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RUNNING The Stress Buster

BILLABLE MILES

Lawyers Hit the Trails


CELEBRATE 20 YEARS RUNNING

2014 A 1 Mile race entirely on the sand is added to the Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach Half Marathon weekend, allowing runners to participate in the Remix Challenge.

2001

Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach was the first stand alone Half Marathon in the U.S.

2015

The Military Challenge is introduced and receives the largest turnout across the series with 4,500 participants.

2017

More than 160 Legacy Runners have run Rock ‘n’ Roll Virginia Beach all 16 consecutive years.

H A L F M A R AT H O N | 5 K | M I L E O N T H E S A N D

CREATE YOUR MOMENT ON

SEP 2-3, 2017


On the Cover: Shana Dicks, of Camp Spring, Md., takes on the last mile at the 2016 George Washington Parkway Classic 10 mile. PHOTO BY SWIM BIKE RUN PHOTOGRAPHY

EDITOR’S NOTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OFF THE BEATEN PATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 THE KIDS ON THE COURSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 MILITARY RUNNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 BEST OF WASHINGTON RUNNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 HELPING HANDS, MOVING FEET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 GEORGE WASHINGTON PARKWAY CLASSIC ATHLETE GUIDE UPCOMING RACES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 BILLABLE MILES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 RUNNING WITH, NOT FROM, YOUR PROBLEMS . . . . . . . . . . 41 IT’S NOT A RACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 CELEBRATE RUNNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 1


SUMMER 2016 PUBLISHER Kathy Dalby RunWashington Media LLC EDITOR IN CHIEF Charlie Ban charlie@runwashington.com SENIOR EDITOR Dickson Mercer dickson@runwashington.com COPY EDITOR Katie Bolton

PHOTO BY JULIE FLEMING

This issue is kind of a surprise. We had planned to publish only three magazines in 2017, but shortly after we sent the first issue off to the printer, my publisher Kathy Dalby, said, “Hey, let’s do a fourth.” So, here we are, with some bonus articles. We’re basically printing this issue to accompany the George Washington Parkway Classic Athlete Guide, so, it feels appropriate for me to rave about the race, which I have done five times so far with a sixth coming up, assuming I am not injured. I first picked it to make up for a bad race at Cherry Blossom and ended up running about a minute faster than I had a few weeks before, so I was hooked. In the years since, I run it even if it isn’t my goal race. There’s nothing quite like looking over and seeing the Potomac River down the hill, or having the freedom to run all over that road, tangents be damned. Perhaps my best running memory from all of 2016 was running to Mount Vernon from Alexandria and then back with the race for a long run to prepare for a disastrous marathon (we’ll touch on those later this year). Shana Dicks, of Camp Springs, Md., picked GW for her first long distance run while she prepared for her first half marathon in 2015, and she managed to impress herself by finishing. A year later, a friend asked her to come along, so she was back for more. Three miles in, she started questioning herself, her choices, her entire life, but by the nine-mile mark, she had regained a positive attitude and was ready to give the photographer on Union Street a look of pure focus and determination. It was perfect for our cover. While I’m talking about the cover, I am proud to announce that Nicolas Crozier (from the Spring 2017 issue) escaped the RunWashington cover curse that I just thought up when he won the B&A Trail Marathon March 26. As I remember it I’ve always nervous about putting people on the cover after we depicted Patrick Benko climbing a Metro escalator and a few years later...well, you’ve probably ridden the Metro lately… Actually, that’s pretty much it. The only high school runner who has suffered anything close to a mishap was Rachel McArthur, and she ended up winning the national indoor 800 meters a year later, so we have a good record so far. Elsewhere in the issue, we feature this year’s Best of Washington Running winners. Thank you for your nominations and for voting. Katie Bolton talks to some runners who use the sport to clear their heads, as an escape from existential dread — a population in which I include myself. Andrew Gates checks out a few parkruns, which are spreading throughout the D.C. area on Saturday mornings.

CREATIVE / PRODUCTION AZER CREATIVE www.azercreative.com SALES DIRECTOR Denise Farley denise@runwashington.com 703-855-8145 CUSTOMER SERVICE office@runwashington.com BRANDING ORANGEHAT LLC The entire contents of RunWashington are copyright ©2016 by RunWashington Media, LLC. All rights reserved, and may not be reproduced in any manner, in whole or in part, without the written permission of the publisher. Unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, results, or other materials are welcome but are not returnable and are preferred via electronic communication to charlie@ runwashington.com. Please inform yourself of applicable copyright and privacy laws before submitting for publication; if we decide to publish your submitted material we conduct no such checks and you alone will ultimately be responsible for any violations of any laws including infringement and copyright. Views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher, advertiser, or sponsors. Back issues are available for $5.00 for each copy to cover postage and handling. RunWashington is published four times yearly by RunWashington Media LLC, 4544 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22304. Complimentary copies are mailed to subscribers, area businesses and events. Be advised that running is a strenuous sport and you should seek the guidance of a medical professional before beginning an exercise regimen.

See you out there, Charlie

@runwashington /runwashington

CONTRIBUTORS ARIEL COHEN (Helping Hands, Moving Feet) is a D.C.-based freelance writer who has written for The Hill, The Washington Examiner and The Jerusalem Post. JULIE FLEMMING (Editor’s Note) is a photographer based in King George County, Va. www.julieflemingphoto.com

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@runwashington


run washington cmyk.indd 1

3/21/2017 10:04:08 AM


ALGONKIAN REGIONAL PARK, STERLING, VA.

