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RHQ Rural Health Quarterly

Winter 2018-19

SPEC ISSUIAL E

2018 U.S. Rural Health Report Card

A Publication of the F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health


The Industry Leading Telemedicine Solution

HELPING PROVIDERS INNOVATE, TRANSFORM AND LEAD IN THE AGE OF REMOTE CARE Delivering the Last Mile in Healthcare

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CONTENTS //

RURAL HEALTH QUARTERLY

Volume 3, No. 1 Winter 2018-19

Publisher Billy U. Philips, Jr., Ph.D., executive vice president and director of the F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health, Lubbock, TX Editor in Chief Scott G. Phillips Section Editors Debra Flores—Health Education Catherine Hudson—Rural Research Ronald N. Martin—Behavioral Health Cameron Onks—Public Policy Copy Editor Traci Butler Carroll Research Associate Debra Curti Web Developer Miguel Carrasco

COVER STORY

2018 U.S. RURAL HEALTH REPORT CARD Grading the state of rural health in America

Contacts and Permissions Email RHQ at RHQ@ttuhsc.edu. For more contact information, visit www.RuralHealthQuarterly.com. Rural Health Quarterly is a free publication of the F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health at the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center.

11 - 63

FROM THE PUBLISHER 5

RURAL REPORTS 6-9

RHQ CONFERENCE CALENDAR 64 RHQ

3 


RHQ Rural Health Quarterly

Rural Health Quarterly (ISSN 2475-5044) is

84 million Americans

Maybe even you,

have prediabetes. person-ABOUT-TOFACT-CHECK-THIS-FACT.

published by the F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health, 5307 West Loop 289, Lubbock, TX 79414, and the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Copyright 2019—F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health. The articles published in Rural Health Quarterly do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the F. Marie Hall Institute or of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Publication of an advertisement is not to be considered endorsement or approval of the product or service. Rural Health Quarterly is published four times a year and distributed without charge upon request to individuals residing in the U.S. meeting subscription criteria as set forth by the publisher. RHQ ADVISORY BOARD Ogechika Alozie, associate professor/chief medical informatics officer, TTUHSC El Paso Paul Fowler, associate dean for the School of Medicine Administration, TTUHSC Permian Basin Coleman Johnson, special assistant to the President, TTUHSC Retta Knox, RN, Hart School-Based Health Clinic, Hart, TX Susan McBride, Ph.D., RN, Program Director Graduate Informatics Program, TTUHSC Linda McMurray, executive director at TTUHSC Larry Combest Community Health and Wellness Center Will Rodriguez, executive director, Managed Care, TTUHSC Dr. Julie St. John, assistant professor, TTUHSC Abilene Shari Wyatt, rural health specialist, State Office of Rural Health, Texas Department of Agriculture


From THE PUBLISHER //

Insurance is a Good Idea, and Time is Money!

I

am not a fan of Big Government. A native Texan of my generation, raised on ranches or farms or in a small town, would have been taught to strive to be self-reliant. It was the entire culture of our up-bringing, and even though we knew there were those less fortunate than ourselves, most of us were taught in church that it BILLY U. PHILIPS, JR. was our duty to help them. PUBLISHER Most of my Executive Director, F. generation Marie Hall Institute for worked more Rural and Community Health at the Texas Tech if we fell into University Health Sciences that category of Center needing more, and we were taught in church to give a little more when the offering plate came down the pew on Sunday mornings. We understood that it was up to us to care for one another. We had some other ideas that were foundational, too; ideas of frugality and knowing a good deal when we saw it. Because we worked so hard for our dollars, we are known to pinch a penny until Abe flinches. We think that dollars earned by us are spent best by us and not some faceless bureaucracy across the Potomac. Best decisions are close-to-home decisions. That’s one reason why old guys like me are called conservatives by younger generations. We are, but that doesn’t deflect how we were raised and our basic human values. So with that in mind, I am scratching my head about why Texas is one of only 14 states that has not

adopted a plan to expand Medicaid. Some states came on board early, when the first federal money became available. Some came on board with the 1115 waiver program or other modifications, including changing eligibility requirements, which is a hot topic currently. We published a story about the net beneficial rural results in the last issue of RHQ. On average, the uninsured rate in rural areas in the first 22 states that expanded Medicaid dropped from 35 to 16 percent, while in non-expansion states the uninsured rate in rural areas only declined from 38 to 32 percent, according to a study done by Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families and the University of North Carolina’s Rural Health Research Program. Texas has had an agreement with the federal government for the 1115 Healthcare Transformation Waiver program. This program brings $6 billion a year to the state to support hospitals, especially in rural areas, and makes medical and behavioral health care more available to about one million Texans in need, especially children. It's money used on the most cost-effective primary care and prevention services. Without these funds, more rural hospitals will close because they rely heavily on payments from these programs. All of us know that the legislature is in Austin at the moment. It will be two years before they are back, and a Medicaid expansion amendment has already failed, although narrowly, for a fourth legislative session. This is despite the fact that a January poll of more than 1,200 adult Texans shows that 64 percent support Medicaid expansion in Texas. It’s a wonder to me that, given my upbringing and values (held by many policymakers in Austin right now), we are not talking more seriously about building on what we have learned. We ought to be talking

about this 1115 waiver program now, since it expires in 2021. Today is a good time to begin designing a program that builds out those things that have worked. More importantly, if we will need to negotiate with the federal government in the future, now is the time to craft a deal that both aligns with our values and also provides better access to care for Texans. Leaving this important task for later is risky in three important ways. First, it’s Texans that are responsible for caring for Texans that are in need. Second, that federal money that supports the 1115 waiver program is Texas money paid out in taxes, and we ought to get it back; we earned it, and we’re the best ones to decide how to spend it. Third, we should enter into the negotiations with our best plans, and the best plans are thoughtful and backed up by what we know has and will work. It just seems odd that we would leave something as important as this to the last minute. As good as our policy and decision makers are, we ought not to burden the next legislature with this issue. It's human nature to procrastinate and delay having hard conversations, especially if they are about complex things like how we ensure that all Texans are covered. However, we owe it to our values to think about selfreliance and the fact that it works, and we owe it to ourselves to get the best value for our hard-earned dollars, especially for those who have fallen on hard times. It’s a Texas thing to do to take care of Texans. As sure as I am proud to be an old, conservative Texan, I am just as sure that we will come up with a way to expand Medicaid. Like the line from my fellow Lubbockite, Mac Davis, says, “Oh Lord, it’s hard to be humble / when you’re perfect in every way…” Our perfect system will be uniquely and quintessentially Texan!

.

RHQ

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RURAL

REPORTS

ALABAMA //

ARIZONA //

The University of Alabama Rural Medical Scholars program addresses the need for rural providers in the state. The program is predicated on the idea that physicians who grew up in rural areas are more likely to practice there. The program takes five years to complete.

The University of Arizona College of Public Health, in collaboration with the UA College of Nursing, has received a $1.49 million federal grant to provide sexual assault nurse examiners training and certification to expand services to sexual assault victims in rural areas.

apr.org | 11.01.18

eurekalert.org | 28.11.18

ALASKA // Behavioral health services in some areas of rural Alaska are getting a financial boost, thanks to a six-figure grant from Premera Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alaska. Premera announced its granting $450,000 to the Rural Alaska Community Action Program, Inc. ktva.com | 10.18.18

ARKANSAS // Slight declines in Arkansas' rates of obesity, smoking and diabetes helped the state improve its ranking by two spots, to No. 46, in an annual report on the health of state residents conducted by The United Health Foundation. arkansasonline.com | 01.02.19

MEXICO

AUSTRALIA While Australia has seen improvement in the size of its rural health workforce, especially in the number of doctors working in primary care settings, serious shortages continue, especially in allied health and nursing workforces. pursuit.unimelb.edu.au | 10.25.18

Commercial telecom companies like Telcel and Movistar have declined requests to extend service in mountainous area of Mexico. Now a small nonprofit is fighting to bring cell service, along with lifesaving medical care and employment, to the country’s indigenous groups. There are currently 3,400 registered users on the network.

RURAL HEALTH REPORTING FROM ACROSS THE NATION AND AROUND THE WORLD

CALIFORNIA // An outreach nurse for University of California at San Francisco’s Project ECHO is traveling to rural Northern California communities to help improve medical professionals’ ability to treat patients with hepatitis C. Traveling in a shiny, aluminum Airstream trailer, Jennifer Slepin will visit Sutter County for six weeks to help fight the spread of the disease. appeal-democrat.com | 01.28.19

BRAZIL

6  RHQ | ruralhealthquarterly.com

Tens of thousands of cases of leprosy are reported annually in Brazil, and these figures likely understate the actual prevalence of the disease. That’s because most people in Brazil who wind up with these infections live in rural areas, where access to health care is limited.

According to Mexico’s demographic agency, only four in ten rural Mexicans are internet users.

60% of the armadillos in Brazilian forests carry M. leprae and frequently transmit it to the people living there, who eat it as a source of protein.

nymag.com | 11.01.18

qz.com | 06.28.18


What’s news in your neck of the woods? Let us know: Email: Email your rural health news to RHQ at RHQ@ttuhsc.edu

U.S. Mail: Rural Health Quarterly, F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural & Community Health, 5307 West Loop 289, St. 301 Lubbock, Texas 79414

Voicemail: Prefer to call? Leave us a message at (806) 743-9891 FAX: (806) 743-7953

Web: Find more RHQ contacts at ruralhealthquarterly.com or follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/RuralHealthQuarterly.

CONNECTICUT //

ILLINOIS //

Connecticut saw one of the biggest drops in the uninsured rate among low-income adults living in rural areas and small towns compared to other states, according to a national study by the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families and the North Carolina Rural Health Research Program.

Rural Health Link in Anna, Illinois in southern Illinois was one of nine community health centers in the state awarded federal funding from HRSA. Rural Health Link is receiving $2,490,495.

ctmirror.org | 09.28.19

IDAHO //

kfvs12.com | 01.30.19

Florida is in the midst of a dental access crisis. There are too few dentists to go around, especially in rural areas. Dentists have been stepping up to provide more pro bono services, but there are 24 counties in Florida with a population-to-dentist ratio greater than 3,000 to one

An Idaho Nursing Workforce Center report and the Idaho Alliance of Leaders in Nursing outlined Idaho’s nursing shortage. Seventy-six percent of hospitals in Idaho reported having at least one vacant nursing job for the entirety of last year and 83 percent of hospitals expect the problem to get worse. Rural areas have been hit especially hard. Nearly half of all Idaho’s registered nurses practice in or near Boise, the most populated area in the state.

tallahassee.com | 02.11.19

postregister.com | 11.13.18

theindychannel.com | 01.07.19

FRANCE

RWANDA

FLORIDA //

INDIANA // The Indiana State Department of Health says a new program is aimed at attracting psychiatrists and alcohol and substance use counselors to a region experiencing high numbers of opioid deaths. This program hopes to attract providers to 11 rural eastern counties by helping them pay off their loans.

m

RUSSIA In Russia, many people still live in small villages far from the nearest medical clinic. The situation has deteriorated in recent years as the government has been "optimising" medical care, closing thousands of rural hospitals and clinics to save money. Now one region has taken matters into its own hands. Dozens of pensioners, mostly women, have been training in first-aid and offering emergency care to their neighbours.

France's health system is "no longer one of the best." 59 percent of those surveyed say they believe the situation has worsened, with packed emergency wards and rural parts of the country now described as "medical deserts."

Rwanda’s government has made universal health insurance a reality, and a new university equips doctors and nurses with the tools to care for rural patients, even those without electricity or running water.

www.bbc.com | 02.19.19

thelocal.fr | 09.28.18

politico.com | 11.27.19 RHQ

7 


Rural Reports // KANSAS //

MISSISSIPPI //

The outgoing Governor of Kansas signed the Kansas Telemedicine Act which provides parity for telemedicine. Kansas has a shortage of mental health care providers and a rising demand for services.

More Mississippians signed up for health insurance in 2018 through the Affordable Care Act’s marketplace than in the previous year. Mississippi is one of just five states that increased total marketplace enrollment over 2017.

gctelegram.com | 01.20.19

KENTUCKY // Physician assistants (PAs) are leaving rural Kentucky to practice out-of-state because their ability to practice is restricted. Kentucky is the only state where a PA cannot prescribe a controlled substance. HB 93 would allow PAs to prescribe certain controlled substances.

MARYLAND // While enrollment in health exchange plans in Maryland in 2018 was up about 2 percent, there were places where policies sold like hotcakes. Rural counties reported jumps as high as 28 percent from last year. The reason? A “perfect storm” that made some policies sold under the Affordable Care Act the least expensive in the least populated areas. baltimoresun.com | 12.19.18

After an overhaul in Lousiana's Medicaid program, now fewer than 1 in 10 people lack insurance. Before the changes, one in four people in this state did not have access to health care or insurance. ktbs.com | 12.18.18

MAINE //

8

MONTANA // Montana ranks in the top five states for its rate of suicides. Montana State University Extension agents are bringing a program called Mental Health First Aid to rural counties that will help youth and adults alike identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses. helenair.com | 02.06.19

amnews.com | 01.10.19

LOUISIANA //

mississippitoday.org | 12.28.18

MICHIGAN // Professionals with a lower level of training than a dentist will now be allowed to provide “midlevel” dental care in Michigan. Seventy-eight of Michigan’s 83 counties have at least one dental shortage area. fox17online.com | 12.27.18

MINNESOTA //

NEVADA // Nevada ranks last in the country when it comes to mental health access and services statewide.

Northern Light Health is struggling to hire EMTs and paramedics in rural communities. To help resolve these issues, the company is reimbursing workers for tuition and offering a retirement plan with matching employer recontribution.

No state has had more hospitals stop delivering babies in the past decade, and yet, Minnesota still has a higher rate of rural hospitals providing obstetrics (OB) per women of childbearing age than almost any other state.

The state legislature is considering a bill that creates a pilot approach in rural Nevada to train law enforcement officers and first responders in crisis intervention training.

beckershospitalreview.com | 02.04.19

startribune.com | 02.07.19

mynews4.com | 02.21.19

RHQ


NEW MEXICO // In 2018, Pecos Valley Medical Center began offering diabetes education to address a high rate of the disease among residents, and it opened a school-based clinic to ease access to medical care for kids. It also helped bring a nonprofit to town that aims to reduce food deserts by providing low-cost produce and other healthy goods. santafenewmexican.com | 12.01.18

PENNSYLVANIA //

VERMONT //

The Clinical & Translational Science Institute at Penn State has been awarded a $416,000 grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences for a pilot program to better understand the issues facing rural communities and address a decline in American life expectancy.

The statewide rate of uninsured Vermonters is 3 percent, less than half that from just a decade ago (8 percent).

news.psu.edu | 10.12.18

caledonianrecord.com | 01.10.19

SOUTH CAROLINA // South Carolina saw approximately 7,400 potentially excess deaths in 2015 among the five leading causes of death, and almost half of these occurred among rural populations. newsstand.clemson.edu | 01.16.19

NORTH CAROLINA //

WASHINGTON // Plans for the first Rural Health Dental Clinic in Washington were presented to the public by Jefferson Healthcare during a community open house at the hospital. peninsuladailynews.com | 10.05.18

WISCONSIN //

Southeastern Health and Campbell University are looking to train rural physicians with the hope that they will stay and work locally. One-fourth of the recent graduates remained in the area.

Twenty of Wisconsin’s 72 counties don’t have an OB-GYN, according to the AMA. For some women, that means driving more than an hour to reach a hospital, while a few have even given birth in their cars.

northcarolinahealthnews.org | 11.07.17

TEXAS // OKLAHOMA //

According to the 2018 Vermont Household Health Insurance Survey, nearly all counties in the state have rates of 4 percent or less, comparable to the bestperforming states.

Oklahoma State University has a $3.9 million plan to fight obesity in two rural counties in eastern Oklahoma, including one county that includes a town with the lowest life expectancy in the United States. The funding will come from a five-year federal grant.

The late-July reopening of the Crockett Medical Center in Crockett, Texas makes it a pleasant surprise in a state that has led the nation in rural hospital closures. Since January 2010, 17 of the 94 shuttered hospitals have been in Texas, including two that closed in December, according to data from the University of North Carolina.

tulsaworld.com | 12.09.1

khn.org | 01.07.19

fox6now.com | 01.20.19

WYOMING // Wyoming Medical Center has announced partnerships with two hospitals and conversations with three more to join its Telemed Wyoming network, which uses telemedicine to improve care for stroke patients in rural locations. mhealthintelligence.com | 11.30.18

RHQ

9 


RHIhub Your First STOP for

Rural Health

INFORMATION

ruralhealthinfo.org Online Library www.ruralhealthinfo.org/library

RHIhub’s online library includes over 12,000 resources, updated daily. Find publications, research, organizations, maps, and websites. Search news and events to stay current on rural health issues.

