of the magazine or in its breadth of content. Yes, we do have two new regular columnists: Sasha Gibb (of CCA Galleries) writing on art and culture in Jersey and Joseph Baker (No 10 Restaurant) on ‘food for thought’. A warm welcome to them both. But these new additions to the RURAL family of contributors are still very much ‘on theme’ of the magazine’s core content… which is?

The second aim of RURAL is to provide a magazine for grown-ups, with something actually between its covers to read, rather than to skim through and then to cast aside.’

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL

Find out more about our 100% efficient heating solutions at Smarter Living, The Powerhouse.

S M A R T E R L I V I N G . J E | T H E P O W E R H O U S E , Q U E E N ’ S R O A D J E 4 8 N Y | T: 5 0 5 6 0 0 |

Growing Our Security

Carriage driving in Jersey and the UK

How can Jersey safeguard its own food security?

A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals Are there solutions to the JSPCA’s problems?

Proverbially, fine feathers do not make fine birds – or, if you prefer – ‘do not judge a book by its cover’. But the feathers and covers do help to make the tastier or more interesting bit inside them rather more appealing – and so we hope you agree that we have succeeded there. So welcome to the ‘new look’ RURAL magazine. I hope you like it and I would welcome your thoughts if you would like to let me know.

SPRING 2019

- 1

Front cover image: Ivor and Carole Barette while carriage driving. Picture by Gary Grimshaw RURAL magazine can be collected free of charge from any number of places around the island. If you are unable to find a copy, please contact us on 864344 and we will ensure that you receive a copy directly. www.ruraljersey.co.uk

Sales: Rebecca Harrington rebecca@getrefined.com T: 01534 720200 Design: Eunice Santos eunice@getrefined.com

Published by: Crosby Media and Publishing Ltd La Chue, St John JE3 4FN T 01534 865334 M 07797 773880

Echoes of the Past

So, no change to any of that, I’m glad to say.

I make no apology for repeating what I wrote recently about the purpose of RURAL magazine: to ‘promote the often neglected rural, traditional and cultural aspects of the Island, local life and localism. By doing so, it also promotes the best of Jersey, its countryside and culture, both within the Island and to those living in the wider world beyond it.

Electricity is the cleaner, greener alternative to oil and gas and it’s easy to switch with our interest free credit and payment plans. Reduce your footprint with smart technology, lower carbon emissions and one third of your energy from tidal power. Good for you, good for the planet.

R URAL ISSUE #26 - SPRING 2019

pring cleaning is not called that for nothing: spring is a time of renewal, repair and getting ready for the year ahead. So it is no accident that we have chosen this time of year to ‘spring clean’ RURAL magazine. Not that it was getting shabby, but we have now been publishing it for six years, and a ‘makeover’ was overdue.

A greener future is a smarter future.

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

Editor: Alasdair Crosby editorial@ruraljersey.co.uk Photographer: Gary Grimshaw info@photoreportage.co.uk

©2019. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other non-commercial uses permitted by copyright law. Disclaimer While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, no responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies, however caused. No liability can be accepted for copy, illustrations, photographs, artwork or advertising material while in transmission or with the publisher or their agents. All information is correct at time of going to print.

@SMARTERLIVI NGJ E SPRING 2019

- 3


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Contents 7 - Over The Wall

FARM AND GARDEN

A RURAL view

8 - A Jersey Salmagundi

ART AND CULTURE

FOOD AND KITCHEN

36 - Art, Inspired By Nature

50 - In The Kitchen Springtime recipes from Zoë Garner

A mixed salad of Jersey life

We feature contemporary Jersey artist Nicholas Romeril

52 - Food For Thought

OUT AND ABOUT

38 - Not So Soft Power

Our new columnist, Joseph Baker of No 10 Restaurant

Art and Culture in Jersey, with Sasha Gibb

53 - Spring Vegetables

THE FUR SIDE

The Joy of kale, by Chloë Bowler

40 - Fashionable Walkies

SPORT

Fashion and walking the dog – Gill Maccabe takes the lead

54 - Swing Into Spring

10 - Horses In Hand Ivor and Carole Barette go for a drive – with their horses – at the Royal Windsor Horse Show. They talked to Ruth Le Cocq

14 - Echoes Of The Past The sign and sound of horse-drawn vehicles remains in our lanes, thanks to events organised by the Hersey Horse Driving Society. They took Ruth Le Cocq for a ride

17 - Open Gardens 2019 This year’s programme of the Jersey Association of Youth and Friendship

19 - Meet The Farmer The farming manager of the Jersey Royal Company Ltd, Phil Rive, spoke to Alasdair Crosby

Health and Fitness with Chloë Bowler

23 - Secret Lives

42 - Walkie Talkies

Bestselling author Rosamund Young farms organically in the Cotswolds

Kieranne Grimshaw talks to States Members; their dogs talk to her

61 - Jersey’s Ancient Heritage An invitation to help discover the Island’s prehistory, from Nicky Westwood NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

63 - Normandy, A Drive-In History Lesson From Hamish Marett-Crosby BUSINESS

66 - From ‘A’ to ‘B’ Greener travel solutions for a growing Island, by our columnist Sean Guegan

25 - Growing Our Security

Contributors

How we could do more to safeguard our food security, by Andrew Le Quesne

Tommy A’Court Joseph Baker Chloë Bowler William Church Zoë Garner Sasha Gibb Kieranne Grimshae Sean Guegan Ruth Le Cocq Graeme Le Marquand Shannon Le Seeleur Andrew Le Quesne Gill Maccabe Hamish Marett-Crosby James Mews Terry Neale Jane Pearce Nicholas Romeril Ben Spink Mike Stentiford Nicky Westwood Rosamund Young

27 - The Pollinator Project 55 - The Pleasures Of Pétanque

The ‘bee’s knees’ of environmental initiatives, by Mike Stentiford

29 - The Wonderful World Of Daffodils

In which Gill Maccabe discovers a French Game that Jersey has taken to its heart HERITAGE

Shannon Le Seeleur writes on her favourite flower

4

- SPRING 2019

58 - 3 King Street

33 - The Movable Salad Bar

45 - A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals

By Graeme Le Marquand of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association

Problems and solution - Our new series on the JSPCA, its present and future, by Kieranne Grimshaw

A short history, by Jane Pearce

59 - Jèrriais A modern language, by Ben Spink of l’Office d’Jèrriais

67 - Rural Property By Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates

68 - Hair Today, Somewhere Else Tomorrow Terry Neale discovers a business ‘on the fringe’

70 - Funny, The Power Of Slow Music Alasdair Crosby has the last word (for once)

SPRING 2019

- 5


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Contents 7 - Over The Wall

FARM AND GARDEN

A RURAL view

8 - A Jersey Salmagundi

ART AND CULTURE

FOOD AND KITCHEN

36 - Art, Inspired By Nature

50 - In The Kitchen Springtime recipes from Zoë Garner

A mixed salad of Jersey life

We feature contemporary Jersey artist Nicholas Romeril

52 - Food For Thought

OUT AND ABOUT

38 - Not So Soft Power

Our new columnist, Joseph Baker of No 10 Restaurant

Art and Culture in Jersey, with Sasha Gibb

53 - Spring Vegetables

THE FUR SIDE

The Joy of kale, by Chloë Bowler

40 - Fashionable Walkies

SPORT

Fashion and walking the dog – Gill Maccabe takes the lead

54 - Swing Into Spring

10 - Horses In Hand Ivor and Carole Barette go for a drive – with their horses – at the Royal Windsor Horse Show. They talked to Ruth Le Cocq

14 - Echoes Of The Past The sign and sound of horse-drawn vehicles remains in our lanes, thanks to events organised by the Hersey Horse Driving Society. They took Ruth Le Cocq for a ride

17 - Open Gardens 2019 This year’s programme of the Jersey Association of Youth and Friendship

19 - Meet The Farmer The farming manager of the Jersey Royal Company Ltd, Phil Rive, spoke to Alasdair Crosby

Health and Fitness with Chloë Bowler

23 - Secret Lives

42 - Walkie Talkies

Bestselling author Rosamund Young farms organically in the Cotswolds

Kieranne Grimshaw talks to States Members; their dogs talk to her

61 - Jersey’s Ancient Heritage An invitation to help discover the Island’s prehistory, from Nicky Westwood NEXT DOOR NEIGHBOURS

63 - Normandy, A Drive-In History Lesson From Hamish Marett-Crosby BUSINESS

66 - From ‘A’ to ‘B’ Greener travel solutions for a growing Island, by our columnist Sean Guegan

25 - Growing Our Security

Contributors

How we could do more to safeguard our food security, by Andrew Le Quesne

Tommy A’Court Joseph Baker Chloë Bowler William Church Zoë Garner Sasha Gibb Kieranne Grimshae Sean Guegan Ruth Le Cocq Graeme Le Marquand Shannon Le Seeleur Andrew Le Quesne Gill Maccabe Hamish Marett-Crosby James Mews Terry Neale Jane Pearce Nicholas Romeril Ben Spink Mike Stentiford Nicky Westwood Rosamund Young

27 - The Pollinator Project 55 - The Pleasures Of Pétanque

The ‘bee’s knees’ of environmental initiatives, by Mike Stentiford

29 - The Wonderful World Of Daffodils

In which Gill Maccabe discovers a French Game that Jersey has taken to its heart HERITAGE

Shannon Le Seeleur writes on her favourite flower

4

- SPRING 2019

58 - 3 King Street

33 - The Movable Salad Bar

45 - A Shelter For Jersey’s Animals

By Graeme Le Marquand of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association

Problems and solution - Our new series on the JSPCA, its present and future, by Kieranne Grimshaw

A short history, by Jane Pearce

59 - Jèrriais A modern language, by Ben Spink of l’Office d’Jèrriais

67 - Rural Property By Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates

68 - Hair Today, Somewhere Else Tomorrow Terry Neale discovers a business ‘on the fringe’

70 - Funny, The Power Of Slow Music Alasdair Crosby has the last word (for once)

SPRING 2019

- 5


Over the wall. A RURAL view.

I

magine – a warm summer’s lunchtime pause in Jersey and the enjoyment of a delicious crab salad – it is just as much a special Jersey feast as eating Jersey Royals in the spring. But, as much as we might enjoy and support the consumption of local produce, appearance might not match the reality. A Jersey company that owns a number of restaurants paid close on £1 million last year for supplies of fish and shellfish - but almost none of those supplies came from Jersey waters. It was not for want of trying – the restaurant company simply cannot get the products from Jersey. There are two reasons for that: as far as crab is concerned, the Island’s traditional crabbing grounds lie in areas covered by the licensing authority delegated to Guernsey by the UK. This has resulted in Jersey fishermen’s access to traditional crab grounds becoming severely limited. Moreover, Jersey fishermen are often not allowed to catch local fish, because of the Fish Management Agreement (FMA) with the UK, which is an instrument for maintaining EU fishery regulations. Another factor is the difficulty in obtaining locally-caught fish is the provisions of the 18-year-old Granville Bay Agreement (GBA), a bilateral treaty between the UK and France, negotiated with much input from Jersey. This treaty was always meant to be reviewed after ten years; the provisions were never meant to be static. Such a review has not happened yet; Brexit might well provide that opportunity. There you have it: Guernsey, FMA, GBA, Brexit… four topics that loom large in any conversation with Jersey fishermen about the state of their industry.

It is the industry’s opinion that neither the FMA nor the GBA really work for its own benefit. They could both do with a lot of tweaking - and Brexit is the opportunity for doing just that. Let us examine these in a little more detail. Guernsey: there remains a lot to be resolved in the long-running dispute between the two Islands. Nothing much is happening at the moment, which is a shame, as the energy now being spent on persecuting each other’s fishermen might be better spent in negotiating a joint Channel Islands fishing area. The Fisheries Management Agreement: at the moment, it is felt that this merely rubber-stamps any regulation emanating from the EU, whether it is appropriate to the Jersey area or not. Fishermen are finding that over the last ten years or so they are progressively losing access to all their primary fish stocks. The FMA was concluded between Jersey and UK and was put in place because the UK, being part of the EU, has obligations to work to EU fish quotas for the better management of fish stocks. Although the FMA binds Jersey to adopt all regulations that are issued by the EU, it excludes Jersey fishermen from the funding which is made available for the mandatory fitting of items such as vessel monitoring systems and electronic log books. The adoption of EU measures that prevent Jersey’s fleet from catching many of the ‘finfish’ species found within Island waters has also resulted in extra pressure on shellfish stocks. In summary, the FMA is very unpopular within the industry and it sincerely hopes that post-Brexit, it will come up for review. The Granville Bay Agreement relates to Jersey’s share of the stocks available in local waters and also deals with the unloading of catches in France.

At the point when the UK ceases to be part of the EU, both the FMA and the GBA might fall away, as would Jersey’s obligation to work to EU quotas. In short, the prospect of Brexit is seen in very positive terms by the local industry: it would help to get the outcomes that are seen as absolutely pivotal to the industry’s successful future. Jersey is putting pressure on the French to renegotiate the GBA. But, consider this: the GBA limits the number of permits for French fishermen to fish in the Granville Bay zone to 627, of which 430 have permits to access the part of the area specifically within Jersey’s territorial seas. In fact, only 65 French vessels currently fish regularly within Jersey waters. If and when Brexit really kicks in, all those French boats that now fish inside the UK’s 12 miles of territorial waters would be thrown out. Where would they go? With so many unused permits in Granville Bay, the answer surely is not too difficult to guess. So, there is everything to play for in the negotiations taking place now and in the immediate future if Brexit were to become a reality. How can Jersey fishermen gain proper access to fish stocks in home waters? How can we remove the constraints of these two agreements? How can they gain a fair share of the stocks available? And - will these negotiations result in Islanders finally being able to consume more Jersey-caught fish? SPRING 2019

- 7


Over the wall. A RURAL view.

I

magine – a warm summer’s lunchtime pause in Jersey and the enjoyment of a delicious crab salad – it is just as much a special Jersey feast as eating Jersey Royals in the spring. But, as much as we might enjoy and support the consumption of local produce, appearance might not match the reality. A Jersey company that owns a number of restaurants paid close on £1 million last year for supplies of fish and shellfish - but almost none of those supplies came from Jersey waters. It was not for want of trying – the restaurant company simply cannot get the products from Jersey. There are two reasons for that: as far as crab is concerned, the Island’s traditional crabbing grounds lie in areas covered by the licensing authority delegated to Guernsey by the UK. This has resulted in Jersey fishermen’s access to traditional crab grounds becoming severely limited. Moreover, Jersey fishermen are often not allowed to catch local fish, because of the Fish Management Agreement (FMA) with the UK, which is an instrument for maintaining EU fishery regulations. Another factor is the difficulty in obtaining locally-caught fish is the provisions of the 18-year-old Granville Bay Agreement (GBA), a bilateral treaty between the UK and France, negotiated with much input from Jersey. This treaty was always meant to be reviewed after ten years; the provisions were never meant to be static. Such a review has not happened yet; Brexit might well provide that opportunity. There you have it: Guernsey, FMA, GBA, Brexit… four topics that loom large in any conversation with Jersey fishermen about the state of their industry.

It is the industry’s opinion that neither the FMA nor the GBA really work for its own benefit. They could both do with a lot of tweaking - and Brexit is the opportunity for doing just that. Let us examine these in a little more detail. Guernsey: there remains a lot to be resolved in the long-running dispute between the two Islands. Nothing much is happening at the moment, which is a shame, as the energy now being spent on persecuting each other’s fishermen might be better spent in negotiating a joint Channel Islands fishing area. The Fisheries Management Agreement: at the moment, it is felt that this merely rubber-stamps any regulation emanating from the EU, whether it is appropriate to the Jersey area or not. Fishermen are finding that over the last ten years or so they are progressively losing access to all their primary fish stocks. The FMA was concluded between Jersey and UK and was put in place because the UK, being part of the EU, has obligations to work to EU fish quotas for the better management of fish stocks. Although the FMA binds Jersey to adopt all regulations that are issued by the EU, it excludes Jersey fishermen from the funding which is made available for the mandatory fitting of items such as vessel monitoring systems and electronic log books. The adoption of EU measures that prevent Jersey’s fleet from catching many of the ‘finfish’ species found within Island waters has also resulted in extra pressure on shellfish stocks. In summary, the FMA is very unpopular within the industry and it sincerely hopes that post-Brexit, it will come up for review. The Granville Bay Agreement relates to Jersey’s share of the stocks available in local waters and also deals with the unloading of catches in France.

At the point when the UK ceases to be part of the EU, both the FMA and the GBA might fall away, as would Jersey’s obligation to work to EU quotas. In short, the prospect of Brexit is seen in very positive terms by the local industry: it would help to get the outcomes that are seen as absolutely pivotal to the industry’s successful future. Jersey is putting pressure on the French to renegotiate the GBA. But, consider this: the GBA limits the number of permits for French fishermen to fish in the Granville Bay zone to 627, of which 430 have permits to access the part of the area specifically within Jersey’s territorial seas. In fact, only 65 French vessels currently fish regularly within Jersey waters. If and when Brexit really kicks in, all those French boats that now fish inside the UK’s 12 miles of territorial waters would be thrown out. Where would they go? With so many unused permits in Granville Bay, the answer surely is not too difficult to guess. So, there is everything to play for in the negotiations taking place now and in the immediate future if Brexit were to become a reality. How can Jersey fishermen gain proper access to fish stocks in home waters? How can we remove the constraints of these two agreements? How can they gain a fair share of the stocks available? And - will these negotiations result in Islanders finally being able to consume more Jersey-caught fish? SPRING 2019

- 7


A JERSEY SALMAGUNDI

WAES HAEL! ‘ (OR ‘SANTE’?) From our wassailing correspondent, Hamish Marett-Crosby

A mixed salad of Jersey life

Nature is capricious, and so folk search for some insurance policy, preferably one steeped in tradition, for support. Thus, on the first Saturday of January, a newly planted apple orchard belonging to Donelda Guy was visited by the Helier Morris Men who, with due solemnity (or perhaps what passes as solemnity for Morris Men), were going to do their best to ensure its health and fruitfulness with a traditional Wassail ceremony.

ROYAL PROGRESS The sales and marketing director of the Jersey Royal Company, William Church updates us as the planting season gets under way As the new planting season gets under way, I am hesitant to say that things are going ok… fingers crossed! The weather has been in complete contrast to last year, and farmers haven’t yet been hit with a deluge of rain, so the mood in the countryside is much more upbeat with good planting progress. January, although dry, has been a bit of a funny month with very low light levels, not something that we ordinarily talk about. The result of this is that most indoor crops

LIBERATION INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL 9 - 12 May 2019 - Preview by the festival chairman, James Mews.

are looking a bit ‘leggy’ as plants strive to find the light. That said, with the mild weather they are all maturing well and are likely to be ready to dig a little earlier than in other years. The themes from last year roll on to this, and there are still concerns about access to and recruitment of seasonal labour. On top of that, I have to mention the dreaded word ‘Brexit’. As with other industries there is an air of uncertainty hanging over farmers and how the result will affect us in terms of potential import duties on inputs

beauty. Blue Badge guide Ned Malet de Carteret will lead the walk around St Ouen’s Manor exploring the rich history of the area and stopping at interludes to be serenaded by violinist Harriet Mackenzie.

The Liberation International Music Festival is back, celebrating Jersey’s liberation from German occupation. The central theme of this year’s festival is the unifying power of music and the exciting program, featuring works by English, American, German and Italian composers, speaks of the strength of nations working together to create unity after WWII.

On 10 May the audience will be treated to a stunning program of chamber music, featuring Schubert’s Quintet for strings and Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in G minor, played by major stars of the classical world: violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky, So Ock Kim and pianist Wu Qian. Sitkovetsky, winner of the Lincoln Centre Emerging Artist Award, will give a pre-concert talk about his career which began when he played his first solo concert as a precociously talented eight year old.

The Jersey Opera House plays host to several concerts and on 9 May the Festival opens with a lovely family event: the ever popular Musical Walk offering a wonderful combination of music, history and natural

On Saturday 11 May, a celebration of the great Broadway musicals and music featuring the Jersey Chamber Orchestra will be directed by Dominic Ferris and led by BBC Symphony Orchestra first

With the renaissance of cider making in Jersey, it was no surprise to discover the Morris Men are pretty busy in the New Year so, on Saturday 4 January, they were visiting five apple orchards starting and finishing at Samarès Manor. At each stop, three traditional dances were performed, a cider libation poured around the tree and a slice of cider-imbued toast fixed to a branch.

and whether any log-jam at ports could impact entry into the UK. The one thing that we can certainly all take comfort from is that the Jersey Royal brand remains very strong, and as a British product that is principally sold into a British market, demand should remain firm regardless of any outcome and could even get stronger.

violinist, Anna Smith. As well as favourites, including a reuniting of the Les Miserable cast from 2016, the show will also feature Rhapsody in Blue with Dominic as soloist, and a range of songs from Phantom of the Opera to Cole Porter classics. As the Festival ends on Sunday 12 May, it’s picnic time with the ever popular Jazz festival. The twist is that it will be a Jazz and Gin Festival bringing classics mixes to the fore as well as moving the venue to the Royal Jersey Showground. Headlining this year is the multiple award winning vocalist Clare Teal making her third appearance in 11 years. Clare is a regular at on BBC Radio 2 with her own show and her sensational set of jazz and swing classics is sure to end this year’s Festival on a high note.

CCA Galleries

5 – 28 February

Recent print releases by Sir Peter Blake, Paul Huxley and Bruce McLean with archive prints by Sandra Blow limited edition silk screen prints, with collage, embossing, paint, glazes and glitter by contemporary print masters and rare archive prints by the legendary Sandra Blow.

8 March - 24 April

Behind the Lens photography exhibition by Mike McCartney, Carinthia West and Rupert Trueman

- SPRING 2019

Given the emphasis on cider making, it was no huge surprise to see Richard Matlock of La Robeline Cider company there, although he stuck to playing in the band, rather than being part of the intricate manoeuvres of a dance. He also provided the cider necessary for the ‘blessing’ and for his colleagues to quench their thirst. The Squire of the Helier Morris Men, Colin Ireson, explained the dress used that day was based on the Border tradition of coloured rags and high hats normally seen in the Welsh Marches rather than the more commonly seen (as in Jersey at least) a white-coloured turn out. Dancing in the open air is strenuous and thirsty work and so it all ended with cider, sandwiches and also some calvados; the latter was served to keep us warm on a cold January day, but that was for the spectators. So, after all the fun, feasting and merriment, was it worth it? Will Donelda’s trees grow both healthy and productive? Who knows? It gave her confidence, provided a spectacle for everyone on a grey winter Saturday and, just to make sure even surer, there is always next time. But… ‘Wassail’ – in Jersey should not that be santé?

CCA Galleries International is at the centre of cultural life in Jersey; bringing an opportunity to view and purchase work by leading International and Jersey artists and offering educational opportunities for the community. As well as inviting leading artists to the island to attend events and give talks, they offer art consultancy, art loan, framing, hanging and collecting advice. They also sell gift vouchers, art books and a substantial collection of contemporary limited edition prints.

Exhibition Schedule Spring 2019

Paul Huxley

7 March - 7 – 8 pm

‘In conversation’ with McCartney, West and Truman– an enlightening discussion covering a lifetime photographing 60’s legends (The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bowie, Pink Floyd) and the stories behind the shots. Drinks and private view with the artists from 5.30. Tickets cost £36,and should be booked at the gallery in advance t: 739900/ e: enquiries@ccagalleriesinternational.com

3 May - 10 June

Full details of all events, can be found at www.liberationjersey.com Tickets are available from www.jerseyoperahouse.co.uk Carinthia Weat - HotPants_Rod Stewart

8

Waes hael means ‘Good health’ in AngloSaxon, and was a convivial salutation in those times, like ‘Cheers’ today. Later Waes hael became ‘Wassail’; a Wassail Cup was a boozy Christmastide treat and the activity called ‘wassailing’ meant encouraging the fruition of healthy apple trees and a good cider crop. In Jersey, this ancient tradition goes back at least 20 years.

Danny Rolph: Jèrriais: an exhibition of triple wall collages based on the Jèrriais language. Gallery discussions with Danny and Gerraint Jennings and a performance by the Badlabecques

Ian Dury And The Blockheads - Mr Lovepants

SPRING 2019

- 9


A JERSEY SALMAGUNDI

WAES HAEL! ‘ (OR ‘SANTE’?) From our wassailing correspondent, Hamish Marett-Crosby

A mixed salad of Jersey life

Nature is capricious, and so folk search for some insurance policy, preferably one steeped in tradition, for support. Thus, on the first Saturday of January, a newly planted apple orchard belonging to Donelda Guy was visited by the Helier Morris Men who, with due solemnity (or perhaps what passes as solemnity for Morris Men), were going to do their best to ensure its health and fruitfulness with a traditional Wassail ceremony.

ROYAL PROGRESS The sales and marketing director of the Jersey Royal Company, William Church updates us as the planting season gets under way As the new planting season gets under way, I am hesitant to say that things are going ok… fingers crossed! The weather has been in complete contrast to last year, and farmers haven’t yet been hit with a deluge of rain, so the mood in the countryside is much more upbeat with good planting progress. January, although dry, has been a bit of a funny month with very low light levels, not something that we ordinarily talk about. The result of this is that most indoor crops

LIBERATION INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL 9 - 12 May 2019 - Preview by the festival chairman, James Mews.

are looking a bit ‘leggy’ as plants strive to find the light. That said, with the mild weather they are all maturing well and are likely to be ready to dig a little earlier than in other years. The themes from last year roll on to this, and there are still concerns about access to and recruitment of seasonal labour. On top of that, I have to mention the dreaded word ‘Brexit’. As with other industries there is an air of uncertainty hanging over farmers and how the result will affect us in terms of potential import duties on inputs

beauty. Blue Badge guide Ned Malet de Carteret will lead the walk around St Ouen’s Manor exploring the rich history of the area and stopping at interludes to be serenaded by violinist Harriet Mackenzie.

The Liberation International Music Festival is back, celebrating Jersey’s liberation from German occupation. The central theme of this year’s festival is the unifying power of music and the exciting program, featuring works by English, American, German and Italian composers, speaks of the strength of nations working together to create unity after WWII.

On 10 May the audience will be treated to a stunning program of chamber music, featuring Schubert’s Quintet for strings and Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in G minor, played by major stars of the classical world: violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky, So Ock Kim and pianist Wu Qian. Sitkovetsky, winner of the Lincoln Centre Emerging Artist Award, will give a pre-concert talk about his career which began when he played his first solo concert as a precociously talented eight year old.

The Jersey Opera House plays host to several concerts and on 9 May the Festival opens with a lovely family event: the ever popular Musical Walk offering a wonderful combination of music, history and natural

On Saturday 11 May, a celebration of the great Broadway musicals and music featuring the Jersey Chamber Orchestra will be directed by Dominic Ferris and led by BBC Symphony Orchestra first

With the renaissance of cider making in Jersey, it was no surprise to discover the Morris Men are pretty busy in the New Year so, on Saturday 4 January, they were visiting five apple orchards starting and finishing at Samarès Manor. At each stop, three traditional dances were performed, a cider libation poured around the tree and a slice of cider-imbued toast fixed to a branch.

and whether any log-jam at ports could impact entry into the UK. The one thing that we can certainly all take comfort from is that the Jersey Royal brand remains very strong, and as a British product that is principally sold into a British market, demand should remain firm regardless of any outcome and could even get stronger.

violinist, Anna Smith. As well as favourites, including a reuniting of the Les Miserable cast from 2016, the show will also feature Rhapsody in Blue with Dominic as soloist, and a range of songs from Phantom of the Opera to Cole Porter classics. As the Festival ends on Sunday 12 May, it’s picnic time with the ever popular Jazz festival. The twist is that it will be a Jazz and Gin Festival bringing classics mixes to the fore as well as moving the venue to the Royal Jersey Showground. Headlining this year is the multiple award winning vocalist Clare Teal making her third appearance in 11 years. Clare is a regular at on BBC Radio 2 with her own show and her sensational set of jazz and swing classics is sure to end this year’s Festival on a high note.