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BY CHARLIE BAN Two years ago we checked out the rocky, eastern end of the Potomac Heritage Trail. Now we’ll take a look at a more gentle portion up the Potomac River starting in Sterling and heading down to Great Falls. Starting from the Algonkian Regional Park Sportsplex, you can head right onto the gravel trail and head east, with the golf course on your left. Pretty soon, you’ll see the trail veer off to the left, so follow it, looking out for green blazes on the trees, but for the most part, the trail is fairly obvious. You’ll eventually come out alongside another golf course, with more formal trail markings. If you are more familiar with golf courses for running than walking, be aware that golfers offer one another respectful quiet while addressing their shots, and granting that courtesy while passing near the tees, fairways and greens will help ensure that runners will be able to continue crossing the course. Soon after leaving the links, you can bear to the left and remain on the Potomac Heritage Trail or veer to the right and climb the hills of Seneca Regional Park, which will eventually lead to farther down river. Parts of the heritage trail, particularly near the golf course, can be popular with hikers, and in February I saw several dozen within one mile, so be ready to share the trail, which can be as narrow and single-track at times. Sticking on the trail close to the river will treat you to some tremendous views, but will make yuo earn them with technical climbs. A DC Water Authority trail offers a flatter alternative, but when you see a trail along a wide power line cut, turn to the left and head toward the river, because water authority trail will soon end at a fence with barbed wire. From here, you generally follow the Potomac all the way to Riverbend and Great Falls parks, though you will have to turn in for a little bit to reach a bridge over Nicholas Run. This part of the Potomac Heritage Trail is used every spring for two days by the North Face Endurance Challenge’s seven races Anzhela Knyazeva has run the race, and the trail, several times, and raves about the scenery. “The path runs through the woods but views of the river open up along the way, so you don’t really get bored running it,” she said. The terrain also delights her. “It was easy on the feet — soft and mostly non-technical terrain. I am not a fan of hard-packed, fire road trails and don’t like trails that get very dusty in the summer. On the downside, the trail didn’t seem to drain as well, so it got quite muddy after rain.”

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JALEN BUNCH, CORT MERRITT and HENRY REID race during the DCXC Invitational. RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY CHARLIE BAN

BY CHARLIE B AN There was big news spreading at the DCXC Invitational last fall, after the elementary school races. Two girls were eager to share it. “I got second place!” That wasn’t even the big news. From her friend: “I got ice cream!” Both were treated with equal praise by coaches and teammates and that, in large part, speaks to the promise lying ahead for young cross country runners. In an activity in which participants are definitively ranked — someone is first and someone is last — the big challenge for coaches is developing a long-term interest regardless of a kid’s natural talent. Dereck Barnes has been coaching the Fairfax Police Youth Club for three years. Though he ran for Methodist College in North Carolina, he refined his experience though a coaching certification course. “I knew the art of running, but I didn’t know the science,” he said. “Getting a coaching certification helped me a lot.” He found that more than at any other level, a youth coach’s role is to hold the athlete back from running too much. “The magic is encouraging, them, explaining why we do the workouts,” he said. “We don’t do any type of intensity until they hit puberty. We’ll run up some hills, but we won’t go any anaerobic work.” Three times a week, FPYC practices in one of Fairfax County’s many parks, where the runners can stay on grass. “We teach them to run by feel, learn the sport, respect the sport,” Barnes said. “There’s plenty of time for them to work on speed. We just want them to enjoy running.” Kathryn McKinney has been a volunteer

coach at Oyster-Adams Bilingual School in D.C.’s Woodley Park neighborhood for five years. And even though her athletes finished racing at DCXC, she stuck around to see two former runners, then freshmen at Wilson High School, race later in the day. “I hope they wind up with a life-long love of running,” she said. “We try to keep the program competitive but fun.” One way she does that is by keeping plenty of records by which kids can gauge their improvement. The one-mile uphill run in the zoo is a staple of the program, and kids love to look back and see how they did in different “zoo miles.” “We have kids coming in with all different kinds of experience,” she said. “Some of them have parents who run. Some of them have never played a competitive sport before.” Vincent Kamani is one of them. an eighth grader during the 2016 season, he joined the team a year earlier after a lot of soul searching. “I thought about if there was an apocalypse, I’d better be able to run,” he said. “It seemed like the best sport to get into shape. Now I can run a lot faster than I thought I could.” McKinney tries to keep the workload, as light as it is, from intimidating her athletes. “We’ll run a mile to Rock Creek Park and a mile back, so everyone who comes to practice does at least two miles, and they don’t even notice it,” she said. “I’ll have them to scavenger hunts, things that take their mind off of the running.” And it’s been working. For a school of roughly 170 people, the team sports 50 runners. “We have almost a third of the students in the school on the team,” McKinney said. “That means they’re having fun and want to keep running. That’s good feedback to have.”

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TOM’S RUN PARTICIPANTS AND THEIR BIKE ESCORTS HEAD DOWN THE C&O CANAL TOWPATH. PHOTOS COURTESY OF TOM’S RUN.

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By Beth Roessner Joe Stammer never considered himself much of a runner. And yet, there was something appealing about signing up for a 200-mile relay. Tom’s Run offered more than just a flat course and a good time, it offered a logistical challenge that intrigued Stammer: runners have 35 hours to get their team from Cumberland, Md. to the finish line in Alexandria, Va. His team was welcoming, and Stammer took on the shortest legs—all under two miles. He wasn’t too concerned with his speed. It was Tom’s Run that helped him become a runner. “It’s a fun run. There’s no race. It’s all about camaraderie,” Stammer, 52, explained. Stammer, a Marine veteran and civilian worker with the Coast Guard, has now completed 15 Tom’s Run Relays in the last 16 years, oversaw several teams over the years, and will lead a team this June. He’s planning his legs of the race this year so that he’s run the entire course while participating. “By the time you get to your third leg, everyone is pretty exhausted and pretty beat. That’s the challenge of it,” Stammer said. “You’re running way more than you usually do.” With an emphasis on team building and logistical challenges, Tom’s Run has carved out a unique niche in the running world. It’s also become popular among local Coast Guardsmen. “Tom’s Run is so representative of the Coast Guard,” said Roger Butturini, race director and Tom’s Run veteran. “The teams include many different kinds of people and they do a great deal of planning together. They embark with a goal, preserver, adapt along the way, see other teams on the trail, and everyone comes together at the end. It’s magic.” The race is in tribute to Coast Guard Chief Warrant Officer Tom Brooks. Brooks was known to his family and friends as a sociable, caring and active guy. He loved spreading his passion for fitness with others. “He had a reputation for energizing people. He did believe that getting up and getting around led to a happy lifestyle,” Butturini said. Brooks learned he had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — ALS — in the late 1990s, and his friends rallied together in support.