Looking for funding? Search for the latest federal, state, and foundation opportunities: www.ruralhealthinfo.org/funding

Topic & State Guides

Get Rural Updates Receive weekly email updates with the latest news, funding opportunities, publications, model programs, new Rural Monitor articles, and more.

www.ruralhealthinfo.org/guides

Compiles in-depth information on rural health topics and your state. Includes key resources, funding, maps, events, news, statistics, and more.

Rural Data Visualizations www.ruralhealthinfo.org/visualizations

Offers maps, charts, and tools which illustrate publicly available data in a variety of formats to show how rural areas compare.

Case Studies and Conversations

Custom Alerts Select the issues, locations, and types of information most relevant to you, and receive daily or weekly notifications of all RHIhub additions on those topics.

www.ruralhealthinfo.org/case-studies-conversations

Introduces you to successful rural health programs and leaders, highlights important rural health issues, and provides opportunities for you to join the conversation and share your experience. • Rural Health Models and Innovations – Find examples of rural health projects other communities have undertaken. Gain insights from their experiences to help you develop new programs in your area.

• Rural Monitor – Online magazine focusing on healthcare and population health in rural communities, with feature articles, interviews with rural health experts, and more.

Tools for Success www.ruralhealthinfo.org/success Access resources to help you grow funding, improve programs, demonstrate program effectiveness, plan for long-term success, and promote successes. • Am I Rural? – Determine if your program is considered rural based on various definitions of rural.

• Evidence-Based Toolkits – Step-by-step guides to develop programs that

improve the health of rural communities, based on evidence-based and promising interventions.

Resource and Referral Service RHIhub provides free,

customized assistance for organizations and individuals seeking to maintain and improve healthcare delivery and population health in rural areas. Our information specialists are waiting for your call!

800.270.1898 info@ruralhealthinfo.org


THE STATE OF RURAL HEALTH IN AMERICA

2018

RURAL HEALTH REPORT CARD

is pleased to present our second annual U.S. RHQ Rural Health Report Card. Last year, we were humbled by the warm reception afforded our first attempt

at ranking and grading states by rural health outcomes and access to care. We also learned a great deal from your feedback, and we've attempted to incorporate your suggestions into this year's Report Card. Each state's individual report card page now includes a complete listing of all the indicators that went into that state's final score, and each also includes a more detailed discussion of "What's Good" and "What Needs Work" in the state. We've also begun to address what was perhaps the most glaring omission in last year's report: Telemedicine access. Telemedicine plays an increasingly vital role in rural health care nationwide, and adoption of the technology is advancing so rapidly we would be remiss to ignore it. Reliable national telehealth usage data is still hard to come by, however, so we chose to begin where every rural community interested in adopting telehealth solutions must also begin: Broadband access. Going forward, every state will receive a rural broadband access grade that will be factored into that state's

final Access to Care score (see Methodology). This Broadband Access grade replaces 2017's Emergency Care Access grade, a measure of access to emergency care physicians that appears to have a weaker correlation to rural health outcomes than many other access measures. We compiled this report to provide policymakers, practitioners and the public with a snapshot of each state's rural health status relative to other states across the nation. These state report cards underscore ongoing challenges that face many rural communities, but they also highlight health care success stories and improvements made by those who take direct action to reduce rural health disparities. We hope that the information we are providing will be of assistance to all rural health stakeholders in helping to craft effective solutions. This research was supported by the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center and the F. Marie Hall Institute for Rural and Community Health. We thank our colleagues who provided insight and expertise that greatly assisted in the creation of the 2018 U.S. Rural Health Report Card, including Billy Philips, Catherine Hudson, Gordon Gong, Debra Curti, Luciano Boas, Miguel Carrasco and Traci Butler Carroll. RHQ

11 

FALL 2017 | RHQ   11


METHODOLOGY When it comes to defining rurality, counties are RHQ's sole unit of measurement. This has the virtue of allowing us to use well-established and reliable data sources. Unfortunately, this means excluding three states and Washington D.C. from our study. While Delaware, New Jersey and Rhode Island each contain small pockets of rurality, these states, like D.C., are largely urbanized, and none contains a single county with a non-metropolitan population. We combined data from all rural counties in a state, and the rural/urban status of a county is defined according to the 2013 Rural Urban Continuum Codes (RUCC); i.e., the rural area of a state is an aggregate of all rural counties in a state. All counties in the U.S. are sorted as either metropolitan (urban) or non-metropolitan (rural). RUCC forms a classification scheme that distinguishes metropolitan counties by the population size of their metro area, and nonmetropolitan counties by degree of urbanization and adjacency to a metro area. The overall composite scores in the Report Card are calculated using 10 variables divided into three equally weighted categories: Mortality, Quality of Life and Access to Care (see Figure 1). Mortality includes age-adjusted mortality rates for all

causes of death in all rural counties in a state. Mortality accounts for 1/3 of each state’s final composite score. Grades are also assigned to the top-five causes of death in each state's report card for discussion purposes, but we use only the All-Cause Mortality rate (and not the rates of individual causes of death) to determine each state’s composite score, rank and grade. Quality of Life includes the percentage of babies born in rural counties with a low birth weight (2010-2016), the percentage of rural residents who reported having poor general health (2016), the number of poor physical health days reported by rural residents in the past 30 days (2016) and the number of poor mental health days reported by rural residents in the past 30 days (2016). Each state’s combined Quality of Life score accounts for 1/3 of that state’s final composite score. Access to Care includes the number of non-federal primary patient care physicians practicing in rural counties in 2015 per 100,000 population, the number of nonfederal psychiatrists practicing in rural counties in 2015 per 100,000 population, the number of dentists practicing in rural counties in 2015 per 100,000 population, the percentage of uninsured rural residents under 65 years of age in 2015, and the percentage of rural residents with

TABLE 1: FINAL RURAL HEALTH STATE RANKINGS AND GRADES

STATE RANK GRADE

12

RHQ

STATE RANK GRADE

STATE RANK GRADE

STATE RANK GRADE

AL

46

F

IN

29

C-

MT

16

B

SC

43

F

AK

23

C+

IA

8

A-

NE

10

A-

SD

14

B

AZ

33

D

KS

22

C+

NV

30

D+

TN

44

F

AR

40

F

KY

42

F

NH

2

A+

TX

36

D-

CA

15

B

LA

45

F

NM

31

D+

UT

26

C

CO

11

B+

ME

13

B+

NY

19

B-

VT

5

A

CT

1

A+

MD

17

B

NC

34

D

VA

32

D+

FL

37

D-

MA

6

A

ND

7

A

WA

12

B+

GA

39

F

MI

24

C

OH

28

C-

WV

38

D-

HI

4

A

MN

3

A+

OK

41

F

WI

9

A-

ID

20

B-

MS

47

F

OR

21

C+

WY

18

B-

IL

27

C-

MO

35

D

PA

25

C

*DE, NJ, and RI excluded.


access to "high-quality" broadband in 2016. Each state’s combined Access to Care score accounts for 1/3 of that state’s final composite score. "High-quality” broadband access, a new metric added to the report cards this year, was defined by Congress in 2018 as the capability that allows users to “originate and receive high-quality voice, data, graphics, and video” services. The FCC retains the existing speed benchmark of 25 Mbps download/3 Mbps upload (25 Mbps/3 Mbps) for "high-quality" fixed services. A variety of measures and data sources related to U.S. health care were reviewed for this study, but the three categories and ten variables selected appear to offer the most even-handed and accurate picture of the state of rural health across the nation. Other well-known national health rankings, like the County Health Rankings (CHR) model produced by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, rely heavily on a more holistic view of population health, but the RHQ U.S. Rural Health Report Card focuses instead on a narrow band of data related specifically to rural health outcomes and access. This choice should not be interpreted as a criticism of other models. Rather, RHQ’s approach takes as a given that social and economic factors exert a powerful influence on health. Our report card instead seeks to highlight a limited set of key variables in an attempt to create a clear snapshot of state and regional differences in rural health care delivery. GRADING SYSTEM Each state was given a letter grade based on calculations using a Z-score. Grades were put into five traditional American grading categories: A, B, C, D and F. Positive and negative delineations (+ and -) were added to each letter grades except F to indicate the top three and bottom three performers in each quintile. We used Z-scores to standardize each measure for each state relative to the average of all states where: Z = (state value – average of all states) / (standard deviation of all states). A positive Z-score indicates a value higher than the average of all states; a negative Z-score indicates a value for that state lower than the average of all states. Z scores for provider supplies (primary care physicians, dentists and psychiatrists) are reversed; i.e., a positive value is reversed to a negative one and negative one to a positive value. For the 47 states included, each grade was based on their overall quintile ranking.

Each state’s final grade and overall rank appear prominently at the top of each page alongside a listing of each state’s grades in each of 10 differently weighted rural health measures. Below the final grade for each state, numbers and arrows indicate each state's 2018 State Rural Health Rankings for the three equally weighted categories: Mortality, Quality of Life and Access to Care. Each report card also includes a state map that delineates rural and urban counties by color (red means rural) along with a brief list of facts about each state’s rural population. Finally, every report card offers a summary of "What's Good," "What Needs Work," and the "Urban-Rural Divide" in state mortality rates. Urban-rural difference in mortality is defined as the result of the z-score of rural counties minus the z-score of urban counties of the same state; the county with the smallest value is ranked the highest. In Figure 2, all nine U.S. Census regional divisions are numbered and color coded based on their final average rankings. The top third is in green, the middle third is yellow, and the bottom third is red. Further details about divisional rankings (composite scores calculated using all 10 health variables) are detailed in Table 3. The map in Figure 3 color codes each state individually and provides their final 2018 rankings at a glance. DATA SOURCES & TOOLS 1. United States Department of Agriculture, Rural-Urban Continuum Codes. 2. United States Census Bureau, Census Regions and Divisions of the United States. 3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. 4. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, County Health Rankings. 5. Health Resources and Services Administration of U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 6. United States Census Bureau. American Community Survey, American Factfinder (S2701) 7. Federal Communications Commission, 2018 Broadband Deployment Report 8. SAS Statistical Package 9.4

.

REPORT CARDS The key findings for each state are summarized in each of the individual state report cards that follow this section.

RHQ

13 


FIGURE 1 : RURAL HEALTH RANKING SYSTEM - CATEGORIES AND WEIGHTS

+

MORTALITY: 1/3 ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY: 100%

+

QUALITY OF LIFE: 1/3

ACCESS TO CARE: 1/3

GENERAL HEALTH: 20%

PRIMARY CARE Access: 30%

MENTAL HEALTH (30 DAYS): 20%

MENTAL HEALTH ACCESS: 15%

PHYSICAL HEALTH (30 DAYS): 20%

DENTAL CARE ACCESS: 10%

LOW BIRTH WEIGHT: 40%

Broadband Access: 5% UNINSURED RATE: 40%

TABLE 2: U.S. RURAL HEALTH RANKINGS BY STATE - ALL CATEGORIES All-Cause MORTALITY

General HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH DAYS

PHYSICAL HEALTH DAYS

LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

PRIMARY Access

MENTAL Access

DENTAL Access

Broadband access

UNINSURED RATE

1. connecticut

2

1

6

1

17

14

4

2

1

3

2. NEW HAMPSHIRE

11

3

19

9

16

1

1

3

5

16

3. minnesota

4

4

3

4

2

9

15

21

8

5

4. hawaii

1

16

10

16

27

7

5

7

7

4

5. VERMONT

15

2

25

10

11

3

2

13

10

2

6. Massachusetts

6

5

34

15

3

5

6

5

11

1

7. north dakota

7

8

1

2

10

32

21

14

4

18

8. IOWA

14

6

5

3

9

20

22

23

6

7

9. WISCONSIN

10

9

11

12

4

11

18

19

34

9

10. nebraska

9

11

4

5

8

15

37

11

23

21

11. COLORADO

3

12

12

8

36

6

19

10

27

26

12. WASHINGTON

5

18

20

29

5

25

35

16

2

19

13. Maine

22

14

22

17

18

2

7

22

14

22

14. SOUTH DAKOTA

18

10

2

7

7

17

16

18

12

29

15. california

19

22

21

20

6

12

8

4

39

17

16. MONTANA

13

15

8

14

21

8

10

6

35

38

17. MARYLAND

16

19

23

13

34

19

3

17

3

15

18. WYOMING

8

13

9

11

32

13

11

8

28

33

19. NEW YORK

17

24

24

27

19

27

9

28

9

8

20. IDAHO

12

26

18

21

12

16

26

15

21

39

21. OREGON

21

25

37

26

13

10

28

9

16

20

22. KANSAS

26

23

7

6

14

21

41

24

20

24

STATE RANK

14

RHQ


All-Cause MORTALITY

General HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH DAYS

PHYSICAL HEALTH DAYS

LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

PRIMARY Access

MENTAL Access

DENTAL Access

Broadband access

UNINSURED RATE

23. ALASKA

23

30

14

30

1

4

12

1

46

46

24. michigan

24

21

30

31

15

22

17

20

32

12

25. PENNSYLVANIA

25

17

29

19

20

28

14

29

19

13

26. utah

20

7

13

18

28

24

43

12

18

36

27. ILLINOIS

28

20

15

24

23

39

39

3

25

6

28. OHIO

35

29

26

28

22

36

30

36

17

14

29. INDIANA

33

28

27

22

24

44

31

35

33

25

30. NEVADA

29

27

32

33

30

45

47

30

24

30

31. NEW MEXICO

30

39

39

31

38

23

13

32

43

32

32. VIRGINIA

37

31

17

23

40

35

25

38

29

27

33. ARIZONA

27

47

43

47

25

37

46

27

47

41

34. NORTH CAROLINA

34

34

33

36

32

31

20

34

13

37

35. MISSOURI

36

33

32

39

41

29

33

40

44

35

36. TEXAS

31

36

16

25

31

46

40

43

31

47

37. FLORIDA

32

41

35

40

35

47

34

46

37

45

38. WEST VIRGINIA

41

44

47

46

41

18

29

31

22

11

39. GEORGIA

38

35

28

35

43

33

23

42

30

43

40. arkansas

40

45

46

43

38

30

44

39

42

23

41. OKLAHOMA

42

34

42

39

26

40

36

26

40

44

42. KENTUCKY

47

41

42

40

45

26

24

25

26

10

43. SOUTH CAROLINA

39

38

41

37

46

34

38

44

36

34

44. TENNESSEE

44

37

45

44

37

42

32

41

15

28

45. LOUISIANA

43

40

38

36

45

41

45

45

45

40

46. ALABAMA

45

46

44

42

44

43

42

47

38

31

47. MISSISSIPPI

46

43

33

34

47

38

27

37

41

42

STATE rank

TABLE 3: U.S. RURAL HEALTH RANKINGS BY U.S. CENSUS REGIONAL DIVISION - ALL CATEGORIES All-Cause MORTALITY

General HEALTH

MENTAL HEALTH DAYS

PHYSICAL HEALTH DAYS

LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

PRIMARY Access

MENTAL Access

DENTAL Access

Broadband access

UNINSURED RATE

1. NEW ENGLAND

2

1

4

1

3

1

1

2

1

2

2. PACIFIC

1

4

5

5

1

2

3

1

4

5

3. WEST NORTH CENTRAL

4

2

1

2

2

4

6

4

3

4

4. MID-ATLANTIC

5

3

6

3

5

6

2

6

2

1

5. MOUNTAIN

3

6

2

6

6

3

4

3

8

7

6. EAST NORTH CENTRAL

6

5

3

4

4

5

7

5

6

3

7. SOUTH ATLANTIC

7

7

8

7

8

7

5

8

5

8

8. WEST SOUTH CENTRAL

8

8

7

8

7

9

9

9

9

9

9. EAST SOUTH CENTRAL

9

9

9

9

9

8

8

7

7

6

CENSUS DIVISION

RHQ

15 


FIGURE 2: U.S. CENSUS REGIONAL DIVISIONS (RANKED AVERAGES)

2

3

5

4

6 7

9

8

1

ralHealthRankings 2018RuralHealthReportCardStateRanks

TOP THIRD

MIDDLE THIRD

BOTTOM THIRD

FIGURE 3: FINAL STATE RANKINGS

12 16

13

7

21

3 20 18 30

26

15

33

5

9

14

24 25

8

10

27

11

22

28

29

35

17

38 42

40

43 47

36

46

39

45 37

4

23 TOP THIRD

MIDDLE THIRD TOP THIRD

16

RHQ

BOTTOM THIRD MIDDLE THIRD

32 34

44

41

31

19

BOTTOM THIRD

2 6 1


IN FREE F AND RIGH

ALABAMA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

A

F F F F F

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

F F F DD+

The poverty rate in rural Alabama is 23 percent, compared with 17.1 percent in urban areas.