CCA Galleries

5 – 28 February

Recent print releases by Sir Peter Blake, Paul Huxley and Bruce McLean with archive prints by Sandra Blow limited edition silk screen prints, with collage, embossing, paint, glazes and glitter by contemporary print masters and rare archive prints by the legendary Sandra Blow.

8 March - 24 April

Behind the Lens photography exhibition by Mike McCartney, Carinthia West and Rupert Trueman

- SPRING 2019

Given the emphasis on cider making, it was no huge surprise to see Richard Matlock of La Robeline Cider company there, although he stuck to playing in the band, rather than being part of the intricate manoeuvres of a dance. He also provided the cider necessary for the ‘blessing’ and for his colleagues to quench their thirst. The Squire of the Helier Morris Men, Colin Ireson, explained the dress used that day was based on the Border tradition of coloured rags and high hats normally seen in the Welsh Marches rather than the more commonly seen (as in Jersey at least) a white-coloured turn out. Dancing in the open air is strenuous and thirsty work and so it all ended with cider, sandwiches and also some calvados; the latter was served to keep us warm on a cold January day, but that was for the spectators. So, after all the fun, feasting and merriment, was it worth it? Will Donelda’s trees grow both healthy and productive? Who knows? It gave her confidence, provided a spectacle for everyone on a grey winter Saturday and, just to make sure even surer, there is always next time. But… ‘Wassail’ – in Jersey should not that be santé?

CCA Galleries International is at the centre of cultural life in Jersey; bringing an opportunity to view and purchase work by leading International and Jersey artists and offering educational opportunities for the community. As well as inviting leading artists to the island to attend events and give talks, they offer art consultancy, art loan, framing, hanging and collecting advice. They also sell gift vouchers, art books and a substantial collection of contemporary limited edition prints.

Exhibition Schedule Spring 2019

Paul Huxley

7 March - 7 – 8 pm

‘In conversation’ with McCartney, West and Truman– an enlightening discussion covering a lifetime photographing 60’s legends (The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bowie, Pink Floyd) and the stories behind the shots. Drinks and private view with the artists from 5.30. Tickets cost £36,and should be booked at the gallery in advance t: 739900/ e: enquiries@ccagalleriesinternational.com

3 May - 10 June

Full details of all events, can be found at www.liberationjersey.com Tickets are available from www.jerseyoperahouse.co.uk Carinthia Weat - HotPants_Rod Stewart

8

Waes hael means ‘Good health’ in AngloSaxon, and was a convivial salutation in those times, like ‘Cheers’ today. Later Waes hael became ‘Wassail’; a Wassail Cup was a boozy Christmastide treat and the activity called ‘wassailing’ meant encouraging the fruition of healthy apple trees and a good cider crop. In Jersey, this ancient tradition goes back at least 20 years.

Danny Rolph: Jèrriais: an exhibition of triple wall collages based on the Jèrriais language. Gallery discussions with Danny and Gerraint Jennings and a performance by the Badlabecques

Ian Dury And The Blockheads - Mr Lovepants

SPRING 2019

- 9


OUT & ABOUT

HORSES IN HAND Ivor and Carole Barette’s carriage driving hobby re-enacts the glory days of the ‘four-in-hand club’. And at the Windsor Horse Show their impressive results promote Jersey – even if the announcer can’t quite pronounce their surname correctly. They talked to Ruth Le Cocq.

S

tepping through the door into the Barette’s farm shed is like taking a step back into the Golden Age of Coaching without using a time machine. There, lined up against the far wall, are horse-drawn vehicles of every description and in every state of repair, including Jersey vans, carriages and even a hearse. When the door to the tack room is opened, the smell of leather mixed with saddle soap makes it clear that the harnesses hanging on the wall are not gathering dust and spider webs like so many others lying forgotten in farm buildings across the Island. Ivor Barette and his wife, Carole, have spent many years honing their skills and collecting suitable horses to fulfil their ambition of participating in driving classes in the UK. Last year they won the Concorde d’Elegance prize in the Champagne Laurent Perrier Meet of the British Driving Society at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, and they took part in the Coaching Marathon - a nine-mile drive through Home Park which included the Long Walk.

vehicles, and outfits for the humans, not to mention food for all, is mind-boggling. Ivor said: ‘We have a suitcase for each horse so nothing gets mixed up, each horse has got his own harness so they have four suitcases in the lorry.’ ‘Then we have our own suitcases,’ said Carole, ‘and I take a variety of hats and a couple of outfits.’ ‘Team Barette’ includes Jersey Horse Driving Society President Ian Le Marquand who starts cleaning the horses’ harnesses about a week before an event to ensure the brass and silver don’t tarnish. Carole’s daughter, Kirsten McDonald, baths the horses before they are loaded into the horsebox to travel to the UK. Once there, they meet Craig Rees, who, together with Kirsten, acts as a groom. Wendy and Michael Merryman, who provide the catering, then join them.

Those years of preparation have clearly paid off and the couple are looking forward to visiting Windsor again

Carole said: ‘It took us five years to get the whole turnout together to be able to meet the standard that was required to go to the county shows.’ Those years of preparation have clearly paid off and the couple are looking forward to visiting Windsor again this May. ‘Of course, it’s not just me and Ivor,’ said Carole, ‘we have “Team Barette” supporting us otherwise it would impossible.’ The amount of preparation needed to take four horses, harnesses and rugs, two 10

- SPRING 2019

Outside Rozel Manor SPRING 2019

- 11


OUT & ABOUT

HORSES IN HAND Ivor and Carole Barette’s carriage driving hobby re-enacts the glory days of the ‘four-in-hand club’. And at the Windsor Horse Show their impressive results promote Jersey – even if the announcer can’t quite pronounce their surname correctly. They talked to Ruth Le Cocq.

S

tepping through the door into the Barette’s farm shed is like taking a step back into the Golden Age of Coaching without using a time machine. There, lined up against the far wall, are horse-drawn vehicles of every description and in every state of repair, including Jersey vans, carriages and even a hearse. When the door to the tack room is opened, the smell of leather mixed with saddle soap makes it clear that the harnesses hanging on the wall are not gathering dust and spider webs like so many others lying forgotten in farm buildings across the Island. Ivor Barette and his wife, Carole, have spent many years honing their skills and collecting suitable horses to fulfil their ambition of participating in driving classes in the UK. Last year they won the Concorde d’Elegance prize in the Champagne Laurent Perrier Meet of the British Driving Society at the Royal Windsor Horse Show, and they took part in the Coaching Marathon - a nine-mile drive through Home Park which included the Long Walk.

vehicles, and outfits for the humans, not to mention food for all, is mind-boggling. Ivor said: ‘We have a suitcase for each horse so nothing gets mixed up, each horse has got his own harness so they have four suitcases in the lorry.’ ‘Then we have our own suitcases,’ said Carole, ‘and I take a variety of hats and a couple of outfits.’ ‘Team Barette’ includes Jersey Horse Driving Society President Ian Le Marquand who starts cleaning the horses’ harnesses about a week before an event to ensure the brass and silver don’t tarnish. Carole’s daughter, Kirsten McDonald, baths the horses before they are loaded into the horsebox to travel to the UK. Once there, they meet Craig Rees, who, together with Kirsten, acts as a groom. Wendy and Michael Merryman, who provide the catering, then join them.

Those years of preparation have clearly paid off and the couple are looking forward to visiting Windsor again

Carole said: ‘It took us five years to get the whole turnout together to be able to meet the standard that was required to go to the county shows.’ Those years of preparation have clearly paid off and the couple are looking forward to visiting Windsor again this May. ‘Of course, it’s not just me and Ivor,’ said Carole, ‘we have “Team Barette” supporting us otherwise it would impossible.’ The amount of preparation needed to take four horses, harnesses and rugs, two 10

- SPRING 2019

Outside Rozel Manor SPRING 2019

- 11


OUT & ABOUT

‘On show day we get up at 4.30am – depending on how far we are staying from the showground. I usually plait the night before – it takes me three hours to plait four horses - just over half an hour a horse,’ said Carole. She added: ‘You have to turn out to a standard and a dress code and the guests on board have to interact with each other, smiling and laughing. The grooms have to be turned out in a certain way – ours wear coats with burgundy velvet collars and cuffs, top hats, white stocks, brown gloves and long boots with a top.’ It’s a far cry from the days when Ivor, as a young boy, learnt to drive the old farm horse so he could plant potatoes on his father’s farm. ‘I did that for three or four years until machinery took over. I remember getting

OUT & ABOUT

the boxes from the field with the old Jersey van because I wasn’t old enough to drive a tractor but I could drive the horse,’ he said, laughing. Ivor admitted that driving four horses at the same time had taken a bit of practice. ‘With coaching you need a team of four horses – it’s like driving two pairs – you have to learn to hold four reins in one hand so it’s quite a skill, it takes a bit of learning but once you’ve got it, it’s a pleasure,’ he said. ‘However, you can’t always mix the horses up into different positions – two may go well here and two may go well there but, if you put them in a different position, they don’t go so well. We seem to have got it right at the moment,’ he added.

With coaching you need a team of four horses – it’s like driving two pairs – you have to learn to hold four reins in one hand

” Royal Windsor Horse Shwo 2018

It’s taken a lot of perseverance to get all the horses going nicely and interacting but they are all friends.

Royal Windsor Horse Shwo 2018

12

- SPRING 2019

The Barettes have five driving horses – Bill and Ben, Duke and Denis, and King. They also have three young horses, which are yet to be broken to harness, and a retired horse. ‘I’ve had the coach for 12 years,‘ said Ivor, ‘and it’s taken a lot of perseverance to get all the horses going nicely and interacting but they are all friends. They love it. Two of them are 17 or 18 years old now so that’s why we got the youngsters.’ Usually, ‘Team Barette’ travels to the UK four times during the show season, leaving on a Tuesday to compete on a Friday. ‘It is very tiring - you work hard and you play hard,’ said Carole. ‘It’s such a lovely feeling getting up on the coach but sometimes, when I get towards the end of the drive, I realise I’ll be sitting in the ring for another hour!’ While in the massive ring, the class competitors are introduced on big screens to ensure the crowd can see

everybody clearly. With a laugh, the couple recounted how, until last year, the Jersey pronunciation of ‘Barette’ had seemed to flummox the commentator. The formal atmosphere of the show ring contrasts dramatically with the fun that is had in the lorry park afterwards. ‘It is very formal but once you get off the coach every turnout has an after party so you spend the next couple of hours socialising with the tables set out,’ said Carole. With the arrival of spring, the Barrettes’ attention is now turning towards the summer season. The horses, who relax out in the field during the winter, will soon be brought back into work. And, at the thought of what the future might bring, Carole turned to Ivor and said tentatively: ‘It would be nice to win the coaching, although it is fiercely competitive.’ Ivor turned to her, smiling broadly: ‘But we are going further up the line as the years progress.’

SPRING 2019

- 13


OUT & ABOUT

‘On show day we get up at 4.30am – depending on how far we are staying from the showground. I usually plait the night before – it takes me three hours to plait four horses - just over half an hour a horse,’ said Carole. She added: ‘You have to turn out to a standard and a dress code and the guests on board have to interact with each other, smiling and laughing. The grooms have to be turned out in a certain way – ours wear coats with burgundy velvet collars and cuffs, top hats, white stocks, brown gloves and long boots with a top.’ It’s a far cry from the days when Ivor, as a young boy, learnt to drive the old farm horse so he could plant potatoes on his father’s farm. ‘I did that for three or four years until machinery took over. I remember getting

OUT & ABOUT

the boxes from the field with the old Jersey van because I wasn’t old enough to drive a tractor but I could drive the horse,’ he said, laughing. Ivor admitted that driving four horses at the same time had taken a bit of practice. ‘With coaching you need a team of four horses – it’s like driving two pairs – you have to learn to hold four reins in one hand so it’s quite a skill, it takes a bit of learning but once you’ve got it, it’s a pleasure,’ he said. ‘However, you can’t always mix the horses up into different positions – two may go well here and two may go well there but, if you put them in a different position, they don’t go so well. We seem to have got it right at the moment,’ he added.

With coaching you need a team of four horses – it’s like driving two pairs – you have to learn to hold four reins in one hand

” Royal Windsor Horse Shwo 2018

It’s taken a lot of perseverance to get all the horses going nicely and interacting but they are all friends.

Royal Windsor Horse Shwo 2018

12

- SPRING 2019

The Barettes have five driving horses – Bill and Ben, Duke and Denis, and King. They also have three young horses, which are yet to be broken to harness, and a retired horse. ‘I’ve had the coach for 12 years,‘ said Ivor, ‘and it’s taken a lot of perseverance to get all the horses going nicely and interacting but they are all friends. They love it. Two of them are 17 or 18 years old now so that’s why we got the youngsters.’ Usually, ‘Team Barette’ travels to the UK four times during the show season, leaving on a Tuesday to compete on a Friday. ‘It is very tiring - you work hard and you play hard,’ said Carole. ‘It’s such a lovely feeling getting up on the coach but sometimes, when I get towards the end of the drive, I realise I’ll be sitting in the ring for another hour!’ While in the massive ring, the class competitors are introduced on big screens to ensure the crowd can see

everybody clearly. With a laugh, the couple recounted how, until last year, the Jersey pronunciation of ‘Barette’ had seemed to flummox the commentator. The formal atmosphere of the show ring contrasts dramatically with the fun that is had in the lorry park afterwards. ‘It is very formal but once you get off the coach every turnout has an after party so you spend the next couple of hours socialising with the tables set out,’ said Carole. With the arrival of spring, the Barrettes’ attention is now turning towards the summer season. The horses, who relax out in the field during the winter, will soon be brought back into work. And, at the thought of what the future might bring, Carole turned to Ivor and said tentatively: ‘It would be nice to win the coaching, although it is fiercely competitive.’ Ivor turned to her, smiling broadly: ‘But we are going further up the line as the years progress.’

SPRING 2019

- 13


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

E

very January onlookers in St Lawrence are taken back to a bygone age as members of the Jersey Horse Driving Society gather in anticipation of their Anniversary Drive to celebrate the group’s first event held in 1972. In that year, a cavalcade of eight horsedrawn vehicles met at the Carrefour Selous Public House – now home to the Club Carrefour Gym – for the drive.

Echoes of the Past The clattering sound of horse shoes is still commonplace on Jersey’s roads, but these days it is rare for them to announce the presence of horse-drawn vehicles weaving their way through some of the Island’s narrowest lanes. Ruth Le Cocq was taken for a ride – by the Jersey Horse Driving Society

14

- SPRING 2019

This year, five drivers and their horses and ponies took part, led by Ivor and Carole Barette, driving a pair of Gelderlanders. They all met at St Lawrence Parish Hall before setting off on a circular route, which included going past the National Trust’s Le Rât Cottage. An hour later the drivers, grooms and passengers enjoyed refreshments provided by Angie Fenlon and served by founder members Rose Le Sech and Karan Osborne, the daughter of the Society’s first president, Cyril Byrd. JHDS president Ian Le Marquand, who works tirelessly alongside Club stalwarts to organise events, is looking forward to celebrating its 50th anniversary in a couple of years’ time. ‘We will be doing something special although not on the scale

of our 25th anniversary when 17 of us took part and we drove into St Helier – I don’t think we could do that nowadays,’ he laughed. Phyllis Gouedart, Jersey’s Area Commissioner for the British Driving Society, added: ‘On that occasion we had lots of different vehicles including traditional Jersey vans and two-wheel rally cars but these days, for insurance purposes, we use four-wheelers, which are safer and are fitted with brakes.’

Members tend to use exercise vehicles because of their versatility although the Society still wishes to maintain the use of traditional vehicles when appropriate to do so, for example at the Club’s shows. The Society has about 60 or 70 members – down from about 100 a few years ago - and both Ian and Phyllis are keen to encourage more people to become involved. ‘Driving is a good way to promote a certain amount of responsibility in looking after a pony and it is also great fun,’ said Phyllis. She explained that when the Society was founded the horses were mainly working on farms or they were children’s ponies that had been outgrown and broken to harness. ‘Nowadays outgrown ponies tend to be sold on rather than kept and, of course, there aren’t many farm horses left!’ The Society holds a variety of competitions throughout the year including skilled driving events which teach accuracy and helps drivers to become proficient on the roads. ‘It is lovely to see the children of our current members following in the footsteps of their parents,’ said Ian, ‘although we would like to see more young people becoming involved so driving skills can be passed on to new generations.’

SPRING 2019

- 15


OUT & ABOUT

OUT & ABOUT

E

very January onlookers in St Lawrence are taken back to a bygone age as members of the Jersey Horse Driving Society gather in anticipation of their Anniversary Drive to celebrate the group’s first event held in 1972. In that year, a cavalcade of eight horsedrawn vehicles met at the Carrefour Selous Public House – now home to the Club Carrefour Gym – for the drive.

Echoes of the Past The clattering sound of horse shoes is still commonplace on Jersey’s roads, but these days it is rare for them to announce the presence of horse-drawn vehicles weaving their way through some of the Island’s narrowest lanes. Ruth Le Cocq was taken for a ride – by the Jersey Horse Driving Society

14

- SPRING 2019

This year, five drivers and their horses and ponies took part, led by Ivor and Carole Barette, driving a pair of Gelderlanders. They all met at St Lawrence Parish Hall before setting off on a circular route, which included going past the National Trust’s Le Rât Cottage. An hour later the drivers, grooms and passengers enjoyed refreshments provided by Angie Fenlon and served by founder members Rose Le Sech and Karan Osborne, the daughter of the Society’s first president, Cyril Byrd. JHDS president Ian Le Marquand, who works tirelessly alongside Club stalwarts to organise events, is looking forward to celebrating its 50th anniversary in a couple of years’ time. ‘We will be doing something special although not on the scale

of our 25th anniversary when 17 of us took part and we drove into St Helier – I don’t think we could do that nowadays,’ he laughed. Phyllis Gouedart, Jersey’s Area Commissioner for the British Driving Society, added: ‘On that occasion we had lots of different vehicles including traditional Jersey vans and two-wheel rally cars but these days, for insurance purposes, we use four-wheelers, which are safer and are fitted with brakes.’

Members tend to use exercise vehicles because of their versatility although the Society still wishes to maintain the use of traditional vehicles when appropriate to do so, for example at the Club’s shows. The Society has about 60 or 70 members – down from about 100 a few years ago - and both Ian and Phyllis are keen to encourage more people to become involved. ‘Driving is a good way to promote a certain amount of responsibility in looking after a pony and it is also great fun,’ said Phyllis. She explained that when the Society was founded the horses were mainly working on farms or they were children’s ponies that had been outgrown and broken to harness. ‘Nowadays outgrown ponies tend to be sold on rather than kept and, of course, there aren’t many farm horses left!’ The Society holds a variety of competitions throughout the year including skilled driving events which teach accuracy and helps drivers to become proficient on the roads. ‘It is lovely to see the children of our current members following in the footsteps of their parents,’ said Ian, ‘although we would like to see more young people becoming involved so driving skills can be passed on to new generations.’

SPRING 2019

- 15


OUT & ABOUT

Think Rayburn. Think Rubis. Install | Fuel | Maintain

OPEN GARDENS 2019 The Jersey Association of Youth and Friendship has published its programme of open gardens for 2019. Sunday 16 June Domaine des Vaux, La Rue de Bas, St Lawrence JE3 1JG

Explore extensive gardens and woodland set around a traditional farmhouse. The valley contains native and species trees including many magnolias and camellias. A formal herb garden and a vegetable garden accompany the beautiful main garden.

Grey Gables

If you own or are buying a Rayburn for your home, Rubis is the only accredited Rayburn Heat Centre in the Channel Islands. Speak to us about installation and maintenance and find out more about our Thermo Premium kerosene to keep your stove in top condition.

01534 709 800 or 01481 200 800 enquiries@rubis-ci.co.uk

Sunday 14 April

Sunday 5 May

St George’s Preparatory School, La Rue de la Hague, Mont du Presbytère, St Peter JE3 7DB

Grey Gables, La Rue Du Bocage, St Brelade JE3 8BP

These glorious grounds comprise some of the most impressive woodland areas on the island and include a number of specimen trees. There are 35 acres of landscaped garden in total surrounding a Grade II listed Manor which now houses the school.

Explore these extensive terraced and formal gardens including a delightful rose and peony garden. Mature spring flowering shrubs flank the paths leading to the beautiful valley area. Open by kind permission of the family of the late Celia Skinner.

Sunday 28 April

Sunday 19 May

Oaklands, La Rue d’Elysée, St Peter JE3 7DT

Old Farm, La Route de la Trinite, Trinity JE3 5JN

Visit this beautiful rambling garden, open by kind permission of Mrs Melissa Bonn. Highlights include an extensive collection of camellias and specimen shrubs, a large pond and extensive woodland, featuring silver birch, acers and what is reputed to be Jersey’s largest walnut.  

Open by kind permission of Mr and Mrs Clive Chaplin, this wonderful garden consists of a small formal terrace with pond and rockery, an arboretum and a lawn with extensive herbaceous borders. Look out for the many fine specimen trees throughout.

Sunday 7 July Les Chasses, La Rue des Chasses, St John JE3 4EE

A delight for nature lovers, these beautiful gardens have been specifically designed to attract birds, bugs and bees. And there is an emphasis on traditional, pesticide-free solutions to gardening problems.

Sunday 21 July Le Coin, Le Mont du Coin, St Brelade JE3 8BE

Originally a farm, beautiful Le Coin dates back in part to the early 17th Century. The five acre garden is modelled on those of Monserrate in Portugal.

All properties open by kind permission of the owners in aid of JAYF. From 2pm to 5pm. Delicious cream teas available. Admission £4; Children under 12 free. All proceeds to JAYF.

rubis-ci.co.uk SPRING 2019

- 17


OUT & ABOUT

Think Rayburn. Think Rubis. Install | Fuel | Maintain

OPEN GARDENS 2019 The Jersey Association of Youth and Friendship has published its programme of open gardens for 2019. Sunday 16 June Domaine des Vaux, La Rue de Bas, St Lawrence JE3 1JG

Explore extensive gardens and woodland set around a traditional farmhouse. The valley contains native and species trees including many magnolias and camellias. A formal herb garden and a vegetable garden accompany the beautiful main garden.

Grey Gables

If you own or are buying a Rayburn for your home, Rubis is the only accredited Rayburn Heat Centre in the Channel Islands. Speak to us about installation and maintenance and find out more about our Thermo Premium kerosene to keep your stove in top condition.

01534 709 800 or 01481 200 800 enquiries@rubis-ci.co.uk

Sunday 14 April

Sunday 5 May

St George’s Preparatory School, La Rue de la Hague, Mont du Presbytère, St Peter JE3 7DB

Grey Gables, La Rue Du Bocage, St Brelade JE3 8BP

These glorious grounds comprise some of the most impressive woodland areas on the island and include a number of specimen trees. There are 35 acres of landscaped garden in total surrounding a Grade II listed Manor which now houses the school.

Explore these extensive terraced and formal gardens including a delightful rose and peony garden. Mature spring flowering shrubs flank the paths leading to the beautiful valley area. Open by kind permission of the family of the late Celia Skinner.

Sunday 28 April

Sunday 19 May

Oaklands, La Rue d’Elysée, St Peter JE3 7DT

Old Farm, La Route de la Trinite, Trinity JE3 5JN

Visit this beautiful rambling garden, open by kind permission of Mrs Melissa Bonn. Highlights include an extensive collection of camellias and specimen shrubs, a large pond and extensive woodland, featuring silver birch, acers and what is reputed to be Jersey’s largest walnut.  

Open by kind permission of Mr and Mrs Clive Chaplin, this wonderful garden consists of a small formal terrace with pond and rockery, an arboretum and a lawn with extensive herbaceous borders. Look out for the many fine specimen trees throughout.

Sunday 7 July Les Chasses, La Rue des Chasses, St John JE3 4EE

A delight for nature lovers, these beautiful gardens have been specifically designed to attract birds, bugs and bees. And there is an emphasis on traditional, pesticide-free solutions to gardening problems.

Sunday 21 July Le Coin, Le Mont du Coin, St Brelade JE3 8BE

Originally a farm, beautiful Le Coin dates back in part to the early 17th Century. The five acre garden is modelled on those of Monserrate in Portugal.

All properties open by kind permission of the owners in aid of JAYF. From 2pm to 5pm. Delicious cream teas available. Admission £4; Children under 12 free. All proceeds to JAYF.

rubis-ci.co.uk SPRING 2019

- 17


FARM & GARDEN

Meet the farmer

As the Jersey Royal planting season gets under way, Alasdair Crosby spoke to Phil Rive, the farming manager at the largest farm in the Island, the Jersey Royal Company Ltd SPRING 2019

- 19


FARM & GARDEN

Meet the farmer

As the Jersey Royal planting season gets under way, Alasdair Crosby spoke to Phil Rive, the farming manager at the largest farm in the Island, the Jersey Royal Company Ltd SPRING 2019

- 19


FARM & GARDEN

I

t had begun to rain, after a dry period in late January. Phil Rive did not look pleased.

As the interview went on, it started raining harder. Phil frequently looked out of the window and sounded even less impressed. Fortunately we were indoors at his home, unlike the 300 or so workforce out planting in the fields, for whose work Phil has responsibility. ‘It is, of course, easier to do work when it’s dry,’ he said, ‘especially these days when the days aren’t long and things take longer to dry. Dry weather does make things easier, especially on heavy soil. Also, laying the polythene covers on top helps to condition the soil as well as advance the crop. People always think the covers protect it from frost. It does a little – but that’s not the main benefit. Our work at the moment is all about planting and getting the crop covered as soon as possible.’ Phil’s job at this time of year entails managing all the teams planting potatoes. But whatever the time of year, he is a busy person with a demanding job – there is no sitting about in the months between lifting the potatoes and the next year’s planting.

FARM & GARDEN

Also, it’s a longer season these days and there are over 1,600 fields to be farmed– although not all of them are under potatoes in the same season. Some are resting, some have been swapped with livestock farmers but all have to be managed. The company aims to sell about 20,000 tons of early potatoes per season; it manages 9,000 vergées, making it the largest farm in the Island.

...there were no regular taste teste back in temps passé, such as my company now does regularly throughout the season.