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They initially created the race as a fundraising event. Even while sick and wheelchair bound, Brooks made appearances. Brooks passed away in 2003, but his legacy lives on through the yearly race. With Brooks’ ties to the Coast Guard, several Coast Guard organizations support the event, and the race has become a favorite among local Coasties. As a member of the Coast Guard himself, Butturini truly understands the power of a supportive community. And this race acts like “a showcase to advertise” what he appreciates most about the Coast Guard. Coast Guard values like perseverance, team work, selfsufficiency are all celebrated in the race. While not everyone would describe a 200mile run as “fun,” Butturini swears that it is. The only finishing time that truly matters is the time set by race officials. All racers must be at the finish line at 11 a.m Sunday morning and are given a 35-hour window to make the 200-mile trek. This is where things get strategic. The official race start is midnight Saturday, but depending on a team’s size and speed, they may alter when they start. Single racers are able to start earlier on Friday and several past teams have started late in the morning on Saturday. “We’re not running away from each other in Tom’s Run. We’re actually running towards each other,” Butturini said. “And it’s about helping other people.” And, there are very few restrictions. On average there about 30 teams and only 500 participants. Teams can be as small as one runner, or as many as a dozen. All teams are in charge of their own logistics, Butturini said, and that’s what makes it an experiment in team building. If a runner isn’t able to organize a team, they’re able to join a team. Teams are completely self-sufficient along the 200-mile course — no support is given aside from course directions. Runners reconnect with their teams at different transition stops. There are 32 legs in the course, varying in distance from about two miles to just under 12 miles. Over 180 miles are on the C&O Canal Towpath. The course winds through the National Mall and ends at Fort Hunt Park near Mount Vernon. A party winds down the weekend. Runners must be accompanied by a


cyclist at all times. Some teams switch off bicycling duties, while single runners may bring in a support crew. Two participants may split up running and cycling duties during one leg based on their endurance. You can learn a lot about your teammates when you’re sleep-deprived, hungry and running before dawn. Butturini and his team have a cookout. Some teams eat s’mores or order pizza. Other teams send goofy photos of themselves to each other. The run is also able to be completed virtually, Butturini said. A few years ago, a deployed reservist was able to run his sixmile leg while stationed in Iraq. They’ve had runners virtually participate in Oklahoma City, San Francisco and as far away as Sitka, Alaska. Some Coast Guard Cutters completed their own Tom’s Run while on board their ship by running around the flight deck several years ago. The race doesn’t make a profit. The website is bare bones and Butturini is a oneman show. He takes pride in the inexpensive entry fee ($14) and the race’s minimalist style. “It’s not a fundraiser. It’s about celebrating the concept of community among the people who are participating”. For Tom’s Run veteran runner and Coast Guardsman Kelly Merchen, it’s not another race. “I love the concept of the team, unity, cohesiveness and support. When you do a regular 5k, you do it yourself…It’s just you,” said Merchen, 46. “But when you do this as a team, it’s fun. It’s not just running. It’s staying up and running while sleep deprived. It’s like going to church camp as a kid or doing a road trip; it’s just fun.” SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 11


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BY CHARLIE BAN Thank you to everyone who voted for the Best of Washington Running this year! We had to keep the voting to a month and a half to accommodate our publishing deadline, but we also had more than three times as many votes cast than in 2016. Look out for our nomination period in November and December for next year’s awards!

Best Pre-race Expo and Bib Pickup CHERRY BLOSSOM TEN MILE NATIONAL BUILDING MUSEUM The National Building Museum has played host to the Cherry Blossom expo since 2008, when race director Phil Stewart and his thendeputy Irv Newman realized the race had outgrown hotel ballrooms. Deputy Race Director Becky Lambros, who manages the expo, acknowledges that the race is a much different lessee the museum staff are accustomed, but they welcomed the runners and “throughout the intervening years they have become a true partner in our event,” she said. “The soaring venue, location close to the metro and the wonderful staff have made the Expo at the National Building Museum a wonderful place to start race weekend.” And, for out-of-towners, it helps them check another museum off their lists.

RUNNERS-UP MARINE CORPS MARATHON BEFORE ITS MOVE TO THE NATIONAL HARBOR — WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER AND D.C. ARMORY ARMY TEN-MILER — D.C. ARMORY

Best 10 mile CHERRY BLOSSOM

EARLY APRIL, WASHINGTON MONUMENT, WASHINGTON, D.C. WWW.CHERRYBLOSSOM.ORG

RUNNERS-UP ARMY TEN-MILER

OCT. 8, THE PENTAGON, ARLINGTON, VA. WWW.ARMYTENMILER.COM

G.W. PARKWAY CLASSIC APRIL 23, MOUNT VERNON, VA. WWW.RUNPACERS.COM/ RACE/PARKWAY-CLASSIC

The Credit Union CHERRY BLOSSOM TEN MILE EXPO at the National Building Museum. PHOTO COURTESY OF CREDIT UNION CHERRY BLOSSOM TEN MILE