WHAT’S GOOD While Alabama lost ground in many report card categories in 2018, the Yellowhammer State saw modest improvement in its Mental Health Access ranking, moving up from 44th in the nation (F) to 42nd (F).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Alabama dropped one final ranking position in 2018 from 45th out of 47 states to 46th, or next to last in the nation for overall rural health. In 2018, Alabama saw a precipitous drop in its ranking for Accidental Death in rural counties, from 22nd (C+) in 2017 to 33rd (D).

17  RHQ

46/47 ALABAMA ranks 46th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

LABAMA has a population of 4.9 million people, and 23.7 percent live in one of the state’s 38 rural counties.

68.9 percent of Alabama’s rural population identifies as Non-Hispanic White, while 72.1 percent of the statewide is White. 24.1 percent is Black/African-American, 4.3 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 0.7 percent is American Indian/ Alaska Native and 0.5 percent is Asian.

F

..

Alabama is one of nine states to receive a failing grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

Mortality:

Alabama also saw a significant drop in its national ranking for rural Cancer Mortality — from 34th (D) in 2017 to 38th (D-). The state's General Health ranking also declined from 43rd (F) to 46th (F), and the ranking for the states Uninsured Rate fell from 29th (C-) to 31st (D+).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Alabama ranks 24th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Alabama is 8.6 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Down one spot nationally to 45th (44th in 2017)

45

Quality of Life:

No change in national ranking of 44th for 2018

44

Access to Care: No change in national ranking of 40th for 2018

40

RHQ

17 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

C+ 23/47 ALASKA ranks 23rd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Alaska is one of three states to receive a grade of “C+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

23

Down one spot nationally to 23rd (22nd in 2017)

Quality of Life:

11

Down two spots nationally to 11th (9th in 2017)

Access to Care:

28 18

RHQ

18  RHQ

Down three spots nationally to 28th (25th in 2017)

ALASKA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

C+ Primary Care Access A D + Mental Health Access B+ B Dental Care Access A+ D + Broadband Access F + Uninsured states today more than “plus” orA a “minus” for factors Rate F 50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access LASKA haseveryone an estimated of LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception loses: population 742,000 people, and 32.2 percent live PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended in onemore of Alaska’s 26 rural ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, abortions, and counties. PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

A

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 68.9 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.9 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 4.5growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 5.4 percent Asian and 26.9 New percent Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker American Indian/Alaska Native. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Alaska is 23a percent, and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, compared with 7.7 percent in urbanAlabama, areas of Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, RURAL COUNTIES the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, COUNTIES “In theURBAN past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S GOOD the slippage on reproductive received a “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but drop this year Alaska also saw a substantial in itscould see MANY The LastFACTORS Frontier State saw substantial Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks ACCOUNTEDin FOR national ranking for rural CLRD Mortality — at the improvement its 2018 Cancer Mortality national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADE from 7th (A) in 2017 to 19th (B-) in 2018. The ranking for rural counties — 17th (B) in 2018, Walker warned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES state's rankings also declined in General Health up from 28th (C-) in 2017 — and modest reproductive health should not sexDays) education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND (-8), Health (30 (-4) and Physical depend on where sheMental lives, but improvement in its Heart Disease Mortality and a return to abstinence AFFORDABILITY Health (30 Days) (-6). Rural Broadband Access only does,(C+) as women in many ranking, up from 25th (C) in 2017 toit 21st programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced eleven criteria, the is among the worst in the nation at 46th (F), inUsing 2018. proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health Institute’s report card ranked along with the rural Uninsured Rate (46, F). care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the WHAT NEEDS WORK Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for Alaska saw declines in all of its major report to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who isfor concerned card category rankings in 2018 — Mortality, Alaska ranks 22nd out of 47 states urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health Quality of Life, and Access to Care — and theof women rural difference of millions without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing state one final ranking in accessmortality rate in rural Alaska is nine percent improved to contraception upondropped their composite scores (0- position 2016 was, 2017 could be 2018 of 47astates higher than the rate as in urban counties. and other health care services. 100), from each 22nd state out received “core”to 23rd. a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

ARIZONA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

A

CF F F C

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

DF CF F

The poverty rate in rural Arizona is 26.2 percent, compared with 15.8 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Grand Canyon State saw modest improvement in its 2018 Heart Disease Mortality ranking for rural counties — 9th (A-) in 2018, up from 12th (B+) in 2017 — and in its Cancer Mortality ranking, up from 4th (A) in 2017 to 1st (A+) in 2018, the best in the nation.

WHAT NEEDS WORK Arizona saw no change in its final report card grade from 2017 to 2018 (D), but it did lose ground along several key indicators. Arizona's All-Cause Mortality rank fell 4 points to 27th in the nation in 2018. For the second

33/47 ARIZONA ranks 33rd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

RIZONA has a population of 6.9 million people, and 5 percent live in one of Arizona’s 7 rural counties.

39.4 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 0.7 percent is Black/ African-American, 25 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 0.6 percent is Asian and 32.8 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native.

D

..

Arizona is one of three states to receive a grade of “D” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

year in a row, Arizona ranked last in the nation for its rural Accident Mortality rate (47th, F). The state also come in last place for rural Broadband Access (47th, F). The state's Dental Care Access ranking saw a substantial drop as well, from 17th (B) in 2017 to 27th (C-) in 2018.

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Arizona ranks 44th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Arizona is 21 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Mortality:

Down four spots nationally to 27th (23rd in 2017)

27

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 39th for 2018

39

Access to Care

Down one spot nationally to 42nd (41st in 2017)

42

RHQ

19 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

F 40/47 ARKANSAS ranks 40th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Arkansas is one of nine states to receive a failing grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

40

Mortality:

No change in national ranking of 40th for 2018

Quality of Life:

42 32

20

RHQ

20  RHQ

Down two spots nationally to 42nd (40th in 2017)

Access to Care: Up five spots nationally to 32nd (37th in 2017)

ARKANSAS

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

F Primary Care Access D+ F Mental Health Access F F Dental Care Access F F Broadband Access F + of states today more than “plus” orDa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate C50% women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access RKANSASeveryone has a population of 3 millionLIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception loses: people, and 38 percent live in one of FUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended Arkansas’s rural counties. pregnancies, more55 abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

A

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 78 percent of the state’s rural population is Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding This year’s report card14.4 also percent is Non-Hispanic White, Black/ “B-“ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to and “a growing African-American 5 percent is (California, Hispanic/ New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.4 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.5 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Arkansas isa18.9 and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, percent, compared with 16.2 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. RURAL COUNTIES mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, URBAN COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S GOOD the slippage on reproductive received a “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this(a year could see but one Quality of Life measure D- for Low MANY FACTORS The Natural State saw improvement in its Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED Birth Weight), Arkansas dropped seven spots 2018 Access toFOR Care ranking for rural counnational level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADE the ties, up five points to 32nd (D+), dueWalker largely to in warned that “Anational woman’sranking for self-reporrted in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR Mental Health (46, F). improvements in theSCORES state's rural Uninsured reproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND on where she lives, but Rate — 23rd (C+) in 2018, up from depend 31st (D+) and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY Arkansas it does, as women in manyalso dropped two positions yearin 2017. programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, the over-year for both Cancer Mortality (45, F) proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive healthMortality (40, F). Institute’s reportWORK card ranked and Stroke WHAT NEEDS care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four Arkansas slipped slightly in a number of other URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for categories in 2018 and dropped two final to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone is concerned spots for the year from 38th (D-) in 2017 to Arkansas ranks 24th out of 47who states for urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health 40th (F). rural difference of millions of women without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing mortality rate in rural Arkansas is 9 percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (02016 was, 2017 could be In100), addition to earning a failing inother all health higher than the rate as in urban counties. and care services. each state received a “core”grade a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

CALIFORNIA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

C

BC+ C+ BA

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

B+ AA F B

The poverty rate in rural California is 17.1 percent, compared with 14.3 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

15/47 CALIFORNIA ranks 15th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

ALIFORNIA has a population of 39 million people, and 2.1 percent live in one of California’s 21 rural counties.

73.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 1.4 percent is Black/African-American, 16.8 percent is Hispanic/Latino and 1.7 percent is Asian, 2.8 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native.

B

..

California is one of four states to receive a grade of “B” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

The Golden State saw no change in its final report card grade from 2017 to 2018 (B), but it did see significant improvements for several key indicators. California improved its rural Mortality rates for three of the leading causes of death in the U.S. — Heart Disease (+4, B), CLRD (+8, C-), and Stroke (+9, C) — and the state also saw improvements in its rural Uninsured Rate rank — 17th (B) in 2018, up from 28th (C-) in 2017.

WHAT NEEDS WORK

California also saw impressive improvements in self-reported Mental Health (+7, C+) and self-reported Physical Health (+9, B-) in rural counties.

California ranks 45th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural California is 25 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

California saw a modest decline in its rankings for rural Cancer Mortality (-3, B) and Accident Mortality (-3, D-) in 2018. Remarkably, California is also among those states with the poorest rural Broadband Access in the nation at 39th (F).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Down three spots nationally to 19th (16th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up three spots nationally to 14th (17th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up one spot nationally to 10th (11th in 2017)

19 14

10

RHQ

21 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

B+ 11/47 COLORADO ranks 11th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Colorado is one of three states to receive a grade of “B+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

3

23

14

22

RHQ

22  RHQ

Mortality:

No change in national ranking of 3rd for 2018

Quality of Life: Up two spots nationally to 23rd (25th in 2017)

Access to Care: Up three spots nationally to 14th (17th in 2017)

COLORADO

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A + Primary Care Access A B+ Mental Health Access BB+ Dental Care Access AA- Broadband Access Cstates today more than “plus” orDa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate C50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access OLORADOeveryone has a population of 5.5 ‘CHOOSE LIFE’ LICENSE to contraception loses: million people, and 12.7 percent live in PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one of more Colorado’s 47 rural ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, abortions, and counties. PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

C

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to 73.6 percent of the state’s rural population curtail access to contraceptive Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 1.3 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a growing African-American, 21.4 percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino and 1.4 percent is AmericanNew Indian/ Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Alaska Native and 0.7 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Colorado isa13.6 and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, percent, compared with 10.7 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. RURALnoted COUNTIES mandate. Walker that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, URBAN COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, yearrural could see MANY FACTORS the state slipped a bit but in itsthis stellar The Centennial State saw no changeUtah, in itsVirginia, final and and Wisconsin. unprecedented at the ACCOUNTED FOR ranking for rural Stroke Mortality (-4,setbacks A-). report card grade from 2017 to 2018 (B+), but national level, including cuts FAILING GRADE itALABAMA’S did see significant improvements in a couple Walker warned that “A woman’s in funding comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES Lowshould Birth Weight continues to for be cause for of key indicators. In 2018, Coloradoreproductive improved health not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND concern in but rural Colorado (36th, D-), and its rural mortality rank for CLRD (+10, B-), and depend on where she lives, and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY does, as women in many Mental Health (-4, B+) declined self-reported the state also saw a sharp decline initits rural programs which have been are Using eleven criteria, the 26th (C) inareas slightlyreduced in 2018 alongside the state's rural Uninsured Rate — ranked 2018, upexperiencing proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive Institute’s report card ranked Mentalhealth Health Access ranking (-2, B-). from 39th (F) in 2017. Colorado ranks second services including abortion.” the 50 theDiseasecare ineach theof nation forstates bothand Heart Mortality Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four and Cancer Mortality in rural counties. URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who isfor concerned WHAT NEEDS WORK Colorado ranks 3rd out of 47 states urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health rural difference of millions of women without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing Colorado lost considerable ground in 2018 in mortality rate in rural Connecticut is one percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0asurban 2016 was, 2017 could be its ranking rural Accident Mortality (-13, C-),health lower the rate in counties. and other care than services. 100), each for state received a “core” a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

CONNECTICUT All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

C

A+ A+ A A+ B

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

B A A+ A+ A+

90.2 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 1.4 percent is Black/African-American, 5.2 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 1.8 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural Connecticut is 6.8 percent, compared with 9.9 percent in urban areas of the state.

The Constitution State saw no change in its final report card grade from 2017 (A+), but climbed to 1st place in the national rankings from 3rd place in 2017, passing New Hamphire and Vermont to claim the top spot. The state's overall ranking for Quality of Life measures jumped six spots year over year to finish second in nation. Connecticut did see marked improvement in its ranking for self-reported Mental Health in 2018 (+10, A) and in its ranking for Accident Mortality (up 17 points from 2017 to 10th place overall (A). Connecticut also leads the nation in its rural health rankings for

1/47 CONNECTICUT ranks 1st in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

ONNECTICUT has a population of 3.5 million people, and 5.1 percent live in Connecticut’s one rural county.

WHAT’S GOOD

A+ Connecticut is one of three states to receive a grade of “A+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

General Health (A+), Stroke Mortality (A+) and Broadband Access (A+).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Connecticut faded in its 2018 ranking for rural Heart Disease Mortality (-3, A-) and for rural Cancer Mortality (-3, A-).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Connecticut ranks 8th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural Connecticut is one percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

No change in national ranking of 2nd for 2018

2

Quality of Life: Up six spots nationally to 2nd (8th in 2017)

2

Access to Care No change in national ranking of 4th for 2018

4

RHQ

23 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

D37/47 FLORIDA ranks 37th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Florida is one of three states to receive a grade of “D-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

32

Mortality:

Up two spots nationally to 32nd (34th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

37

Down three spots nationally to 37th (34th in 2017)

Access to Care:

46

24

RHQ

24  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 46th for 2018

FLORIDA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

D + Primary Care Access F F Mental Health Access D D Dental Care Access F F Broadband Access Dstates today more than “plus” orD a “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate F 50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access LORIDA haseveryone a population million LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception loses: of 20.6 people, and 3.4 percent live in one of FUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended Florida’smore 23 rural counties. pregnancies, abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

F

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 67.9 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 15 percent is“B-“ Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention toand “a growing African-American 14.3 percent is(California, Hispanic/ New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.5 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.6 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016:RURAL COUNTIES The poverty rate in rural Florida is 23 percent, and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, compared with 17.1 percent in urban areas ofArkansas, Florida, URBAN COUNTIES Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The Sunshine State saw a slight improvement in Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks ACCOUNTED FOR counties (-9, F) and at the its 2018 Mortality ranking for rural counties, up General Health in rural national level, including ALABAMA’S FAILING self-reported Physical Health (-8, F). The cuts two points to 32nd (D+),GRADE as well asWalker a strong warned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POORfor SCORES state's rank for Low Birth Weight also slipped jump in its ranking rural Stroke reproductive Mortality health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND in she 2018 (-2,but D). depend on where lives, (+8, B-). and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, the Florida's rural Uninsured Rate (45, F) remains WHAT NEEDS WORK proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive Institute’s report card ranked amonghealth the highest in the country. care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the For the second consecutive year, Florida Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four ranks last in the nation for Primary Care URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for Access in rural counties. Rural Dental Care to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who isfor concerned Access also declined considerably (-5 points ) Florida ranks 46th out of 47 states urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health to 46th overalland (F)access. in 2018. rural difference of millions of women without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, Based and rights. “As disappointing mortality rate in rural Florida is 29 percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (02016 was, 2017 could be Florida alsostate lost received ground in the rankings for health higher than the rate as in urban counties. and other care services. 100), each a “core” a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

GEORGIA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

G

DD CD F

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

D C+ F D+ F

65.5 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 25.8 percent is Black/ African-American, 6.4 percent is Hispanic/Latin, 0.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.8 percent is Asian.

WHAT’S GOOD The Peach State saw modest improvement in its 2018 Cancer Mortality ranking for rural counties — 34th (D) in 2018, up from 37th (D-) in 2017 — and in its ranking for Dental Care Access, up from 45th (F) in 2017 to 42nd (F) in 2018. Self-reported Mental Health also improved year over year (+5, C-).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Georgia saw little change in its national ranking overall in 2018, but most of the modest changes resulted in small declines in rank.

39/47 GEORGIA ranks 39th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

EORGIA has a population of 10 million people, and 17.2 percent live in one of Georgia’s 85 rural counties.

The poverty rate in rural Georgia is 22.1 percent, compared with 14.7 percent in urban areas of the state.

F

..