‘I don’t think people realise just how immense the holdings are,’ he said, ‘or how many workers are needed to farm them: around 300 at planting time and more than 400 to dig and pack the potatoes. We have accommodation for them at over 20 locations – it is a major operation just to collect them in the mornings and transport them to the right working location. We have just over 100 tractors, 24 harvesting machines and 45 minibuses}’ His remarks highlight two important factors in his company’s operation: land and labour (or, to put it another way, the lack of an adequate amount of land and the number of people to work it). Jersey, a small island with a large population proportionate to its size and a high volume of traffic on the roads, is

a difficult place to grow any commercial crop, he said. It is an expensive bit of water over which to export produce and land is limited and divided into relatively small fields all around the Island. And labour: ‘We have to rely on importing workers. We are always on the look-out for them. People say they are going to come, but until their feet touch the ground in Jersey, we can’t count on anything for certain!’ Securing labour is the most common worry for farmers in Jersey and elsewhere in Britain… and then there’s Brexit – that topic deep in a forest of question marks and uncertainty, although as the only market for the Jersey Royal is the UK, he said that a ‘no-deal’ or difficult Brexit might tempt UK consumers to buy Jersey produce rather than possibly more expensive imports from the EU. Another concern of his is the unfavourable publicity that potato growers attract through their usage of pesticides. ‘People complain about chemicals and say that “in the old days” things were more natural and better – and, of course, the Jersey Royal also tasted better back then (apparently). But actually the reverse is true. The chemicals we are using are much safer than in “the good old days”. We have strict supermarket protocols to observe and as a company, we are really trying to cut down on the usage of fertiliser and pesticides and using non-chemical ways of keeping the crop healthy. ‘In our detailed digital maps all the different fields are mapped showing their location in water catchment areas. So every time we spread manure on a field, we check on the digital map first and then, if necessary, spray accordingly, with regard to the potential risk to boreholes and water supply pollution. We work closely with Jersey Water and by swapping land with cattle farmers, we do everything we can to ensure rotation of use. ‘And as for the taste… there were no regular taste tests back in temps passé, such as my company now does regularly throughout the season.’ Asked about his daily routine, he replied: ‘I don’t have one. I’m in the office by 6.30am. I speak to the two farming

team managers and try to coordinate operations s as far as possible. Sometimes there are huge discussions on what we should do: should we risk planting more, if we are a little bit behind with putting the covers over the newly planted crop. Should we be ploughing fields before it gets too wet? That sort of thing.’ He stressed that he was only part of a team of colleagues with responsibility for their own sectors of the business, but, he joked, if he started naming them the list would just go on and on – and if he forgot to mention one name, he would not easily be forgiven! After the morning meeting he usually visits the work teams in the fields to see how they are getting on – there’s always seems to be something that needs sorting! He works long hours, especially in the summer. ‘As farming manager, planting is my responsibility and so is keeping all the technical records of when, where and how much is planted.

‘It’s going to be challenging, what with other crops of early potatoes being grown elsewhere and the continuing trend towards eating pasta in place of spuds.

‘We also grow organic Royals. The main problem in growing these is that we are limited on how to prevent potato blight, to which unfortunately the Royal is susceptible. Once the crop becomes infected, even if we quickly destroy it, there is also the problem of it already having spread to neighbouring nonorganic fields, which perversely will now require more pesticides to avoid losing those as well. ‘It is a little frustrating to hear some people proclaim that the obvious answer is to just “go organic”. If it were really that simple, then of course that’s what we would have done. ‘We also grow 25 vergées of tea plants, but it is still in its infancy; nothing has been harvested yet. We are always criticised for not diversifying, so here we are - diversifying.’ How does he see the future of the industry? ‘It’s going to be challenging, what with other crops of early potatoes being

SPRING 2019

- 21


FARM & GARDEN

I

t had begun to rain, after a dry period in late January. Phil Rive did not look pleased.

As the interview went on, it started raining harder. Phil frequently looked out of the window and sounded even less impressed. Fortunately we were indoors at his home, unlike the 300 or so workforce out planting in the fields, for whose work Phil has responsibility. ‘It is, of course, easier to do work when it’s dry,’ he said, ‘especially these days when the days aren’t long and things take longer to dry. Dry weather does make things easier, especially on heavy soil. Also, laying the polythene covers on top helps to condition the soil as well as advance the crop. People always think the covers protect it from frost. It does a little – but that’s not the main benefit. Our work at the moment is all about planting and getting the crop covered as soon as possible.’ Phil’s job at this time of year entails managing all the teams planting potatoes. But whatever the time of year, he is a busy person with a demanding job – there is no sitting about in the months between lifting the potatoes and the next year’s planting.

FARM & GARDEN

Also, it’s a longer season these days and there are over 1,600 fields to be farmed– although not all of them are under potatoes in the same season. Some are resting, some have been swapped with livestock farmers but all have to be managed. The company aims to sell about 20,000 tons of early potatoes per season; it manages 9,000 vergées, making it the largest farm in the Island.

...there were no regular taste teste back in temps passé, such as my company now does regularly throughout the season.

‘I don’t think people realise just how immense the holdings are,’ he said, ‘or how many workers are needed to farm them: around 300 at planting time and more than 400 to dig and pack the potatoes. We have accommodation for them at over 20 locations – it is a major operation just to collect them in the mornings and transport them to the right working location. We have just over 100 tractors, 24 harvesting machines and 45 minibuses}’ His remarks highlight two important factors in his company’s operation: land and labour (or, to put it another way, the lack of an adequate amount of land and the number of people to work it). Jersey, a small island with a large population proportionate to its size and a high volume of traffic on the roads, is

a difficult place to grow any commercial crop, he said. It is an expensive bit of water over which to export produce and land is limited and divided into relatively small fields all around the Island. And labour: ‘We have to rely on importing workers. We are always on the look-out for them. People say they are going to come, but until their feet touch the ground in Jersey, we can’t count on anything for certain!’ Securing labour is the most common worry for farmers in Jersey and elsewhere in Britain… and then there’s Brexit – that topic deep in a forest of question marks and uncertainty, although as the only market for the Jersey Royal is the UK, he said that a ‘no-deal’ or difficult Brexit might tempt UK consumers to buy Jersey produce rather than possibly more expensive imports from the EU. Another concern of his is the unfavourable publicity that potato growers attract through their usage of pesticides. ‘People complain about chemicals and say that “in the old days” things were more natural and better – and, of course, the Jersey Royal also tasted better back then (apparently). But actually the reverse is true. The chemicals we are using are much safer than in “the good old days”. We have strict supermarket protocols to observe and as a company, we are really trying to cut down on the usage of fertiliser and pesticides and using non-chemical ways of keeping the crop healthy. ‘In our detailed digital maps all the different fields are mapped showing their location in water catchment areas. So every time we spread manure on a field, we check on the digital map first and then, if necessary, spray accordingly, with regard to the potential risk to boreholes and water supply pollution. We work closely with Jersey Water and by swapping land with cattle farmers, we do everything we can to ensure rotation of use. ‘And as for the taste… there were no regular taste tests back in temps passé, such as my company now does regularly throughout the season.’ Asked about his daily routine, he replied: ‘I don’t have one. I’m in the office by 6.30am. I speak to the two farming

team managers and try to coordinate operations s as far as possible. Sometimes there are huge discussions on what we should do: should we risk planting more, if we are a little bit behind with putting the covers over the newly planted crop. Should we be ploughing fields before it gets too wet? That sort of thing.’ He stressed that he was only part of a team of colleagues with responsibility for their own sectors of the business, but, he joked, if he started naming them the list would just go on and on – and if he forgot to mention one name, he would not easily be forgiven! After the morning meeting he usually visits the work teams in the fields to see how they are getting on – there’s always seems to be something that needs sorting! He works long hours, especially in the summer. ‘As farming manager, planting is my responsibility and so is keeping all the technical records of when, where and how much is planted.

‘It’s going to be challenging, what with other crops of early potatoes being grown elsewhere and the continuing trend towards eating pasta in place of spuds.

‘We also grow organic Royals. The main problem in growing these is that we are limited on how to prevent potato blight, to which unfortunately the Royal is susceptible. Once the crop becomes infected, even if we quickly destroy it, there is also the problem of it already having spread to neighbouring nonorganic fields, which perversely will now require more pesticides to avoid losing those as well. ‘It is a little frustrating to hear some people proclaim that the obvious answer is to just “go organic”. If it were really that simple, then of course that’s what we would have done. ‘We also grow 25 vergées of tea plants, but it is still in its infancy; nothing has been harvested yet. We are always criticised for not diversifying, so here we are - diversifying.’ How does he see the future of the industry? ‘It’s going to be challenging, what with other crops of early potatoes being

SPRING 2019

- 21


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

grown elsewhere and the continuing trend towards eating pasta and rice in place of spuds. At least the “Jersey Royal” name has legal protection and there is still great public support in the UK for the crop, which is helped by advertising. It is still seen as a treat in springtime, so I cannot imagine supermarkets ceasing to buy it. ‘But labour is such a pressing problem for us and we need to find out how to farm with less labour and use the latest technology efficiently. ’ Phil has always been interested in farming. He grew up on the mixed dairy and arable farm of his father, Oscar, who still lives a short distance from his own farm near Queen’s Valley. Phil began his farming career as an independent grower and is now part of a much larger unit – the story of his working life could be a summary of the evolution of potato growing in modern times, in Jersey as elsewhere.

SECRET LIVES The best-selling author of The Secret Life of Cows, Rosamund Young, farms organically at Kite’s Nest Farm in the Cotswolds M A R K E T S | FA R M S H O P S | R E S TA U R A N T S

Passionate about food.

Whether it’s reared, grown, caught or made in Jersey, Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of local provenance. In a nutshell, the Mark allows you to make an informed choice to support the local economy, embrace seasonality and reduce your food miles.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.com

Look for the Mark before you buy

22

- SPRING 2019

I

n the Cotswolds at this time of year snowdrops are in full sail, hazel catkins so advanced they make the trees look fully clothed, the first tight plum buds clutch their tiny fists, but the always cold-looking blackthorn is bare and dark and sharp as I begin a new adventure, the last thing you would expect a farmer to be doing in February. With newly purchased magnifying lens bouncing on a cord round my neck I am searching for the eggs of The Brown Hairstreak butterfly. Inspired by ‘The Butterfly Isles’ by Patrick Barkham, in which he describes his quest to see all 59 native British butterflies in one year, I try to imitate his antics on a raw February day, scanning large numbers of bare twigs in five separate blackthorn spinneys. The eggs, laid singly, in the join between twig and stem are attached so firmly they withstand winter storms and snows. I find a motionless Rosie Rustic moth, two acrobatic spiders dangling from single, silken threads, an infinitesimal

insect I may wish to identify in the future and two ladybirds. Most of England’s ladybirds seem to be over-wintering in curtain folds in our farmhouse so I stop to make certain these are not the invader Harlequins who might very well eat the eggs I cannot find or do they wait till spring to eat the caterpillars? Every discovery begs many questions and I am always running to catch up. A few days later and the builder working on our new barn asks when I last saw a stag beetle. I plan my next novel expedition and begin by researching online. Stag beetles take ‘only’ five to six years to develop from an egg into a beetle, up to a foot below ground, munching dead wood. If I ever find an egg, I may make an identification in the middle of the next decade! Winter is usually wall to wall hard graft and I certainly owe it to my livestock to be their devoted attendant. However, stealing time for something out of the ordinary is exhilarating and fuels me with new energy for the daily tasks.

I incline increasingly to the belief that the smaller the creature or organism, the cleverer it is: cows, sheep, hens, wild birds, bats, beetles, fungi, bacteria, mycorrhizae. The smallest things create and sustain life on earth; humans only use and destroy it. Sometimes I become so immersed in the daily physical routine I do not take sufficient notice of what the animals are telling me. A year ago, White Dots developed painful mastitis just before she calved and I found myself doing the vet’s bidding: bathing, stripping, massaging, injecting, feeding and watering and giving supplementary milk to the calf, that I neglected to give the cow any ‘time’. It hit me on about day four and I simply placed my hands on her side and felt her whole, massive frame relax. I did not move for some time. She looked visibly comforted. After a while I stroked and then groomed her. Her recovery gathered pace.

SPRING 2019

- 23


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

grown elsewhere and the continuing trend towards eating pasta and rice in place of spuds. At least the “Jersey Royal” name has legal protection and there is still great public support in the UK for the crop, which is helped by advertising. It is still seen as a treat in springtime, so I cannot imagine supermarkets ceasing to buy it. ‘But labour is such a pressing problem for us and we need to find out how to farm with less labour and use the latest technology efficiently. ’ Phil has always been interested in farming. He grew up on the mixed dairy and arable farm of his father, Oscar, who still lives a short distance from his own farm near Queen’s Valley. Phil began his farming career as an independent grower and is now part of a much larger unit – the story of his working life could be a summary of the evolution of potato growing in modern times, in Jersey as elsewhere.

SECRET LIVES The best-selling author of The Secret Life of Cows, Rosamund Young, farms organically at Kite’s Nest Farm in the Cotswolds M A R K E T S | FA R M S H O P S | R E S TA U R A N T S

Passionate about food.

Whether it’s reared, grown, caught or made in Jersey, Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of local provenance. In a nutshell, the Mark allows you to make an informed choice to support the local economy, embrace seasonality and reduce your food miles.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.com

Look for the Mark before you buy

22

- SPRING 2019

I

n the Cotswolds at this time of year snowdrops are in full sail, hazel catkins so advanced they make the trees look fully clothed, the first tight plum buds clutch their tiny fists, but the always cold-looking blackthorn is bare and dark and sharp as I begin a new adventure, the last thing you would expect a farmer to be doing in February. With newly purchased magnifying lens bouncing on a cord round my neck I am searching for the eggs of The Brown Hairstreak butterfly. Inspired by ‘The Butterfly Isles’ by Patrick Barkham, in which he describes his quest to see all 59 native British butterflies in one year, I try to imitate his antics on a raw February day, scanning large numbers of bare twigs in five separate blackthorn spinneys. The eggs, laid singly, in the join between twig and stem are attached so firmly they withstand winter storms and snows. I find a motionless Rosie Rustic moth, two acrobatic spiders dangling from single, silken threads, an infinitesimal

insect I may wish to identify in the future and two ladybirds. Most of England’s ladybirds seem to be over-wintering in curtain folds in our farmhouse so I stop to make certain these are not the invader Harlequins who might very well eat the eggs I cannot find or do they wait till spring to eat the caterpillars? Every discovery begs many questions and I am always running to catch up. A few days later and the builder working on our new barn asks when I last saw a stag beetle. I plan my next novel expedition and begin by researching online. Stag beetles take ‘only’ five to six years to develop from an egg into a beetle, up to a foot below ground, munching dead wood. If I ever find an egg, I may make an identification in the middle of the next decade! Winter is usually wall to wall hard graft and I certainly owe it to my livestock to be their devoted attendant. However, stealing time for something out of the ordinary is exhilarating and fuels me with new energy for the daily tasks.

I incline increasingly to the belief that the smaller the creature or organism, the cleverer it is: cows, sheep, hens, wild birds, bats, beetles, fungi, bacteria, mycorrhizae. The smallest things create and sustain life on earth; humans only use and destroy it. Sometimes I become so immersed in the daily physical routine I do not take sufficient notice of what the animals are telling me. A year ago, White Dots developed painful mastitis just before she calved and I found myself doing the vet’s bidding: bathing, stripping, massaging, injecting, feeding and watering and giving supplementary milk to the calf, that I neglected to give the cow any ‘time’. It hit me on about day four and I simply placed my hands on her side and felt her whole, massive frame relax. I did not move for some time. She looked visibly comforted. After a while I stroked and then groomed her. Her recovery gathered pace.

SPRING 2019

- 23


FARM & GARDEN

Growing our Security Andrew Le Quesne of ‘Earth Project Jersey’ discusses ways in which Jersey could do more to safeguard its own food security

S

ittingon a little piece of rock in the sea is a wonderful thing in so many ways that we take for granted. Needless to say, it also has some disadvantages, especially when our transport links break down.

Come and see our exciting new showroom

Last winter the Ro-Ro ferries were unable to dock on a couple of occasions because of the weather conditions and the absence of our tug the ‘Duke of Normandy’. Supermarket shelves rapidly emptied and people started to get anxious about food shortages. But those who shop in the market, local shops and farm outlets hardly noticed a thing. The issue is food security. The ‘just in time’ processed food supply chain is very vulnerable to the slightest interference, while the locally grown supply chain barely notices. The problem is that we do not give enough priority to our local producers, everything is driven by price, not on quality, nutritional value or food miles. Jersey has had historical issues with food security especially when we indulged in virtual monoculture economics, knitting, oysters, and cider. The last occasion when we were forced to be as nearly self-sufficient as possible was during the Occupation, and none of us want to return to that situation. So what can we do to reduce our vulnerability and improve our sustainability? The answer is to grow our own. The problem is that it is not that simple, there are a whole chain of interconnected factors that need to be identified and addressed. Let’s start with the simple questions, like: What to grow?

Opening hours:

Well, I thought we could grow about 100 different crops in Jersey, I have recently been told that with the use of glasshouses that total is over 150! So given that huge

Monday – Saturday 8.30am - 5.00pm 24

- SPRING 2019

Retail showroom at Five Oaks

SPRING 2019

- 25


FARM & GARDEN

Growing our Security Andrew Le Quesne of ‘Earth Project Jersey’ discusses ways in which Jersey could do more to safeguard its own food security

S

ittingon a little piece of rock in the sea is a wonderful thing in so many ways that we take for granted. Needless to say, it also has some disadvantages, especially when our transport links break down.

Come and see our exciting new showroom

Last winter the Ro-Ro ferries were unable to dock on a couple of occasions because of the weather conditions and the absence of our tug the ‘Duke of Normandy’. Supermarket shelves rapidly emptied and people started to get anxious about food shortages. But those who shop in the market, local shops and farm outlets hardly noticed a thing. The issue is food security. The ‘just in time’ processed food supply chain is very vulnerable to the slightest interference, while the locally grown supply chain barely notices. The problem is that we do not give enough priority to our local producers, everything is driven by price, not on quality, nutritional value or food miles. Jersey has had historical issues with food security especially when we indulged in virtual monoculture economics, knitting, oysters, and cider. The last occasion when we were forced to be as nearly self-sufficient as possible was during the Occupation, and none of us want to return to that situation. So what can we do to reduce our vulnerability and improve our sustainability? The answer is to grow our own. The problem is that it is not that simple, there are a whole chain of interconnected factors that need to be identified and addressed. Let’s start with the simple questions, like: What to grow?

Opening hours:

Well, I thought we could grow about 100 different crops in Jersey, I have recently been told that with the use of glasshouses that total is over 150! So given that huge

Monday – Saturday 8.30am - 5.00pm 24

- SPRING 2019

Retail showroom at Five Oaks

SPRING 2019

- 25


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

choice, do we grow the highest monetary value crops? Those with the largest carbon footprint or food miles cost, those that lose most nutritional value in transit, the most exotic? How do you choose?

THE POLLINATOR PROJECT

Then we come to where to grow it. The first thought that comes to mind is to bring every available glasshouse back into production, mostly without heating, at first, but as we develop sustainable economically viable heating methods we can retrofit and extend the growing season.

It’s the ‘bees knees’ of environmental initiatives says Mike Stentiford

And then there is the question of using crop rotation to bring arable land back into more general production, and also coincidentally improve soil health. How are we to cultivate these crops? Chemical agriculture or traditional methods (often called ‘regenerative’)? Personally, I believe that if we can set up an Island-wide network of chemical-free green waste compost sites, then we could use that to go chemical free. This is all very idealistic, but the bottom line is that it has to make economic sense and to pay for itself (which is more often than not the killer question). We want to

do the right thing but we are averse to paying a premium for it. So I would like to suggest that in order to get it started we would need to subsidise the transition in some way and that we should start by giving some grants to growers to expand their range, or to

new growers to start up.They have to be encouraged to grow the highest quality and nutritional value produce and to make it premium quality; the market accordingly will grow faster. A method of building market share and also spreading the cost of initial setup and support would be for States Departments to purchase it. Thus we could have schools buying in from the local growers and combining it with educational benefit. Health could improve the quality of food both in hospital and (by education of patients) derive a positive long-term health benefit. How about making sure that the Meals on Wheels service has access to top quality produce? In order to bring some cohesion to this project, I would suggest that some sort of produce / horticulture marketing body would need to be established, something that I am sure could be championed by Jersey Business, helped by Digital Jersey and then taken on by representatives of the growers. This could lead to the development of an integrated marketing and sales process, market prediction to help with planting schedules and, at the end of the day possibly give Jersey a template to sell around the world to small jurisdictions. I hope that this outline gives people food for thought. There are budding growers and horticulturists out there; the empty glasshouses are there; the compost could be there; the skills and digital support are there. Why not give it a try?

26

- SPRING 2019

I

t’s now become abundantly clear that many species of pollinating insects are in spiralling freefall.

Whether butterflies, bumble bees, honey bees or hoverflies, life, as these major fruit and veg providers once knew it, is changing - fast. Although graphs and statistics genuinely help to paint a picture of clarity, the plain simple truth is that two thirds of the UK’s butterflies and moths and 38 per cent of Europe’s bees and hoverflies are facing the toughest of tough times. Putting this into perspective: one out of every three mouthfuls of the food that we eat is entirely dependent on insect pollination. It’s a factual statement that is impossible to overestimate. Obviously, something, somewhere is failing the pollinating system. Disease, climate change and changes to the plant community are all playing a part although, so far, no single, overriding cause of such decline has been officially identified. Nevertheless, a major part of the problem in Europe and parts of mainland Britain are the severely intensive farming practices and the simplified crop rotation undertaken in large fields. Other factors being thrown into the mix include an increased use of high herbicide and fertilizer and an upwardly mobile density in livestock.

While each might individually appear somewhat innocuous, they clearly deliver a negative impact on pollinators.

window boxes and even States owned public spaces taking on an air of botanical benevolence.

Collectively, what goes into the land and what grazes on it inevitably affects the loss of critically important pollinatorfriendly habitats, such as flower-rich hay meadows and rough grassland.

Such environmental intentions are certainly being undertaken by many Island organisations, including Natural Jersey

It’s a sorry picture but one that each of the Channel Islands is addressing head on. Starting the helpful ‘polli-ball’ rolling in 2017 was Guernsey, which, in partnership with Floral Guernsey, launched what was aptly named the Pollinator Project. There’s little doubt that the success of this joint venture proved truly remarkable, so much so that the initiative has been quickly seized upon by Jersey, Sark and Alderney. It’s a simple enough structure whereby public awareness of the situation is the very first and most critical port of call. Recognised as a bit of a challenge to begin with, public understanding quickly grasps the reality that without pollinating insects our five allotted daily health shots would quickly find themselves in serious jeopardy. Once the floral penny has dropped, community initiatives quickly follow with private gardens, schools, allotments,

This is a local charity that encourages the Island’s community to embrace and submit all-important environmental endeavours in the annual Parish in Bloom competition. In this respect, doing so without the use of pesticides inevitably entices any judging panel to award a hefty number of extra brownie points. Few would disagree that, with so many pollinating insects currently on red-alert, securing nectar-rich habitats in all twelve parishes would prove a remarkable environmental achievement. Putting the current situation into perspective are the official records of butterfly species gathered by monitors over the last 15 years. Of the 49 species once recorded, only 28 species are now seen each summer. Sadly, it’s now becoming a struggle for even this scant number to appear. It’s an opportune time, wouldn’t you say, for us all to plant something appropriately big for our small and desperately needy pollinators? SPRING 2019

- 27


FARM & GARDEN

FARM & GARDEN

choice, do we grow the highest monetary value crops? Those with the largest carbon footprint or food miles cost, those that lose most nutritional value in transit, the most exotic? How do you choose?

THE POLLINATOR PROJECT

Then we come to where to grow it. The first thought that comes to mind is to bring every available glasshouse back into production, mostly without heating, at first, but as we develop sustainable economically viable heating methods we can retrofit and extend the growing season.

It’s the ‘bees knees’ of environmental initiatives says Mike Stentiford

And then there is the question of using crop rotation to bring arable land back into more general production, and also coincidentally improve soil health. How are we to cultivate these crops? Chemical agriculture or traditional methods (often called ‘regenerative’)? Personally, I believe that if we can set up an Island-wide network of chemical-free green waste compost sites, then we could use that to go chemical free. This is all very idealistic, but the bottom line is that it has to make economic sense and to pay for itself (which is more often than not the killer question). We want to

do the right thing but we are averse to paying a premium for it. So I would like to suggest that in order to get it started we would need to subsidise the transition in some way and that we should start by giving some grants to growers to expand their range, or to

new growers to start up.They have to be encouraged to grow the highest quality and nutritional value produce and to make it premium quality; the market accordingly will grow faster. A method of building market share and also spreading the cost of initial setup and support would be for States Departments to purchase it. Thus we could have schools buying in from the local growers and combining it with educational benefit. Health could improve the quality of food both in hospital and (by education of patients) derive a positive long-term health benefit. How about making sure that the Meals on Wheels service has access to top quality produce? In order to bring some cohesion to this project, I would suggest that some sort of produce / horticulture marketing body would need to be established, something that I am sure could be championed by Jersey Business, helped by Digital Jersey and then taken on by representatives of the growers. This could lead to the development of an integrated marketing and sales process, market prediction to help with planting schedules and, at the end of the day possibly give Jersey a template to sell around the world to small jurisdictions. I hope that this outline gives people food for thought. There are budding growers and horticulturists out there; the empty glasshouses are there; the compost could be there; the skills and digital support are there. Why not give it a try?

26

- SPRING 2019

I

t’s now become abundantly clear that many species of pollinating insects are in spiralling freefall.

Whether butterflies, bumble bees, honey bees or hoverflies, life, as these major fruit and veg providers once knew it, is changing - fast. Although graphs and statistics genuinely help to paint a picture of clarity, the plain simple truth is that two thirds of the UK’s butterflies and moths and 38 per cent of Europe’s bees and hoverflies are facing the toughest of tough times. Putting this into perspective: one out of every three mouthfuls of the food that we eat is entirely dependent on insect pollination. It’s a factual statement that is impossible to overestimate. Obviously, something, somewhere is failing the pollinating system. Disease, climate change and changes to the plant community are all playing a part although, so far, no single, overriding cause of such decline has been officially identified. Nevertheless, a major part of the problem in Europe and parts of mainland Britain are the severely intensive farming practices and the simplified crop rotation undertaken in large fields. Other factors being thrown into the mix include an increased use of high herbicide and fertilizer and an upwardly mobile density in livestock.

While each might individually appear somewhat innocuous, they clearly deliver a negative impact on pollinators.

window boxes and even States owned public spaces taking on an air of botanical benevolence.

Collectively, what goes into the land and what grazes on it inevitably affects the loss of critically important pollinatorfriendly habitats, such as flower-rich hay meadows and rough grassland.

Such environmental intentions are certainly being undertaken by many Island organisations, including Natural Jersey

It’s a sorry picture but one that each of the Channel Islands is addressing head on. Starting the helpful ‘polli-ball’ rolling in 2017 was Guernsey, which, in partnership with Floral Guernsey, launched what was aptly named the Pollinator Project. There’s little doubt that the success of this joint venture proved truly remarkable, so much so that the initiative has been quickly seized upon by Jersey, Sark and Alderney. It’s a simple enough structure whereby public awareness of the situation is the very first and most critical port of call. Recognised as a bit of a challenge to begin with, public understanding quickly grasps the reality that without pollinating insects our five allotted daily health shots would quickly find themselves in serious jeopardy. Once the floral penny has dropped, community initiatives quickly follow with private gardens, schools, allotments,

This is a local charity that encourages the Island’s community to embrace and submit all-important environmental endeavours in the annual Parish in Bloom competition. In this respect, doing so without the use of pesticides inevitably entices any judging panel to award a hefty number of extra brownie points. Few would disagree that, with so many pollinating insects currently on red-alert, securing nectar-rich habitats in all twelve parishes would prove a remarkable environmental achievement. Putting the current situation into perspective are the official records of butterfly species gathered by monitors over the last 15 years. Of the 49 species once recorded, only 28 species are now seen each summer. Sadly, it’s now becoming a struggle for even this scant number to appear. It’s an opportune time, wouldn’t you say, for us all to plant something appropriately big for our small and desperately needy pollinators? SPRING 2019

- 27


FARM & GARDEN

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THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF

Daffodils Shannon Le Seeleur writes on her favourite flower and growing narcissus in Jersey. Her husband, John, has been a successful daffodil grower in West Cornwall and in Jersey for many years; they now farm oysters in Grouville Bay

M

y love and knowledge of daffodils has grown immensely in recent years, especially after my husband gave me a few hundred for our garden! They turned out to be hybridised varieties from our farm in Cornwall and some of the most beautiful and interesting plants I have grown.