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Best 5k RACE 4 RESPECT

SAT. JUNE 3, FREEDOM PLAZA, WASHINGTON, D.C. WWW.RACE4RESPECT.COM

When most races begin the planning process, they start small with an eye toward growth in the future and try to cut disruptions to a minimum. Not Gena Mitchell; she wanted to stop traffic. When setting out to plan the D.C. area’s first Down Syndrome-related event, she wanted it to be less of a fundraiser and more an event for every participant to remember. “So many ‘cause’ races raise money to wipe something out, eradicate something,” she said. “We want to celebrate what our children and people with Down Syndrome can do.” So having the race in downtown D.C. was a must, starting at Freedom Plaza and heading down Pennsylvania Avenue past the Capitol. Mitchell also wanted it to serve the competitive racing community, partially to bring people into the community but also to establish the race’s viability “If the race we built the event around wasn’t worthwhile, the whole thing would feel hollow,” she said. “I just wanted to do a great job with it and for people to have a good time and want to come back next year.” Most of the proceeds go into the event, though special education grants are awarded to the largest school-based team and the nine regional Down Syndrome networks.

RUNNERS-UP JINGLE ALL THE WAY

DEC. 10, WASHINGTON MONUMENT, WASHINGTON, D.C. WWW.RUNPACERS.COM/RACE/ JINGLE-ALL-THE-WAY-5K

CRYSTAL CITY TWILIGHTER

JULY 22, CRYSTAL CITY, ARLINGTON, VA. WWW.RUNPACERS.COM/RACE/ CRYSTAL-CITY-TWILIGHTER

GENA MITCHELL and her daughter, DEVIN, at the 2015 Race4Respect. PHOTO COURTESY OF GENA MITCHELL

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Best Half Marathon ROCK ‘N’ ROLL D.C.

MARCH 17, SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, WASHINGTON, D.C. WWW.RUNROCKNROLL.COM/DC

From its roots as the National Half Marathon, the Rock ‘n’ Roll D.C. Half Marathon serves as a rust buster for many runners targeting a Spring marathon or as a target to get people through the usually-tough Winter months. The course is tough, but fair. Remember, when thinking about climbing Shoreham Drive out of Rock Creek Park, that you get to barrel down to the reservoir a few miles later. It’s true tour of D.C. From the Mall, to Rock Creek Parkway, through Columbia Heights, H Street and Capitol Hill. And how many other races pass right down residential streets?

RUNNERS-UP NAVY-AIR FORCE HALF MARATHON

SEPT, 17, WASHINGTON MONUMENT, WASHINGTON, D.C. HTTP://WWW.NAVYHALF.COM/

PRINCE WILLIAM HALF MARATHON

OCT. 1, JIFFY LUBE LIVE, BRISTOW, VA. WWW.PRINCEWILLIAMHALF.COM

Runners navigate Columbia Heights during the 2016 Rock ‘n’ Roll D.C. Half Marathon. RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY DUSTIN WHITLOW/ D/WHIT PHOTOGRAPHY

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Best Maryland Specialty Running Store FLEET FEET SPORTS — GAITHERSBURG

255 KENTLANDS BLVD GAITHERSBURG, MD 20878 301-926-6442 WWW.FLEETFEETGAITHERSBURG.COM

Best Virginia Specialty Running Store

Fleet Feet Sports- Gaithersburg also won the 2015 Best of Washington Running Best Maryland Speciality Running Store, the only other time that category was contested.

THE RUNNING STORE — GAINESVILLE

7343 ATLAS WALKWAY, GAINESVILLE, VA. 703-753-4470 HTTP://WWW.THERUNNINGSTORETEAM.COM

RUNNERS-UP CHEVY CHASE RUNNING COMPANY

4461 WILLARD AVE, CHEVY CHASE, MD 20815 301-215-6355

RNJ SPORTS — ROCKVILLE

11910 PARKLAWN DR R, ROCKVILLE, MD 20852 301-881-0021 WWW.RNJSPORTS.COM

Best D.C. Specialty Running Store POTOMAC RIVER RUNNING — D.C. 919 F ST., NW WASHINGTON, DC 20004 WWW.POTOMACRIVERRUNNING.COM/ LOCATION/DC 202-393-8500

Near Ford’s Theater is a dicey place to sell running shoes, but Potomac River Running has thrived by being right in the thick of the downtown business district and pretty close to the National Mall, where no doubt hundreds of tourists discover, halfway through their visits, that their old busted sneakers aren’t going to last at the pace they’re walking around the nation’s capital.

RUNNERS-UP PACERS — 14TH STREET

1821 14TH STREET NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20009 202-506-2029 WWW.RUNPACERS.COM/LOCATION/ 14TH-STREET/

GEORGETOWN RUNNING COMPANY

3401 M ST NW, WASHINGTON, DC 20007 202-337-8626

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Former professional runner Ian Connor has taken the reins of Gainesville’s running specialty store, which will be celebrating its 10th anniversary this November.

RUNNERS-UP POTOMAC RIVER RUNNING — RESTON

11911 DEMOCRACY DR., RESTON VA 20190 WWW.POTOMACRIVERRUNNING.COM/ LOCATION/RESTON-CENTER 703-689-0999

PACERS — ALEXANDRIA

1301 KING STREET, ALEXANDRIA, VA 22314 703-836-1463 WWW.RUNPACERS.COM/LOCATION/ ALEXANDRIA

Best Running Club MONTGOMERY COUNTY ROAD RUNNERS CLUB WWW.MCRRC.ORG

Top to bottom, the Montgomery County Road Runners Club owns suburban Maryland running. With a designated back-of-the-pack group, it ensures that eveyone has a place in is variety of training programs, while at the same time members of the club’s competitive racing teams go shoulder-to-shoulder with some of the region’s fastest. The club also plays host to races of all types, from track miles to two (technically three) ultras.