Georgia is one of nine states to receive a failing grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

Mortality:

Heart Disease Mortality dropped to 39th (F) from 37th (D-) in 2017. Self-reported Physical Health dropped one spot to 35th (D). Georgia also has one of the highest mortality rates in the country for Stroke (43rd, F) and is near the bottom for Low Birth Weight as well (43rd, F).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Georgia ranks 42nd out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Georgia is 19 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

No change in national ranking of 38th for 2018

38

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 38th for 2018

Access to Care

38

Up one spot nationally to 43rd (44th in 2017)

43

RHQ

25 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A 4/47 HAWAII ranks 4th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Hawaii is one of four states to receive a grade of “A” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

1

Mortality:

No change in national ranking of 1st for 2018

Quality of Life:

17

Down six spots nationally to 17th (11th in 2017)

Access to Care:

5

26

RHQ

26  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 5th for 2018

HAWAII

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A + Primary Care Access A B Mental Health Access A A- Dental Care Access A B Broadband Access A states today more than “plus” orCa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access AWAII haseveryone a population million LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception loses: of 1.5 people, and 18.9 percent live in one of PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended Hawaii’s 2 rural counties. pregnancies, more abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

H

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 30.6 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.6 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a growing African-American, 11.8 percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 24.7 percent is Asian and 10.5 Newpercent Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker is Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander. received an “A”. Washington) to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Hawaii is 12.9 and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, percent, compared with 8.5 percentAlabama, in urban Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. RURAL COUNTIES mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, URBAN COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. WHAT’S Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The Aloha State saw no change in itsUtah, finalVirginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FOR WHAT NEEDS WORK report card grade from 2017 (4th, A), but national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING Hawaii's ranking for ruralGRADE Stroke Mortality Walker warned that “A woman’s in its funding comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES Hawaii slipped a bit in 2018 for rankings for climbed an impressive 20 points to reproductive move from health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Quality of Life depend on where she lives, but measures. The state saw rural 42nd (F) to 22nd (C+). and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY rankings decline for General Health (-3, B), it does, as women in many programs which have been are experiencing reducedMental Health (-5, A-), and selfUsing eleven criteria, the self-reported Hawaii's All-Cause Mortality rankingareas for rural proven to be ineffective.” access health Institute’sleads report card ranked reported Physical Health (-10, B). Counties the nation (1st). Hawaii alsoto reproductive including abortion.” each of 50 CLRD states Mortality and the (1st) care leads forthe rural and services for Walker stressed that this Walker noted 19 states, District of Columbia on four Accident Mortality (1st). The state also performs that URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to well for rural Heart Disease Mortality (4th, A) “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: and rural Cancer Mortality (5th, A). anyone who isfor concerned Hawaii ranks 30th out of 47 states urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing Hawaii also earns straight A's for all Access mortality rate in rural Hawaii is 12 percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (02016 was, 2017 could be to Care measures in rural counties.and other health higher than the rate as in urban counties. care services. 100), each state received a “core” a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

IDAHO All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

I

B+ C BC+ B+

DAHO has a population of 1.7 million people, and 33.1 percent live in one of Idaho’s 33 rural counties.

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

..

B C B C+ F

Idaho is one of three states to receive a grade of “B-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

The poverty rate in rural Idaho is 16.5 percent, compared with 13.3 percent in urban areas of the state.

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

WHAT’S GOOD

The state also improved marginally in its rankings for Primary Care Access (+2, B-) and Mental Health Access (+2, C).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Idaho lost ground in 2018 in its rankings for rural Accident Mortality (-8, C) and rural Stroke

20/47 IDAHO ranks 20th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

81.8 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 0.4 percent is Black/ African-American, 13.8 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 1.3 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.9 percent is Asian.

The Gem State improved in all major report card category rankings in 2018 — Mortality, Quality of Life, and Access to Care — and Idaho saw significant improvement in its ranking for Heart Disease Mortality (+9, A) and selfreported Physical Health (+4, C+).

B-

Mortality:

Mortality (-7, C). Self-reported Mental Health rank also slipped in rural counties (-4, B-) Idaho received a failing grade for its rural UnInsured Rate in 2018, falling to 39th in the nation.

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Idaho ranks 7th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Idaho is one percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Up one spot nationally to 12th (13th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 18th (19th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up one spot nationally to 29th (30th in 2017)

12 18

29

RHQ

27 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

C27/47 ILLINOIS ranks 27th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Illinois is one of three states to receive a grade of “C-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

28

22

21

28

RHQ

28  RHQ

Mortality:

Up two spots nationally to 28th (30th in 2017)

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 22nd for 2018

Access to Care: Up one spot nationally to 21st (22nd in 2017)

ILLINOIS

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

C- Primary Care Access F B- Mental Health Access F B Dental Care Access D C Broadband Access C states today more than “plus” orC a+ “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access has aeveryone population of 12.8 million LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE toLLINOIS contraception loses: people, and 11.5 percent live in one ofFUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended Illinois’s 62more rural abortions, counties. and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

I

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 90.1 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s report card also isThis Non-Hispanic White, 3.8 percent is“B-“ Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to4“apercent growing African-American, is Hispanic/Latino, (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker and 0.6 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Illinois is 14.5 percent, and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, compared with 12.8 percent in urbanAlabama, areas of Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, the state. RURAL COUNTIES mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, URBAN COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. WHAT’S Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS WHAT NEEDS WORK The Prairie State saw real improvement its Utah, in Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FOR 2018 Heart Disease Mortality ranking for rural national level, including ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADE Illinois saw a drop in its national ranking for cuts Walker warned that “A woman’s counties — 27th (C-) in 2018, up from 30th (C-) inin funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES rural Stroke Mortality 2018 —from 25th (C) reproductive in 2017 — and in its All-Cause Mortality rank- health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND depend on where she lives, but in 2017 to 32nd (D+). The state's self-reported ing (+2, C-). and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many Physical Health ranking declined as well (-4, C). programs which have been are experiencing reduced Using eleven The state earned failing grades for rural access Illinois's ruralcriteria, Mentalthe Health Accessareas ranking proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health Institute’s report card ranked to both Primary and Mental Health Care. also improved (+3, F) alongside the state's care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the self-reported Mental Health in rural counties Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four year’s report card should be (+5, B). URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who isfor concerned Illinois also improved its already impressive Illinois ranks 35th out of 47 states urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health ranking for rural rate, moving rural difference of millions of women without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and Uninsured access. Based and rights. “As disappointing from (A-) in the nation 2017 to 6th (A) accessmortality rate in rural Illinois is 15 percent improved to contraception upon9th their composite scoresin(02016 was, 2017 could be in100), 2018. care services. each state received a “core” and other health higher than the rate as in urban counties. a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

INDIANA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

I

D CCC+ C

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

F D+ D D C

92.5 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 1.4 percent is Black/AfricanAmerican, 4.1 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 0.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.5 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural Indiana is 13.4 percent, compared with 14.3 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

The state also improved in its rural CLRD Mortality ranking (+3, D-).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Indiana continues to be among the lowest ranked states in the nation for rural access to Primary Care, placing 44th (F) in both 2017 and 2018, and the state's national ranking for rural Uninsured Rates actually fell in 2018 (25th, C).

29/47 INDIANA ranks 29th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

NDIANA has a population of 6.6 million people, and 22.1 percent live in one of Indiana’s 48 rural counties.

The Hoosier State improved in its 2018 rankings for self-reported Physical Health (+4, C+) and self-reported Mental Health (+3, C-) in rural counties.

CIndiana is one of three states to receive a grade of “C-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

Indiana also dropped in the rankings for rural Cancer Mortality (-2, D), rural Heart Disease Mortality (-4, D+) and for rural Stroke Mortality (-5, D-). The state's ranking for Mental Health Access in rural counties also fell in 2018 (-5, D+).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Indiana ranks 13th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Illinois is three percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

No change in national ranking of 33rd for 2018

33

Quality of Life: Down one spot nationally to 27th (26th in 2017)

27

Access to Care No change in national ranking of 34th for 2018

34 42 RHQ

29 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A8/47 IOWA ranks 8th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Iowa is one of four states to receive a grade of “A-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

14

5

Mortality:

Up one spot nationally to 14th (15th in 2017)

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 5th for 2018

Access to Care:

11 30

RHQ

30  RHQ

Down one spot nationally to 11th (10th in 2017)

IOWA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

B Primary Care Access BA Mental Health Access C+ A Dental Care Access C+ A + Broadband Access A states today more than “plus” orAa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access has a population 3.1 million people,LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE toOWA contraception everyone of loses: and 40.7 percent live in one of Iowa’s 78 FUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended rural counties. pregnancies, more abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

I

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 91.1 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 1.3 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 5.1growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.3 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.9 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Iowa is 23 apercent, RURAL COUNTIES the Affordable and eliminating Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, compared with 17.1 percent in urban areas ofArkansas, Florida, URBAN COUNTIES Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, WHAT NEEDS WORK health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The Hawkeye State ranks among the top Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Iowa saw a slight drop in its nationalsetbacks ranking for unprecedented at the ACCOUNTED FOR for General Health (6th, states in the nation Access to Care in 2018, including rural Primary national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING A), self-reported MentalGRADE Health (5th, A) and Walker warned that “A woman’s Care Access (-3, B-) and rural Mental Care in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR self-reported PhysicalSCORES Health (3rd, reproductive A+). health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Access (-1, C+). depend on where she lives, but and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many Iowa improved its Mortality rankings in 2018, programs which havealso been The state's rural Stroke Mortality ranking areas Using eleven criteria,Mortality the including its Cancer ranking forare ru-experiencing reduced proven to be ineffective.” dropped in 2018 (-5, B-). reproductive health Institute’s report card ranked ral counties — 19th (B-) in 2018, upaccess from to 24th care each the 50 (C) in of 2017. Thestates stateand alsothe improved itsservices CLRD including abortion.” Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of ranking Columbia onB). four URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Mortality (+3, year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: Iowa ranks 16th out of 47 states urban/ Iowa also earns high marks for rural Broadanyone whofor is concerned Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted about reproductive health band Access (6th, A) rural Low Birth Weight of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based mortality rate in rural Iowa is four and rights. “Aspercent disappointing (9th, A-) and the rural Uninsured Rate (7th, improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (02016 was, 2017 could be higher than the rate as in urban counties. A). care services. 100), each state received a “core” and other health a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

KANSAS All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

K

C C+ A A B

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

C+ F C BC

80.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 2.4 percent is Black/ African-American, 12.4 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 1.1 percent is Asian and 0.8 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native.

..

The poverty rate in rural Kansas is 23 percent, compared with 17.1 percent in urban areas of the state.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

WHAT NEEDS WORK Kansas' overall Access to Care score dropped in

Kansas is one of three states to receive a grade of “C+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

WHAT’S GOOD

Kansas also improved its 2018 Mortality ranking (+1), including its Cancer Mortality ranking for rural counties (+4, C+), Accident Mortality (+10, B+) and Stroke Mortality (+3, C+).

22/47 KANSAS ranks 22nd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

ANSAS has a population of 2.9 million people, and 32.1 percent live in one of Kansas’s 86 rural counties.

The Sunflower State ranks among the top states in the nation for self-reported Physical Health (6th, A) and self-reported Mental Health (7th, A). The state's General Health rank also rose in 2018 (+5, C+), and its Low Birth Weight ranking improved, as well (+3, 14).

C+

Mortality:

2018 (-4, C-). The state's rural Mental Health Access ranks among the lowest in the nation, and rural Dental Care Access also declined slightly in 2018 (-1, C). The state's rural CLRD Mortality ranking remains unchanged at 30th (D+).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Kansas ranks 25th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Kansas is 10 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Up one spot nationally to 26th (27th in 2017)

26

Quality of Life:

8

Up four spots nationally to 8th (12th in 2017)

Access to Care

Down four spots nationally to 27th (23rd in 2017)

27 RHQ

31 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

F 42/47 KENTUCKY ranks 42nd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Kentucky is one of nine states to receive a grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

47

Down one spot nationally to 47th (46th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

41

18

32

RHQ

32  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 41st for 2018

Access to Care: Up nine spots nationally to 18th (27th in 2017)

KENTUCKY

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

F Primary Care Access C F Mental Health Access C F Dental Care Access C F Broadband Access C states today more than “plus” orFa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A-50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ENTUCKY has a population 4.4 millionLIFE’ LICENSE to contraception everyone loses: of ‘CHOOSE people, and 41.3 percent live in one of FUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended Kentucky’s 85abortions, rural counties. pregnancies, more and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

K

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 92.7 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 3.4 percent “B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention toand “a growing African-American 1.8 percent is(California, Hispanic/ New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.4 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received RURAL COUNTIES serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Kentucky isa 23.6 URBAN COUNTIES and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, percent, compared with 14.9 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, received Tennessee,failing Texas,grades for rural Heart level, F), butrural this year could see MANY FACTORS The Bluegrass State saw significant improveMortality (42nd, Accident Utah, Virginia, Disease and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FOR ment in its overall Access to Care ranking in Mortality (44th, F) and rural Stroke Mortality national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING 2018 (+9, B-) due largelyGRADE to it's improved rural Walker warned (39th, that “AF). woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR Uninsured Rate (+11,SCORES A-). reproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND depend on where she lives,also but earned failing grades for rural Kentucky and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many General Health (42nd,programs F), self-reported Mental WHAT NEEDS WORK which have been areas are experiencing Using eleven criteria, the Health reduced (40th, F), self-reported Health proven toPhysical be ineffective. ” access health Institute’sfell report cardplace ranked (45th, F) and Low Birth Weight (39th, F). Kentucky to last in the nation in to reproductive care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the 2018 for rural All-Cause Mortality (47th, F) Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four and earned low marks for all Quality of Life year’s report card should be URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for measures. to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone is concerned Kentucky ranks 39th out of 47who states for urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health The state ranks last in theBased nation forofrural Can-of women rural difference millions without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and access. and rights. “As disappointing cer Mortality (47th, F) and rural Mortality mortality rate in rural Kentucky is 18 percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0- CLRD 2016 was, 2017 could be (47th, in both anda2018, it other health higher than the rate as in urban counties. care services. 100), F) each state 2017 received “core”andand a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

LOUISIANA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

L

F F DDF

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

F

F F F F F

45/47 LOUISIANA ranks 45th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

OUISIANA has a population of 4.7 million people, and 16.2 percent live in one of Louisiana’s 29 rural counties.

62.5 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 31.4 percent is Black/ African-American, 2.9 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.8 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.6 percent is Asian. The poverty rate in rural Louisiana is 23 percent, compared with 17.1 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

..

Louisiana is one of nine states to receive a grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

RURAL PARISHES URBAN PARISHES

The Pelican State saw a slight improvement in national ranking in all major categories in 2018, including Mortality (43rd, +2), Quality of Life (43rd, +3), and Access to Care (44th, +1).

Louisiana's score for rural CLRD Mortality also fell significantly (33rd, -7) rural Accident Mortality (30th, -8), and rural Cancer Mortality (44th, -3).

Louisiana saw significant improvements in rural General Health (+4, F), self-reported Mental Health (+5, F), and self-reported Physical Health (+5, F).

The state also is amoung the lowest ranked states for rural Uninsured Rate (40th, F) and rural Broadband Access (45th, F).

WHAT NEEDS WORK The state lost ground in the 2018 rankings for rural Heart Disease Mortality, placing last in the nation (47th, -1).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Louisiana ranks 34th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural Louisiana is 15 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Mortality:

43

Up two spots nationally to 43rd (45th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up three spots nationally to 43rd (46th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up one spot nationally to 44th (45th in 2017)

43

44

RHQ

33 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

B+ 13/47 MAINE ranks 13th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Maine is one of three states to receive a grade of “B+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

22

Mortality:

Up six spots nationally to 22nd (28th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

16 6

34

RHQ

34  RHQ

Down one spot nationally to 16th (15th in 2017)

Access to Care: No change in national ranking of 6th for 2018

MAINE

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

C+ Primary Care Access A+ B Mental Health Access A C+ Dental Care Access C+ B Broadband Access B + of states today more than “plus” orBa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate C50% women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access AINE has a population million LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone loses: of 1.3 people, and 40.8 percent live in oneFUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended of Maine’s 11 rural counties. pregnancies, more abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

M

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 95.3 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.5 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 1.2growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.8 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.6 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Maine is 15.1 percent, and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, compared with 11.7 percent in urban areas ofArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, the state. mandate. RURAL WalkerCOUNTIES noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, URBAN COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY The Pine FACTORS Tree State saw significant improvement Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks FOR inACCOUNTED its All-Cause Mortality rank in 2018 (+6, 22nd). were offset somewhat by a sharp decline in at the national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADE 2018 ranking for Accident Mortality Walker warned the thatstate's “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING SCORES Maine's scoresPOOR improved for rural CLRD reproductive health (-15,should D-). not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND depend (+4, on where she lives, but Mortality (+10, C), rural Cancer Mortality and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, in many D+), and rural Heart Disease Mortality (+2,as women Maine's rural Uninsured Rate ranking also programs which have been areas are experiencing Using eleven criteria, the B-). slippedreduced in 2018 fromproven 17th (B)toinbe2017 to 22nd ineffective. ” access to reproductive Institute’s report card ranked (C+) inhealth 2018. care services including abortion.” each ofalso the has 50 states and the Maine a strong Rural Broadband Walker stressed that this Walker 19 states, District of Columbia on four Access score for a state with so much ruralnoted that year’s report card should be URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to area (B+, 14th). “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who isfor concerned Maine ranks 20th out of 47 states urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health WHAT NEEDS WORK rural difference of millions of women without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing mortality rate in rural Maine is seven percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0asurban 2016 was, 2017 could be Gains madestate in other categories higher than the rate in counties. and other health care services. 100), each received a “core”of Mortality a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

MARYLAND All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

M

B BC+ B+ D

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

BA+ B A+ B

The poverty rate in rural Maryland is 14.2 percent, compared with 9.5 percent in urban areas of the state.