The climate in Jersey and its rich soils are conducive to good growth and early flowering. Like potatoes and other vegetables, daffodils have grown well here: they thrive in our mild marine climate, not too hot and not too cold! Daffodils have changed tremendously since say, the 18th Century. There

is hardly another plant that has been ‘worked or altered’ as much. Consequently there is a huge array of forms and colours which makes daffodil growing particularly interesting. They also require little maintenance. It is not always easy to classify them but they appear almost overnight and flower from late December as if by magic.

SPRING 2019

- 29


FARM & GARDEN

Excellent Value

mercurydeliver.com offers real value on everyday essentials

Big Brands

Order Online

A wide range of your favorite brands delivered direct to your door

Place your order Online in minutes. Ideal for those heavy bulky items

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF

Daffodils Shannon Le Seeleur writes on her favourite flower and growing narcissus in Jersey. Her husband, John, has been a successful daffodil grower in West Cornwall and in Jersey for many years; they now farm oysters in Grouville Bay

M

y love and knowledge of daffodils has grown immensely in recent years, especially after my husband gave me a few hundred for our garden! They turned out to be hybridised varieties from our farm in Cornwall and some of the most beautiful and interesting plants I have grown.

The climate in Jersey and its rich soils are conducive to good growth and early flowering. Like potatoes and other vegetables, daffodils have grown well here: they thrive in our mild marine climate, not too hot and not too cold! Daffodils have changed tremendously since say, the 18th Century. There

is hardly another plant that has been ‘worked or altered’ as much. Consequently there is a huge array of forms and colours which makes daffodil growing particularly interesting. They also require little maintenance. It is not always easy to classify them but they appear almost overnight and flower from late December as if by magic.

SPRING 2019

- 29


FARM & GARDEN

MORE PEOPLE H AV E B E E N I N TO S PAC E THAN H AV E PA S S E D THE MASTER OF WINE EXAM

Today, almost all daffodils have been crossbred and with increasing hybridisation are ever growing in style and variety. They are therefore classified into Divisions. So if you were looking for a daffodil with a feature such as a ‘large cup’ (the central projecting element), you should certainly look in a reputable catalogue of daffodils under Division 2. Favourites are Wimbledon Country Girl, Caribbean Snow and Pink Charm. Dutch Master (Division 1) has a large, pronounced frilly trumpet. Rich yellow in colour it is a rather grand looking bloom. Tahiti and Merrymeet (Div 4) are yellow ‘doubles’ with a dark orange centre. They are delightful as if someone scrunched up different colour tissues and let go. Like Jersey Roundabout and Golden Lion, they flower in the mid-tolate flowering season (from mid-March). These plants are very different to the traditional yellow daffodil and would grace any garden. The daffodil blooming season starts around late December in Jersey, continuing to April (although seasons can be early or late). It starts with less

statuesque daffodils, such as Early Sensation, which is one of the oldest hybridised varieties. Then Paperwhite appear in scented clusters of small white blooms by early January. This isn’t a particularly grand daffodil but it does add early colour and scent. As the season progresses the more colourful daffodils such as Soleil d’Or flower followed by other multi heads such as Dan du Plessis and Andrew’s

Choice (after author, Andrew Tomsett). Then picturesque ‘split corona’ such as Mondragon (Div 11). Grand Soleil d’Or (Div 8) is one of the earliest and greatest commercial varieties of all time. Daffodils in this division are known as Tazettas and have flower heads borne in clusters. It is a yellow multihead with orange centres and a delightful perfume. First grown in the 1800’s in The Scilly Isles, it flourished in the mild marine climate. Tête-à-Tête (Div 12) is a delight. It is an older variety developed in Holland where it is sold in large quantities. Its charming miniature yellow flowers bloom for weeks from as early as February. Their short stems and happy countenance make them ideal for pots, rock gardens and window displays. Cornish Chuckles (Div 12) flower later with a more statuesque flower head, also ideal for pots and window boxes. Hedges and fields throughout Jersey are full of ‘rogue’ daffodils. Put aside by farmers they now enhance many of the pretty lanes and roadsides that characterise our Island. Daffodils are the easiest of plants to cultivate and give such high rewards. I wish you endless enjoyment with our charming, ever-changing friends!

* Shannon & John Le Seelleur will be giving an illustrated talk about daffodils with The Gardening Club, St Lawrence Parish Hall, 8pm Tuesday 16th April 2019.

30

- SPRING 2019

Meet Pierpaolo, he’s one of three Masters of Wine here at Waitrose & Partners. He and his team spend their lives searching the planet to find the best wines for our customers. Think of them as your very own sommeliers. Because every single wine we sell has been hand-picked by them.

FOR US, IT’S PERSONAL

Pierpaolo, Partner & Head of Wine Buying


FARM & GARDEN

MORE PEOPLE H AV E B E E N I N TO S PAC E THAN H AV E PA S S E D THE MASTER OF WINE EXAM

Today, almost all daffodils have been crossbred and with increasing hybridisation are ever growing in style and variety. They are therefore classified into Divisions. So if you were looking for a daffodil with a feature such as a ‘large cup’ (the central projecting element), you should certainly look in a reputable catalogue of daffodils under Division 2. Favourites are Wimbledon Country Girl, Caribbean Snow and Pink Charm. Dutch Master (Division 1) has a large, pronounced frilly trumpet. Rich yellow in colour it is a rather grand looking bloom. Tahiti and Merrymeet (Div 4) are yellow ‘doubles’ with a dark orange centre. They are delightful as if someone scrunched up different colour tissues and let go. Like Jersey Roundabout and Golden Lion, they flower in the mid-tolate flowering season (from mid-March). These plants are very different to the traditional yellow daffodil and would grace any garden. The daffodil blooming season starts around late December in Jersey, continuing to April (although seasons can be early or late). It starts with less

statuesque daffodils, such as Early Sensation, which is one of the oldest hybridised varieties. Then Paperwhite appear in scented clusters of small white blooms by early January. This isn’t a particularly grand daffodil but it does add early colour and scent. As the season progresses the more colourful daffodils such as Soleil d’Or flower followed by other multi heads such as Dan du Plessis and Andrew’s

Choice (after author, Andrew Tomsett). Then picturesque ‘split corona’ such as Mondragon (Div 11). Grand Soleil d’Or (Div 8) is one of the earliest and greatest commercial varieties of all time. Daffodils in this division are known as Tazettas and have flower heads borne in clusters. It is a yellow multihead with orange centres and a delightful perfume. First grown in the 1800’s in The Scilly Isles, it flourished in the mild marine climate. Tête-à-Tête (Div 12) is a delight. It is an older variety developed in Holland where it is sold in large quantities. Its charming miniature yellow flowers bloom for weeks from as early as February. Their short stems and happy countenance make them ideal for pots, rock gardens and window displays. Cornish Chuckles (Div 12) flower later with a more statuesque flower head, also ideal for pots and window boxes. Hedges and fields throughout Jersey are full of ‘rogue’ daffodils. Put aside by farmers they now enhance many of the pretty lanes and roadsides that characterise our Island. Daffodils are the easiest of plants to cultivate and give such high rewards. I wish you endless enjoyment with our charming, ever-changing friends!

* Shannon & John Le Seelleur will be giving an illustrated talk about daffodils with The Gardening Club, St Lawrence Parish Hall, 8pm Tuesday 16th April 2019.

30

- SPRING 2019

Meet Pierpaolo, he’s one of three Masters of Wine here at Waitrose & Partners. He and his team spend their lives searching the planet to find the best wines for our customers. Think of them as your very own sommeliers. Because every single wine we sell has been hand-picked by them.

FOR US, IT’S PERSONAL

Pierpaolo, Partner & Head of Wine Buying


ADVERTORIAL

FARM & GARDEN

Savills THE MOVABLE SALAD BAR Who better to teach us about growing your own vegetables than the green-fingered Graeme Le Marquand, chairman of the Jersey branch of the National Vegetable Association?

32

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 33


FARM & GARDEN

I

was fortunate enough to come across this lonesome looking plant-like stand that had been offered for sale with no takers, and my immediate reaction was that the frame could be modified to suit my needs! So, after further thought, I set about modifying the nine round shelf enclosures into larger units that could house various containers that, as it so happened, I had already acquired. I had ten identical ones in which I could grow an array of tasty mouthwatering salads and after scanning most of the 2019 seed catalogues, I was finally smitten about a new variety of lettuce named outREDgeous. This was the very first plant to be grown and eaten in space by astronauts and apparently has a deep plum red colour and is very crunchy. The remaining salads that I am growing are: AMARANTH - is new to the markets and is advertised as a superfood variety with colourful flavoured leaves which can be used in a stir fry. LITTLE GEM INTRED - is a compact plant with reddish outer leaves and red heart. GOURMET GLOBAL MIX - is a leafy salad mix that includes Asian greens, which are all contained in a one pellet salad mix. WONDER WOK SALAD - another salad mix of mustard, Kale Bok Choi, all contained in one pellet. CLAYTONIA - a salad like spinach also known as Miners lettuce and is very nutritious and has a good source of vitamin C.

34

- SPRING 2019

SPICY SALAD LEAVES - very spicy MUSTARD RED FRILLS - a fast growing variety with deep red and green leaves to mix with salads. EDIBLE FLOWER SALAD MIX - a mixture of nasturtium, violas, primulas and calendula to enhance your salad mix. All these salads have different sowing dates with some that can be sowed all year round.

Parts of the salad bar have been made from recycled timber and placed on top of a flower pot so as to give it height. This is an ideal stand for growing in containers, which can be placed on the patio, balcony and garden and can be used for so many other projects, including herbs and flowers.

Stephen Cohu SPRING 2019

- 35


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

ART, INSPIRED BY NATURE In each issue this year we profile works by contemporary Jersey artists who draw their inspiration from Jersey’s landscapes or natural environment. In this issue we feature Nicholas Romeril’s Millions of Penguins. There are not many penguins in Jersey, of course, nor does the landscape depicted much resemble anywhere in the Island. But we are making an exception for this issue, as the artist explains: ‘As the 2018 Artist in Residence for Friends of Scott Polar Research Institute, I travelled to the Antarctic Peninsula in late January 2018 on board HMS Protector for a 6 weeks journey. The ship criss-crossed the peninsula and travelled 3500 miles in total encountering many colossal mountains, blue icebergs and millions of penguins. I have now finished 80 paintings depicting the icy landscape and these will be exhibited for the first time at Chris Beetle Gallery in London from 2 April to 20 April 2019.  ‘After making such a large body of work, I wanted to relax and have some fun painting the humorous penguins. They have such funny ways of walking on land I felt they would make a great subject for a small exhibition in Jersey.’ Mixed media on canvas 130cmx130cm £6,000.00 The exhibition Millions of Penguins will be held at Jane James Gallery, (by Normans, Commercial buildings) from 15th to 23rd March 2019.The full selection of penguins can be on viewed and purchased at the gallery or through Nick’s website: www.nicholasromeril.com nick@nicholasromeril.com 07797 759867

36

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 37


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

ART, INSPIRED BY NATURE In each issue this year we profile works by contemporary Jersey artists who draw their inspiration from Jersey’s landscapes or natural environment. In this issue we feature Nicholas Romeril’s Millions of Penguins. There are not many penguins in Jersey, of course, nor does the landscape depicted much resemble anywhere in the Island. But we are making an exception for this issue, as the artist explains: ‘As the 2018 Artist in Residence for Friends of Scott Polar Research Institute, I travelled to the Antarctic Peninsula in late January 2018 on board HMS Protector for a 6 weeks journey. The ship criss-crossed the peninsula and travelled 3500 miles in total encountering many colossal mountains, blue icebergs and millions of penguins. I have now finished 80 paintings depicting the icy landscape and these will be exhibited for the first time at Chris Beetle Gallery in London from 2 April to 20 April 2019.  ‘After making such a large body of work, I wanted to relax and have some fun painting the humorous penguins. They have such funny ways of walking on land I felt they would make a great subject for a small exhibition in Jersey.’ Mixed media on canvas 130cmx130cm £6,000.00 The exhibition Millions of Penguins will be held at Jane James Gallery, (by Normans, Commercial buildings) from 15th to 23rd March 2019.The full selection of penguins can be on viewed and purchased at the gallery or through Nick’s website: www.nicholasromeril.com nick@nicholasromeril.com 07797 759867

36

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 37


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

NOT SO SOFT POWER Art and culture in Jersey, with CCA Galleries director Sasha Gibb

B

ritish Council Senior Policy Analyst Alistair MacDonald recently launched a publication exploring the impact of soft power. Soft power refers to the ability to shape public preference through non-coercive appeal and attraction. It relates to culture, political values and foreign policy.

There has been a huge expansion in soft power activity in Asia over the past five years. Nations around the world are recognising the importance of soft power in realising their global ambitions and are investing heavily to increase their reach and impact and shape the international agenda. Russia and China in particular have been massively expanding their investment in soft power activities. In particular, international broadcasting, cultural institutes and programmes. In the last five years, the network of the Confucius Institutes has grown from 320 to 507. The institution’s aim is to promote Chinese language and culture and facilitate cultural exchange. As the world’s leading international power, the United States has the greatest concentration of these institutions and is the nation most targeted by others for cultural and education connections. 80% of these 134 offices in the USA are Chinese Confucius Institutes. Indeed, this has been such a success for China, that the Trump administration has even warned the universities that they have unwittingly exposed themselves to influence or even spies from their biggest political and economic rival!

ing110 year Celebrat s

From the Government’s London Office: ‘I’m very interested in culture and the value of soft diplomacy, and I think we should look to every opportunity to promote a more rounded picture of the Island. The culture and history of the Island make us who we are, and it’s important to be able to showcase those things.’ The benefit was flagged by Health and Social Services, who noted that social activity and social integration are a massive part of health and should be seen as priorities as much as the medical side of things. Visit Jersey commented: ‘Cultural tourism is about sharing experiences which connect people to the place, offers discovery, learning and creates lasting memories. An experience is formed by a combination of activity, setting, social interaction and personal connection. Experience engages the senses. Encouraging more visitors to get involved with these activities will help drive repeat visits and recommendations to Jersey.’

Traditional Jersey Silverware since 1909

However, when looking at the actual States investment in arts and culture in Jersey, funding is £500,000 less than in 2010. The shortfall is not the result of dramatic cuts - the assistant minister for Culture actively resisted inherited cuts. It is the result of a low base level of funding, determined by historic grant agreements and a slow diminution of value over time.

Jersey Bachin

The document also contains some interesting comparisons with other islands. In the Isle of Wight, State expenditure per person on culture is £91, Isle of Man £79. In Jersey it is £46. So, in the Isle of Wight, State expenditure on culture is 98% higher than in Jersey.

ES T A B L I S H ED 1 9 0 9

Jersey Bowl

Jersey Milk Can

Available in Silver, Silver-plated and Copper in various sizes all suitable for engraving which can be done within 48 hours

3 King Street, St Helier, Jersey. JE2 4WF Tel: 01534 722536 www.pearcejewellers.co.uk

38

In the 2018 Jersey Culture, Arts and Heritage Strategic Review, the findings showed that the States of Jersey also has a good understanding of the relevance of the arts and culture, particularly within their external relations departments: ‘Soft power is central to how Jersey positions itself to the rest of the world. Cultural diplomacy is an anchor for the States’ ER efforts to build positive, long-term engagements with other countries around the world from EU member states to emerging markets.’

- SPRING 2019

Jersey has no shortage of creative minds. With commitment to seed funding from the States to get initiatives off the ground and to develop existing cultural organisations, commercial sponsorship and philanthropy would follow. The creative industries in Jersey could then begin to show the world what they’re really capable of.

The Signtech

RURAL JERSEY LANDSCAPE AWARD

RURAL magazine has teamed up with CCA Galleries International and Signtech Ltd to launch a new art award category at the Jersey Summer Exhibition

£600 PRIZE

If you are already thinking of submitting a piece of work to CCA Galleries International for the Jersey Summer Exhibition 2019, you might be interested to learn that RURAL Magazine, in partnership with Signtech Ltd, are offering an additional award category. The Signtech RURAL Jersey Landscape Award offers a winners’ prize of £600 for a piece of artistic work that, in the opinion of the judges, best evokes Jersey’s traditional rural landscape.

The panel of judges will consist of:

In order to qualify for this prize, the works must have already been submitted to and accepted by CCA Galleries International for the Jersey Summer Exhibition which takes place from Friday 21 June to Friday 26 July 2019. Call CCA Galleries on 01534 739900 for further details.

Sean Guegan, representing the sponsors, Signtech Ltd;

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL Details: 1. The prize is open to artists, based in and working in Jersey, or with a strong connection with the Island | 2. All visual art forms, including photography, film, architecture, painting, print, sculpture and design are eligible | 3. Application for the Jersey Summer Exhibition can be submitted via the gallery website: www. ccagalleriesinternational.com | 4. The deadline for submission for the Jersey Summer Exhibition is 12 March 2019 | 5. The decision as to whether an artwork qualifies for the award will be made by the judges’ panel and is non-negotiable | 6. The winner will be announced at a special RURAL Magazine invitation evening where the winning artwork and runners-up will be showcased together | 7. For full terms of entry, please refer to the Gallery’s website: http://www.ccagalleriesinternational.com/exhibition/terms

Sasha Gibb, Director of CCA Galleries International;

Alastair Best, artist and representing the Société Jersiaise; Charles Alluto, Chief Executive of the National Trust for Jersey; Mike Stentiford, Environmentalist and regular RURAL magazine contributor; Robert Perchard, President of the Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society; Alasdair Crosby, Editor of RURAL, Jersey Country Life magazine

SPRING 2019

- 39


ART & CULTURE

ART & CULTURE

NOT SO SOFT POWER Art and culture in Jersey, with CCA Galleries director Sasha Gibb

B

ritish Council Senior Policy Analyst Alistair MacDonald recently launched a publication exploring the impact of soft power. Soft power refers to the ability to shape public preference through non-coercive appeal and attraction. It relates to culture, political values and foreign policy.

There has been a huge expansion in soft power activity in Asia over the past five years. Nations around the world are recognising the importance of soft power in realising their global ambitions and are investing heavily to increase their reach and impact and shape the international agenda. Russia and China in particular have been massively expanding their investment in soft power activities. In particular, international broadcasting, cultural institutes and programmes. In the last five years, the network of the Confucius Institutes has grown from 320 to 507. The institution’s aim is to promote Chinese language and culture and facilitate cultural exchange. As the world’s leading international power, the United States has the greatest concentration of these institutions and is the nation most targeted by others for cultural and education connections. 80% of these 134 offices in the USA are Chinese Confucius Institutes. Indeed, this has been such a success for China, that the Trump administration has even warned the universities that they have unwittingly exposed themselves to influence or even spies from their biggest political and economic rival!

ing110 year Celebrat s

From the Government’s London Office: ‘I’m very interested in culture and the value of soft diplomacy, and I think we should look to every opportunity to promote a more rounded picture of the Island. The culture and history of the Island make us who we are, and it’s important to be able to showcase those things.’ The benefit was flagged by Health and Social Services, who noted that social activity and social integration are a massive part of health and should be seen as priorities as much as the medical side of things. Visit Jersey commented: ‘Cultural tourism is about sharing experiences which connect people to the place, offers discovery, learning and creates lasting memories. An experience is formed by a combination of activity, setting, social interaction and personal connection. Experience engages the senses. Encouraging more visitors to get involved with these activities will help drive repeat visits and recommendations to Jersey.’

Traditional Jersey Silverware since 1909

However, when looking at the actual States investment in arts and culture in Jersey, funding is £500,000 less than in 2010. The shortfall is not the result of dramatic cuts - the assistant minister for Culture actively resisted inherited cuts. It is the result of a low base level of funding, determined by historic grant agreements and a slow diminution of value over time.

Jersey Bachin

The document also contains some interesting comparisons with other islands. In the Isle of Wight, State expenditure per person on culture is £91, Isle of Man £79. In Jersey it is £46. So, in the Isle of Wight, State expenditure on culture is 98% higher than in Jersey.

ES T A B L I S H ED 1 9 0 9

Jersey Bowl

Jersey Milk Can

Available in Silver, Silver-plated and Copper in various sizes all suitable for engraving which can be done within 48 hours

3 King Street, St Helier, Jersey. JE2 4WF Tel: 01534 722536 www.pearcejewellers.co.uk

38

In the 2018 Jersey Culture, Arts and Heritage Strategic Review, the findings showed that the States of Jersey also has a good understanding of the relevance of the arts and culture, particularly within their external relations departments: ‘Soft power is central to how Jersey positions itself to the rest of the world. Cultural diplomacy is an anchor for the States’ ER efforts to build positive, long-term engagements with other countries around the world from EU member states to emerging markets.’

- SPRING 2019

Jersey has no shortage of creative minds. With commitment to seed funding from the States to get initiatives off the ground and to develop existing cultural organisations, commercial sponsorship and philanthropy would follow. The creative industries in Jersey could then begin to show the world what they’re really capable of.

The Signtech

RURAL JERSEY LANDSCAPE AWARD

RURAL magazine has teamed up with CCA Galleries International and Signtech Ltd to launch a new art award category at the Jersey Summer Exhibition

£600 PRIZE

If you are already thinking of submitting a piece of work to CCA Galleries International for the Jersey Summer Exhibition 2019, you might be interested to learn that RURAL Magazine, in partnership with Signtech Ltd, are offering an additional award category. The Signtech RURAL Jersey Landscape Award offers a winners’ prize of £600 for a piece of artistic work that, in the opinion of the judges, best evokes Jersey’s traditional rural landscape.

The panel of judges will consist of:

In order to qualify for this prize, the works must have already been submitted to and accepted by CCA Galleries International for the Jersey Summer Exhibition which takes place from Friday 21 June to Friday 26 July 2019. Call CCA Galleries on 01534 739900 for further details.

Sean Guegan, representing the sponsors, Signtech Ltd;

JERSEY COUNTRY LIFE MAGAZINE

R URAL Details: 1. The prize is open to artists, based in and working in Jersey, or with a strong connection with the Island | 2. All visual art forms, including photography, film, architecture, painting, print, sculpture and design are eligible | 3. Application for the Jersey Summer Exhibition can be submitted via the gallery website: www. ccagalleriesinternational.com | 4. The deadline for submission for the Jersey Summer Exhibition is 12 March 2019 | 5. The decision as to whether an artwork qualifies for the award will be made by the judges’ panel and is non-negotiable | 6. The winner will be announced at a special RURAL Magazine invitation evening where the winning artwork and runners-up will be showcased together | 7. For full terms of entry, please refer to the Gallery’s website: http://www.ccagalleriesinternational.com/exhibition/terms

Sasha Gibb, Director of CCA Galleries International;

Alastair Best, artist and representing the Société Jersiaise; Charles Alluto, Chief Executive of the National Trust for Jersey; Mike Stentiford, Environmentalist and regular RURAL magazine contributor; Robert Perchard, President of the Royal Jersey Agricultural and Horticultural Society; Alasdair Crosby, Editor of RURAL, Jersey Country Life magazine

SPRING 2019

- 39


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

and Harry were pictured in the tabloids wearing one of their puffa jackets in New Zealand. The young sales assistant in a Tromso outlet pounced on my husband and I when he heard our accents, excitedly pointing out ‘the Jacket’ which had caused their sales figures to go through the roof for weeks after. Outdoor fashion is big business in Scandinavia. Back home and I’ve noticed dog walkers are just as fashion savvy here.

Fashionable WALKIES Fashion and walking the dog – do the two things really go together? Gill Maccabe reports from St Ouen’s beach

I

nspiration strikes your fashion correspondent in the most unlikely locations.

It was around midday on 17 January in the town of Kirkenes in Norway, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle and within spitting distance of the Russian border. So, it was cold -minus 16 in fact. And dark.

40

- SPRING 2019

The sun had just risen and was getting ready to set again. They get around 50 minutes of precious daylight at that time of year. We were trekking around slowly on cross country skis, sticking to the prepared floodlit tracks when whoosh- a couple of gorgeous lithe ladies sped past us doing the more advanced skating style of cross country with a pair of happily yapping dogs on leads racing in front of them .

Far from being victims of seasonal affective disorder and hugging the fire indoors, the Norwegians seem to spend all their time outside in the winter, either walking their dogs or exercising on snowshoes or cross country skis. Instead of high vis jackets or reflectives, they just turn up the colour in bright layered combinations of outdoor clothing by popular names such as Noronna which received a huge boost when Meghan

It’s a stressful business being a full time yummy mummy, I know I tried it for a short time in the 1990s. You have to wear the right outfit for dropping off the children (not too much make up , but no bed- head either), then there is the gym gear, and the supermarket gear , as you never know who you will bump into, and finally the End of Day School Pick up Outfit which requires a bit of lipstick, as inevitably you will be forced to chat to someone whilst your child dawdles, and you don’t want to look as if you have Let

Yourself Go, or conversely are Trying Too Hard. And now there is the Dog Walking Outfit. Walking dogs is good for your well being and deep friendships are formed in dog walking groups so to ensure you are invited to be part of the gang you have to look the part. Our photographer, Gary Grimshaw, and I went looking for dog walkers down at Le Braye one blustery Saturday recently and it wasn’t long before we came across a young professional couple, the Eastwoods from St Brelade, out with their young son, Jasper, who is nearly two and Renee and Chloe who are a blend of Yorkshire and Jack Russell Terrier.

Victoria: Lightweight belted Jacket by Barbour, approx. £150 Skinny jeans by Topshop, £42. Wellingtons by Hunter, from around £119 available at Schuh in King Street. Scarf by Louis Vuitton. Carlo: Wellingtons by Hunter, stockists as previously. Chinos by Hackett, approx. £130. Sweater by Nigel Hall approx. £100 Gilet by Moncler, from approx. £400 upwards depending on style. Shirt, Gieves and Hawkes, Jermyn Street, from approx. £150.

Carlo and Victoria know all about dog walking fashion, they lived in a smart part of London until recently where these things were taken very seriously. Jersey-born Victoria loves being back home and adores re-acquainting herself with King Street shops and introducing Carlo to the ‘Jersey Way of Life’.

beautiful hand crafted interiors

MEMBER OF THE

Get in touch today to discover how the team at Matthew Thebault Stonemasons can transform your interior space into something truly special. 01534 738 358

07797 750 820

www.mtstonemasons.com

SPRING 2019

- 41


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

and Harry were pictured in the tabloids wearing one of their puffa jackets in New Zealand. The young sales assistant in a Tromso outlet pounced on my husband and I when he heard our accents, excitedly pointing out ‘the Jacket’ which had caused their sales figures to go through the roof for weeks after. Outdoor fashion is big business in Scandinavia. Back home and I’ve noticed dog walkers are just as fashion savvy here.

Fashionable WALKIES Fashion and walking the dog – do the two things really go together? Gill Maccabe reports from St Ouen’s beach

I

nspiration strikes your fashion correspondent in the most unlikely locations.