RUNNERS-UP D.C. ROAD RUNNERS

WWW.DCROADRUNNERS.ORG

DISTRICT RUNNING COLLECTIVE WWW.DISTRICTRUNNINGCOLLECTIVE.COM


Best Running-related Nonprofit GIRLS ON THE RUN

WWW.GOTRDC.ORG WWW.GOTRNOVA.ORG WWW.GIRLSONTHERUNOFMOCO.ORG

At a time in a child’s development when social dynamics can muddy the waters of personal growth, Girls on the Run offers lessons in good health, happiness and confidence all based around the joy of running. Girls in grades 3-8 meet before or after school with volunteer coaches and train for the 5k that closes every season. The national organization is in its 21st year, the D.C. area is home to three chaptersD.C. Northern Virginia and Montgomery County, with the Piedmont (Virginia), Greater Chesapeake, Frederick County and Central Maryland chapters a little farther out.

RUNNERS-UP

BACK ON MY FEET

Best Physical Therapist or Clinician PROACTION PHYSICAL THERAPY 11820 PARKLAWN DRIVE, SUITE 120 ROCKVILLE, MD 20852 301-881-CARE WWW.PROACTIONPT.COM

Rockville-based ProAction Physical Therapy is a perennial contender for the Best of Washington Running, with Rachel Miller winning Best Physical Therapist in 2014 and her partner Ken Fleit finishing second that year, and Miller finishing as runner up in 2016.

DC.BACKONMYFEET.ORG

RUNNERS-UP

TEAM RWB

PETER SHERRY SPORTS MASSAGE

WWW.TEAMRWB.ORG

11319 SUNSET HILLS ROAD, RESTON, VA 20190 703-587-8403 WWW.SHERRYTHERAPY.COM

Best Coach KATHY PUGH

WWW.EZ8DC.COM WWW.DCROADRUNNERS.ORG/TRAINING. HTML

Already a successful private coach and a volunteer coach for the D.C. Road Runners, Kathy Pugh took charge of the club’s entire training program last year and impressed club President Rich Mendelowitz with her responsiveness to individual needs. “She understands running, the biomechanics, the structural issues, the anatomy, but she really listens to what people want and what their goals are,” he said. “She thoroughly explains to a group or individuals what you need to do, and in detail.” Perhaps her greatest coaching job, Trish Peva points out, is successfully running with her daughter, Ava. “As a mother of two teenage girls myself, I know that that is truly monumental,” Peva said.

RUNNERS-UP JULIE SAPPER AND LISA REICHMANN

WWW.RUNFARTHERANDFASTER.COM

DUSTIN SWEENEY

WWW.POTOMACRIVERRUNNING.COM/ PRODUCT-AND-SERVICE/COACHING

WASHINGTON WELLNESS PHYSICAL THERAPY 1100 H ST NW, SUITE LL-110, WASHINGTON, DC 20005 202-347-2373 WASHINGTONWELLNESSPT.COM

Best 10k PIKE’S PEEK

APRIL 23, SHADY GROVE METRO STATION, ROCKVILLE, MD. WWW.PIKESPEEK10K.ORG

If you aren’t running Boston or the George Washington Parkway Classic, chances are you’re thinking about trying for a 10k PR at Pike’s Peek. Though the course changes in recent years have made the downhill route a little less ridiculous, several of the miles leave runners feeling like there’s little-to-no consequence of just running all out.

RUNNERS-UP ST. PATRICK’S 10K

MARCH 3, WASHINGTON MONUMENT, WASHINGTON, D.C. WWW.RUNPACERS.COM/RACE/ST-PATS-RU

CAPITOL HILL CLASSIC

MAY 21, STANTON PARK, WASHINGTON, D.C. WWW.CAPITOLHILLCLASSIC.COM

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 17


Best place to take a visitor for a run in D.C. THE NATIONAL MALL

Best Ultramarathon NORTH FACE ENDURANCE CHALLENGE

APRIL 28-29, ALGONKIAN REGIONAL PARK, STERLING, VA.

A popular ultra offers a 50 mile and a 50k, along with a few other races for shorter distance runners, like marathoners, who aren’t quite ready for the big time. It weaves through the Potomac Heritage Trail starting in Sterling and reaches Great Falls Park. Read more about the course in this issue’s Off the Beaten Path, starting on page x.

RUNNERS-UP BULL RUN RUN 50

EARLY APRIL, HEMLOCK OVERLOOK REGIONAL PARK, CLIFTON, VA WWW.VHTRC.ORG/BRR

STONE MILL 50

NOV. 11, STEDWICK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, MONTGOMERY VILLAGE, MD. WWW.STONE-MILL-50-MILE.ORG

RUNNERS-UP ROCK CREEK PARK TIDAL BASIN

Best place to take a visitor for a run in Maryland C&O CANAL TOWPATH RUNNERS-UP GREAT FALLS SENECA CREEK STATE PARK

Best place to take a visitor for a run in Virginia MOUNT VERNON TRAIL RUNNERS-UP GREAT FALLS NATIONAL PARK MANASSAS BATTLEFIELDS

Best course

Best Natural Surface Trail

MARINE CORPS MARATHON

C&O CANAL TOWPATH

OCT. 22, THE PENTAGON, ARLINGTON, VA.

RUNNERS-UP Some say it’s the triumphant climb up the hill to the Iwo Jima memorial. Others love looping the Mall. Or running on Spout Run Parkway. It’s not the fastest course, and a windy day on the 14th Street Bridge can back that point up, but it’s comfortable, reliable and It’s also subject to permits from a variety of local governments and agencies, and when the Metro SafeTrack restrictions tightened the window for runners to reach the starting line in 2016, Operations Manager Bret Schmidt managed to rework the course to give people a little extra time to get to the line while also opening the 14th Street Bridge as scheduled.