..

Maryland is one of four states to receive a grade of “B” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

WHAT’S GOOD The Old Line State saw a dramatic improvement in its rural Stroke Mortality numbers from 2017 (39th, F), up to 21st (C+, +18). Maryland also saw minor improvements in its rural rankings for General Health (+2, B-), selfreported Physical Health (+4, B+), and Primary Care (+1, B-) and Mental Health Access (+1, A+). Maryland's rural Broadband Access is among the best in the country (3rd, A+).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Maryland lost some ground in its 2018

17/47 MARYLAND ranks 17th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

ARYLAND has a population of 6 million people, and 2.5 percent live in one of Maryland’s 5 rural counties.

78.8 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 13.8 percent is Black/ African-American, 4.4 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.9 percent is Asian.

B

Quality of Life ranking (-2, C-) and maintained a low score for Low Birth Weight in rural counties (34th, D). Maryland also saw slight declines in rank for rural Heart Disease Mortality (-2, C+) Maryland's national ranking for rural Uninsured Rate slipped from 11th to 15th (B).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Maryland ranks 14th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Maryland is three percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Mortality:

16

Up one spot nationally to 16th (17th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Down two spots nationally to 29th (27th in 2017)

29

Access to Care No change in national ranking of 8th for 2018

8

RHQ

35 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A 6/47 MASSACHUSETTS ranks 6th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Massachusetts is one of four states to receive a grade of “A” for rural health in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

6 10

Down one spot nationally to 6th (5th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up three spots nationally to 10th (13th in 2017)

Access to Care:

3

36

RHQ

36  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 3rd for 2018

MASSACHUSETTS

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A Primary Care Access A A Mental Health Access A D Dental Care Access A B Broadband Access B+ + Uninsured + of states today more than “plus” orA a “minus” for factors Rate A50% women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ASSACHUSETTS has a population of LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone loses: 6.8 million people, and 1.4 percent PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended live in oneabortions, of Massachusetts’s 3 rural pregnancies, more and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS counties. PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

M

without an abortion provider.

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding This percent year’s report card also rural population 90.1 of the state’s “B-“ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, attention to “a growing isdraws Non-Hispanic White, 2.3 percent(California, is Black/ New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive African-American, 3.8 percent is Hispanic/ New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Latino, 0.3 percent is American Indian/Alaska Washington) received “A”. RURALan COUNTIES to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on received Native and 1.4 percent is Asian. The following states URBAN COUNTIES serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, The poverty rate in rural Massachusetts is 14.8 Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, percent, compared with 14.8 percent in urban mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, areas of the state. “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, Massachusetts has the rural Uninsured thelowest slippage on reproductive received a “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, Rate in the nation (1st, A+) has occurred at the state health WHAT’S GOOD South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FOR for rural Quality of Life The Bay State's scores WHAT NEEDS WORK national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING measures improved overGRADE 2017 (10th,Walker +3). The warned that “A woman’s inground fundinginfor comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES in rural state saw modest improvement General Massachusetts did lose rural Mortality reproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND depend on where she lives, but Health (5th, +2) and self-reported Physical Health rankings, including rural Cancer Mortality (-21, and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women many Mortality (-19, C), and Stroke (15th, +1) in 2018. C),in Accident programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, the Mortality (-6, B). proven to be ineffective.” access toinreproductive health Institute’s reportsaw card ranked improvement Massachusetts significant care services including abortion.” each ofLow the 50 states andranking the its rural Birth Weight in 2018 (+4, URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four A+). year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an action” Massachusetts ranks 15thurgent out ofcall 47 to states for for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: The state's rural Access to Care measures are anyone who is concerned urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageAffordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health among the best the country A+), and of women adjusted mortality rate in rural Massachusetts millions without affordability, andinaccess. Based (3rd, of and rights. “As disappointing itupon eventheir saw composite improvement in rural Dental Care is to four percent higher than the rate in urban improved access contraception scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be Access in 2018 +1). a “core” and other health counties. care services. 100), each state(5th, received a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

MICHIGAN All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

M

C C+ D+ D+ B

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

C+ B BD+ B+

The poverty rate in rural Michigan is 15.4 percent, compared with 14.9 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Great Lakes State saw some improvement in its rural Uninsured Rate in 2018 (+4, B+) and slight upticks in rank for rural Mental Health Access (+1, B) and Dental Care Access (+2, B-). Michigan maintains one of the best rural rankings for Accident Mortality in the nation (6th, A)

WHAT NEEDS WORK Michigan lost significant ground in 2018 in its rural rankings for both Mortality and Quality of Life measures. Michigan's scores dropped for most rural

24/47 MICHIGAN ranks 24th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

ICHIGAN has a population of 4.9 million people, and 18.1 percent live in one of Michigan’s 57 rural counties.

91.2 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 1.6 percent is Black/ African-American, 3.4 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 1.3 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.6 percent is Asian.

C

..

Michigan is one of three states to receive a grade of “C” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

Mortality categories, including Cancer Mortality (-2, C-), CLRD Mortality (-2, D+), Accident Mortality (-2, C) and Stroke Mortality (-8, C-). The state's rural Quality of Life Measures also slipped, particularly self-reported Mental Health (-7, D+) and self-reported Physical Health (-9, D+)

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Michigan ranks 5th out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Michigan is one percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Mortality:

Down three spots nationally to 24th (21st in 2017)

24

Quality of Life:

Down seven spots nationally to 25th (18th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up one spot nationally to 15th (16th in 2017)

25 15

RHQ

37 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A+ 3/47 MINNESOTA ranks 3rd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Minnesota is one of three states to receive a grade of “A+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

4

1

Mortality:

No change in national ranking of 4th for 2018

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 1st (2nd in 2017)

Access to Care:

7

38

RHQ

38  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 7th for 2018

MINNESOTA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A Primary Care Access AA Mental Health Access B A + Dental Care Access C+ A Broadband Access A+ Uninsured states today more than “plus” orA a “minus” for factors Rate A50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access INNESOTA has a loses: population of 5.5 LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone million people, and 22.4 percent liveFUND in PLATES ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one of Minnesota’s ruralORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS counties. pregnancies, more abortions,60 and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

M

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 89.6 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s report card also isThis Non-Hispanic White, 1.2 percent is“B-“ Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention toand “a growing African-American 4.5 percent is(California, Hispanic/ New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 2.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and RURAL COUNTIES program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 1 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on URBAN COUNTIES The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” The poverty rate in rural Minnesotaaisfailing 11.2 grade in 2016: and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, percent, compared with 9.5 percentAlabama, in urban Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The North Star State's overall rankingUtah, for rural Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FOR Quality of Life measures improved over 2017 national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S GRADE to place first inFAILING the nation. The stateWalker saw imwarned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING SCORESin 2018reproductive WHAT NEEDS WORK provement in POOR rural counties in General health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Health (4th, +2) self-reported Mentaldepend Healthon where she lives, but and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY Minnesota it does, (4th, as women in many lost a little ground in the 2018 (3rd, +1) and self-reported Physical Health programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, the rankings for rural Dental Care Access (-1, +3). proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive Institute’s report card ranked 21st). health each of thealso 50 states Minnesota leadsand the the nation forcare low services rural including abortion.” Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four Heart Disease Mortality (1st, A+), and showed URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to significant improvement in its rankings for “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: rural Cancer Mortality (+3, B+) and rural Minnesota ranks 19th out of 47 states for urban/ anyone who is concerned Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health Stroke Mortality (+5, B+). The state also rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing earned A's for rural CLRD Mortality (5th) and mortality rate in rural Minnesota is six percent improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (02016 counties. was, 2017 could be rural higher than the rate inasurban care services. 100), Accident each stateMortality received a(4th). “core” and other health a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

MISSISSIPPI All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

M

F F D D F

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

DCDF F

The poverty rate in rural Mississippi is 24.3 percent, compared with 16.8 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Magnolia State slightly improved its 2017 ranking for All-Cause Mortality (46th, +1), thanks in part to a significant jump in ranking for rural Accident Mortality (+4, D-). The state also saw improvement in rural Mental Health Access in 2018 (+4, C-) and slight upticks in rank for rural Primary Care Access (+1, D-) and Dental Care Access (+1, D-), as well as for self-reported Mental Health (+4, D) and selfreported Physical Health (+3, D)

WHAT NEEDS WORK Mississippi placed last in the nation for rural

47/47 MISSISSIPPI ranks 47th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

ISSISSIPPI has a population of 3 million people, and 53.9 percent live in one of Mississippi’s 65 rural counties.

56.7 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 38.9 percent is Black/ African-American, 2.4 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.6 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.5 percent is Asian.

F

..

Mississippi is one of nine states to receive a grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

health in both 2017 and 2018. The state also places last again for its rural Low Birth Weight ranking (47th) and its overall Quality of Life ranking (47th). Mississippi's rural Uninsured Rate rank plummeted in 2018 to 42nd (-9, F).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Mississippi ranks 28th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural Mississippi is 12 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

46

Up one spot nationally to 46th (47th in 2017)

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 47th for 2018

47

Access to Care Down two spots nationally to 41st (39th in 2017)

41 RHQ

39 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

D 35/47 MISSOURI ranks 35th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Missouri is one of three states to receive a grade of “D” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

36

Mortality:

Up one spot nationally to 36th (37th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

33

No change in national ranking of 33rd for 2018

Access to Care:

38 40

RHQ

40  RHQ

Down five spots nationally to 38th (33rd in 2017)

MISSOURI

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

D- Primary Care Access CD + Mental Health Access D F Dental Care Access F F Broadband Access F states today more than “plus” orCa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate D50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ISSOURIeveryone has a population of 6.1 LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception loses: million people, and 25.4 percent PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended live in oneabortions, of Missouri’s rural ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, more and 81 counties. PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

M

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding This percent year’s report card also rural population 90.7 of the state’s “B-“ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, attention to “a growing isdraws Non-Hispanic White, 3.3 percent(California, is Black/ New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive African-American, 2.9 percent is Hispanic/ New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Latino, 0.5 percent is American Indian/Alaska Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on Native and 0.6 percent is Asian. The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, The poverty rate in rural Missouri is 23 percent, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a compared with percent in urbanGeorgia, areas ofIdaho, Indiana, Kansas, mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in 17.1 the latest report RURALMissouri, COUNTIES Louisiana, Mississippi, the state. “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, URBAN COUNTIES the slippage on reproductive received a “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state WHAT’S GOOD South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FORsaw a little improvement The Show-Me State national including cuts FAILING GRADE Uninsured Rate ranking (-5, D) level, and an additional inALABAMA’S rural Mortality measures in 2018 Walker (+1, D-), warned that “A woman’s inrural funding for comprehensive INCLUDING small ranking drop in Mental Health including ruralPOOR Heart SCORES Disease Mortality (+1, reproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Access (-1,but D). she lives, 40th) and Stroke Mortality (+1, 33rd).depend on where and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced rankings also dipped for Cancer Using eleven criteria, the Health ranking Rural mortality The state's rural General also proven to be ineffective.” Institute’s report (-1, D-)health and CLRD (-1, F). improved slightlycard (+1,ranked 32nd), as didaccess self- to reproductive each of the 50 states and the reported Mental Health (+1, 39th) care and services rural including abortion.” Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four Primary Care Access (+1, 29th). URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: Missouri ranks 32nd out of 47who states for urban/ anyone is concerned WHAT NEEDS WORK Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing mortality rate in rural Missouri is 13 percent Missouri's to Care ranking dropped improved access to contraception upon their Access composite scores (02016 was, 2017 could be higher than the rate as in urban counties. five spots sharp declines the rural other health care services. 100), eachdue statetoreceived a “core” in and a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

MONTANA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

B+ B AB C+

AAA D D-

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

B 16/47

ONTANA has a population of 1 million people, and 64.7 percent live in one of Montana’s 51 rural counties.

M

MONTANA ranks 16th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

68.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 0.3 percent is Black/ African-American, 2.9 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 7.8 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.6 percent is Asian.

Montana is one of three states to receive a grade of “B” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

..

The poverty rate in rural Montana is 14.1 percent, compared with 11.9 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Treasure State improved significantly in its overall 2017 ranking and final grade for 2018, earning a B (16th) up from a B- (19th) in 2017. All-Cause Mortality in rural counties improved seven points for the year, (13th, B+), a fact reflected in improved rankings for rural Accident Mortality (+14, C+), Cancer Mortality (+7, A), Heart Disease Mortality (+3, A-), and Stroke Mortality (+4, A). The state's rural Dental Care Access rank also improved (+4, 6th), as did Primary Care Access (+2, 8th).

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

WHAT NEEDS WORK Montana remains among the states with the highest rural Uninsured Rate ranking (38th out of 47) and rural Broadband Access in the state needs further development (35th, D).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Montana ranks 1st out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. In fact, the ageadjusted mortality rate in rural Montana is 3 percent lower than the rate in urban counties. Montana is one of only three states with a negative urban/rural difference.

.

Up seven spots nationally to 13th (20th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 13th (14th in 2017)

13

13

Access to Care

Down three spots nationally to 23rd (20th in 2017)

23

RHQ

41 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A10/47 NEBRASKA ranks 10th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Nebraska is one of three states to receive a grade of “A-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

9

Mortality:

Up three spots nationally to 9th (12th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

4

Down one spot nationally to 4th (3rd in 2017)

Access to Care:

17 42

RHQ

42  RHQ

Down three spots nationally to 17th (14th in 2017)

NEBRASKA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A- Primary Care Access B B+ Mental Health Access DA Dental Care Access B+ A Broadband Access C+ + of states today more than “plus” orAa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate C50% women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access EBRASKAeveryone has a population of 1.9 ‘CHOOSE LIFE’ LICENSE to contraception loses: million people, and 35 percent live in PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one ofmore Nebraska’s 80and rural counties. ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, abortions, PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

N

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 86.6 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.8 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 9.4growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 1.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.6 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” RURAL COUNTIES a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Nebraska is 23 percent, and eliminating theCOUNTIES Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, URBAN compared with 17.1 percent in urbanAlabama, areas of Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, WHAT Missouri, NEEDS WORK “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, Nebraska lost a littlehealth ground the 2018at the state hasinoccurred South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, rankings for Access to Care rural counties level, butinthis year could see MANY FACTORS The Cornhusker State's overall ranking for Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks (-3, 17th), including rural Dental Care Accessat the ACCOUNTED rural All-Cause FOR Mortality climbed three spots level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING and Mentalnational Health Access (-5, 37th). over 2017 (12th) to 9th inGRADE the nation.Walker The state warned (-2, that11th) “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR saw improvement in SCORES rural Heart Disease reproductive health should not in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Nebraska's ranking sex for education its rural Uninsured depend she lives, but Mortality (+6, B+), CLRD Mortality (+8, B), on where and a return to only AFFORDABILITY Rate plunged eight points to 21st inabstinence the it does, in many Accident Mortality (+3, A) and Stroke Mor-as women programs which have been country. are experiencing reduced Using(+4, eleven criteria, thealso earned areas tality A). The state A's for proven to be ineffective.” to reproductive health Institute’s card (5th) ranked rural CLRDreport Mortality and rural access Accident care services including abortion.” DIVIDE each of the 50 states and the URBAN-RURAL Mortality (4th). Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to Nebraska ranks 11th“an outurgent of 47 states Nebraska is also among the top states in the call to for action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: urban/rural difference in mortality. The agenation for self-reported Mental Health (4th, anyone who is concerned Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, adjusted mortality rate in rural Nebraska is about reproductive health A), self-reported Health (5th, and of women ofA), millions without affordability, andPhysical access. Based and rights. “Asindisappointing two percent higher than the rate urban Low Birth Weight (8th, A-) in rural counties in improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be counties. 2018. care services. 100), each state received a “core” and other health a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

NEVADA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

N

CCD+ D D+

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

F F D+ C D+

The poverty rate in rural Nevada is 13.5 percent, compared with 13.8 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Silver State improved on its 2017 ranking for Access to Care in rural counties (+3, 39th), but it still earned a failing grade. Rural Dental Care Access improved a bit in its ranking (+2, 30th), and the state's rural Uninsured Rate ranking made real progress, climbing seven points to 30th (D+) in the nation. Nevada also improved in its rankings for rural Accident Mortality (+7, C+) and Stroke Mortality (+11, A).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Nevada saw the sharpest declines in 2018 in

30/47 NEVADA ranks 30th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

EVADA has a population of 2.9 million people, and 9.3 percent live in one of Nevada’s 13 rural counties.