It was around midday on 17 January in the town of Kirkenes in Norway, 250 miles north of the Arctic Circle and within spitting distance of the Russian border. So, it was cold -minus 16 in fact. And dark.

40

- SPRING 2019

The sun had just risen and was getting ready to set again. They get around 50 minutes of precious daylight at that time of year. We were trekking around slowly on cross country skis, sticking to the prepared floodlit tracks when whoosh- a couple of gorgeous lithe ladies sped past us doing the more advanced skating style of cross country with a pair of happily yapping dogs on leads racing in front of them .

Far from being victims of seasonal affective disorder and hugging the fire indoors, the Norwegians seem to spend all their time outside in the winter, either walking their dogs or exercising on snowshoes or cross country skis. Instead of high vis jackets or reflectives, they just turn up the colour in bright layered combinations of outdoor clothing by popular names such as Noronna which received a huge boost when Meghan

It’s a stressful business being a full time yummy mummy, I know I tried it for a short time in the 1990s. You have to wear the right outfit for dropping off the children (not too much make up , but no bed- head either), then there is the gym gear, and the supermarket gear , as you never know who you will bump into, and finally the End of Day School Pick up Outfit which requires a bit of lipstick, as inevitably you will be forced to chat to someone whilst your child dawdles, and you don’t want to look as if you have Let

Yourself Go, or conversely are Trying Too Hard. And now there is the Dog Walking Outfit. Walking dogs is good for your well being and deep friendships are formed in dog walking groups so to ensure you are invited to be part of the gang you have to look the part. Our photographer, Gary Grimshaw, and I went looking for dog walkers down at Le Braye one blustery Saturday recently and it wasn’t long before we came across a young professional couple, the Eastwoods from St Brelade, out with their young son, Jasper, who is nearly two and Renee and Chloe who are a blend of Yorkshire and Jack Russell Terrier.

Victoria: Lightweight belted Jacket by Barbour, approx. £150 Skinny jeans by Topshop, £42. Wellingtons by Hunter, from around £119 available at Schuh in King Street. Scarf by Louis Vuitton. Carlo: Wellingtons by Hunter, stockists as previously. Chinos by Hackett, approx. £130. Sweater by Nigel Hall approx. £100 Gilet by Moncler, from approx. £400 upwards depending on style. Shirt, Gieves and Hawkes, Jermyn Street, from approx. £150.

Carlo and Victoria know all about dog walking fashion, they lived in a smart part of London until recently where these things were taken very seriously. Jersey-born Victoria loves being back home and adores re-acquainting herself with King Street shops and introducing Carlo to the ‘Jersey Way of Life’.

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07797 750 820

www.mtstonemasons.com

SPRING 2019

- 41


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

Walkie Talkies

On the very topical subject of dog mess, the Deputy admitted that ‘as an Honorary Policeman he had spent years regularly walking along St Aubin’s Bay and hadn’t managed to spot anyone not picking up after their dog.’

The series of ‘walking and talking’ – walking with dogs and States Members talking to Kieranne Grimshaw – continues with St Lawrence Deputy Gregory Guida and his canine assistant, ‘Apple’

S

etting off along St Lawrence Perquage (Sanctuary Path) towards the beach, with his spaniel, Apple (named after the computer, not the fruit), St Lawrence Deputy Gregory Guida admitted this was his favourite pastime when not working. It seemed the perfect opportunity to start off by asking him about the issue of both dogs and dog walkers in the Island. In his role as Assistant Minister for Environment, Deputy Guida has recently taken on a project to review laws also relating to dogs, many of them controversial, which encompass licensing, dog fouling, registering dog walkers and whether to limit the number of dogs being walked at one time and if so, how many? Various consultations have already been undertaken with related parties – The Deputy works alongside the Constables’

42

- SPRING 2019

Of course, this isn’t the only ‘hot spot’ for dog mess – in an ideal world, there would be enough manpower to police all areas or, even better, everyone would be responsible and pick up. ‘It’s not always easy to catch the few irresponsible owners’ he said, ‘and there’s also the question of cost.’ The future of Jersey’s environment is one of the Deputy’s top priorities. He explained: ‘The increasing population pressure of the past 20 years, which shows no signs of abatement, has put our environment at serious risk. We have reasonable legal protections both in planning and the natural environment, but they’ve lost all chances of being enforced in the successive departmental cuts. We must tackle this if we want to keep our countryside.’

The increasing population pressure of the past 20 years, (...) has put our environment at serious risk.

Committee, which is e responsible for the 1961 Dog Law. An important point was that all walkers should only walk dogs they are capable of managing. So how was the Deputy going to tackle the situation on professional dog walkers? He’s been in contact with the States Vet – ‘who has just finished a good guidance document which will be put to consultation soon, then published.’ said the Deputy. ‘This will probably give much more interesting feedback. Some of its content might eventually find its way into our forthcoming Animal Welfare Law, if there’s a need for it.’ Should more laws be made to try and solve the various dog related issues? In the Deputy’s opinion, any new law would be hard on the people – ‘as it would have to apply to everyone, not just the guilty, and it would be difficult to enforce.’

agreed that being in the States provided plenty of reading material! On joining the States, he said ‘This was the logical step after having been in the Honorary Police for many years. First I was a Constable’s Officer, then a Centenier in St Lawrence.’ Asked what he would most like to achieve, the Deputy said he would like to ‘make a difference’: ‘An Assistant Minister actually has very little power as he can only suggest a Proposition, which must then go to the Chamber for consideration – but I can keep ‘nudging’ and offering suggestions.’ Thanks to Jersey’s beautiful beaches and coastal walks, our politicians are able to take ‘time out’ from the Chamber and enjoy some well-deserved leisure time outside. Deputy Guida clearly appreciates the Island’s natural beauty and seems to be determined to do his best to protect it – before it’s too late.

On future big projects the Deputy stated he didn’t want to leave the States without having provided proper protection for trees – ‘I’m also following the new Wildlife Law very closely, although that was already an advanced project when we arrived.’ Additionally, he would like to provide some relief to the farmers and fishermen ‘as they’ve seen their activities severely restricted in the last decades. As Assistant Minister for Home Affairs, the Deputy’s recent challenges included the increased tensions between Russia and Ukraine. Home Affairs had already amended the immigration policy to allow a certain number of Ukrainian agricultural workers to stay for a limited term over a trial two year period. When their reservists were recalled, the country was off the agenda. The Department would be working closely with the JFU to establish another suitable solution, so back to the drawing board. Juggling environmental issues and Home Affairs keeps the Deputy busy – he likes a challenge – ‘I enjoy reading and I’m constantly learning,’ he stated and

SPRING 2019

- 43


THE FUR SIDE

THE FUR SIDE

Walkie Talkies

On the very topical subject of dog mess, the Deputy admitted that ‘as an Honorary Policeman he had spent years regularly walking along St Aubin’s Bay and hadn’t managed to spot anyone not picking up after their dog.’

The series of ‘walking and talking’ – walking with dogs and States Members talking to Kieranne Grimshaw – continues with St Lawrence Deputy Gregory Guida and his canine assistant, ‘Apple’

S

etting off along St Lawrence Perquage (Sanctuary Path) towards the beach, with his spaniel, Apple (named after the computer, not the fruit), St Lawrence Deputy Gregory Guida admitted this was his favourite pastime when not working. It seemed the perfect opportunity to start off by asking him about the issue of both dogs and dog walkers in the Island. In his role as Assistant Minister for Environment, Deputy Guida has recently taken on a project to review laws also relating to dogs, many of them controversial, which encompass licensing, dog fouling, registering dog walkers and whether to limit the number of dogs being walked at one time and if so, how many? Various consultations have already been undertaken with related parties – The Deputy works alongside the Constables’

42

- SPRING 2019

Of course, this isn’t the only ‘hot spot’ for dog mess – in an ideal world, there would be enough manpower to police all areas or, even better, everyone would be responsible and pick up. ‘It’s not always easy to catch the few irresponsible owners’ he said, ‘and there’s also the question of cost.’ The future of Jersey’s environment is one of the Deputy’s top priorities. He explained: ‘The increasing population pressure of the past 20 years, which shows no signs of abatement, has put our environment at serious risk. We have reasonable legal protections both in planning and the natural environment, but they’ve lost all chances of being enforced in the successive departmental cuts. We must tackle this if we want to keep our countryside.’

The increasing population pressure of the past 20 years, (...) has put our environment at serious risk.

Committee, which is e responsible for the 1961 Dog Law. An important point was that all walkers should only walk dogs they are capable of managing. So how was the Deputy going to tackle the situation on professional dog walkers? He’s been in contact with the States Vet – ‘who has just finished a good guidance document which will be put to consultation soon, then published.’ said the Deputy. ‘This will probably give much more interesting feedback. Some of its content might eventually find its way into our forthcoming Animal Welfare Law, if there’s a need for it.’ Should more laws be made to try and solve the various dog related issues? In the Deputy’s opinion, any new law would be hard on the people – ‘as it would have to apply to everyone, not just the guilty, and it would be difficult to enforce.’

agreed that being in the States provided plenty of reading material! On joining the States, he said ‘This was the logical step after having been in the Honorary Police for many years. First I was a Constable’s Officer, then a Centenier in St Lawrence.’ Asked what he would most like to achieve, the Deputy said he would like to ‘make a difference’: ‘An Assistant Minister actually has very little power as he can only suggest a Proposition, which must then go to the Chamber for consideration – but I can keep ‘nudging’ and offering suggestions.’ Thanks to Jersey’s beautiful beaches and coastal walks, our politicians are able to take ‘time out’ from the Chamber and enjoy some well-deserved leisure time outside. Deputy Guida clearly appreciates the Island’s natural beauty and seems to be determined to do his best to protect it – before it’s too late.

On future big projects the Deputy stated he didn’t want to leave the States without having provided proper protection for trees – ‘I’m also following the new Wildlife Law very closely, although that was already an advanced project when we arrived.’ Additionally, he would like to provide some relief to the farmers and fishermen ‘as they’ve seen their activities severely restricted in the last decades. As Assistant Minister for Home Affairs, the Deputy’s recent challenges included the increased tensions between Russia and Ukraine. Home Affairs had already amended the immigration policy to allow a certain number of Ukrainian agricultural workers to stay for a limited term over a trial two year period. When their reservists were recalled, the country was off the agenda. The Department would be working closely with the JFU to establish another suitable solution, so back to the drawing board. Juggling environmental issues and Home Affairs keeps the Deputy busy – he likes a challenge – ‘I enjoy reading and I’m constantly learning,’ he stated and

SPRING 2019

- 43


THE SPICE OF

Li fe

Welcomes you..

THE FUR SIDE

A SHELTER, FOR JERSEY S ANIMALS

Delicious dishes individually cooked by our Thai chefs to your personal preference. Modern, comfortable surroundings - selection of fine wines, beers and cocktails.

GROUPS AND PARTIES UP TO 50 EXPRESS LUNCHES - OFFICE LUNCHES DELIVERED PRE-BOOKING MENU OPTION Tel: 01534 630303 www.spiceoflifejersey.com 12 Sand Street (opposite car park) St. Helier, Jersey JE2 3QF. Open: Weekdays 12pm - 9.30pm (last orders). Saturday from 5pm. Sunday CLOSED.

There has been negative press this past year or so about the Jersey Society for Protection of Cruelty to Animals and its declining charitable donation. What has happened and are there any solutions? Kieranne Grimshaw begins a four-part series over this year, asking: Does it have a future and does the Island care enough to save it? SPRING 2019

- 45


THE SPICE OF

Li fe

Welcomes you..

THE FUR SIDE

A SHELTER, FOR JERSEY S ANIMALS

Delicious dishes individually cooked by our Thai chefs to your personal preference. Modern, comfortable surroundings - selection of fine wines, beers and cocktails.

GROUPS AND PARTIES UP TO 50 EXPRESS LUNCHES - OFFICE LUNCHES DELIVERED PRE-BOOKING MENU OPTION Tel: 01534 630303 www.spiceoflifejersey.com 12 Sand Street (opposite car park) St. Helier, Jersey JE2 3QF. Open: Weekdays 12pm - 9.30pm (last orders). Saturday from 5pm. Sunday CLOSED.

There has been negative press this past year or so about the Jersey Society for Protection of Cruelty to Animals and its declining charitable donation. What has happened and are there any solutions? Kieranne Grimshaw begins a four-part series over this year, asking: Does it have a future and does the Island care enough to save it? SPRING 2019

- 45


THE FUR SIDE

T

he Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (JSPCA) was founded in 1868 and the Shelter in 1913 – founder of the latter, Frances Wilson (who lived opposite the current JSPCA site), realised that unwanted animals didn’t have anywhere to go; they were either abandoned or just left on the street or beaches – so she wanted to help them. With her sister, Charlotte, she purchased the property at 89 St. Saviour’s Road (now the JSPCA Headquarters) and later gave it to the Animals’ Shelter in 1928, where it has remained ever since. It’s hard to imagine somebody just leaving their dog on the beach nowadays – thanks to Mrs Wilson, our vulnerable animals have somewhere to go and be cared for.

46

- SPRING 2019

THE FUR SIDE

The JSPCA’s mission and aims are to carry on caring for unwanted, ill and elderly animals in Jersey, including wildlife.

The JSPCA’s mission and aims are to carry on caring for unwanted, ill and elderly animals in Jersey, including wildlife. As the co-ordinator for volunteers and recently appointed PR and media manager, Barbara Keywood, said: ‘It’s always been our mission to protect and prevent cruelty to animals. ‘People need a lot more help nowadays. The Island is almost flooded with animals – we’re dealing with large increased numbers compared with about 15 years ago.’ How do they prioritise each animal’s needs? Staff must juggle telephone calls about injured wildlife - from hedgehogs to rabbits – lost dogs, pet cemetery questions, cat boarding, re-homing and veterinary issues.

The staff work here because of their dedication and love for animals, but face some daily challenges. Barbara continued: ‘People may think we’re too strict with re-homing dogs, but we do assessments for every animal that comes to us. Some are with us for months on end because they’re petrified when they arrive – we need to build a behaviour plan and work with them on a daily basis’. A vital, but costly, service is their Veterinary Department. ‘Each day is different’ said Barbara, ‘you never know what will be bought in.’ Walking around the site, it’s clear that space is precious. ‘We sometimes struggle for space for specific animals – there’s even a waiting list for rabbits and terrapins,’ said Barbara. ‘Some tasks are seasonal or can’t be planned. We recently took care of some oiled sea birds. This was time consuming and we had to find volunteers to help clean them up. People even take them home and feed them – animal care doesn’t just stop here.’ Environmentalist Mike Stentiford MBE commented ‘Life has always been tough for wild birds, but with the steady increase in modern day pressures, their survival in the wild has become a constant challenge. Whether damaged through accident, storm or illegally discharged oil, dealing with such casualties is demanding of the highest degree of dedication, experience and patience. The Island and its wildlife are fortunate to have such highly valued skills in the form of the likewise valued staff of the JSPCA.’

The staff work here because of their dedication and love for animals, but face some daily challenges.

Despite some successful projects, the JSPCA has suffered financial difficulties. What are the solutions? The recently appointed interim Chief Executive, Kevin Keen, stepped in to help on a voluntary basis. Asked why, he said: ‘I care about the Island and Jersey institutions. I don’t like seeing them going through challenging times, so when I heard about the JSPCA’s problems, I was concerned and alarmed that after 150 years, the Charity was in trouble. ‘I was approached to offer some business advice, but knew it would need more, so I volunteered to step into the vacant CEO position.’


THE FUR SIDE

T

he Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (JSPCA) was founded in 1868 and the Shelter in 1913 – founder of the latter, Frances Wilson (who lived opposite the current JSPCA site), realised that unwanted animals didn’t have anywhere to go; they were either abandoned or just left on the street or beaches – so she wanted to help them. With her sister, Charlotte, she purchased the property at 89 St. Saviour’s Road (now the JSPCA Headquarters) and later gave it to the Animals’ Shelter in 1928, where it has remained ever since. It’s hard to imagine somebody just leaving their dog on the beach nowadays – thanks to Mrs Wilson, our vulnerable animals have somewhere to go and be cared for.

46

- SPRING 2019

THE FUR SIDE

The JSPCA’s mission and aims are to carry on caring for unwanted, ill and elderly animals in Jersey, including wildlife.

The JSPCA’s mission and aims are to carry on caring for unwanted, ill and elderly animals in Jersey, including wildlife. As the co-ordinator for volunteers and recently appointed PR and media manager, Barbara Keywood, said: ‘It’s always been our mission to protect and prevent cruelty to animals. ‘People need a lot more help nowadays. The Island is almost flooded with animals – we’re dealing with large increased numbers compared with about 15 years ago.’ How do they prioritise each animal’s needs? Staff must juggle telephone calls about injured wildlife - from hedgehogs to rabbits – lost dogs, pet cemetery questions, cat boarding, re-homing and veterinary issues.

The staff work here because of their dedication and love for animals, but face some daily challenges. Barbara continued: ‘People may think we’re too strict with re-homing dogs, but we do assessments for every animal that comes to us. Some are with us for months on end because they’re petrified when they arrive – we need to build a behaviour plan and work with them on a daily basis’. A vital, but costly, service is their Veterinary Department. ‘Each day is different’ said Barbara, ‘you never know what will be bought in.’ Walking around the site, it’s clear that space is precious. ‘We sometimes struggle for space for specific animals – there’s even a waiting list for rabbits and terrapins,’ said Barbara. ‘Some tasks are seasonal or can’t be planned. We recently took care of some oiled sea birds. This was time consuming and we had to find volunteers to help clean them up. People even take them home and feed them – animal care doesn’t just stop here.’ Environmentalist Mike Stentiford MBE commented ‘Life has always been tough for wild birds, but with the steady increase in modern day pressures, their survival in the wild has become a constant challenge. Whether damaged through accident, storm or illegally discharged oil, dealing with such casualties is demanding of the highest degree of dedication, experience and patience. The Island and its wildlife are fortunate to have such highly valued skills in the form of the likewise valued staff of the JSPCA.’

The staff work here because of their dedication and love for animals, but face some daily challenges.

Despite some successful projects, the JSPCA has suffered financial difficulties. What are the solutions? The recently appointed interim Chief Executive, Kevin Keen, stepped in to help on a voluntary basis. Asked why, he said: ‘I care about the Island and Jersey institutions. I don’t like seeing them going through challenging times, so when I heard about the JSPCA’s problems, I was concerned and alarmed that after 150 years, the Charity was in trouble. ‘I was approached to offer some business advice, but knew it would need more, so I volunteered to step into the vacant CEO position.’


THE FUR SIDE

Explaining why the Charity had ended up in this perilous financial position, he said that it had become very dependent on legacies for its day to day expenditure and the deficit before legacies was typically £1 million; those legacies over the years were about £1 million each year, but gradually decreased. Reserves ran down and ultimately they started to borrow against future legacies. Can these problems be solved? Kevin believes finding new sources of funding, obtaining a more diverse income and getting their message across better are all essential. ‘Perhaps getting more smaller donations from more people,’ he suggested. ‘There are 20,000 pet owners in the Island – if each one donated £5 a month, that’s £1 million per year. ‘We need to make sure we’re as efficient as possible and any money raised spent carefully. Ensuring people know why we’re important is vital. Perhaps we became a bit forgotten about – we weren’t publicising the work we do and why it needs doing. All these three things are beginning to happen now.

48

- SPRING 2019

THE FUR SIDE

‘We’ve also got the financial position stable, at least, as we were very fortunate that the States agreed to lend us some money to repay one of the lenders’. But the work continues – what’s on Kevin’s ‘to do list’? ‘We’re now looking at what the Charity actually does and asking why we are doing it and if it could be done it in a better, more efficient way. So that’s looking at every expense - and also the staff, which is our biggest cost.’

really busy enough – you can’t afford to run a business if you’re not commercially viable.

Jersey is good, when they see it’s in a scrape, the public are generally quick to help – Jersey is a pretty kind place’.

‘We’re always going to have some kennels though, as unfortunately dogs will be disclaimed from time to time – owners become ill or die and their dog needs a home. We’re always going to have animals that have no home, hence the shelter. We’ll be looking at the spare space and seeing what we can do with it.’

So, is the JSPCA still in trouble? ‘I think it’s out of “intensive care” but still in “recovery” said Kevin. ’The public, some local companies, a number of charitable trusts and the States have all stepped in and provided help. We just need to agree the new way forward and ensure we prioritise correctly.’

The site is a large property and needs a lot of maintenance. He said: ‘We’re very lucky to have the Back to Work Team helping us refurbish the Cattery. It’s a really great thing they’re doing there.

Positive steps have already been made and the Island wishes the JSPCA all the best – after all, pet owners and animal lovers rely on them. *Contact details: www.jspca.org.je

Tough decisions were taken as a couple of staff were made redundant after the kennel boarding stopped. The decision to close the dog boarding wasn’t taken lightly. Last year, the charity was unsuccessful in finding a better location. ‘These premises aren’t ideal as it’s hard to exercise the animals properly around town and it’s close to neighbouring properties,’ said Kevin. ‘It’s also quite a seasonal activity for the main holiday periods. You’ve got to employ staff the entire year, but it’s not

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

ed t a e r C in

Jersey.

Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become objects of desire. Available across the Island, a purchase supports local craftspeople and supports the local economy.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.com

Look for the Mark before you buy

SPRING 2019

- 49


THE FUR SIDE

Explaining why the Charity had ended up in this perilous financial position, he said that it had become very dependent on legacies for its day to day expenditure and the deficit before legacies was typically £1 million; those legacies over the years were about £1 million each year, but gradually decreased. Reserves ran down and ultimately they started to borrow against future legacies. Can these problems be solved? Kevin believes finding new sources of funding, obtaining a more diverse income and getting their message across better are all essential. ‘Perhaps getting more smaller donations from more people,’ he suggested. ‘There are 20,000 pet owners in the Island – if each one donated £5 a month, that’s £1 million per year. ‘We need to make sure we’re as efficient as possible and any money raised spent carefully. Ensuring people know why we’re important is vital. Perhaps we became a bit forgotten about – we weren’t publicising the work we do and why it needs doing. All these three things are beginning to happen now.

48

- SPRING 2019

THE FUR SIDE

‘We’ve also got the financial position stable, at least, as we were very fortunate that the States agreed to lend us some money to repay one of the lenders’. But the work continues – what’s on Kevin’s ‘to do list’? ‘We’re now looking at what the Charity actually does and asking why we are doing it and if it could be done it in a better, more efficient way. So that’s looking at every expense - and also the staff, which is our biggest cost.’

really busy enough – you can’t afford to run a business if you’re not commercially viable.

Jersey is good, when they see it’s in a scrape, the public are generally quick to help – Jersey is a pretty kind place’.

‘We’re always going to have some kennels though, as unfortunately dogs will be disclaimed from time to time – owners become ill or die and their dog needs a home. We’re always going to have animals that have no home, hence the shelter. We’ll be looking at the spare space and seeing what we can do with it.’

So, is the JSPCA still in trouble? ‘I think it’s out of “intensive care” but still in “recovery” said Kevin. ’The public, some local companies, a number of charitable trusts and the States have all stepped in and provided help. We just need to agree the new way forward and ensure we prioritise correctly.’

The site is a large property and needs a lot of maintenance. He said: ‘We’re very lucky to have the Back to Work Team helping us refurbish the Cattery. It’s a really great thing they’re doing there.

Positive steps have already been made and the Island wishes the JSPCA all the best – after all, pet owners and animal lovers rely on them. *Contact details: www.jspca.org.je

Tough decisions were taken as a couple of staff were made redundant after the kennel boarding stopped. The decision to close the dog boarding wasn’t taken lightly. Last year, the charity was unsuccessful in finding a better location. ‘These premises aren’t ideal as it’s hard to exercise the animals properly around town and it’s close to neighbouring properties,’ said Kevin. ‘It’s also quite a seasonal activity for the main holiday periods. You’ve got to employ staff the entire year, but it’s not

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

ed t a e r C in

Jersey.

Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become objects of desire. Available across the Island, a purchase supports local craftspeople and supports the local economy.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.com

Look for the Mark before you buy

SPRING 2019

- 49


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

Parmesan Chicken

IN THE KITCHEN

A spring time comfort meal yet light and fresh.. Ingredients (serves 4): 1 beaten egg white 75g parmesan, finely grated 4 chicken breast, skin removed 400g Jersey Royals, cut into small cubes

Springtime treats with our cookery writer, Zoe Garner

125g frozen peas handful baby spinach

Hello - brighter mornings and lighter evenings, that must mean one thing, spring has sprung! And what better way to pull ourselves out of the depths of winter than by cooking up a storm with these sumptuous spring time foods?

1tbsp white wine vinegar 2tsp olive oil

Sundried Tomato & Olive Loaf

Perfect as a pre supper nibble or as a lunchtime filler. Ingredients: 100ml olive oil, plus extra for greasing 

1. Line a baking sheet with tin foil and preheat the grill to medium. Put the egg white and parmesan onto two separate plates. Season the egg white, and then dip the chicken into the egg white, followed by the cheese. Lay the 4 coated chicken breasts on the baking sheet and grill for 10-12mins, turning if needed. 2. Boil the Jersey Royals for 10mins, adding the peas for the final 3mins. Drain and add to a bowl with the spinach, vinegar and oil. Season to taste.  3. Divide the warm salad between 4 plates and serve alongside the chicken. 

200g self-raising flour a small handful of basil leaves, roughly torn 3 large beaten eggs 100ml milk 75g each pitted black olives and sundried tomatoes, roughly chopped 100g grated gruyere cheese

Spiced Rhubarb Traybake Making the most of this seasonal fruit, sweet and nicely baked with a little bit of spice!

Ingredients: 275g butter, softened, plus extra to grease 275g golden caster sugar 400g self-raising flour

1. Heat oven to 190C (170C fan). Grease and line the base of a loaf tin (Approx 22x10x5cm) with baking paper. Put the flour and basil in a large bowl, season and mix together. Make a well in the centre, add the olive oil, eggs and milk and stir to combine. Beat to make a smooth batter, Approx 1min.

11/2tsp baking powder

2. Add most of the olives, tomatoes and cheese to the batter, reserving a little to sprinkle over at the end. Pour into the tin, sprinkle over reserved ingredients, finishing with the cheese. Bake for 35-40mins, or until the loaf feels firm to touch and has formed a crust. Leave to cool in the tin for 5mins before turning out onto a wire rack.

icing sugar, for decorating

2tsp mixed spice 1tsp ground ginger 5 medium eggs 300g rhubarb, cut into 1in chunks

1. Preheat oven to 190C (170C fan). Grease and line a 12 x 8in baking tin. Put all the ingredients, except the rhubarb, into a bowl and beat together until light and fluffy. Using a metal spoon fold in the rhubarb and spoon into the pre lined tin. 2. Bake for 40-45min until the cake feels firm to touch. Cool in the tin for 5min, then turn out and cool on a wire rack. Dust with icing sugar and serve.

50

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 51


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

Parmesan Chicken

IN THE KITCHEN

A spring time comfort meal yet light and fresh.. Ingredients (serves 4): 1 beaten egg white 75g parmesan, finely grated 4 chicken breast, skin removed 400g Jersey Royals, cut into small cubes

Springtime treats with our cookery writer, Zoe Garner

125g frozen peas handful baby spinach

Hello - brighter mornings and lighter evenings, that must mean one thing, spring has sprung! And what better way to pull ourselves out of the depths of winter than by cooking up a storm with these sumptuous spring time foods?