RUNNERS-UP CHERRY BLOSSOM TEN-MILE

EARLY APRIL, WASHINGTON MONUMENT, WASHINGTON, D.C.

PRINCE WILLIAM HALF MARATHON

OCT. 1, JIFFY LUBE LIVE, BRISTOW, VA.

18 | RUNWASHINGTON | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | SUMMER 2017

MANASSAS BATTLEFIELDS GREAT FALLS NATIONAL PARK

Best Paved Path CAPITAL CRESCENT TRAIL RUNNERS-UP WASHINGTON & OLD DOMINION TRAIL MOUNT VERNON TRAIL

Best D.C. perk THE SCENERY RUNNERS-UP NUMBER OF TRAILS VARIETY OF RACES


run washington v2 cmyk.indd 1

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Members of the DUNBAR ALEXANDRIA-OLYMPIC BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB during the 2016 George Washington Parkway Classic 5k. PHOTO BY SWIM BIKE RUN PHOTOGRAPHY

20 | RUNWASHINGTON | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | SUMMER 2017


BY ARIEL COHEN It takes a lot to make a race run smoothly, but it doesn’t take a lot to teach kids to fall in love with running. The Dunbar Alexandria-Olympic Boys and Girls Club’s involvement with the George Washington Parkway Classic is proof. Pacers Running and the Boys and Girls Club have a longstanding partnership focused on getting local youth involved in running. Look no further than the enthusiastic boys and girls handing out water cups, cheering on runners or racing in the 5k at this year’s race. Between 8,000 and 9,000 runners are expected to participate in this year’s 10 miler and 5k on April 23. Meanwhile, the Boys and Girls Club will help pass out more than 2,472 gallons of water along the course, hand out thousands of finisher medals and cheer runners along the route. Older volunteers from the club man the post-race beer garden. Plus, every kid in the club trains for the kids dash, while many even participate in the 5k. This partnership goes back 15 years and came naturally. The race passes by the club’s headquarters. And Keith Burner, a Boys and Girls Club board member and former Parkway race organizer, was responsible for officially linking the two organizations. “It lands in our backyard, right here in Alexandria,” Burner said. “We are committed to serving at-risk youth in our city that we love. We hope to always be partners with Pacers for this race because we so enjoy what this race means to our city and to the Boys and Girls Club.” Ties have indeed remained strong. In fact, after each George Washingon Parkway Classic, Pacers donates upwards of $25,000 to the Boys and Girls Club, a sum mainly supported by entry fees and sponsorships. On weekdays, the Parkway is notorious for its bumper-to-bumper morning traffic, while also popular for its scenic views of the Washington Monument and Potomac River. While the Mount Vernon Trail runs alongside parts of the parkway and is a favorite of many local athletes, this is one few races that actually occurs on the usually busy road.

Running beyond race day When Pacers and the Boys and Girls Club first joined forces, they wanted to make sure that the kids not only trained for the springtime Parkway Classic, but were motivated to run after race day. To incentivize the young runners, Pacers loaned out running shoes. They could keep them, too. All they had to was complete the race. The motivation worked. Today, more than 20 of the Boys and Girls Club members who

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 21


trained for the GW Parkway Classic at one point are now track and field runners at T.C. Williams High School. “The experience exposed the kids to see what a real race is about,” Alexandria Boys and Girls Club Branch Manager Alston Waller said. “So this race was something different and fun at the same time with the kids. They really took to it and enjoyed it every year.” The Boys and Girls Club takes training seriously. Every kid ages 5–18 who enters the door of the club in the months leading up to the race trains. No excuses. Waller and the kids run miles around the block, do sprints on a nearby track and also encourage a little competition. They hold mile fun runs to determine the fastest kid in every age group, but the main challenge is personal. Each club member runs with their most recent best time written on their hand. Their goal? Beat the number on their hand. Most of the kids who choose to run do the 5k race, but a few of the older ones take on the 10 miler. In the early days of the race, Waller had to call parents at early hours and even pick up some of the kids himself to make sure everyone got to their water stop or to the starting line. Now, the night before the race, Waller holds a big sleepover at the Boys and Girls Club to make sure everyone is ready for the 6 a.m. wake-up call. The sleepover helps make sure everyone is there, though it doesn’t exactly help performance. “The kids usually stay up all night laughing, then we have to go straight to the race,” said Waller, who expects at least 50 members to participate in this year’s race. “There’s a lot of energy behind it once they’ve been exposed to running,” he added. “Once we finish with the Parkway race lots of kids are asking, ‘Okay, when are we going to the next race?’” And while the Boys and Girls Club is a constant feature on race day, they aren’t the only volunteers on the course. The race needs up to 300 volunteers every year in order to run smoothly. Other water stops and aid stations will be manned by the Alexandria Police Foundation, the November Project, Shirlington Running Club, D.C. Front Runners, D.C. Road Runners and the Alexandria Police Foundation. “We’re very fortunate with this race to partner with a lot of the community in Alexandria,” Lisa Reeves, Pacers Events Race Director, said. “It’s considered Alexandria’s hometown race. There’s a lot of tradition that’s affiliated with the race and it’s an excellent distance for this time of year”.