74.6 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 1.4 percent is Black/ African-American, 16.8 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 3.4 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 1.3 percent is Asian.

D+

..

Nevada is one of three states to receive a grade of “D+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

Rural All-Cause Mortality (-4). Heart Disease Mortality (37th, D-) lost six points year over year, and rural CLRD Mortality slipped from 43rd (F) in 2017 to 45th (F) in 2018. Rural Access to Primary Care (45th, F) and Mental Health (47th, F) remain among the worst in the country.

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Nevada ranks 21st out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Nevada is eight percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Mortality:

Down four spots nationally to 29th (25th in 2017)

29

Quality of Life: Down one spot nationally to 31st (30th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up three spots nationally to 39th (42nd in 2017)

31 39

RHQ

43 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A+ 2/47 NEW HAMPSHIRE ranks 2nd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. New Hampshire is one of three states to receive a grade of “A+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

11

Down four spots nationally to 11th (7th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

12 1

44

RHQ

44  RHQ

Down two spots nationally to 12th (10th in 2017)

Access to Care: No change in national ranking of 1st for 2018

NEW HAMPSHIRE

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

B+ Primary Care Access A+ A + Mental Health Access A+ B- Dental Care Access A+ A- Broadband Access A states today more than “plus” orB a “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate B50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access EW HAMPSHIRE a population of LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyonehas loses: 1.3 million people, and 37.2 percent live in PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one of more New Hampshire’s 7 ruralORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS counties. pregnancies, abortions, and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

N

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 94.1 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.8 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 1.7growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 1.5 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural New Hampshire is 9.2 and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, percent, compared with 6.2 percentAlabama, in urban Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. RURAL COUNTIES mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, URBAN COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S GOOD the slippage on reproductive received a “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but thisMortality year could see MANY FACTORS Mortality (-2, B+) and Accident (-1, The Granite State leads the nation for Access to Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FOR (1st, A+) with A's across B-). Care in rural counties national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S GRADE the board in allFAILING categories except Uninsured Walker warned that “A woman’s indropped funding afor comprehensive INCLUDING SCORES New Hampshire also spot in the Rate (16th, B).POOR New Hampshire takes the reproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND 2018 depend on where sherankings lives, but for self-reported Physical Health number one spot for rural Primary Care Access and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does,Care as women inA-) many (9th, and Low Birth Weight (16th, B) in rural and Mental Health Access. Rural Dental programs which have been areasAccess are experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, counties. Access ranks third, andthe Rural Broadband proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health isInstitute’s fifth. report card ranked care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four WHAT NEEDS WORK year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to New Hampshire ranks out call of 47 “an12th urgent to states action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyoneinwho is concerned for urban/rural difference mortality. The New Hampshire lost substantial ground in the Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health age-adjusted 2018 rankingsand for access. rural Heart DiseaseofMortality millions of women without mortality rate in rural New affordability, Based and rights. “Asthan disappointing is two percent higher the (-5, B+)their and composite Cancer Mortality, (-8, C).improved The stateaccessHampshire to contraception upon scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be rate inservices. urban counties. also a bitreceived in the rankings CLRD other health care 100),slipped each state a “core” forand a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

NEW MEXICO All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

N

D+ F D+ DD

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

C+ B+ D+ F D+

38.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 1.8 percent is Black/ African-American, 45.3 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 11.6 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.8 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural New Mexico is 23.3 percent, compared with 18.1 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

New Mexico also improved its Quality of Life ranking (+1, 35th) with a better score for Low Birth Weight in rural counties (+3, D).

WHAT NEEDS WORK New Mexico's All-Cause Mortality score dropped in 2018 (-1, 30th). The states rural Heart Disease Mortality ranking declined nine points (26th, C), CLRD Mortality fell 12 points

31/47 NEW MEXICO ranks 31st in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

EW MEXICO has a population of 2.1 million people, and 33.3 percent live in one of New Mexico’s 26 rural counties.

The Land of Enchantment improved on its 2017 ranking for Access to Care in rural counties (+1, 30th) thanks in part to an improved ranking for its rural Uninsured Rate (+8, 32nd).

D+ New Mexico is one of three states to receive a grade of “D+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

(32nd, D+), and Stroke Mortality fell 14 points (17th, B). The state's ranking for Dental Care Access also declined in 2018 (-6, 32nd), as did rural Primary Care Access (-2, 23rd) and Mental Health Access (-1, 13th).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE New Mexico ranks 41st out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural New Mexico is 19 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

Down one spot nationally to 30th (29th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 35th (36th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up one spot nationally to 30th (31st in 2017)

30 35

30

RHQ

45 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

B19/47 NEW YORK ranks 19th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. New York is one of three states to receive a grade of “B-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

17

Mortality:

Up two spot nationally to 17th (19th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

24

Down one spot nationally to 24th (23rd in 2017)

Access to Care:

13 46

RHQ

46  RHQ

Down one spot nationally to 13th (12th in 2017)

NEW YORK

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

B Primary Care Access CC Mental Health Access AC Dental Care Access CC- Broadband Access Astates today more than “plus” orBa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A-50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access EW YORKeveryone has a population of 19.7 LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception loses: million people, and 7 percent live inFUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended one ofmore Newabortions, York’s 24and rural counties. ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

N

without an abortion provider.

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 89.8 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 2.9 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 4.1growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.7 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.9 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural New York isa 15.5 Alabama, which received an “F”, RURAL COUNTIESand eliminating the Affordable Alabama, percent, compared with 14.7 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, was one of 20 states receiving a URBAN COUNTIESCare Act’s no-cost birth control Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas of the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has(-1), occurred at the state slipped a bit for rural counties with notable South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could MANY FACTORS drops for rural General Health (-7, 24th), self-see The Empire State improved its ranking in Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FORMortality in rural counties reported Mental Health (-10 36th) and Physical 2018 for All-Cause national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S GRADEprogress Health (-4, 27th). (17th, +2) and FAILING saw particular in Walker warned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING its ranking forPOOR HeartSCORES Disease Mortality (+6, health should not reproductive sex education in theranking schools IN PREVENTION AND New rural Mental Health Access depend on where sheYork's lives, but C-). The state also saw slight improvements and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY does, in dropped many also a bit (-2, A-), as did the state's in rank for rural CLRD Mortality (+1,itB-) andas women programs which have been are experiencing reduced Rate ranking (-1, A-). Using eleven criteria, rural Uninsured Stroke Mortality (+1, the A). New York'sareas ranking proven to be ineffective.” to reproductive health Institute’s report card rankedremainsaccess for rural Accident Mortality among abortion.” each of the 50 states the best in the nationand (3rd,the A+), and care Newservices York including URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four is among the top ten states for rural Broadyear’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to band Access and rural Mental Health Access. New York ranks 43rd outurgent of 47 states “an call to for action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who is concerned urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageAffordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health adjusted mortality rate in rural New York WHAT NEEDS WORK of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based “As in disappointing is to 20contraception percent higherand thanrights. the rate urban improved access upon their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be counties. New 2018received Qualityaof“core” Life ranking and other health care services. 100),York's each state a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

NORTH CAROLINA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

D D DD+ F

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

D+ BD B+ D-

N

D 34/47

ORTH CAROLINA has a population of 10.1 million people, and 21.7 percent live in one of North Carolina’s 54 rural counties.

NORTH CAROLINA ranks 34th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

64.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 21.8 percent is Black/ African-American, 7.2 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 3.5 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.7 percent is Asian.

North Carolina is one of three states to receive a grade of “D” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

The poverty rate in rural North Carolina is 19.2 percent, compared with 14.3 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Tar Heel State saw slight improvement in 2018 in its rankings for rural Primary Care Access (+1, D+) and rural Dental Care Access (+2. D). The state also slightly improved its ranking for rural Heart Disease Mortality (+2, C).

WHAT NEEDS WORK North Carolina lost considerable ground in 2018 in other Mortality categories, including rural CLRD Mortality (-7, C), Cancer Mortality (-2, C-), Accident Mortality (-5, D+) and Stroke

..

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

Mortality (-5, D-). North Carolina's Low Birth Weight score for rural counties continues to be cause for concern, falling to 42nd in the nation (F). The states rural Uninsured Rate score also slipped in 2018 (-2, D-).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE North Carolina ranks 29th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural North Carolina is 12 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

Mortality:

Down three spots nationally to 34th (31st in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 36th (37th in 2017)

34 36

Access to Care No change in national ranking of 35th for 2018

35

RHQ

47 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A 7/47 NORTH DAKOTA ranks 7th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. North Dakota is one of four states to receive a grade of “A” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

7

3

Mortality:

Up two spots nationally to 7th (9th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 3rd (4th in 2017)

Access to Care:

22 48

RHQ

48  RHQ

Down four spots nationally to 22nd (18th in 2017)

NORTH DAKOTA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A Primary Care Access D+ A- Mental Health Access C+ A + Dental Care Access B A + Broadband Access A states today more than “plus” orAa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate B-50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ORTH DAKOTA hasloses: a population of LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone 758,000 people, and 50.1 percent live PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended in one more of North Dakota’sand 47 rural counties. ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, abortions, PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

N

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 85.9 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 1.1 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 3.2growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 7.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.6 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing The poverty rate in rural North Dakota is 9.9grade in 2016: and eliminating Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, RURALthe COUNTIES Alabama, percent, compared with 11.6 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a URBAN COUNTIES Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT NEEDS WORK WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, North Dakota lost ground in 2018 in rural level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The Peace Garden State improved inUtah, 2018 Virginia, in and Wisconsin. Stroke Mortality (-9, B), and droppedsetbacks four spots unprecedented at the ACCOUNTED FORAll-Cause Mortality (+2, its ranking for rural in rural Access to Care measures (22nd, C+). national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S GRADE A), and jumpedFAILING in rank for rural Heart Disease Walker warned that “A woman’s funding for for both comprehensive INCLUDING SCORES The should state slipped oneinposition rural Mortality (+8, POOR A), Cancer Mortality (+9, A), reproductive health not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Primary Care depend on where she lives, butAccess (32nd, D+) and Mental CLRD Mortality (+5, A+) and Accident Mortaland The a return abstinence only AFFORDABILITY Health Access (21st, C+). ruraltoUninsured it does, as women in many ity (+5, A-). programs which have been Rate rank fell eight points to 18th in the nation (B-). areas are experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, the proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health Institute’s report card North Dakota leads theranked nation in its rural ranking abortion.” DIVIDE each of the 50 states andHealth the (1st, care URBAN-RURAL for self-reported Mental A+), services ranks including Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four second for self-reported Physical Health and year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to North Dakota ranks 9th of 47call states for for earns A's in both rural General Health (8th) and “anout urgent to action” to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: urban/rural difference in mortality. The agerural Low Birth Weight (10th). anyone who is concerned Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health adjusted mortality rate in rural North Dakota of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based andthan rights. “As disappointing is two percent higher the rate in urban North Dakota is among the top states for rural improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be counties. Broadband Access (4th, A). 100), each state received a “core” and other health care services. a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

OHIO All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

O

D CC CC+

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

DD+ DB B

93.1 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 2 percent is Black/ African-American, 2.5 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.5 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural Ohio is 14.3 percent, compared with 14.6 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

Rural Broadband Access in Ohio is ranked a respectable 17th in the nation (B).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Ohio's 2018 Mortality ranking fell three spots in 2018. While the state's rural Heart Disease Mortality ranking improved slightly (+1, D), the Cancer Mortality rank for rural areas fell five points (35th, D), Accident Mortality fell

28/47 OHIO ranks 28th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

HIO has a population of 11.6 million people, and 20.3 percent live in one of Ohio’s 50 rural counties.

The Buckeye State improved its ranking in 2018 for Access to Care in rural counties (25th, +1) and saw a slight uptick in its rural Uninsured Rate ranking (14th, +1).

COhio is one of three states to receive a grade of “C-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

10 points (35th, D) and Stroke Mortality fell seven points (34th, D). Ohio's rural CLRD Mortality ranking held steady at 35th (D). Primary Care Access in rural Ohio remains well below average (36th, D-), as does Dental Care Access (36th, D-).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

Ohio ranks 18th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Ohio is five percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

Down three spots nationally to 35th (32nd in 2017)

35

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 28th for 2018

Access to Care

28

Up one spot nationally to 25th (26th in 2017)

25

RHQ

49 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

F 41/47 OKLAHOMA ranks 41st in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Oklahoma is one of nine states to receive a grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

42 34

No change in national ranking of 42nd for 2018

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 34th (35th in 2017)

Access to Care:

45 50

RHQ

50  RHQ

Down two spots nationally to 45th (43rd in 2017)

OKLAHOMA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

F Primary Care Access F D Mental Health Access DF Dental Care Access C F Broadband Access F states today more than “plus” orC a “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate F 50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access KLAHOMA has a population of 3.9 LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone loses: million people, and 34.3 percent liveFUND in PLATES ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one ofmore Oklahoma’s rural counties. ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, abortions,59and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

O

without an abortion provider.

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 69.8 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 3.3 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a African-American, 7.7growing percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 10.5 percent is American Indian/ New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Alaska Native and 0.8 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received RURAL COUNTIES serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” 2016: COUNTIES The poverty rate in rural Oklahoma aisfailing 19 grade in URBAN and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, percent, compared with 15 percentAlabama, in urban Arkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level,Access but this year could and rural Mental Health (-1, 36th). Thesee MANY FACTORS The Sooner State saw some improvement Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the FOR for rural Quality of Life state also saw declines in ranking for rural selfinACCOUNTED 2018 in its ranking national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADE reported Mental Health (-7, 42nd). measures (+1, D), including rural General Walker warned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING SCORES Health (+4, D) POOR and rural Low Birth Weight (+4. health should not reproductive sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Oklahoma depend on where she lives, also but earned failing grades for its C). a return AFFORDABILITY rural Uninsured Rateand ranking (44th,toF)abstinence and for only it does, as women in many programs which have been are experiencing reduced Access (40th, F). Using eleven the improvedareas rural Broadband The state also criteria, significantly its ranking proven to be ineffective.” access Institute’s reportMortality card ranked for rural Cancer (+4, F) and ruralto reproductive health care services including abortion.” each ofMortality the 50 states Stroke (+2, and D). the URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an to action” for WHAT NEEDS WORK Oklahoma ranks 31st outurgent of 47 call states for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who is concerned urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageAffordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health Oklahoma lostand ground in Based 2018 in its rankings forof women adjusted mortality rate in rural Oklahoma of millions without affordability, access. and rights. “As disappointing rural to Care measures (-2, F), improved including accessis to 13contraception percent higher than the rate in urban uponAccess their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be both Care Access 40th) counties. other health care services. 100),rural each Primary state received a “core” (-2,and a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

OREGON All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

O

C+ C DC B+

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

ACAB B-

80.6 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 0.5 percent is Black/ African-American, 12.5 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 2.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.9 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural Oregon is 15.4 percent, compared with 13 percent in urban areas of the state.

The Beaver State strongly improved on its 2017 ranking for rural All-Cause Mortality (+5), Quality of Life (+3) and Access to Care (+3). Oregon is tied with Washington for most improved state in RHQ's 2018 U.S. Rural Health Report Card. Oregon made significant gains in its rankings for rural Cancer Mortality (+2, D+), CLRD Mortality (+5, C-), Accident Mortality (+15, B) and Stroke Mortality (+5, C-). The state also improved in rank for General Health (+5, C), self-reported Mental Health (+5, D-) and self-reported Physical Health (+10, C).

21/47 OREGON ranks 21st in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

REGON has a population of 4 million people, and 16.2 percent live in one of Oregon’s 23 rural counties.