1tbsp white wine vinegar 2tsp olive oil

Sundried Tomato & Olive Loaf

Perfect as a pre supper nibble or as a lunchtime filler. Ingredients: 100ml olive oil, plus extra for greasing 

1. Line a baking sheet with tin foil and preheat the grill to medium. Put the egg white and parmesan onto two separate plates. Season the egg white, and then dip the chicken into the egg white, followed by the cheese. Lay the 4 coated chicken breasts on the baking sheet and grill for 10-12mins, turning if needed. 2. Boil the Jersey Royals for 10mins, adding the peas for the final 3mins. Drain and add to a bowl with the spinach, vinegar and oil. Season to taste.  3. Divide the warm salad between 4 plates and serve alongside the chicken. 

200g self-raising flour a small handful of basil leaves, roughly torn 3 large beaten eggs 100ml milk 75g each pitted black olives and sundried tomatoes, roughly chopped 100g grated gruyere cheese

Spiced Rhubarb Traybake Making the most of this seasonal fruit, sweet and nicely baked with a little bit of spice!

Ingredients: 275g butter, softened, plus extra to grease 275g golden caster sugar 400g self-raising flour

1. Heat oven to 190C (170C fan). Grease and line the base of a loaf tin (Approx 22x10x5cm) with baking paper. Put the flour and basil in a large bowl, season and mix together. Make a well in the centre, add the olive oil, eggs and milk and stir to combine. Beat to make a smooth batter, Approx 1min.

11/2tsp baking powder

2. Add most of the olives, tomatoes and cheese to the batter, reserving a little to sprinkle over at the end. Pour into the tin, sprinkle over reserved ingredients, finishing with the cheese. Bake for 35-40mins, or until the loaf feels firm to touch and has formed a crust. Leave to cool in the tin for 5mins before turning out onto a wire rack.

icing sugar, for decorating

2tsp mixed spice 1tsp ground ginger 5 medium eggs 300g rhubarb, cut into 1in chunks

1. Preheat oven to 190C (170C fan). Grease and line a 12 x 8in baking tin. Put all the ingredients, except the rhubarb, into a bowl and beat together until light and fluffy. Using a metal spoon fold in the rhubarb and spoon into the pre lined tin. 2. Bake for 40-45min until the cake feels firm to touch. Cool in the tin for 5min, then turn out and cool on a wire rack. Dust with icing sugar and serve.

50

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 51


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

SPRING VEGETABLES

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

with Chloe Bowler

Chef –Restaurateur Joseph Baker of No 10 Restaurant, Broad Street, starts a new food column for RURAL magazine

We have had a very mild winter, and this time of year is so exciting, having just witnessed the fields being ploughed for the Jersey Royals. Spring is a popular time to think about planting some salad seeds or trying your hand at growing a carrot or two. Whether you grow your own vegetables at home or not, there are some delicious, local vegetables that are in season right now, and ready to be enjoyed. Look out for the many honesty boxes that line the country lanes, brimming with locally-grown broccoli, spinach, leeks and kale. Many of our supermarkets now support locally-grown vegetables, so look out for the Genuine Jersey logo on the shelves.

on the outskirts of Düsseldorf, fresh out of my mother’s suitcase from the Cotswolds), would probably think me a decidedly odd if she saw my Instagram feed.

As a chef/restaurateur it is useful to me that our industry is no longer considered the domain of reprobates. But this detached obsession with food/health/ wellness is becoming obscene; we idolise the end result.

I am grateful recently to have had the opportunity to play a part in one of the many cooking shows you will find vying for your attention this year. I was exposed, in the best sense, to a great, eye-opening experience. We cooked, competed, discussed, learnt and analysed (or were analysed). But I left, craving.

Basically we don’t cook half as well as our grannies did; we don’t really know where our food comes from or how it’s produced - and brown cows produce chocolate milk. On the other hand, we lionise celebrity chefs and, incredibly, spend more time dissecting food through the lens of Instagram than through our disappointed (or de-sensitised) stomachs. My German grandmother (who would greedily pluck partridges on her balcony

52

- SPRING 2019

I craved the clean, pure, joyful connection to food that led me to be there in the first place. And the cameras meant there was no music in the kitchen. I learnt to remember the simple things, the rest follows. But where does that get lost? I believe we lose something in the platitudes and vanities of multi-media. It’s over influence to the point where it’s all scrambled eggs.

Kale is also fantastically easy to work with, and can be enjoyed in many different ways. I love to pop some in the oven with a little olive oil and sea salt for a crispy snack. It also works well simply steamed. Here is my recipe for a lovely warming salad with kale.

Pearled Spelt, Kale & Feta Salad Ingredients (serves 2):

IT’S SIMPLE – (OR, AT LEAST, IT SHOULD BE) It’s a huge irony that never have we been so exposed to so much food content when at the same time we have never been so disconnected from what food is.

Kale is a vegetable I love to cook with. It is absolutely brimming with nutrients, a single portion has more Vitamin C than an orange, and it is also a great source of fibre, which many people are lacking in their diet.

1 Onion Feeding someone is, as the late and truly great A.A Gill once put it, a ‘secular form of transubstantiation’. This might sound inflated. But the connection we risk losing for real food, real time, real understanding of production, is the same thing that risks eroding our empathy for the systems and environment that create it, and more importantly for the people around us and the spiritual potential of food. When anything is becomes voyeuristic you end up feeling guilty. So, keep it simple. In food as in all life there is more to be gleaned with repeated focus than hazy, shimmering horizons. Be mindful of the first Jersey Royal this spring, enjoy scrubbing it, smell the soil, talk to the person that grew it, eat it with loads of Jersey butter. Then when it’s time is up, wait eagerly for next year. And that’s just a bowl of potatoes.

1 Clove of Garlic 100g Pearled Spelt 250ml Vegetable Stock 100g Curly Kale 50g Cooked Chickpeas 50g Feta Cheese Heat some oil in a large saucepan, add the chopped onion, garlic, season and heat through. Add the pearled spelt, stir well and then pour in the stock. Pop the lid on the saucepan and leave to simmer for 10-15 minutes until cooked. At the last minute add the kale and chickpeas and stir well. Remove the saucepan from the heat, and crumble some feta through. Serve immediately for a warming salad, or keep in the fridge for a later date. For healthy recipes visit www.chloebowler.com

SPRING 2019

- 53


FOOD & KITCHEN

FOOD & KITCHEN

SPRING VEGETABLES

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

with Chloe Bowler

Chef –Restaurateur Joseph Baker of No 10 Restaurant, Broad Street, starts a new food column for RURAL magazine

We have had a very mild winter, and this time of year is so exciting, having just witnessed the fields being ploughed for the Jersey Royals. Spring is a popular time to think about planting some salad seeds or trying your hand at growing a carrot or two. Whether you grow your own vegetables at home or not, there are some delicious, local vegetables that are in season right now, and ready to be enjoyed. Look out for the many honesty boxes that line the country lanes, brimming with locally-grown broccoli, spinach, leeks and kale. Many of our supermarkets now support locally-grown vegetables, so look out for the Genuine Jersey logo on the shelves.

on the outskirts of Düsseldorf, fresh out of my mother’s suitcase from the Cotswolds), would probably think me a decidedly odd if she saw my Instagram feed.

As a chef/restaurateur it is useful to me that our industry is no longer considered the domain of reprobates. But this detached obsession with food/health/ wellness is becoming obscene; we idolise the end result.

I am grateful recently to have had the opportunity to play a part in one of the many cooking shows you will find vying for your attention this year. I was exposed, in the best sense, to a great, eye-opening experience. We cooked, competed, discussed, learnt and analysed (or were analysed). But I left, craving.

Basically we don’t cook half as well as our grannies did; we don’t really know where our food comes from or how it’s produced - and brown cows produce chocolate milk. On the other hand, we lionise celebrity chefs and, incredibly, spend more time dissecting food through the lens of Instagram than through our disappointed (or de-sensitised) stomachs. My German grandmother (who would greedily pluck partridges on her balcony

52

- SPRING 2019

I craved the clean, pure, joyful connection to food that led me to be there in the first place. And the cameras meant there was no music in the kitchen. I learnt to remember the simple things, the rest follows. But where does that get lost? I believe we lose something in the platitudes and vanities of multi-media. It’s over influence to the point where it’s all scrambled eggs.

Kale is also fantastically easy to work with, and can be enjoyed in many different ways. I love to pop some in the oven with a little olive oil and sea salt for a crispy snack. It also works well simply steamed. Here is my recipe for a lovely warming salad with kale.

Pearled Spelt, Kale & Feta Salad Ingredients (serves 2):

IT’S SIMPLE – (OR, AT LEAST, IT SHOULD BE) It’s a huge irony that never have we been so exposed to so much food content when at the same time we have never been so disconnected from what food is.

Kale is a vegetable I love to cook with. It is absolutely brimming with nutrients, a single portion has more Vitamin C than an orange, and it is also a great source of fibre, which many people are lacking in their diet.

1 Onion Feeding someone is, as the late and truly great A.A Gill once put it, a ‘secular form of transubstantiation’. This might sound inflated. But the connection we risk losing for real food, real time, real understanding of production, is the same thing that risks eroding our empathy for the systems and environment that create it, and more importantly for the people around us and the spiritual potential of food. When anything is becomes voyeuristic you end up feeling guilty. So, keep it simple. In food as in all life there is more to be gleaned with repeated focus than hazy, shimmering horizons. Be mindful of the first Jersey Royal this spring, enjoy scrubbing it, smell the soil, talk to the person that grew it, eat it with loads of Jersey butter. Then when it’s time is up, wait eagerly for next year. And that’s just a bowl of potatoes.

1 Clove of Garlic 100g Pearled Spelt 250ml Vegetable Stock 100g Curly Kale 50g Cooked Chickpeas 50g Feta Cheese Heat some oil in a large saucepan, add the chopped onion, garlic, season and heat through. Add the pearled spelt, stir well and then pour in the stock. Pop the lid on the saucepan and leave to simmer for 10-15 minutes until cooked. At the last minute add the kale and chickpeas and stir well. Remove the saucepan from the heat, and crumble some feta through. Serve immediately for a warming salad, or keep in the fridge for a later date. For healthy recipes visit www.chloebowler.com

SPRING 2019

- 53


SPORT

SPORT

SWING INTO SPRING!

The Pleasures of Pétanque In which Gill Maccabe discovers ‘Pétanque’

Be fit with Chloe Bowler

Chloë is a personal trainer and wellbeing expert, and owner of Health Chef, delivering freshly-prepared, healthy meals to your door.

J

ersey is home to some of the most breath-taking views and idyllic scenery. What better way to enjoy a hobby that you can do outdoors, whilst taking in the sights of this beautiful Island? If fast-paced sports are not your thing, golf is a game that will improve fitness and strength while offering a competitive environment if you so wish. I would strongly encourage anyone to have a golf lesson. We are lucky to have some extremely talented and highly qualified instructors in this island, offering group and individual lessons. As a golfer, I can thoroughly recommend it as a fantastic way to spend a few hours in the fresh air. It is great exercise, increasing core strength, coordination and stamina. Once you are playing nine or eighteen holes, you can spend up to three or four hours getting a workout walking the course as you play and building up a healthy appetite. Golf is also wonderfully social. Of course you can practise and play on your own if you wish, but it is such fun to play with one or three others, or as part of a team in a competition or friendly match. The Royal Jersey Golf Club boasts wonderful views of Mont Orgeuil Castle, La Moye overlooks St Ouen’s Bay, with Les Mielles also just off the Five Mile Road, and not forgetting St Clements, which is five minutes away from St Helier, so you can be on the first tee straight after work!

54

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 55


SPORT

SPORT

SWING INTO SPRING!

The Pleasures of Pétanque In which Gill Maccabe discovers ‘Pétanque’

Be fit with Chloe Bowler

Chloë is a personal trainer and wellbeing expert, and owner of Health Chef, delivering freshly-prepared, healthy meals to your door.

J

ersey is home to some of the most breath-taking views and idyllic scenery. What better way to enjoy a hobby that you can do outdoors, whilst taking in the sights of this beautiful Island? If fast-paced sports are not your thing, golf is a game that will improve fitness and strength while offering a competitive environment if you so wish. I would strongly encourage anyone to have a golf lesson. We are lucky to have some extremely talented and highly qualified instructors in this island, offering group and individual lessons. As a golfer, I can thoroughly recommend it as a fantastic way to spend a few hours in the fresh air. It is great exercise, increasing core strength, coordination and stamina. Once you are playing nine or eighteen holes, you can spend up to three or four hours getting a workout walking the course as you play and building up a healthy appetite. Golf is also wonderfully social. Of course you can practise and play on your own if you wish, but it is such fun to play with one or three others, or as part of a team in a competition or friendly match. The Royal Jersey Golf Club boasts wonderful views of Mont Orgeuil Castle, La Moye overlooks St Ouen’s Bay, with Les Mielles also just off the Five Mile Road, and not forgetting St Clements, which is five minutes away from St Helier, so you can be on the first tee straight after work!

54

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 55


SPORT

Bob Morel, the vice president of Carrefour Pétanque Club up at the top of Mont Cochon, was tasked with showing me the ropes, the jack and the boules, at a mid-week mélée held in their purpose-built ground, which boasts 30 terrains or pitches. Carrefour

of the Jersey Pétanque Association. It suffers from an ‘age image’ but the current vice-chairman of the association is Michel Morel, a teacher at Victoria College, who is certainly not old and is passionate about getting more young people involved. Currently some 500 people, aged from early 20s to a little older, play regularly at over 17 locations around the Island. In fact, the four men who represented Jersey Pétanque in Canada (and beat the UK teams) recently are all in their 20s or 30s and anyone who works in town can’t miss the young lunchtime and early evening players in Liberation Square.

You can play triples, doubles or singles. Bearing in mind we started at 2.30pm and it gets dark by about 4pm, Bob wisely decided we would make up a double. The game was over in about 20 minutes. Bob was a brilliant teacher and allowed me to use his second best set of boules. His have ridges and a number carved

into each one. Nobody else in the world has the same number. All serious players have distinguishing marks on their boules, that way they are easy to identify when counting the points (or in my case, just easy to identify). We didn’t play on one of the obstacle terrains thankfully; this is where they have added stone obstacles which create bumps and add more challenge to the game and is quite common in Europe. There are many rules and etiquette, as one would expect in a game that is trying to get Olympic status for 2024.

For more details, visit the Jersey Pétanque association website on www.thejpa.co.uk

TRUS T

Est.

18

I

ED

Years

ED

& ED

TR

To play the game, players stand in a circle, which is scratched out in the gravel, and throw a Cochonnet or jack. All boules must be thrown from within the starting circle and Bob told me to get as close to the jack as possible, and that it is also okay to hit it. The next player stands in the circle and does the same manoeuvre. The other team, or person, must continue throwing their boules until they take the lead or run out of boules when all are thrown (If there is a dispute, the space between them is measured with a tape measure) and the points are counted. The first team or person to win a total of 13 points wins the game. Our game was 13-0. Bob was apologetic, but as anyone who knows me will profess I am a good loser, besides I loved the atmosphere in the clubroom afterwards with lots of banter, laughter, tea and biscuits, a warm environment on a dreich winter’s day.

You can play all year round. You need three boules, sensible shoes, a Cochonnet, a tape measure and a counter. There are four societies and most parishes have a terrain.

ED

It’s all my editor’s fault of course. He did ask me to write a piece about Pétanque, a game of which I knew nothing.

was the first Jersey club to qualify for the finals of the Euro Cup in November having finished in a commendable fourth place in their group on the Ligurian coast earlier in the year. The final in Angoulême in France didn’t net such a great result, but the green and white jerseys have not allowed that to dampen their spirits and are looking onwards and upwards to next time.

TR I

O

h Dear. Just as the children were relaxing into their mid to late twenties, happy that mum was at last beginning to grow up and they could confidently entrust her with prospective grandchildren, I found myself in the middle of a damp field one day in February close to the Island’s centre stone, ‘Kissing the Fanny’.

SPORT

& TR UST

Pétanque has been played in Jersey since the late1980s, it was introduced to the Island by stalwarts Derek Hart and Tony Allchurch, and the late Gerald Durrell was the first honorary president

56

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 57


SPORT

Bob Morel, the vice president of Carrefour Pétanque Club up at the top of Mont Cochon, was tasked with showing me the ropes, the jack and the boules, at a mid-week mélée held in their purpose-built ground, which boasts 30 terrains or pitches. Carrefour

of the Jersey Pétanque Association. It suffers from an ‘age image’ but the current vice-chairman of the association is Michel Morel, a teacher at Victoria College, who is certainly not old and is passionate about getting more young people involved. Currently some 500 people, aged from early 20s to a little older, play regularly at over 17 locations around the Island. In fact, the four men who represented Jersey Pétanque in Canada (and beat the UK teams) recently are all in their 20s or 30s and anyone who works in town can’t miss the young lunchtime and early evening players in Liberation Square.

You can play triples, doubles or singles. Bearing in mind we started at 2.30pm and it gets dark by about 4pm, Bob wisely decided we would make up a double. The game was over in about 20 minutes. Bob was a brilliant teacher and allowed me to use his second best set of boules. His have ridges and a number carved

into each one. Nobody else in the world has the same number. All serious players have distinguishing marks on their boules, that way they are easy to identify when counting the points (or in my case, just easy to identify). We didn’t play on one of the obstacle terrains thankfully; this is where they have added stone obstacles which create bumps and add more challenge to the game and is quite common in Europe. There are many rules and etiquette, as one would expect in a game that is trying to get Olympic status for 2024.

For more details, visit the Jersey Pétanque association website on www.thejpa.co.uk

TRUS T

Est.

18

I

ED

Years

ED

& ED

TR

To play the game, players stand in a circle, which is scratched out in the gravel, and throw a Cochonnet or jack. All boules must be thrown from within the starting circle and Bob told me to get as close to the jack as possible, and that it is also okay to hit it. The next player stands in the circle and does the same manoeuvre. The other team, or person, must continue throwing their boules until they take the lead or run out of boules when all are thrown (If there is a dispute, the space between them is measured with a tape measure) and the points are counted. The first team or person to win a total of 13 points wins the game. Our game was 13-0. Bob was apologetic, but as anyone who knows me will profess I am a good loser, besides I loved the atmosphere in the clubroom afterwards with lots of banter, laughter, tea and biscuits, a warm environment on a dreich winter’s day.

You can play all year round. You need three boules, sensible shoes, a Cochonnet, a tape measure and a counter. There are four societies and most parishes have a terrain.

ED

It’s all my editor’s fault of course. He did ask me to write a piece about Pétanque, a game of which I knew nothing.

was the first Jersey club to qualify for the finals of the Euro Cup in November having finished in a commendable fourth place in their group on the Ligurian coast earlier in the year. The final in Angoulême in France didn’t net such a great result, but the green and white jerseys have not allowed that to dampen their spirits and are looking onwards and upwards to next time.

TR I

O

h Dear. Just as the children were relaxing into their mid to late twenties, happy that mum was at last beginning to grow up and they could confidently entrust her with prospective grandchildren, I found myself in the middle of a damp field one day in February close to the Island’s centre stone, ‘Kissing the Fanny’.

SPORT

& TR UST

Pétanque has been played in Jersey since the late1980s, it was introduced to the Island by stalwarts Derek Hart and Tony Allchurch, and the late Gerald Durrell was the first honorary president

56

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 57


HERITAGE

HERITAGE

IF WALLS COULD TALK...

JÈRRIAIS A Modern Language

What stories might we hear from 4 Peirson Place and 3 King Street? Jane Pearce recounts the story of the Pearce Jewellery business and building

B

eginning with Herbert James Le Breton Pearce, four generations of the Pearce family have lived and worked in the property for the past 110 years. As a result they have a few tales to tell about the history of the building and its inhabitants. King Street was originally named Rue de Derrière, the back street, and it is thought that the premises were built in the back yard of Dr Verrier’s house, now known as The Peirson Pub. The property is listed on the 1925 sale contract as 4 Peirson Place which is the address of the dwelling above the shop. That address is now referred to as the back door with 3 King Street being the front door. Local craftsmen maintaining the building over the years have remarked on its fascinating internal structure, from the tight spiral staircase with its stunning mahogany handrail, the peculiar triangular shaped stair cupboards (affectionately referred to as coffin cupboards), to the fact there isn’t a square corner in the whole building. The French influence within the building includes artisan-made rim lock door fittings and delicate panes of rolled glass which are still visible in the shop. Depicting starfish, scallop shells and vraic, the glass is a magnet to those members of the Société Jersiaise who visit to take rubbings of the antique pattern. Prior to the Pearce family, two generations of the Gellender family of Master Bootmakers lived and worked in the property from at least 1855 to 1892. Edward Gellender had worked his way through the town from Bath Street, Beresford Street, and Halkett Place before finally buying 3 King Street. Gellender appears to have retired and let the premises to N.J Prigg, another Bootmaker until 1897.

58

- SPRING 2019

JÈRRIAIS CHALLENGE Bouônjour Hello Photo by: Mark Wilkinson

The first watchmaker, Herbert Binet, takes up residence and he is listed in the almanac as a watchmaker in his own right. After five years J.E Hoquard takes over the premises as a jeweller and watchmaker. In a typically Jersey coincidence Mr Hoquard is found to have been a distant cousin to Kathleen Vibert of St Ouen, who later becomes daughter in law to H.J. Pearce. While Messrs Prigg, Binet and Hoquard are plying their trades in the little shop on the corner, Herbert (known as H.J) is training at C.T Maine, The London Jewellers & Silversmiths at 35 King Street. Herbert specialised as an optician, as was customary for jewellers, and had risen to Manager over 15 years. Married to Elizabeth with two small children, Barbara and Paul, he decided to start his own business. In 1909 Herbert bought the jewellery and watch business from Hoquard but didn’t purchase the property from Gellender until 1925. As is traditional in this era, the purchase was funded by rentes, an old Jersey form of mortgage usually raised in small quantities by numerous people; we call this ‘crowd funding’ today. A rente was calculated in quarters, cabots, and sixtonniers of wheat, the value of which was set by the Royal Court each year. The values attributed to the original contract range from 44p (4 cabots and 5 sixtonniers) to £2.19 (3 quarters). The rente book is still in use today, the last rente collected in 2016 was one quarter for which 73p was paid.

H.J had a third child, Elizabeth, who attended finishing school in Austria. Fluent in German, she became the interpreter between the Bailiff and Kommandant during the Occupation. Through this work Elizabeth met and married Francis de Lisle Bois, who later became Deputy Bailiff. Despite filming and photography being banned during the Occupation, a secretly filmed record of their wedding exists within the Jersey Archive. The building has a distinctive appearance with a curved front corner window and is the last of its type to still have its heavy wooden shutters in use today. During the Occupation, First World War veteran Larry Mangan was responsible for taking down the shutters, washing the glass and polishing the brass. Larry later admitted that he had concealed a crystal set inside the shutter box, H.J would have been furious if he had known at the time. There are many stories about Larry, known as the Baron of King Street, as he kept himself busy running rings around the occupying forces during the Second World War. One tale has him being chased through town after curfew and climbing into the shutter-box to escape German soldiers, confounding them in the process. Paul Murray Pearce succeeded his father in 1959 and with his wife Kay they successfully managed the shop and raised five children. The youngest of their children, Peter, having worked in the business since finishing college in 1967, took over when his mother passed away in 1983. Peter met his wife Jane when she started working at the shop and they have worked together for 35 years. Together they also have five children, the youngest of which is still involved today.

À bétôt / À bi Goodbye Oui /Nânnîn Yes / No Comment qu’tu’es? How are you? J’sis mangnifique I’m wonderful Mèrcie bein des fais Thank you very much S’i’ t’pliaît! Please! À la préchaine Till the next time I’ n’y’a pon d’tchi! Don’t mention it! Tch’est qu’chenna veurt dithe? What does that mean? Man Doue d’la vie! Oh my goodness! Bein seux! Of course! J’aime bein Jèrri! I love Jersey! Tch’est qu’est tan nom? What is your name? Man nom est.. My name is.. Tch’est qu’ch’est? What is it? Ch’est un pliaîsi It’s a pleasure Pâle-tu l’Jèrriais? Do you speak Jèrriais? J’peux-t-i’ t’aîdgi? Can I help you? Tchi pitchi! What a pity!

Ben Spink of l’Office d’Jèrriais describes how Jersey’s own language is being promoted as something not just as a curiosity of lé temps passé, but as something meaningful for today.

T

he year 2019 has been designated International Year of Indigenous Languages by UNESCO. Throughout the year, the Jèrriais Teaching Service and L’Office du Jèrriais will be organising a range of initiatives to mark and celebrate this landmark occasion. One such initiative - ‘20 in 2019’ - invites individuals and groups to learn 20 Jèrriais phrases throughout the year. The phrases will be available to download from www.learnjerriais.org.je, where it will also be possible to access audio and video clips of the phrases being used. Participants will be encouraged to post video clips of themselves saying the phrases on social media, using the hashtag #20in2019. An award will be given towards the end of 2019 to an individual or group in recognition of their efforts in attempting the challenge. The phrases are given below should any eager readers be particularly keen to get started on the challenge. Schoolchildren throughout the Island are being encouraged to use the phrases, which will also appear in local media, as part of a wider attempt to encourage local organisations and businesses to use Jersey’s native tongue. With a proposition having been lodged in the States to include Jèrriais in signage as and when it is replaced, it is hoped that more of Jersey’s indigenous language will be seen and heard in 2019 and beyond. Islanders can also expect to hear songs in Jèrriais at various events throughout the year

including Jersey’s anthem, ‘Man Bieau P’tit Jèrri’ (Beautiful Jersey), which will be sung on Liberation Day and at the Siam Cup rugby match. A Jèrriais song will also feature in the annual Jersey Sings event. La Fête du Jèrriais will also return for its second year in 2019, with a number of events planned to celebrate the language with the support of Jersey Heritage. The programme is expected to include live music, talks, stories, poetry, films, crafts, games, cider tasting and more. The usual Jèrriais classes will continue for both children and adults and the opportunities to join a conversation group are being expanded to include two further café conversation sessions on top of the existing café and pub groups. Weekly sessions can now be joined in the following locations: The Adelphi [Tuesdays from 5:30]; The Village Tea Room, St Martin [Wednesdays from 10:30]; Jersey Museum Café [Thursdays from 10:30]; Jersey Pearl [Fridays from 10:30].

SPRING 2019

- 59


HERITAGE

HERITAGE

IF WALLS COULD TALK...

JÈRRIAIS A Modern Language

What stories might we hear from 4 Peirson Place and 3 King Street? Jane Pearce recounts the story of the Pearce Jewellery business and building

B

eginning with Herbert James Le Breton Pearce, four generations of the Pearce family have lived and worked in the property for the past 110 years. As a result they have a few tales to tell about the history of the building and its inhabitants. King Street was originally named Rue de Derrière, the back street, and it is thought that the premises were built in the back yard of Dr Verrier’s house, now known as The Peirson Pub. The property is listed on the 1925 sale contract as 4 Peirson Place which is the address of the dwelling above the shop. That address is now referred to as the back door with 3 King Street being the front door. Local craftsmen maintaining the building over the years have remarked on its fascinating internal structure, from the tight spiral staircase with its stunning mahogany handrail, the peculiar triangular shaped stair cupboards (affectionately referred to as coffin cupboards), to the fact there isn’t a square corner in the whole building. The French influence within the building includes artisan-made rim lock door fittings and delicate panes of rolled glass which are still visible in the shop. Depicting starfish, scallop shells and vraic, the glass is a magnet to those members of the Société Jersiaise who visit to take rubbings of the antique pattern. Prior to the Pearce family, two generations of the Gellender family of Master Bootmakers lived and worked in the property from at least 1855 to 1892. Edward Gellender had worked his way through the town from Bath Street, Beresford Street, and Halkett Place before finally buying 3 King Street. Gellender appears to have retired and let the premises to N.J Prigg, another Bootmaker until 1897.