22 | RUNWASHINGTON | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | SUMMER 2017


KEITH BURNER (right), member of the Dunbar AlexandriaOlympic Boys and Girls Club board of directors, with Branch Director ALSTON WALKER and MARIAN NEAL. RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY MARLEEN VAN DEN NESTE

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 23


MAY 2 ROSARYVILLE OFF-ROAD HALF MARATHON AND 10K UPPER MARLBORO, MD

MAY 6 COLLEGE PARK PARKRUN COLLEGE PARK, MD RUN TO BREAK THE SILENCE ON OVARIAN CANCER 5K NATIONAL HARBOR, MD NANTY NARKING NEARLY 9K SANDY SPRING, MD SET SMART! 5K LEESBURG, VA FALCON 5K VIENNA, VA LA MILLA DE MAYO GAITHERSBURG, MD OAK HILL 5K OAK HILL, VA AMP UP! RUN TO END BLADDER CANCER 5K WASHINGTON, DC

MAY 7 RACE FOR HOPE DC 5K WASHINGTON, DC PUBLIC SERVICE CHARITY 5K WASHINGTON, DC MARK’S RUN 5K BETHESDA, MD OAR RUN FOR AUTISM WASHINGTON, DC BACKYARD BURN 5M/10M LORTON, VA LOUDOUN LYME 10K/5K/1K ASHBURN, VA RESCUE1 8K BETHESDA, MD BABY’S BOUNTY 5K ROCKVILLE, MD ASHBURN VILLAGE FIESTA 5K/10K ASHBURN, VA HOPECAM 5K

RESTON, VA SPRING BACKYARD BURN TRAIL RUNNING SERIES-RACE #4 LORTON, VA AOL 5K DULLES, VA

MAY 20 LACE UP FOR RAINN 5K WASHINGTON, DC GERMANTOWN 5 MILER GERMANTOWN, MD CLIFTON CABOOSE TWILIGHT RUN

DEFEAT DIPG SUPERHERO SPRINT & 6K BETHESDA, MD CROPPEMETCALFE’S 10 MILER AND 5K BUG RUN WASHINGTON, DC

CLIFTON, VA

MAY 29

SEMPER FI 5K

JEREMY’S RUN

WASHINGTON, DC

OLNEY, MD

RACE FOR LINMARIE FIGHTER 5K/

RINGING IN HOPE 5K/10K

POWER 10K

ASHBURN, VA

LAKE RIDGE, VA

MEMORIAL 5 MILE

MY HEALTH MATTERS 5K

ROCKVILLE, MD

HERNDON, VA

JUNE 3

ADAM’S ANGELS 5K

SPRINGFIELD 5K

FAIRFAX, VA

ALEXANDRIA/FRANCONIA, VA

SIMPSON 5K COLOR STAMPEDE

RACE4RESPECT 5K

LEESBURG, VA

WASHINGTON, DC

WESTFIELD 5K

STROKES & STRIDES

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK 5K

CHANTILLY, VA

GAITHERSBURG, MD

WASHINGTON, DC

SPIRIT RUN 5K

COLLEEN’S BA 5K

KIDS ON THE RUN

FAIRFAX STATION, VA

KENSINGTON, MD

GAITHERSBURG, MD

WT WOODSON 5K

BALTIMORE 10 MILER

HERNDON MIDDLE SCHOOL 5K

FAIRFAX, VA

BALTIMORE, MD

HERNDON , VA

SPRING IN TO SUMMER 5K

QUEEN OF APOSTLES 5K

LAUREL, MD

JUNE 4

ALEXANDRIA, VA

MAY 21

VIENNA ELEMENTARY 5K VIENNA, VA MELANOMORE 5K STERLING, VA FRIENDS OF MONTESSORI EDUCATION 5K ARLINGTON, VA MENTORING MATTERS 5K WASHINGTON, DC POTOMAC RIVER MARATHON AND HALF WASHINGTON, DC

MAY 13

RACCOON RUN 5K FAIRFAX, VA RACE TO VICTORY 5K BRISTOW, VA SPRING BURKE LAKE 5K/10K FAIRFAX STATION,VA

MAY 14

STAR KIDS 5K

HERNDON, VA

FAIRFAX, VA

RUN FOR THE ANIMALS 5K

JUNE 10

SILVER SPRING, MD RESERVOIR RELAY TRAIL RUN CENTREVILLE, VA RUNNING WITH THE STARS ASHBURN, VA

BETHESDA, MD

CAPITOL HILL CLASSIC

RUN AWARE

WASHINGTON, DC

BETHESDA, MD

MCM HISTORIC HALF

MOTHER’S DAY 4 MILER

FREDERICKSBURG, VA

RESTON, VA

MAY 28

SPRINGFIELD, VA TRICIA DAVIS 5K WASHINGTON, DC

24 | RUNWASHINGTON | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | SUMMER 2017

HERNDON, VA

RED SHOE 5K

HOPE FOR HENRY’S 5K

MOTHERS HELPING MOTHERS 5K

HENDON FESTIVAL 10K/5K

ALEXANDRIA RUNNING FESTIVAL HALF MARATHON/5K ALEXANDRIA, VA

LAWYERS HAVE HEART 10K/5K WASHINGTON, DC RUN AMUCK QUANTICO, VA

JUNE 11 CELEBRATE FAIRFAX 5K FAIRFAX, VA FOUNTAINHEAD OFF-ROAD HALF MARATHON AND 10K FOUNTAINHEAD OFF-ROAD HALF MARATHON AND 10K FAIRFAX STATION, VA


Presented by:

Parkway Classic GEORGE WASHIN

GTON

10 MILE • 5K • K IDS DASH

RACE DAY EVENT GUIDE 8:00AM | APRIL 23, 2017 | ALEXANDRIA, VA


WELCOME WELCOME TO GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL PARKWAY! On behalf of George Washington Memorial Parkway staff and the National Park Service we welcome runners, walkers, and spectators to the fourth most visit national park site in the United States. The parkway was designed for recreational driving and stops along this 25-mile roadway form a sweeping course in American history from colonization to slavery sprinkled with marshes and other natural wonders. George Washington Memorial Parkway is committed to providing outstanding recreational opportunities and facilitating transformative experiences for visitors from all walks of life. During this year’s George Washington Parkway Classic, Park Rangers and National Park Service volunteers will cheer on participants as they run on the scenic roadway originally known as the Mount Vernon Memorial Parkway. Rumor, even has it that Buddy Bison will be at the finish line!