WHAT’S GOOD

C+ Oregon is one of three states to receive a grade of “C+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

Oregon's rural Uninsured Rate ranking improved seven points to 20th in the nation (B+).

WHAT NEEDS WORK Oregon slipped significantly in the 2018 rankings for rural Heart Disease Mortality (-5, B+) and in rural Dental Care Access (-5, A-).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Oregon ranks 33rd out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Oregon is 14 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

21

Up five spots nationally to 21st (26th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up three spots nationally to 26th (29th in 2017)

Access to Care

Up three spots nationally to 12th (15th in 2017)

26

12

RHQ

51 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

C 25/47 PENNSYLVANIA ranks 25th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Pennsylvania is one of three states to receive a grade of “C” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

25

Down one spot nationally to 25th (24th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

21

Down one spot nationally to 21st (20th in 2017)

Access to Care:

20 52

RHQ

52  RHQ

Down one spot nationally to 20th (19th in 2017)

PENNSYLVANIA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

C Primary Care Access CB Mental Health Access B C- Dental Care Access CB- Broadband Access B+ of states today more than “plus” orBa “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate B50% women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ENNSYLVANIA has aloses: population of 12.8 LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone million people, and 11.5 percent live PLATESinFUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one of Pennsylvania’s rural ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS counties. pregnancies, more abortions,30 and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

P

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 94 percent of the state’s rural population is Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding This year’s report card2.2 alsopercent is“B-“ Non-Hispanic White, Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a growing is Hispanic/ African-American, 2 percent (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.5 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing The poverty rate in rural Pennsylvania is 13.8grade in 2016: and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, Florida, RURAL COUNTIES percent, compared with 12.8 percent in urbanArkansas, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, URBAN COUNTIES areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, -1), but Quality this yearofcould MANY FACTORS including Mortality (25th, Life see The Keystone State improved significantly Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. setbacks at the FOR for rural CLRD Mortality (21st, -1), and Accessunprecedented to Care (20th, -1). inACCOUNTED 2018 in its rankings national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING (+7, A-) and rural Stroke GRADE Mortality (+3, B). warned that “A woman’s Walker in funding INCLUDING POOR SCORES Pennsylvania's largest declinesfor in comprehensive rural rankreproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND ingshe were depend in on where lives,for butHeart Disease Mortality (-5, The state also saw slight improvements and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY does, many Mortality (-5, D) self-reported D),inAccident rank for rural General Health (+1,itB) andas women programs which have been UsingLow eleven criteria, the (+1, B-). areas are experiencing Mentalreduced Health (-5, C-) and Physical Health rural Birth Weight proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health Institute’s report card ranked (-4, B-). care services eachrural of the 50 states and The Uninsured Ratethe in Pennsylvania is including abortion.” Walker stressed that this Walker noted 19 states, District of Columbia on four ranked a respectable 13th in the nation (B+). that URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone concerned Pennsylvania ranks 17th out who of 47is states for WHAT NEEDS WORK Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health urban/rural of millions of women withoutdifference in mortality. The ageaffordability, and access. Based rights. “As disappointing mortality rateand in rural Pennsylvania is five Pennsylvania saw a slight decline nationalaccessadjusted to contraception upon their composite scores (0- inimproved as 2016 was, 2017 could be percent higher than the rate in urban counties. rankings instate all major categories and other health care services. 100), each received a “core” in 2018, a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

SOUTH CAROLINA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

F DF DF

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

D DF DD

F 43/47

OUTH CAROLINA has a population of 4.8 million people, and 23.7 percent live in one of South Carolina‘s 20 rural counties.

S

SOUTH CAROLINA ranks 43rd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

54.2 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 39.9 percent is Black/ African-American, 3.5 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.5 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.5 percent is Asian.

South Carolina is one of nine states to receive a grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

..

The poverty rate in rural South Carolina is 20.4 percent, compared with 14.4 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD The Palmetto State saw slight improvement in 2018 in its rankings for rural Cancer Mortality (+2, D-), rural Heart Disease Mortality (+1, D-). and overall Access to Care (+1, D-).

WHAT NEEDS WORK South Carolina earned a failing grade for rural All-Cause Mortality in both 2017 and 2018. Rural Stroke Mortality in the state again ranks among the worst in the country (45th, F), and the state saw declines in ranking for rural CLRD Mortality (-3, C+) and rural Accident Mortality (-1, C-).

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

The state also saw declines in ranking for rural General Health (-2, D-) as well as in rural access to Primary Care (-1, D), Mental Health (-2, D-) and Dental Care (-1, F). South Carolina's low rural ranking for Low Birth Weight remains a cause for concern (46th, F).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE South Carolina ranks 36th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural South Carolina is 15 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

No change in national ranking of 39th for 2018

39

Quality of Life: No change in national ranking of 45th for 2018

Access to Care

Up one spot nationally to 37th (38th in 2017)

45 37

RHQ

53 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

B 14/47 SOUTH DAKOTA ranks 14th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. South Dakota is one of four states to receive a grade of “B” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

18

No change in national ranking of 18th for 2018

Quality of Life:

6

Down five spots nationally to 6th (1st in 2017)

Access to Care:

26 54

RHQ

54  RHQ

Down five spots nationally to 26th (21st in 2017)

SOUTH DAKOTA

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

B- Primary Care Access B A- Mental Health Access B A + Dental Care Access BA Broadband Access B+ states today more than “plus” orA a “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate C-50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access OUTH DAKOTA has loses: a population of ‘CHOOSE LIFE’ LICENSE to contraception everyone 865,000 people, and 51.9 percent live in PLATES FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended one of South Dakota’s 58 ruralORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS counties. pregnancies, more abortions, and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

S

without an abortion provider.

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 80.9 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.7 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a2.6 growing African-American, percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 12.6 percent is American Indian/ New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Alaska Native and 1.1 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural South Dakota is 15.3 RURAL COUNTIES and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Florida, percent, compared with 11 percentAlabama, in urban Arkansas,URBAN COUNTIES Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas of the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, measures. The state's ranking rural Stroke health has for occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level,and butthe thisranking year could Mortality fell 17 points, for see MANY FACTORS The Mount Rushmore State's rankingUtah, for rural Virginia, and Wisconsin. ACCOUNTED rural Uninsured Rateunprecedented fell 10 points.setbacks at the Uninsured RateFOR improved considerably in 2018, national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S GRADE rising 10 pointsFAILING from 2017 to 29th (C-). Southwarned that “A woman’s Walker in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES South Dakota also declined significantly in the Dakota also improved its rural rankingreproductive for Mental health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND depend on whererural she rankings lives, but for Cancer Mortality (-7, 18th), Health Access (+9, A+) and Dental Care Access and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY Accident does, as women in manyMortality (-8, 32nd) and Stroke (+3, B-). The state's ranking for ruralit CLRD programs which have been areas reduced Using eleven the in 2018 (+5, Mortality (-16, 30th). Mortality alsocriteria, improved A-).are experiencing proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health Institute’s report card ranked care services including abortion.” each of the 50isstates and South Dakota among thethe top performing Walker stressed that this URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE District of Columbia on four states for rural Low Birth Weight (7th,Walker A). noted that 19 states, year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an to action” South Dakota ranks 37thurgent out of call 47 states for for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who is concerned WHAT NEEDS WORK urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageAffordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health adjusted mortality rate in rural South Dakota of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing South Dakota lost significant groundimproved in 2018 in accessisto15 contraception upon their composite scores (0percent higher than the rate in urban as 2016 was, 2017 could be and other care services. 100),Quality each state received “core” to Care both of Life (-5) andaAccess (-5) healthcounties. a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

TENNESSEE All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

T

F DF F D-

ENNESSEE has a population of 6.7 million people, and 22.6 percent live in one of Tennessee’s 53 rural counties.

87.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 6.1 percent is Black/ African-American, 3.3 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.2 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.5 percent is Asian.

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

..

F D+ F B C-

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

WHAT NEEDS WORK Tennessee's national ranking for rural All-Cause Mortality declined in 2018 (-1, 44th), and the state earned failing grades in rural counties for all of the top five causes of death in the U.S.: Heart Disease Mortality (44th, F), Cancer Mortality (46th, F), CLRD Mortality (39th, F),

Tennessee is one of nine states to receive a grade of “F” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

WHAT’S GOOD

Tennessee has an above average rank of 15th (B) for rural Broadband Access.

44/47 TENNESSEE ranks 44th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

The poverty rate in rural Tennessee is 18.7 percent, compared with 14.9 percent in urban areas of the state.

The Volunteer State saw significant improvement in the rankings for Mental Health Access in rural counties in 2018 (+5, D+).

F

Accident Mortality (41st, F) and Stroke Mortality (44th, F). Tennessee also declined significantly in the rankings for rural Uninsured Rate (-4, C-), as well as for General Health (-3, D-) and selfreported Physical Health (-3, F).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Tennessee ranks 38th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural Tennessee is 16 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

Mortality:

Down one spot nationally to 44th (43rd in 2017)

44

Quality of Life: Up two spots nationally to 40th (42nd in 2017)

40

Access to Care No change in national ranking of 36th for 2018

36

RHQ

55 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

D36/47 TEXAS ranks 36th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Texas is one of three states to receive a grade of “D-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

31

30

Mortality:

Up four spots nationally to 31st (35th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up two spots nationally to 30th (32nd in 2017)

Access to Care:

47

56

RHQ

56  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 47th for 2018

TEXAS

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

D+ Primary Care Access F D- Mental Health Access F B Dental Care Access F C Broadband Access D+ + Uninsured states today more than “plus” orD a “minus” for factors Rate F 50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access EXAS has aeveryone population of 27.9‘CHOOSE million LIFE’ LICENSE to contraception loses: people, and 11 percent live in one of FUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended Texas’s more 172 rural counties. pregnancies, abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

T

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 57 percent of the state’s rural population is Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding This year’s report card Non-Hispanic White, 7.9also percent is Black/African“B-“ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a growing American, 32.9 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 0.3 (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker 0.5 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Texas is 18.1 percent, and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, compared with 15.3 percent in urban areas ofArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, the state. mandate. Walker noted that failing grade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, RURAL COUNTIES “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, URBAN COUNTIES WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see FACTORS InMANY 2018, rural Texas saw modest improvements Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented FORmortality grade (+3, D) and Access (40th, F), Dental Care Access setbacks (43rd, F),at the inACCOUNTED its heart disease national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADE its CLRD mortality grade (+3, C-). Walker warned rural that “AUninsured woman’s Rates (47th, F) and rural in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORES reproductive health should not Broadband Access (31st, D+). sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND The Accident Mortality rate rankingdepend in ruralon where she lives, but and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many Texas is better than average (11th, B+), as is the Texas also declined significantly in the rural programs which have been areas are experiencing reduced Using elevenMental criteria,Health the ranking in self-reported rural rankings for Cancer Mortality and ” proven to(-4, be 23rd) ineffective. access to reproductive Institute’s(16th, report counties B).card ranked Strokehealth Mortality (-2, 40th). care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and the Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four WHAT NEEDS WORK year’s report card should be URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone whofor is urban/rural concerned Texas ranks 40th out of 47 states For the second straight year, Texas ranks last Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health difference in mortality. The all-cause mortality inaffordability, the nation and for Access to Care in rural of millions of women without access. Based and rights. “As disappointing in rural Texas is 19 percent higher than the counties (47th, F), a measure whichimproved includes accessrate to contraception upon their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be rate in services. urban counties. and other health care Primary Care Access (46th, F), Mental Health 100), each state received a “core” a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

UTAH All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

U

BA B+ BC-

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

C F B+ BD-

84.2 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 0.4 percent is Black/African-American, 9 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 4.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.8 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural Utah is 13.9 percent, compared with 9.8 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

The state's ranking for rural Accident Mortality climbed seventeen ponts and moved from a D in 2017 to a B in 2018.

WHAT NEEDS WORK Utah's final grade dropped a bit in 2018, falling three points to 26th (C) from 23rd (C+) in 2017. The state lost significant ground in 2018 in

26/47 UTAH ranks 26th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

TAH has a population of 3.1 million people, and 10.6 percent live in one of Utah’s 19 rural counties.

The Beehive State saw significant improvements in its rural Quallity of Life ranking in 2018 (+2, B-). General Health climbed nine points (7th, A) and self reported mental Health improved two points (13th, B+).

C Utah is one of three states to receive a grade of “C” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

both rural All-Cause Mortality (-6, B-), Heart Disease Mortality (-6, B) and CLRD Mortality (-13, B). The state's Mental Health Access ranking also fell (-4, F), as did its rank for rural Uninsured Rate (-4, D-).

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Utah ranks 23rd out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Utah is 9 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

.

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

Down six spots nationally to 20th (14th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up two spots nationally to 19th (21st in 2017)

20 19

Access to Care Down two spots nationally to 31st (29th in 2017)

31 RHQ

57 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A 5/47 VERMONT ranks 5th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Vermont is one of four states to receive a grade of “A” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

15

Down five spots nationally to 15th (10th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

9

Down three spots nationally to 9th (6th in 2017)

Access to Care:

2

58

RHQ

58  RHQ

No change in national ranking of 2nd for 2018

VERMONT

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

B Primary Care Access A+ A + Mental Health Access A+ C Dental Care Access B+ A- Broadband Access A+ of states today more than “plus” orB a+ “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A50% women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ERMONT everyone has a population 625,000 LIFE’ LICENSE to contraception loses: of‘CHOOSE people, and 65.1 percent live in one ofFUND ANTI-CHOICE PLATES there are more unintended Vermont’s rural counties. pregnancies, more11 abortions, and ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

V

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 94.9 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 0.7 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a growing African-American,1.6 percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 0.3 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 0.8 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” failing grade in 2016: The poverty rate in rural Vermont isa12.7 RURAL COUNTIES and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, percent, compared with 10.3 percent in urban COUNTIES Care Act’sURBAN no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, falling three points tohealth 5th (A) from 2nd (A+) in state has occurred at the South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, level, but this year could see 2017. The state lost significant ground in rural MANY FACTORS The Green Mountain State's rankingsUtah, for rural Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented ACCOUNTED FOR All-Cause Mortality (-5, B) and Heartsetbacks Diseaseat the Access to Care measures are among the nations national level, ALABAMA’S FAILINGearns GRADE (-5, B-), and the state sawincluding a majorcuts best (2nd, A+). Vermont an A+ for ruralwarned Mortality Walker that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR(3rd), SCORES decline its national ranking for rural Accident Primary Care Access Mental Health Access reproductive health should not sex education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Mortality she lives,(-16, but C). (2nd) and Uninsured Rate (2nd), and it isdepend amongon thewhere and a return to abstinence only AFFORDABILITY it does, as women in many top 10 states for rural Broadband Access (10th). programs which have been areas are experiencing reducedMental Health in rural counties Using eleven criteria, the Self-reported proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health cardranks ranked also fell off considerably (-12, C). InInstitute’s addition,report Vermont second nationally care services including abortion.” each of the 50 states and(A+), the and it improved for rural General Health Walker stressed that this Walker for noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four impressively in 2018 in its national ranking year’s report card should be URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to rural Stroke Mortality (+17, A+). “an urgent call to action” for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone is concerned Vermont ranks 26th out of 47who states for urban/ Affordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about reproductive health WHAT NEEDS WORK rural difference of millions of women without in mortality. The age-adjusted affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0mortality rate in rural Vermont is 11 percent as 2016 was, 2017 could be other health care services. 100), each final stategrade received a “core” Vermont's dropped a bit and in 2018, higher than the rate in urban counties. a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

VIRGINIA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

V

DD+ B C+ F

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

D C DCC-

32/47 VIRGINIA ranks 32nd in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

IRGINIA has a population of 8.4 million people, and 12.4 percent live in one of Virginia’s 53 rural counties.

75.9 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 19 percent is Black/ African-American, 2.8 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.6 percent is Asian.

..

The poverty rate in rural Virginia is 16.7 percent, compared with 10.2 percent in urban areas of the state.

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

Old Dominion's rankings improved in 2018 for rural CLRD Mortality (+6, C+) and for rural Accident Mortality (+9, C-).

for rural Stroke Mortality (-7, D-), self-reported Physical Health (-2, C+) and the Uninsured Rate (-2, C-). The state also saw slight declines in rank for rural Dental Care Access (-1, D-) and self-reported Physical Health (-2, C+).

Virginia also continues to rank above the national average for self-reported Mental Health (17th, B).

Virgina continues to earn low marks in 2018 for its Low Birth Weight ranking in rural counties (40th, F).

WHAT NEEDS WORK

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

Virginia saw a slight decline in national rankings in all major categories in 2018, including Mortality (37th, -1), Quality of Life (32nd, -1), and Access to Care (33rd, -1). Virginia's largest declines in rural ranking were

Virginia ranks last (highest) in the nation (47th out of 47 states) for urban/rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Virginia is 30 percent higher than the rate in urban counties.