58

- SPRING 2019

JÈRRIAIS CHALLENGE Bouônjour Hello Photo by: Mark Wilkinson

The first watchmaker, Herbert Binet, takes up residence and he is listed in the almanac as a watchmaker in his own right. After five years J.E Hoquard takes over the premises as a jeweller and watchmaker. In a typically Jersey coincidence Mr Hoquard is found to have been a distant cousin to Kathleen Vibert of St Ouen, who later becomes daughter in law to H.J. Pearce. While Messrs Prigg, Binet and Hoquard are plying their trades in the little shop on the corner, Herbert (known as H.J) is training at C.T Maine, The London Jewellers & Silversmiths at 35 King Street. Herbert specialised as an optician, as was customary for jewellers, and had risen to Manager over 15 years. Married to Elizabeth with two small children, Barbara and Paul, he decided to start his own business. In 1909 Herbert bought the jewellery and watch business from Hoquard but didn’t purchase the property from Gellender until 1925. As is traditional in this era, the purchase was funded by rentes, an old Jersey form of mortgage usually raised in small quantities by numerous people; we call this ‘crowd funding’ today. A rente was calculated in quarters, cabots, and sixtonniers of wheat, the value of which was set by the Royal Court each year. The values attributed to the original contract range from 44p (4 cabots and 5 sixtonniers) to £2.19 (3 quarters). The rente book is still in use today, the last rente collected in 2016 was one quarter for which 73p was paid.

H.J had a third child, Elizabeth, who attended finishing school in Austria. Fluent in German, she became the interpreter between the Bailiff and Kommandant during the Occupation. Through this work Elizabeth met and married Francis de Lisle Bois, who later became Deputy Bailiff. Despite filming and photography being banned during the Occupation, a secretly filmed record of their wedding exists within the Jersey Archive. The building has a distinctive appearance with a curved front corner window and is the last of its type to still have its heavy wooden shutters in use today. During the Occupation, First World War veteran Larry Mangan was responsible for taking down the shutters, washing the glass and polishing the brass. Larry later admitted that he had concealed a crystal set inside the shutter box, H.J would have been furious if he had known at the time. There are many stories about Larry, known as the Baron of King Street, as he kept himself busy running rings around the occupying forces during the Second World War. One tale has him being chased through town after curfew and climbing into the shutter-box to escape German soldiers, confounding them in the process. Paul Murray Pearce succeeded his father in 1959 and with his wife Kay they successfully managed the shop and raised five children. The youngest of their children, Peter, having worked in the business since finishing college in 1967, took over when his mother passed away in 1983. Peter met his wife Jane when she started working at the shop and they have worked together for 35 years. Together they also have five children, the youngest of which is still involved today.

À bétôt / À bi Goodbye Oui /Nânnîn Yes / No Comment qu’tu’es? How are you? J’sis mangnifique I’m wonderful Mèrcie bein des fais Thank you very much S’i’ t’pliaît! Please! À la préchaine Till the next time I’ n’y’a pon d’tchi! Don’t mention it! Tch’est qu’chenna veurt dithe? What does that mean? Man Doue d’la vie! Oh my goodness! Bein seux! Of course! J’aime bein Jèrri! I love Jersey! Tch’est qu’est tan nom? What is your name? Man nom est.. My name is.. Tch’est qu’ch’est? What is it? Ch’est un pliaîsi It’s a pleasure Pâle-tu l’Jèrriais? Do you speak Jèrriais? J’peux-t-i’ t’aîdgi? Can I help you? Tchi pitchi! What a pity!

Ben Spink of l’Office d’Jèrriais describes how Jersey’s own language is being promoted as something not just as a curiosity of lé temps passé, but as something meaningful for today.

T

he year 2019 has been designated International Year of Indigenous Languages by UNESCO. Throughout the year, the Jèrriais Teaching Service and L’Office du Jèrriais will be organising a range of initiatives to mark and celebrate this landmark occasion. One such initiative - ‘20 in 2019’ - invites individuals and groups to learn 20 Jèrriais phrases throughout the year. The phrases will be available to download from www.learnjerriais.org.je, where it will also be possible to access audio and video clips of the phrases being used. Participants will be encouraged to post video clips of themselves saying the phrases on social media, using the hashtag #20in2019. An award will be given towards the end of 2019 to an individual or group in recognition of their efforts in attempting the challenge. The phrases are given below should any eager readers be particularly keen to get started on the challenge. Schoolchildren throughout the Island are being encouraged to use the phrases, which will also appear in local media, as part of a wider attempt to encourage local organisations and businesses to use Jersey’s native tongue. With a proposition having been lodged in the States to include Jèrriais in signage as and when it is replaced, it is hoped that more of Jersey’s indigenous language will be seen and heard in 2019 and beyond. Islanders can also expect to hear songs in Jèrriais at various events throughout the year

including Jersey’s anthem, ‘Man Bieau P’tit Jèrri’ (Beautiful Jersey), which will be sung on Liberation Day and at the Siam Cup rugby match. A Jèrriais song will also feature in the annual Jersey Sings event. La Fête du Jèrriais will also return for its second year in 2019, with a number of events planned to celebrate the language with the support of Jersey Heritage. The programme is expected to include live music, talks, stories, poetry, films, crafts, games, cider tasting and more. The usual Jèrriais classes will continue for both children and adults and the opportunities to join a conversation group are being expanded to include two further café conversation sessions on top of the existing café and pub groups. Weekly sessions can now be joined in the following locations: The Adelphi [Tuesdays from 5:30]; The Village Tea Room, St Martin [Wednesdays from 10:30]; Jersey Museum Café [Thursdays from 10:30]; Jersey Pearl [Fridays from 10:30].

SPRING 2019

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HERITAGE

LAKEY OFFSHORE

Jersey’s Ancient Heritage

Business Brokers and Consultants

We offer a unique service in the Channel Islands as a long-established business broker.

VENDORS

BUYERS

Vendors who are considering selling their business or looking for a partner/investor can discuss their needs with us in confidence. We can assist in valuations and the presentation and marketing of the business.

Buyers whether experienced or taking their first step into entrepreneurial life can discuss their goals and requirements and seek advice and details of businessess on our registers.

The Chairman of the Archaeology Section of the Société Jersiaise, Nicky Westwood, invites readers to help in the discovery of Jersey’s prehistory

Buying and Selling a business is not an everyday event and our professional guidance can avoid the pitfalls and help transactions run smoothly. CONSTRUCTION INFRASTRUCTURE SUPPLIER £1m+ contracts WIP HOME IMPROVEMENTS £750k t/over across 3 islands SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTION £5m t/over across 2 islands RETAIL WIZARDS AND WOOZLES Exotic and interesting products FOOD SUPPLIER Specialising in Polish products HOUSEHOLD ESSENTIALS Consistant profits - good location TEA SUPPLIER Retail - Wholesale - Internet - Guernsey FOOD OUTLET TAKE-AWAY Central market BUSY RESTAURANT Town outskirts TAKE-AWAY West of town

SANDWICH BAR Good town location COUNTRY PUB Great potential QUALITY RESTAURANT Town Centre OTHERS HAIR AND BEAUTY SALON In town HEALTHCARE NURSING Qualified professional team NURSING HOME Guernsey MOTOR SERVICING & REPAIR CENTRE Good reputation HABERDASHERY & NEEDLECRAFT Town Centre FITNESS & BEAUTY CENTRE Favourable setting IT SECURITY SYSTEM SUPPLIER Supply and service REMOVALS & RUBBISH With contracts - always busy

Telephone: 07797 939662 Many more on www.lakeyoffshore.com

The Pinnacle

F

ollowing the success of last year’s Archaeology Conference, this year in June, the Prehistoric Society (prehistoricsociety.org) will host a conference from 14 to 16 June on the subject of Jersey’s ancient heritage. It is an appropriate location and subject for the conference, because Jersey’s roots extend far down into the deep past. The story starts in the Paleolithic Age – a vast period of time in itself, and incorporating both a semi tropical and an Ice Age wintry climate for Jersey.

For some of that time we were separated from England just as now, but at other times we were joined to the European mainland. So men crossed the tundra and rivers and reached the raised part of land – now water-bound and known as Jersey - and left evidence of their habitation. The first evidence we have of this is the cave at La Cotte de St Brélade, where axe heads and mammoth remains have been found. The La Cotte site is unique in the British Isles as it is the earliest site

of Neanderthal occupation we have. For long periods it was too cold to venture any further north. Ice Ages came and went and over time the earth warmed and the water level gently rose. Many dolmens and other monuments were erected in the Neolithic times, roughly 6,000 years ago, quite a few of which were destroyed comparatively recently. There is also evidence of monoliths, large stones specifically erected alone or in groups, in the low tide areas. We still don’t

SPRING 2019

- 61


HERITAGE

LAKEY OFFSHORE

Jersey’s Ancient Heritage

Business Brokers and Consultants

We offer a unique service in the Channel Islands as a long-established business broker.

VENDORS

BUYERS

Vendors who are considering selling their business or looking for a partner/investor can discuss their needs with us in confidence. We can assist in valuations and the presentation and marketing of the business.

Buyers whether experienced or taking their first step into entrepreneurial life can discuss their goals and requirements and seek advice and details of businessess on our registers.

The Chairman of the Archaeology Section of the Société Jersiaise, Nicky Westwood, invites readers to help in the discovery of Jersey’s prehistory

Buying and Selling a business is not an everyday event and our professional guidance can avoid the pitfalls and help transactions run smoothly. CONSTRUCTION INFRASTRUCTURE SUPPLIER £1m+ contracts WIP HOME IMPROVEMENTS £750k t/over across 3 islands SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTION £5m t/over across 2 islands RETAIL WIZARDS AND WOOZLES Exotic and interesting products FOOD SUPPLIER Specialising in Polish products HOUSEHOLD ESSENTIALS Consistant profits - good location TEA SUPPLIER Retail - Wholesale - Internet - Guernsey FOOD OUTLET TAKE-AWAY Central market BUSY RESTAURANT Town outskirts TAKE-AWAY West of town

SANDWICH BAR Good town location COUNTRY PUB Great potential QUALITY RESTAURANT Town Centre OTHERS HAIR AND BEAUTY SALON In town HEALTHCARE NURSING Qualified professional team NURSING HOME Guernsey MOTOR SERVICING & REPAIR CENTRE Good reputation HABERDASHERY & NEEDLECRAFT Town Centre FITNESS & BEAUTY CENTRE Favourable setting IT SECURITY SYSTEM SUPPLIER Supply and service REMOVALS & RUBBISH With contracts - always busy

Telephone: 07797 939662 Many more on www.lakeyoffshore.com

The Pinnacle

F

ollowing the success of last year’s Archaeology Conference, this year in June, the Prehistoric Society (prehistoricsociety.org) will host a conference from 14 to 16 June on the subject of Jersey’s ancient heritage. It is an appropriate location and subject for the conference, because Jersey’s roots extend far down into the deep past. The story starts in the Paleolithic Age – a vast period of time in itself, and incorporating both a semi tropical and an Ice Age wintry climate for Jersey.

For some of that time we were separated from England just as now, but at other times we were joined to the European mainland. So men crossed the tundra and rivers and reached the raised part of land – now water-bound and known as Jersey - and left evidence of their habitation. The first evidence we have of this is the cave at La Cotte de St Brélade, where axe heads and mammoth remains have been found. The La Cotte site is unique in the British Isles as it is the earliest site

of Neanderthal occupation we have. For long periods it was too cold to venture any further north. Ice Ages came and went and over time the earth warmed and the water level gently rose. Many dolmens and other monuments were erected in the Neolithic times, roughly 6,000 years ago, quite a few of which were destroyed comparatively recently. There is also evidence of monoliths, large stones specifically erected alone or in groups, in the low tide areas. We still don’t

SPRING 2019

- 61


NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

HERITAGE

N O R M A N D Y

know the relevance of a lot of these monuments, what they originally looked like, or how they were used. Some were definitely enclosed at some point, such as the passage grave under the mound at La Hougue Bie, but others were probably open temples, such as the dolmen at Faldouet. They nearly all relate to the rising sun at certain times of the year. They are often in prominent positions, where they could be seen from far away. A temple was also established at The Pinnacle. The axe heads found here are no longer in knapped flint (as at La Cotte), but are beautifully honed granite axes, made for ceremonial purposes or as gifts. Moving further forward still, we come to the hoard of Bronze Age axes found in a field at Trinity. These were used as a type of currency, as they contain too much lead to be used as an implement, and are not properly finished. More recently, there is evidence of Gallo-Roman habitation, and of course the large Celtic coin hoard that was housed at La Hougue Bie museum was also found to contain much gold jewellery. It is not known whether this was wealth hidden from the invading Romans,

A DRIVE-IN HISTORY LESSON The Section looking at a standing stone on the dunes possibly to pay an army to retaliate, a gift to the gods, or was buried for some other purpose. Actually, Prehistory was never originally a great interest of mine. I was always more interested in the glamour and drama of the Tudor period, or the machinations of the Wars of the Roses. However, when I returned to Jersey ten years ago and realised what a wealth of Prehistory we have, I joined the Société Jersiaise Archaeology Section and began my education.

www.maillards.je T: 01534 713600

For anyone interested in finding out more about our historical origins, Hamish Marett-Crosby suggests a history lesson in Normandy.

The Archaeology Section has been involved in digging many sites over the years. I have worked on the GalloRoman site by St Clement’s church which produced huts and other domestic evidence, medieval graves at Grouville church, and most recently, Samarès Manor, which provided habitation evidence going back top prehistory. The Island is a focus of international interest with many different universities working here from time to time. University College London have asked the Section to process the finds that come out of La Cotte this summer along with collaborating on other projects. Last year the Société held an Archaeology Conference, and every year there is a two week Archaeology Festival in July. The Société has worked hard to protect the sites of the Island, recording them, monitoring them, and sometimes, despite their limited funds, purchasing them. Jersey is so rich in history, it is impossible to know where to start. Wherever you live, you will be near Megalithic remains, a hill fort, a scattering of flint sherds, or, at the very least, some old pottery or coins.

Country House Sales

Farmsteads

Land Sales

Valuations

Maillard’s Estates are pleased to continue serving the rural community through Tommy A’Court, our agricultural land specialist and the team. Ring us today to discuss your property requirements in confidence.

The Section meets weekly, and when we’re not digging or field walking we’re keeping abreast of archaeological methods and discoveries. If you’re interested in joining, contact the Société, and you’ll be made to feel very welcome. *Contact: Nicky Westwood at Societe Jersiaise, 7 Pier Rod; 01534 758314; info@societejersiaise.org

Serving the Island of Jersey since the 1920s.

William the Conqueror’s Castle Falaise 4 ∏ F. Lambert Normandy Tourism

62

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 63


NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

HERITAGE

N O R M A N D Y

know the relevance of a lot of these monuments, what they originally looked like, or how they were used. Some were definitely enclosed at some point, such as the passage grave under the mound at La Hougue Bie, but others were probably open temples, such as the dolmen at Faldouet. They nearly all relate to the rising sun at certain times of the year. They are often in prominent positions, where they could be seen from far away. A temple was also established at The Pinnacle. The axe heads found here are no longer in knapped flint (as at La Cotte), but are beautifully honed granite axes, made for ceremonial purposes or as gifts. Moving further forward still, we come to the hoard of Bronze Age axes found in a field at Trinity. These were used as a type of currency, as they contain too much lead to be used as an implement, and are not properly finished. More recently, there is evidence of Gallo-Roman habitation, and of course the large Celtic coin hoard that was housed at La Hougue Bie museum was also found to contain much gold jewellery. It is not known whether this was wealth hidden from the invading Romans,

A DRIVE-IN HISTORY LESSON The Section looking at a standing stone on the dunes possibly to pay an army to retaliate, a gift to the gods, or was buried for some other purpose. Actually, Prehistory was never originally a great interest of mine. I was always more interested in the glamour and drama of the Tudor period, or the machinations of the Wars of the Roses. However, when I returned to Jersey ten years ago and realised what a wealth of Prehistory we have, I joined the Société Jersiaise Archaeology Section and began my education.

www.maillards.je T: 01534 713600

For anyone interested in finding out more about our historical origins, Hamish Marett-Crosby suggests a history lesson in Normandy.

The Archaeology Section has been involved in digging many sites over the years. I have worked on the GalloRoman site by St Clement’s church which produced huts and other domestic evidence, medieval graves at Grouville church, and most recently, Samarès Manor, which provided habitation evidence going back top prehistory. The Island is a focus of international interest with many different universities working here from time to time. University College London have asked the Section to process the finds that come out of La Cotte this summer along with collaborating on other projects. Last year the Société held an Archaeology Conference, and every year there is a two week Archaeology Festival in July. The Société has worked hard to protect the sites of the Island, recording them, monitoring them, and sometimes, despite their limited funds, purchasing them. Jersey is so rich in history, it is impossible to know where to start. Wherever you live, you will be near Megalithic remains, a hill fort, a scattering of flint sherds, or, at the very least, some old pottery or coins.

Country House Sales

Farmsteads

Land Sales

Valuations

Maillard’s Estates are pleased to continue serving the rural community through Tommy A’Court, our agricultural land specialist and the team. Ring us today to discuss your property requirements in confidence.

The Section meets weekly, and when we’re not digging or field walking we’re keeping abreast of archaeological methods and discoveries. If you’re interested in joining, contact the Société, and you’ll be made to feel very welcome. *Contact: Nicky Westwood at Societe Jersiaise, 7 Pier Rod; 01534 758314; info@societejersiaise.org

Serving the Island of Jersey since the 1920s.

William the Conqueror’s Castle Falaise 4 ∏ F. Lambert Normandy Tourism

62

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 63


ADVERTORIAL

NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

A GOURMET PARADISE

I

like history, but I am not sure if I like history with footnotes. The sort of book – essential I am sure - in which footnotes, qualifications and the listing of source material takes up more of the page than the text - is a book written as history for experts; those who inhabit a world where the greatest crime is to be popular and interesting. Such qualities, it is argued, denote a lack of gravitas. Fine, gravitas I can do without and Normandy can be a place for history without gravitas - history not to read, but to visit, walk round, and bring to life - while avoiding the footnotes and so create one’s own sense of the past. My ‘Damascus Moment’ was (some years ago) at the ruins of the Abbey of Bec in eastern Calvados, where I saw a carved stone commemorating that community’s famous sons who achieved high office in England during the decades after the Battle of Hastings. There were Archbishops of Canterbury, abbots as well as priors of well-known English monasteries and, given the power of the Church, my reaction was: ‘It wasn’t men in chain-mail who conquered England, it was men in tonsures.’ I was encouraged to look more carefully at what I saw. Caen, a generation ago known only as a city with a great by-pass, now promotes itself as the city of William the Conqueror. It is a city which came late to the tourism industry, having preferred to concentrate on its industrial manufacturing base. But the great steel

An institution in the Channel Islands, La Sablonnerie Hotel, Sark in sark has won numerous awards and accolades but for many, it is the food they enjoy there that has brought them back time and time again. Men’s Abbey © L. Durand Calvados Tourism

mill is now silent, and a concerted effort has been made by the tourism office to use what remains of old Caen to present its amazing historical heritage. Astonishingly, given the damage brought by the allied bombing after D-Day, a remarkable amount of original architecture has been saved and/or restored. As an illustration of the two bastions of mediaeval power – Church and State - the view from the Castle walls is framed by the two great Romanesque abbeys of stunning grandeur and simplicity. An historical walk linking that castle to these two great Norman churches - the Abbaye aux Hommes and the Abbaye aux Dames - has given a reason for us who previously would have driven round the ring road, to turn in and head to the city centre. In promoting William the Conqueror, Caen has joined forces with Bayeux, as well as Falaise where the chateau standing high above the town gives one an idea of what a castle is really for: to impose, to dominate and to keep people out. There, William was born, and also where the end of the Anglo-Norman kingdom is marked by the tower built in 1207 by the triumphant King PhilippeAuguste of France.

But for a real idea of how the JerseyEngland connection started, the obvious place to go is Bayeux. It is here that the famous tapestry telling the story admittedly as seen by the winners - is on display complete, for those seeking gravitas - with footnotes, albeit in Mediaeval Latin. This extraordinary relic of the time is a triumphal example of early historical spin. Once difficult for non-Latin speakers to follow, the official preamble to the visit is an exhibition showing and explaining all the panels. This is achieved through use of brilliant facsimile and interpretation, thus serving to bring the real thing to luminous life when entering the inner sanctum where the original embroidery is stored.

F

from the sea to the fresh berries that are grown on the island during the summer season and the gorse honey produced by Sark bees.

La Sablonnerie prides itself on using locally sourced produce – from fresh lobsters and scallops freshly plucked

Enjoy a lobster lunch in the beautiful gardens in the summer. But if anyone doesn’t quite make it in time for lunch, they can always enjoy the treat of an afternoon cream tea in the sunshine. In the evening, enjoy candlelit fine dining in the restaurant which will help explain why La Sablonnerie was given the Condé Nast Johansens accolade of ‘most romantic hotel’ as well as ‘small hotel of

ree from cars and artificial light pollution, the island of Sark is beautiful, wild and natural. Head across the La Coupée to La Sablonnerie Hotel on Little Sark and you’ll find a unique combination of food, wine and atmosphere. Owner and manager of La Sablonnerie, Elizabeth Perrée, describes her hotel as a ‘ joie de vivre’ and nowhere is it more apparent than in the joy of food at the hotel.

the year.’ Elizabeth says, ‘We were very proud to receive those awards, along with recognition from Which? hotel guide as ‘the place to stay in the Channel Islands.’ Of the Seven Bailiwick restaurants included in the 2018 Michelin Guide, the only restaurant of the group to be noted as one of the guide’s ‘best addresses’ was La Sablonnerie Hotel in Sark. The hotel also received the 2018 Good Hotel Guide Award. Tel +44 (0) 1481 832061 reservations@sablonneriesark.com sablonneriesark.com

But if it is history and heritage you want, whenever and wherever you travel there is much in this delightful area to explore. But, that said, there is more to Normandy than history, even if the impression gained visiting the main tourist destinations leads one to suppose that the Normans have created, over the centuries, more history than they could cope with. That history of war, folk movement and cultural links, has created many bonds between Jersey and Normandy, but one of the more unusual ones is a cartographical coincidence. Draw the outline of the map of Jersey and compare it with that of the Department of Calvados. The boundaries must have been drawn by a homesick Jerseyman.

William the Conqueror’s Castle Falaise 1 ∏ Calvados Tourism

64

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 65


ADVERTORIAL

NEXT DOOR NEGHBOURS

A GOURMET PARADISE

I

like history, but I am not sure if I like history with footnotes. The sort of book – essential I am sure - in which footnotes, qualifications and the listing of source material takes up more of the page than the text - is a book written as history for experts; those who inhabit a world where the greatest crime is to be popular and interesting. Such qualities, it is argued, denote a lack of gravitas. Fine, gravitas I can do without and Normandy can be a place for history without gravitas - history not to read, but to visit, walk round, and bring to life - while avoiding the footnotes and so create one’s own sense of the past. My ‘Damascus Moment’ was (some years ago) at the ruins of the Abbey of Bec in eastern Calvados, where I saw a carved stone commemorating that community’s famous sons who achieved high office in England during the decades after the Battle of Hastings. There were Archbishops of Canterbury, abbots as well as priors of well-known English monasteries and, given the power of the Church, my reaction was: ‘It wasn’t men in chain-mail who conquered England, it was men in tonsures.’ I was encouraged to look more carefully at what I saw. Caen, a generation ago known only as a city with a great by-pass, now promotes itself as the city of William the Conqueror. It is a city which came late to the tourism industry, having preferred to concentrate on its industrial manufacturing base. But the great steel

An institution in the Channel Islands, La Sablonnerie Hotel, Sark in sark has won numerous awards and accolades but for many, it is the food they enjoy there that has brought them back time and time again. Men’s Abbey © L. Durand Calvados Tourism

mill is now silent, and a concerted effort has been made by the tourism office to use what remains of old Caen to present its amazing historical heritage. Astonishingly, given the damage brought by the allied bombing after D-Day, a remarkable amount of original architecture has been saved and/or restored. As an illustration of the two bastions of mediaeval power – Church and State - the view from the Castle walls is framed by the two great Romanesque abbeys of stunning grandeur and simplicity. An historical walk linking that castle to these two great Norman churches - the Abbaye aux Hommes and the Abbaye aux Dames - has given a reason for us who previously would have driven round the ring road, to turn in and head to the city centre. In promoting William the Conqueror, Caen has joined forces with Bayeux, as well as Falaise where the chateau standing high above the town gives one an idea of what a castle is really for: to impose, to dominate and to keep people out. There, William was born, and also where the end of the Anglo-Norman kingdom is marked by the tower built in 1207 by the triumphant King PhilippeAuguste of France.

But for a real idea of how the JerseyEngland connection started, the obvious place to go is Bayeux. It is here that the famous tapestry telling the story admittedly as seen by the winners - is on display complete, for those seeking gravitas - with footnotes, albeit in Mediaeval Latin. This extraordinary relic of the time is a triumphal example of early historical spin. Once difficult for non-Latin speakers to follow, the official preamble to the visit is an exhibition showing and explaining all the panels. This is achieved through use of brilliant facsimile and interpretation, thus serving to bring the real thing to luminous life when entering the inner sanctum where the original embroidery is stored.

F

from the sea to the fresh berries that are grown on the island during the summer season and the gorse honey produced by Sark bees.

La Sablonnerie prides itself on using locally sourced produce – from fresh lobsters and scallops freshly plucked

Enjoy a lobster lunch in the beautiful gardens in the summer. But if anyone doesn’t quite make it in time for lunch, they can always enjoy the treat of an afternoon cream tea in the sunshine. In the evening, enjoy candlelit fine dining in the restaurant which will help explain why La Sablonnerie was given the Condé Nast Johansens accolade of ‘most romantic hotel’ as well as ‘small hotel of

ree from cars and artificial light pollution, the island of Sark is beautiful, wild and natural. Head across the La Coupée to La Sablonnerie Hotel on Little Sark and you’ll find a unique combination of food, wine and atmosphere. Owner and manager of La Sablonnerie, Elizabeth Perrée, describes her hotel as a ‘ joie de vivre’ and nowhere is it more apparent than in the joy of food at the hotel.

the year.’ Elizabeth says, ‘We were very proud to receive those awards, along with recognition from Which? hotel guide as ‘the place to stay in the Channel Islands.’ Of the Seven Bailiwick restaurants included in the 2018 Michelin Guide, the only restaurant of the group to be noted as one of the guide’s ‘best addresses’ was La Sablonnerie Hotel in Sark. The hotel also received the 2018 Good Hotel Guide Award. Tel +44 (0) 1481 832061 reservations@sablonneriesark.com sablonneriesark.com

But if it is history and heritage you want, whenever and wherever you travel there is much in this delightful area to explore. But, that said, there is more to Normandy than history, even if the impression gained visiting the main tourist destinations leads one to suppose that the Normans have created, over the centuries, more history than they could cope with. That history of war, folk movement and cultural links, has created many bonds between Jersey and Normandy, but one of the more unusual ones is a cartographical coincidence. Draw the outline of the map of Jersey and compare it with that of the Department of Calvados. The boundaries must have been drawn by a homesick Jerseyman.