WHAT’S GOOD

D+

.

Virginia is one of three states to receive a grade of “D+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

Down one spot nationally to 37th (36th in 2017)

37

Quality of Life:

Down one spot nationally to 32nd (31st in 2017)

32

Access to Care

Down one spot nationally to 33rd (32nd in 2017)

33

RHQ

59 


IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

B+ 12/47 WASHINGTON ranks 12th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Washington is one of three states to receive a grade of “B+” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

5

15

19

60

RHQ

60  RHQ

Mortality:

Up three spots nationally to 5th (8th in 2017)

Quality of Life: Up one spot nationally to 15th (16th in 2017)

Access to Care: Up nine spots nationally to 19th (28th in 2017)

WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A Primary Care Access C B- Mental Health Access D B- Dental Care Access B C- Broadband Access A+ states today more than “plus” orA a “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate B-50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ASHINGTON hasloses: a population of 7.3LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone million people, and 10 percent live PLATES in FUND ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended onemore of Washington’s 18 rural counties. ORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS pregnancies, abortions, and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

W

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 77.3 percent of the state’s rural population Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding year’s reportWhite, card also isThis Non-Hispanic 1.1 percent“B-“ is Black/ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention to “a growing African-American, 13.7 percent is Hispanic/ (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive Latino, 2.4 percent is American Indian/Alaska New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker Native and 2.1 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” a failing The poverty rate in rural Washington is 16.4grade in 2016: and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, percent, compared with 10.7 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, Care Act’sRURAL no-cost birth control COUNTIES was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate.URBAN Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report COUNTIES Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, improved Tennessee,seven Texas,points to 19th nationally (B-). level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The Evergreen State strongly improved on its Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED 2017 ranking forFOR rural Access to Care (+9, B-) national level, including cuts ALABAMA’S FAILING GRADEin All-Cause WHAT NEEDS WORK and saw modest improvements Walker warned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING POOR SCORESof Life (+1, Mortality (+3, A) and Quality B). reproductive health should not education in the schools IN PREVENTION AND Washington slipped sex a bit in the 2018 rankdepend on where she lives, but Washington is tied with Oregon for most and a return to abstinence AFFORDABILITY ings rural Dental Care Access (-3, B) and only it does, as women in for many improved state in RHQ's 2018 U.S. Rural Health programs which have been areas are experiencing Using eleven Mentalreduced Health Access (-2, D). Report Card. criteria, the proven to be ineffective.” access to reproductive health Institute’s report card ranked abortion.” DIVIDE each of the 50 states and the gainscare Washington made significant in itsservices including URBAN-RURAL Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four rankings for rural Cancer Mortality (+9, A), year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to Heart Disease Mortality (+6, A+), Accident Washington ranks 10th out of call 47 states for for “an urgent to action” to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: Mortality (+4, A) and Stroke Mortality (+5, anyone who is concerned urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageAffordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about health B-). adjusted mortality rate in reproductive rural Washington of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing is two percent higher than the rate in urban improved access to contraception upon their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be Washington's rural Uninsured Rate ranking counties. 100), each state received a “core” and other health care services. a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

WEST VIRGINIA All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

W

F F F F F

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

BCD+ C+ B+

D38/47

EST VIRGINIA has a population of 1.8 million people, and 38.2 percent live in one of West Virginia’s 34 rural

WEST VIRGINIA ranks 38th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

95 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 2.2 percent is Black/AfricanAmerican, 1 percent is Hispanic/Latino, 0.1 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.3 percent is Asian.

West Virginia is one of three states to receive a grade of “D-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018.

counties.

The poverty rate in rural West Virginia is 18.7 percent, compared with 17.4 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

..

RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S Mortality:

The Mountain State's rankings for rural Access to Care rose impressively year over year (+8, B) thanks largely to its improved rural Uninsured Rate (+9, B+).

measures declined in 2018 (-3, F), including those for General Health (-2, F), self-reported Mental Health (-1, F) and self-reported Physical Health (-1, C).

No change in national ranking of 41st for 2018

WHAT NEEDS WORK

West Virginia's rank for rural Low Birth Weight improved slightly (+1) but still earned an F.

Down three spots nationally to 46th (43rd in 2017)

While West Virginia's rural Cancer Mortality ranking improved by five points in 2018, it continues to earn a failing grade (39th, F). The state also failed for rural CLRD Mortality (46th, F) and rural Accident Mortality (45th, F). West Virginia's rural ranking for Quality of Life

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

.

West Virginia ranks 4th out of 47 states for urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageadjusted mortality rate in rural West Virginia is virtually even with the rate in urban counties.

41

Quality of Life:

Access to Care

Up eight spots nationally to 16th (24th in 2017)

46 16

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IN FREE FALL: REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH AND RIGHTS IN AMERICA

A9/47 WISCONSIN ranks 9th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties. Wisconsin is one of three states to receive a grade of “A-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. 2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

10

Mortality:

Up one spot nationally to 10th (11th in 2017)

Quality of Life:

7

No change in national ranking of 7th for 2018

Access to Care:

9

62

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No change in national ranking of 9th for 2018

WISCONSIN

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In releasing its fifth annual 50-State Report Card on Reproductive Health and Rights, the Population Institute lowered the U.S. grade from a “D+” to a “D”. The report card, the most comprehensive report card of its kind, tracks multiple indicators of reproductive health and rights, including access to family planning and abortion services.

All-Cause Mortality

A- Primary Care Access B+ A- Mental Health Access BB+ Dental Care Access BB+ Broadband Access D states today more than “plus” orA a “minus”Uninsured for factors Rate A-50% of women now live in a county not reflected in the core grade.

The Institute’s president Robert Walker said, “For the past five years, reproductive health and rights in the U.S. have been on a slippery slope.” Five years ago nine states received an “F”. In this year’s report card 20 states—including Alabama—received a failing grade. Walker warned, however, “The worst may be yet to come, as Congress and the new Administration are expected to slash federal funding for family planning and comprehensive sex education. The slippery slope is becoming a free fall.”

General Health

Mental Health (30 Days)

Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

Walker emphasized that “It’s not just abortion rights that are under siege; it’s also access to ALABAMA RECEIVED A family planning services, and “MINUS” BECAUSE THEIR when women are denied access ISCONSIN has aloses: population of 5.8 LIFE’ LICENSE ‘CHOOSE to contraception everyone million people, and 25.9 percent liveFUND in PLATES ANTI-CHOICE there are more unintended onemore of Wisconsin’s ruralORGANIZATIONS/CRISIS counties. pregnancies, abortions,46 and PREGNANCY CENTERS higher health care costs.”

without an abortion provider.

W

Federal support for reproductive health and rights could suffer a major reversal in 2017. Congress and the new Administration are expected to curtail access to contraceptive 91.8 percent of the state’s rural population is Only 21 states received a services by blocking all funding This year’s report card0.8 also Non-Hispanic White, percent is Black/Afri“B-“ or higher. Just five states for Planned Parenthood, draws attention3.6 to percent “a growing can-American, is Hispanic/Latino, (California, New Jersey, defunding Title X, a 48-year old national divide” on reproductive 1.6 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native New Mexico, Oregon and program that provides support health and rights, and Walker and 0.9 percent is Asian. Washington) received an “A”. to family planning clinics warned that Alabama is “on The following states received serving low-income households, the wrong side of that divide.” The poverty rate in rural Wisconsin aisfailing 11.3 grade in 2016: and eliminating the Affordable Alabama, which received an “F”, Alabama, percent, compared with 11.9 percent in urbanArkansas, Florida, Care Act’s no-cost birth control was one of 20 states receiving a Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, areas the state. mandate. Walker noted that failingofgrade in the latest report Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, “In the past five years most of card. Five years ago Alabama Nebraska, North Dakota, WHAT’S the RURAL slippage on reproductive received aGOOD “D”. COUNTIES Oklahoma, South Carolina, health has occurred at the state South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, URBAN COUNTIES level, but this year could see MANY FACTORS The Badger State improved on its 2017 ranking Utah, Virginia, and Wisconsin. unprecedented setbacks at the ACCOUNTED FORMortality (+1, A-) and saw for rural All-Cause national level, cuts ALABAMA’S FAILINGin GRADE grade in 2018, and saw a slight dipincluding in rankings specific improvements rural Heart Disease Walker warned that “A woman’s in funding for comprehensive INCLUDING SCORES for rural Mental Health Access (-2, B-) and Mortality (+3,POOR B), CLRD Mortality (+4, A), and reproductive health should not sex education in theBroadschools IN PREVENTION AND rural Care Access (-1, B-). Rural depend on where sheDental lives, but Stroke Mortality (+10, B+). and a return to abstinence AFFORDABILITY band Access in Wisconsin ranks well below only it does, as women in many programs which have been areasinare experiencing reduced Using eleven criteria, the national average (34th, D). Wisconsin also madethe significant gains proven to be ineffective.” access Institute’s report card ranked its rankings for rural General Health (+3,to reproductive health abortion.” each of rural the 50Low states andWeight the A-) and Birth (+2,care A).services The including URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE Walker stressed that this Walker noted that 19 states, District of Columbia on four state's rural Uninsured Rate ranking remains year’s report card should be including Alabama, have refused broad indicators relating to among the nation's top 10 (9th, A-). “an to action” for Wisconsin ranks 6th outurgent of 47 call states for to expand Medicaid under the reproductive health and rights: anyone who is concerned urban/rural difference in mortality. The ageAffordable Care Act, leaving tens effectiveness, prevention, about health adjusted mortality rate in reproductive rural Wisconsin WHAT NEEDS WORK of millions of women without affordability, and access. Based and rights. “As disappointing is to 1 percent higher than the rate in urban improved access contraception upon their composite scores (0as 2016 was, 2017 could be care services. counties. 100), each slipped state received a “core” Wisconsin two points in itsand finalother health a whole lot worse.” Walker also noted that in 27 grade (A, B, C, D or F), but some states received an additional

..

.


IN FREE F AND RIGH

WYOMING All-Cause Mortality General Health Mental Health (30 Days) Physical Health (30 Days) Low Birth Weight

W

AB+ AB+ D+

Primary Care Access Mental Health Access Dental Care Access Broadband Access Uninsured Rate

B+ B+ ACD

The poverty rate in rural Wyoming is 12.1 percent, compared with 9.5 percent in urban areas of the state.

WHAT’S GOOD

18/47 WYOMING ranks 18th in the nation for rural health out of 47 states with rural counties.

YOMING has a population of 586,000 people, and 69.4 percent live in one of Wyoming’s 21 rural counties.

85.2 percent of the state’s rural population is Non-Hispanic White, 0.6 percent is Black/ African-American, 8.9 percent is Hispanic/ Latino, 2.4 percent is American Indian/Alaska Native and 0.8 percent is Asian.

B-

..

Wyoming is one of three states to receive a grade of “B-” for rural health access and outcomes in 2018. RURAL COUNTIES URBAN COUNTIES

2 0 1 8 S TAT E R U R A L H E A LT H R A N K I N G S

The Equality State saw significant improvements in its rural Quallity of Life ranking in 2018 (+4, B-). Rural General Health improved two points (13th, B+) and self-reported Physical Health improved three points (11th, B+).

Access made some gains (+4, A-), the state's ranking for its rural Uninsured Rate fell 11 points (33rd, D). Unlike many of its neighbors, Wyoming has not adopted Medicaid expansion as offered under the Affordable Care Act.

The state's ranking for rural Cancer Mortality is among the best in the nation (4th, A).

Wyoming's rural Accident Mortality ranking remains among the nation's highest (39th, F).

WHAT NEEDS WORK

URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

Wyoming's final grade dropped from a B to a B- in 2018, thanks in part to a steep drop in ranking for Access to Care measures in the state. While Wyoming's rural Dental Care

Wyoming ranks 2nd out of 47 states for urban/ rural difference in mortality. The age-adjusted mortality rate in rural Wyoming is 2 percent lower than the rate in urban counties.

.

Mortality:

Down two spots nationally to 8th (6th in 2017)

8

Quality of Life: Up four spots nationally to 20th (24st in 2017)

20

Access to Care

Down 11 spots nationally to 24th (13th in 2017)

24 RHQ

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RHQ CONFERENCE CALENDAR C

heck out our list of rural health conferences, and let us know if you’re hosting one so we can help spread the word. Email us the details at RHQ@ttuhsc.edu. Nebraska Rural Health Conference April 24-25, 2019 Younes Conference Center, 416 W Talmadge Rd. Kearney, NE nebraskaruralhealth.org Michigan Rural Health Conference April 25-26, 2019 Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort, 6800 Soaring Eagle Blvd. Mount Pleasant, MI www.mcrh.msu.edu/index.html Alabama Rural Health Conference April 25-26, 2019 Montgomery Marriot Prattville Hotel, 2500 Legends Circle Prattville, AL www.arhaonline.org Mississippi Rural Health Clinic Conference May 3, 2019 Jackson Hilton, 1001 County Line Rd. Jackson, MS msrha.org Rural Hospital Innovation Summit May 7-10, 2019 Atlanta Marriot Marquis, 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE Atlanta, GA www.ruralhealthweb.org Health Equity Conference May 7, 2019 Atlanta Marriot Marquis, 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE Atlanta, GA www.ruralhealthweb.org

64

Iowa Association of Rural Health Clinics Conference May 7-8, 2019 Holiday Inn Des Moines Airport Conference Center, 6111 Fleur Drive Des Moines, IA iarhc.org Telehealth at the Crossroads May 23-24, 2019 Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort Austin, TX www.crossroadsconference.us Oklahoma Rural Health Conference May 29, 2019 Embassy Suites Norman Hotel and Conference Center, 2501 Conference Dr. Norman, OK 73069 www.rhao.org

Rural Medical Education Conference May 7, 2019 Atlanta Marriot Marquis, 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE Atlanta, GA www.ruralhealthweb.org

Dakota Conference on Rural and Public Health June 11, 2019 Clarion Hotel and Convention Center, 2200 E. Burdick Expy Minot, ND ruralhealth.und.edu/dakota-conference

NRHA Annual Rural Health Conference May 7-10, 2019 Atlanta Marriot Marquis, 265 Peachtree Center Ave NE Atlanta, GA www.ruralhealthweb.org

Wisconsin Rural Health Conference July 12 - 14, 2019 Glacier Canyon Lodge at the Wilderness Resort, 45 Hillman Road Wisconsin Dells, WI www.wha.org

RHQ

Minnesota Rural Health Conference June 17-18, 2019 Duluth Entertainment Convention Center, 350 Harbor Drive Duluth, MN minnesotaruralhealthconference.org California Rural Health Conference June 17-19, 2019 Lake Natoma Inn, 702 Gold Lake Drive Folsom, CA www.carhc.org Indiana Rural Health Conference June 18-19,2019 French Lick Springs Hotel, 8670 West State Road 56 French Lick, IN www.indianaruralhealth.org State Rural Health Association Leadership Conference July 9-10, 2019 Warwick Hotel, 1776 Grant St. Denver, CO www.ruralhealthweb.org National Association of Rural Health Clinics Fall 2018 Institute October 23 - 25, 2018 Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe, 111 Country Club Drive Incline Village, NV narhc.org

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Making a Healthy Difference for Rural Texans

SERVING THE TEXAS RURAL HEALTH COMMUNITY The obstacles faced by health care providers and patients in rural areas are vastly different than those in urban areas. The Texas Rural Health Association (TRHA) is a nonprofit organization whose primary goal is to improve the health of rural Texans. Since 1984, individuals and organizations of TRHA have been dedicated to providing leadership on rural health care issues through advocacy, communication, and education.

THE TRHA MISSION  Promote rural health as a distinct concern in Texas.  Serve as a strong and unifying voice for concerned citizens,

community leaders, public officials, and health care providers and organizations working to improve rural health in Texas.  Advocate for rural health and promote an enhanced status

and improved health system for rural Texans.  Provide a forum for exchange and distribution of

information and ideas related to improvement of rural health.  Encourage the development of appropriate health resources

to all rural areas of Texas.

WWW.TRHA.ORG | 512-368-9860 | PO BOX 201363 AUSTIN, TX 78720


HQ Plaza, 5307 West Loop 289, Suite 301 Lubbock, TX 79414

Profile for Rural Health Quarterly (RHQ)

Rural Health Quarterly 3.1 - Winter 2018-2019  

SPECIAL ISSUE - 2018 U.S. Rural Health Report Card

Rural Health Quarterly 3.1 - Winter 2018-2019  

SPECIAL ISSUE - 2018 U.S. Rural Health Report Card

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