William the Conqueror’s Castle Falaise 1 ∏ Calvados Tourism

64

- SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

- 65


BUSINESS

ADVERTORIAL

FROM A TO B Greener travel solutions for a growing Island are needed, believes Sean Guegan.

cars crossing the city and pedestrianised all 300,000 sq m of the town centre. Introducing free car parks on the periphery of town, he has rejuvenated the city centre while bringing CO2 emissions down by 70%. Jersey should be following these examples and focusing more on our bus and cycling networks. Our local bus service sees 4.8 million passenger journeys a year (2.1 million from Liberation Station alone), and we are seeing an increasingly growing number of cyclists on the roads, and although this has contributed towards improvements in cycle networks (with new routes in Grouville and St Peter’s Valley), there is substantially more work to be done. Introducing schemes such as park and ride with linked cycle routes would go a long way towards helping reduce traffic, especially in congested areas such as the top of Queen’s Road, Millbrook and Georgetown.

I

’m an all-weather cyclist. Why? Partly due to a love of cycling inherited from my father (who would take us on cycling holidays), but also due to the total lack of patience I have for sitting in traffic. My son and I can leave work at the exact same time (me in a bike helmet and he with car keys in hand) and I’ll be home before he is, enjoying a hot shower while he is crawling his way through stop-start traffic. The bike ride home clears my mind of the day and resets me on every level. I’m not saying cycling is for everyone, but there are currently more vehicles in Jersey than people and if we carry on at this rate, not only could getting around the Island become unbearable, but the fresh sea air we so pride ourselves on could become a low lingering smog. Figures from the end of 2017 show an estimated population of 105,500 with 125,146 registered vehicles and yet, with the exception of few adjustments (mainly the underpass), our road system has remained mostly unchanged since the turn of the millennium (when the population was around 88,400). With UK headlines attributing a whopping 40,000 deaths a year to air pollution, it’s time to radically change the way we move from A to B.

66

- SPRING 2019

Cities around the world (Madrid, Paris and Copenhagen to name a few) are shaking up their ideas and joining the ‘car free’ movement in an attempt to reduce air pollution and improve safety among residents. A combination of car free zones, congestion fees and other restrictions coupled with investments in improved transit systems and cycling initiatives, is resulting in cleaner air, transformed public spaces that encourage a more social, community-led pace of living and a noticeable reduction in car ownership. As I watch our population expand, I wonder what plan our own Island Government has in place to address these issues and what can we do to enable a greener, more stress free-way of getting around this 9 x 5? The Greater Bristol network has recently invested £79 million in a major commuter network with the aim of improving transport issues while planning for the area’s future economic growth. Bristol and South Gloucestershire have also jointly invested £22.8 million in cycle routes. Outside the UK you have visionaries such as Miguel Lores, the mayor of Pontevedra, who in 1999 stopped all

With the increase of cyclists and electric bikes, more safety measures need to be introduced to make commuters feel safe. Better traffic systems and lights for riders would create more awareness among drivers and reassure commuters. When electric bikes first appeared, the local government encouraged their use by offering subsidies towards the cost. Why this has not continued and why there is no government incentive to encourage hybrid vehicles, I have no idea. Almost one third of all new cars purchased in Norway are now electric… these numbers put us to shame. Investment in infrastructure should include designated indoor bicycle parks so commuters can park bikes safely and have a shower (like the facilities for boat owners at the marina). We should talk less about cars and more about buses. With so many people living in such a limited space, buses are a fundamental part of our transit solution. Increased governmental and personal investment in our local bus service could open up more routes between parishes and ‘hop on hop off’ buses that pass all States of Jersey and utility buildings.

RURAL PROPERTY

Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates reports on last year’s land market and two interesting properties recently sold

T

here was an unusually slow start to 2018 with only three land transactions being completed by the half year mark. However, there was plenty of activity with the Jersey Evening Post, Radio Jersey and Channel Television chasing for up-to-date information regarding the sale by tender of land at St Catherine’s, Mont Mado and the Sand Dunes in St Ouen’s Bay. To date, no transactions have been completed although the sale of three agricultural fields bordering the ‘Pine Walk’ in St Catherine’s to the National Trust for Jersey is imminent. The second half of the year was, however, more productive and we eventually completed the sale of 26 fields totalling 107 vergées for a total sum of £817,085. (Not a lot of commission for Tommy !) Prices tended to remain static for agricultural land but there continues to be a demand for secondary land that can be used by non-farmers, especially by owners of nearby property. Maillard’s Estates continue to specialise in the unusual, which very often involves some intriguing and challenging issues.

One of the more interesting character properties that Maillard’s completed in December was the sale of a small farm known as ‘Middlewood’ situated above St Peter’s Valley. Approached by a driveway from Coin Varin, the property offered a spacious but basic house, with a range of various outbuildings, complete with pigs in the stables, plus nine vergées of land that formed a valley used for sheep grazing. The sale involved many frustrating difficulties especially with boundaries, but with assistance of the late owner’s brother, Robert Le Brocq, Anna Carter at Ogier (lawyers acting in the sale) and our property negotiator, Maria Sophianou, the transaction was eventually completed.

2019 With several transactions unable to be completed by the final contract date of last year on 21 December, there was a good start to 2019 with January being an unusually busy month. Maillard’s Estates completed the sale of a picturesque former farmhouse in St Peter known as ‘Havelet Farm’ situated away from the public road at the end of a private driveway. Having been refurbished under the watchful eye of the vendor, a master cabinet maker, the accommodation includes three reception rooms, five bedrooms, oozing with rustic charm from every corner. There is also a ground floor apartment, large two storey barn, garaging, interesting well stocked garden plus mature woodland supporting an abundance of wildlife. The sale was negotiated by Michael Dean for the sum of £1,425,000. If you’re considering selling your property please contact our experienced negotiators Michael (michael@maillards. je) or Maria (maria@maillards.je) for a market appraisal. Tel 713600

With so many possibilities to reduce traffic congestion, lower Jersey’s carbon footprint and boost a healthier Island lifestyle, will it take a visionary like Miguel Lores to make it all happen?

SPRING 2019

- 67


BUSINESS

ADVERTORIAL

FROM A TO B Greener travel solutions for a growing Island are needed, believes Sean Guegan.

cars crossing the city and pedestrianised all 300,000 sq m of the town centre. Introducing free car parks on the periphery of town, he has rejuvenated the city centre while bringing CO2 emissions down by 70%. Jersey should be following these examples and focusing more on our bus and cycling networks. Our local bus service sees 4.8 million passenger journeys a year (2.1 million from Liberation Station alone), and we are seeing an increasingly growing number of cyclists on the roads, and although this has contributed towards improvements in cycle networks (with new routes in Grouville and St Peter’s Valley), there is substantially more work to be done. Introducing schemes such as park and ride with linked cycle routes would go a long way towards helping reduce traffic, especially in congested areas such as the top of Queen’s Road, Millbrook and Georgetown.

I

’m an all-weather cyclist. Why? Partly due to a love of cycling inherited from my father (who would take us on cycling holidays), but also due to the total lack of patience I have for sitting in traffic. My son and I can leave work at the exact same time (me in a bike helmet and he with car keys in hand) and I’ll be home before he is, enjoying a hot shower while he is crawling his way through stop-start traffic. The bike ride home clears my mind of the day and resets me on every level. I’m not saying cycling is for everyone, but there are currently more vehicles in Jersey than people and if we carry on at this rate, not only could getting around the Island become unbearable, but the fresh sea air we so pride ourselves on could become a low lingering smog. Figures from the end of 2017 show an estimated population of 105,500 with 125,146 registered vehicles and yet, with the exception of few adjustments (mainly the underpass), our road system has remained mostly unchanged since the turn of the millennium (when the population was around 88,400). With UK headlines attributing a whopping 40,000 deaths a year to air pollution, it’s time to radically change the way we move from A to B.

66

- SPRING 2019

Cities around the world (Madrid, Paris and Copenhagen to name a few) are shaking up their ideas and joining the ‘car free’ movement in an attempt to reduce air pollution and improve safety among residents. A combination of car free zones, congestion fees and other restrictions coupled with investments in improved transit systems and cycling initiatives, is resulting in cleaner air, transformed public spaces that encourage a more social, community-led pace of living and a noticeable reduction in car ownership. As I watch our population expand, I wonder what plan our own Island Government has in place to address these issues and what can we do to enable a greener, more stress free-way of getting around this 9 x 5? The Greater Bristol network has recently invested £79 million in a major commuter network with the aim of improving transport issues while planning for the area’s future economic growth. Bristol and South Gloucestershire have also jointly invested £22.8 million in cycle routes. Outside the UK you have visionaries such as Miguel Lores, the mayor of Pontevedra, who in 1999 stopped all

With the increase of cyclists and electric bikes, more safety measures need to be introduced to make commuters feel safe. Better traffic systems and lights for riders would create more awareness among drivers and reassure commuters. When electric bikes first appeared, the local government encouraged their use by offering subsidies towards the cost. Why this has not continued and why there is no government incentive to encourage hybrid vehicles, I have no idea. Almost one third of all new cars purchased in Norway are now electric… these numbers put us to shame. Investment in infrastructure should include designated indoor bicycle parks so commuters can park bikes safely and have a shower (like the facilities for boat owners at the marina). We should talk less about cars and more about buses. With so many people living in such a limited space, buses are a fundamental part of our transit solution. Increased governmental and personal investment in our local bus service could open up more routes between parishes and ‘hop on hop off’ buses that pass all States of Jersey and utility buildings.

RURAL PROPERTY

Tommy A’Court of Maillard’s Estates reports on last year’s land market and two interesting properties recently sold

T

here was an unusually slow start to 2018 with only three land transactions being completed by the half year mark. However, there was plenty of activity with the Jersey Evening Post, Radio Jersey and Channel Television chasing for up-to-date information regarding the sale by tender of land at St Catherine’s, Mont Mado and the Sand Dunes in St Ouen’s Bay. To date, no transactions have been completed although the sale of three agricultural fields bordering the ‘Pine Walk’ in St Catherine’s to the National Trust for Jersey is imminent. The second half of the year was, however, more productive and we eventually completed the sale of 26 fields totalling 107 vergées for a total sum of £817,085. (Not a lot of commission for Tommy !) Prices tended to remain static for agricultural land but there continues to be a demand for secondary land that can be used by non-farmers, especially by owners of nearby property. Maillard’s Estates continue to specialise in the unusual, which very often involves some intriguing and challenging issues.

One of the more interesting character properties that Maillard’s completed in December was the sale of a small farm known as ‘Middlewood’ situated above St Peter’s Valley. Approached by a driveway from Coin Varin, the property offered a spacious but basic house, with a range of various outbuildings, complete with pigs in the stables, plus nine vergées of land that formed a valley used for sheep grazing. The sale involved many frustrating difficulties especially with boundaries, but with assistance of the late owner’s brother, Robert Le Brocq, Anna Carter at Ogier (lawyers acting in the sale) and our property negotiator, Maria Sophianou, the transaction was eventually completed.

2019 With several transactions unable to be completed by the final contract date of last year on 21 December, there was a good start to 2019 with January being an unusually busy month. Maillard’s Estates completed the sale of a picturesque former farmhouse in St Peter known as ‘Havelet Farm’ situated away from the public road at the end of a private driveway. Having been refurbished under the watchful eye of the vendor, a master cabinet maker, the accommodation includes three reception rooms, five bedrooms, oozing with rustic charm from every corner. There is also a ground floor apartment, large two storey barn, garaging, interesting well stocked garden plus mature woodland supporting an abundance of wildlife. The sale was negotiated by Michael Dean for the sum of £1,425,000. If you’re considering selling your property please contact our experienced negotiators Michael (michael@maillards. je) or Maria (maria@maillards.je) for a market appraisal. Tel 713600

With so many possibilities to reduce traffic congestion, lower Jersey’s carbon footprint and boost a healthier Island lifestyle, will it take a visionary like Miguel Lores to make it all happen?

SPRING 2019

- 67


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Hair today, somewhere else tomorrow!

Having another pair of hands wielding the scissors provided an additional benefit for mother of three Kira. With Pauline taking charge of the van in the afternoons, Kira was then free to collect her children from school. ‘We do home visits in the van and work seven days a week,’ Kira said. It is in this respect that the business – which will mark its second anniversary on 4 May this year – differs from most other mobile hairdressers. Rather than driving to a client’s home and having to decant hairdryers and other impedimenta, the van is the salon; everything needed is on board.

Terry Neale catches up with the proprietor of a mobile barbershop

D

own a scenic country lane in the heart of St Mary lies the headquarters of a business which is both inspirational and – quite literally – very stylish. The Barberette Van is the brainchild of Kira Everett and its function is to take hairdressing services to the public, relieving clients of the tedium of having to drive, park and walk in order to reach more traditional and static salons. ‘I have been hairdressing for 20 years,’ said Kira. ‘I started in a men’s barbershop in Chester as part of a work experience scheme. Then, after leaving school, I was lucky enough to be given an apprenticeship.’ Seeking a change of scene, Kira arrived in Jersey some 16 years ago and initially worked as a waitress. This was followed by a spell in a ladies’ hairdressing salon, before she returned to the barbershop, this time Weiss, in La Motte Street. ‘I eventually decided to leave the barbershop about eight years ago,’ said Kira. ‘The trouble is that if you don’t have your own business in this industry you don’t really make very much money.’ The great moment of revelation came when Kira’s husband, Craig, bought a large transit-style van. The couple have three young children and the idea was to convert the vehicle into a camper van to be used for family trips and visits to the beach.

68

- SPRING 2019

...the van is the salon; everything needed is on board.

‘But when we looked inside the van, the first thing we noticed was that it had a black and white floor – just like so many salons – and that gave us the idea to turn it into a mobile barbers’ van,’ Kira explained. It took two years of hard work to design a new interior and have all the necessary fittings built and installed. Then, when the van was finally ready to roll, various companies were approached for permission to park up and service clients on their premises. At various times of the week, The Barberette Van can now be found at Holme Grown, El Tico and the aMaizin! Adventure Park. ‘We realised quite early on that word was spreading so another hairdresser, Pauline Kelly, joined the team,’ Kira said. ‘This ensured that we wouldn’t lose customers.’

Kira also does party packages for children and on a Saturday night, between 11pm and 1am, she can be found at Mimosa, at Liberty Wharf, where she applies the face glitter to help create that party atmosphere. She also caters for weddings and corporate events - hard work is clearly something of which Kira is not afraid. Over the Christmas period, for instance, she was putting in 70 hours a week. ‘We are the only barbershop which is open on a Sunday,’ she reasoned, ‘and so we can be extremely busy. We can be working in the van for six hours at a stretch – it is quite literally a case of one person after another passing through.’ With both Kira and Pauline on duty, the mobile salon regularly handles a minimum of 100 clients over a weekend. Men, women and children of all age ranges take advantage of the service and the van is frequently out on the road during the evenings, making it convenient for people who are at work all day and who find it difficult to get to a normal salon. In addition to the van, the business also operates a trailer. This is towed by a Jeep to events and is also fully kitted out as a salon. ‘With the usual nine to five hours and sometimes late evenings, I couldn’t work in an everyday salon. Working for myself gives me the flexibility to be there for my children and work hours that suit our family. ‘I probably work too much but I have a goal to achieve and I want to give my children the best start I can. I’m thankful to my husband, Craig, for supporting me and helping me to achieve my dreams. ‘It may not be a conventional salon but it’s mine and I love every minute of it.’

SPRING 2019

- 69


BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Hair today, somewhere else tomorrow!

Having another pair of hands wielding the scissors provided an additional benefit for mother of three Kira. With Pauline taking charge of the van in the afternoons, Kira was then free to collect her children from school. ‘We do home visits in the van and work seven days a week,’ Kira said. It is in this respect that the business – which will mark its second anniversary on 4 May this year – differs from most other mobile hairdressers. Rather than driving to a client’s home and having to decant hairdryers and other impedimenta, the van is the salon; everything needed is on board.

Terry Neale catches up with the proprietor of a mobile barbershop

D

own a scenic country lane in the heart of St Mary lies the headquarters of a business which is both inspirational and – quite literally – very stylish. The Barberette Van is the brainchild of Kira Everett and its function is to take hairdressing services to the public, relieving clients of the tedium of having to drive, park and walk in order to reach more traditional and static salons. ‘I have been hairdressing for 20 years,’ said Kira. ‘I started in a men’s barbershop in Chester as part of a work experience scheme. Then, after leaving school, I was lucky enough to be given an apprenticeship.’ Seeking a change of scene, Kira arrived in Jersey some 16 years ago and initially worked as a waitress. This was followed by a spell in a ladies’ hairdressing salon, before she returned to the barbershop, this time Weiss, in La Motte Street. ‘I eventually decided to leave the barbershop about eight years ago,’ said Kira. ‘The trouble is that if you don’t have your own business in this industry you don’t really make very much money.’ The great moment of revelation came when Kira’s husband, Craig, bought a large transit-style van. The couple have three young children and the idea was to convert the vehicle into a camper van to be used for family trips and visits to the beach.

68

- SPRING 2019

...the van is the salon; everything needed is on board.

‘But when we looked inside the van, the first thing we noticed was that it had a black and white floor – just like so many salons – and that gave us the idea to turn it into a mobile barbers’ van,’ Kira explained. It took two years of hard work to design a new interior and have all the necessary fittings built and installed. Then, when the van was finally ready to roll, various companies were approached for permission to park up and service clients on their premises. At various times of the week, The Barberette Van can now be found at Holme Grown, El Tico and the aMaizin! Adventure Park. ‘We realised quite early on that word was spreading so another hairdresser, Pauline Kelly, joined the team,’ Kira said. ‘This ensured that we wouldn’t lose customers.’

Kira also does party packages for children and on a Saturday night, between 11pm and 1am, she can be found at Mimosa, at Liberty Wharf, where she applies the face glitter to help create that party atmosphere. She also caters for weddings and corporate events - hard work is clearly something of which Kira is not afraid. Over the Christmas period, for instance, she was putting in 70 hours a week. ‘We are the only barbershop which is open on a Sunday,’ she reasoned, ‘and so we can be extremely busy. We can be working in the van for six hours at a stretch – it is quite literally a case of one person after another passing through.’ With both Kira and Pauline on duty, the mobile salon regularly handles a minimum of 100 clients over a weekend. Men, women and children of all age ranges take advantage of the service and the van is frequently out on the road during the evenings, making it convenient for people who are at work all day and who find it difficult to get to a normal salon. In addition to the van, the business also operates a trailer. This is towed by a Jeep to events and is also fully kitted out as a salon. ‘With the usual nine to five hours and sometimes late evenings, I couldn’t work in an everyday salon. Working for myself gives me the flexibility to be there for my children and work hours that suit our family. ‘I probably work too much but I have a goal to achieve and I want to give my children the best start I can. I’m thankful to my husband, Craig, for supporting me and helping me to achieve my dreams. ‘It may not be a conventional salon but it’s mine and I love every minute of it.’

SPRING 2019

- 69


LAST WORDS

FUNNY, THE POWER OF SLOW MUSIC Alasdair Crosby has the last word (for once)

LOVE YOUR LAWN ben@hydrogrow.je hydrogrow.je

Every home deserves the best lawn. The HydroGrow System was developed to create perfect lawns every time! HydroGrow, a locally owned company combines years of technical and practical landscape experience, cutting edge and environmentally friendly products, and the very best British seed species available.

F

unny, the power of cheap music – as Noel Coward makes his character, Charles, say to Amanda (or vice versa) in one of his pre-war comedies. I tend to agree – especially in respect of some of the glorious melodic popular tunes of that period. But I am also progressively discovering the power of slow music. No, I do not mean that I have become hooked on Ravel’s ‘Pavane for a Dead Princess’, or tune into Radio 3 for their daily ‘slow period’ or now listen exclusively to the slow movements of the great symphonies and other profound musical works of the classical canon. In my context, ‘slow’ does not mean the opposite to fast. Brahms’ Hungarian Dances in this context are slow; a lot of Sibelius and Dvorak and bouncy Russian classical music is slow, and as for the Sabre Dance, well, ‘Slowly, Slowly, Khach a turian,’ as folk wisdom has it. To explain what I mean, let me make an analogy with ‘Slow Food’. The gastronomic philosophy underpinning this concept is very attractive. As well as promoting the three ideals of good, clean and fair production, it is food that has been prepared with care, especially using high quality local and seasonal ingredients. It celebrates the local produce and recipes that derive from the historic traditions of a particular area. In Europe, that means the dishes that derive from the peasant cuisine of past centuries.

70

- SPRING 2019

My writing colleague, David Warr, enthused in this column recently about the joys of regional dishes such as Cassoulet and Gardienne de Taureau, both of which had very humble beginnings but now feature in menus gastronomiques régionales in their home region of southern France. Jersey’s own homely bean crock would undoubtedly also feature in these gastronomic menus if Jersey were part of France. And, of course, traditional Jersey black butter is intermittently the very latest novelty for cookery writers to discover and can be found, so I am informed, in the trendiest delicatessens of Islington.

Tchaikovsky, Falla… so much of their work is constructed from their native folk music. And of course, slow music par excellence: Canteloube’s Songs of the Auvergne.

So much for slow food. In the same way that chefs take a traditional recipe of humble origin and create a culinary masterpiece with it, or find new and innovative uses for it, so, with slow music, the great composers have taken folk tunes and village dances and touched them with a spot of magic and converted them into musical treasure.

It is a shame that Jersey has no similar historical musical tradition (although doubtless someone will inform me of my error), even though Les Badlabecqes group are doing their creditable best to remedy this. I am reminded of the remark by the Jersey historian, G R Balleine, that there was a time when the only acceptable music in Calvinist Jersey was the performance of metrical psalms.

It was not in the gilded ballrooms of Imperial Vienna that the waltz was born; it evolved there from its beginnings in village taverns and suburban dance halls; Strauss and his contemporaries took this and transmuted it into gold and silver. Dvorak visited the southern States of the USA, listened to the songs sung in the cotton plantations by the black workers and incorporated them into his New World Symphony. Smetana, Sibelius,

HYDROSEEDNG BENEFITS

In the works of such composers we see the finished, delicious restaurant dish; in their raw material, we see the locally sourced ingredients that can still be foraged and enjoyed by anyone with an interest in doing so: the musette of France; the cheerful music of village brass bands in Austria and Germany, the traditional tangos of Argentina, Western barn dances in America… the list is endless.

The opposite of slow food is fast food, which is generally disgusting: commercialised and prepared with neither love nor skill. Similarly, the opposite to slow music is fast music: music without melody, beat without soul, too much din and dissonance, with no reference to time or place, just to an Americanised, global sub-culture. But, if music be the food of love… play on (slowly).

A hydroseed lawn is cost and water efficient with less labour involved. Your lawn will be gap and line free with a consistent, even finish that a turfed lawn can’t compare with.

SMARTER WATERING MADE SIMPLE HydroGrow fit fully automatic irrigation systems, including the new ST8-WiFi Smart Irrigation Timer. Rain Bird puts control over your sprinkler system in the palm of your hand. Whether you’re outside in the garden or away from home, you’re always connected to your landscape.

For your perfect lawn contact us now for a no obligation quote. Email: ben@hydrogrow.je


LAST WORDS

FUNNY, THE POWER OF SLOW MUSIC Alasdair Crosby has the last word (for once)

LOVE YOUR LAWN ben@hydrogrow.je hydrogrow.je

Every home deserves the best lawn. The HydroGrow System was developed to create perfect lawns every time! HydroGrow, a locally owned company combines years of technical and practical landscape experience, cutting edge and environmentally friendly products, and the very best British seed species available.

F

unny, the power of cheap music – as Noel Coward makes his character, Charles, say to Amanda (or vice versa) in one of his pre-war comedies. I tend to agree – especially in respect of some of the glorious melodic popular tunes of that period. But I am also progressively discovering the power of slow music. No, I do not mean that I have become hooked on Ravel’s ‘Pavane for a Dead Princess’, or tune into Radio 3 for their daily ‘slow period’ or now listen exclusively to the slow movements of the great symphonies and other profound musical works of the classical canon. In my context, ‘slow’ does not mean the opposite to fast. Brahms’ Hungarian Dances in this context are slow; a lot of Sibelius and Dvorak and bouncy Russian classical music is slow, and as for the Sabre Dance, well, ‘Slowly, Slowly, Khach a turian,’ as folk wisdom has it. To explain what I mean, let me make an analogy with ‘Slow Food’. The gastronomic philosophy underpinning this concept is very attractive. As well as promoting the three ideals of good, clean and fair production, it is food that has been prepared with care, especially using high quality local and seasonal ingredients. It celebrates the local produce and recipes that derive from the historic traditions of a particular area. In Europe, that means the dishes that derive from the peasant cuisine of past centuries.

70

- SPRING 2019

My writing colleague, David Warr, enthused in this column recently about the joys of regional dishes such as Cassoulet and Gardienne de Taureau, both of which had very humble beginnings but now feature in menus gastronomiques régionales in their home region of southern France. Jersey’s own homely bean crock would undoubtedly also feature in these gastronomic menus if Jersey were part of France. And, of course, traditional Jersey black butter is intermittently the very latest novelty for cookery writers to discover and can be found, so I am informed, in the trendiest delicatessens of Islington.

Tchaikovsky, Falla… so much of their work is constructed from their native folk music. And of course, slow music par excellence: Canteloube’s Songs of the Auvergne.

So much for slow food. In the same way that chefs take a traditional recipe of humble origin and create a culinary masterpiece with it, or find new and innovative uses for it, so, with slow music, the great composers have taken folk tunes and village dances and touched them with a spot of magic and converted them into musical treasure.

It is a shame that Jersey has no similar historical musical tradition (although doubtless someone will inform me of my error), even though Les Badlabecqes group are doing their creditable best to remedy this. I am reminded of the remark by the Jersey historian, G R Balleine, that there was a time when the only acceptable music in Calvinist Jersey was the performance of metrical psalms.

It was not in the gilded ballrooms of Imperial Vienna that the waltz was born; it evolved there from its beginnings in village taverns and suburban dance halls; Strauss and his contemporaries took this and transmuted it into gold and silver. Dvorak visited the southern States of the USA, listened to the songs sung in the cotton plantations by the black workers and incorporated them into his New World Symphony. Smetana, Sibelius,

HYDROSEEDNG BENEFITS

In the works of such composers we see the finished, delicious restaurant dish; in their raw material, we see the locally sourced ingredients that can still be foraged and enjoyed by anyone with an interest in doing so: the musette of France; the cheerful music of village brass bands in Austria and Germany, the traditional tangos of Argentina, Western barn dances in America… the list is endless.

The opposite of slow food is fast food, which is generally disgusting: commercialised and prepared with neither love nor skill. Similarly, the opposite to slow music is fast music: music without melody, beat without soul, too much din and dissonance, with no reference to time or place, just to an Americanised, global sub-culture. But, if music be the food of love… play on (slowly).

A hydroseed lawn is cost and water efficient with less labour involved. Your lawn will be gap and line free with a consistent, even finish that a turfed lawn can’t compare with.

SMARTER WATERING MADE SIMPLE HydroGrow fit fully automatic irrigation systems, including the new ST8-WiFi Smart Irrigation Timer. Rain Bird puts control over your sprinkler system in the palm of your hand. Whether you’re outside in the garden or away from home, you’re always connected to your landscape.

For your perfect lawn contact us now for a no obligation quote. Email: ben@hydrogrow.je


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