The parkway which runs alongside the southern edge of the Potomac River from Mount Vernon to Great Falls is a major commuter route for area residents. However, for a couple of hours in April every year, the George Washington Memorial Parkway transforms itself into a pedestrian-friendly roadway. People of all ages and all abilities are given an opportunity to enjoy morning’s early light as they run or walk towards the finish line in Alexandria. Last year, as part of the National Park Service Centennial celebration, a group of GWMP employees— the Blazin Bisons participated in the race. It was an unforgettable experience. I saw the beauty of the area with new eyes and made friends along the way. By walking literally on the roadway instead of driving, my senses were awakened to the natural world rarely experienced while in a vehicle and I gained a whole new appreciation for George Washington Memorial Parkway.

Whether you are a participant or spectator, please take a moment to smell the air, listen to the wild sounds, and enjoy the view because George Washington Memorial Parkway is a special place that has been set aside for your enjoyment. Happy trails and see you at the finish line!

BLANCA ALVAREZ STRANSKY, ACTING SUPERINTENDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL PARKWAY


Experience Old Town

Presented by:

FROM START TO FINISH

Minutes from Washington D.C. on the Potomac River, Old Town Alexandria delights travelers from all over the world. A nationally designated historic district founded in 1749 that George Washington called home, Old Town Alexandria hums with more than 200 independent restaurants and boutiques alongside intimate historic museums and new happenings at the waterfront.

VISIT OUR BOUTIQUES

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HOTEL INDIGO RACE DAY SPECTATOR HOSPITALITY 220 South Union Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 8:00-11:00 a.m. Hotel Indigo Old Town Alexandria is Alexandria’s first waterfront hotel, delivering a stylish, local experience inspired by the city’s picturesque waterfront, and paying homage to its maritime roots. During the George Washington Parkway Classic, Hotel Indigo Old Town Alexandria will serve as a meeting area for spectators, offering poster-making stations to help cheer on race participants. Additionally, the hotel will feature a “refuel bar” offering racers healthy refreshments as they pass through.

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STAY IN ALEXANDRIA It’s not too late to book your weekend getaway hotel package. Check out local hotels and unique activities from our partner Visit Alexandria! www.visitalexandriava.com/parkwayclassic

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Stroll the streets and pick up some goodies during our packet pick ups or race weekend. Download the race app for details on boutique and restaurant Parkway Classic specials!

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Food & Kitchen

Hooray for Books Pacers Running Olio Tasting Room fibre space™ Acme Mid-Century + Modern 6. Stitch Sew Shop 7. Pink & Brown 8. Red Barn Mercantile 9. Current Boutique 10. Bellacara 11. Bishop Boutique

Craft

Kids & Home & Beauty Shoes Fashion Babies Design

12. Duchess M 13. Periwinkle Boutique 14. Vintage Mirage 15. The Dog Park 16. Fleurir Chocolates 17. TSALT 18. Mint Condition 19. 529 Kids Consign 20. Sara Campbell 21. The Shoe Hive 22. Hysteria

23. The Spice & Tea Exchange 24. Gossypia 25. La Cuisine 26. The Hive 27. She’s Unique 28. lou lou 29. The Christmas Attic 30. Coco Blanca A. Podolsky Group, 1701 Duke Street Suite, 100

Pets

Gifts

Jewelry

Dining

B. Lena’s Wood-Fired Pizza & Tap, 401 E. Braddock Rd. C. La Fromagerie D. Braddock Commercial Real Estate, 1018 Wythe St. E. The Majestic F. Misha’s Coffeehouse G. American Advertising, 708 Pendleton St. H. S. Freedman & Sons, 3322 Pennsy Dr.,

Water Taxi & Tours

Business Partner

Landover, MD I. a la Lucia, 315 Madison St. J. LizLuke K. Vola’s Dockside Grill L. Union Street Public House M. Virtue Feed & Grain N. Potomac Riverboat Company

RUN WITH US AT PORT CITY BREWING The award-winning Port City Brewing Company may be our beer garden partner at the Parkway Classic but did you know most Mondays Pacers Running and Port City host our popular Joggers + Lagers, a free community fun run! Jog with new friends followed by spirits in the Port City tasting room. Visit runpacers.com/calendar for details on our next run.

CHOW DOWN ON SOME DONUTS Be sure to stop by our partner, Sugar Shack, for some pre- or post-race fuel. Sugar Shack is the proud host of our Sugar Shack Kid’s Dash. sugarshackdonuts.com

THIS CAMPAIGN WAS MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH THE SUPPORT OF THE ALEXANDRIA MARKETING FUND.


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PLEASE NOTE: Bag check and claim areas are manned by volunteers and staff. The event is not responsible for lost or stolen items. Leave at your own risk. Any items not picked up by the end of the event are taken to the Pacers Alexandria store and may be retrieved there. Items left after seven days will be tossed or donated to charity.

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YOU MUST USE THE CLEAR BAG CHECK BAG GIVEN TO YOU AT PACKET PICK UP. ABSOLUTELY NO GYM BAGS OR BACKPACKS.

» After the races start (8:00am), all checked items will be waiting for you at bag claim in the finish festival area.

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We will have a sag bus manned by a nurse following the last runner. You must maintain a 15 minute pace to not be placed on SAG. You will also be asked to board if you fall behind our course time limits. If you feel like you cannot complete the event for any reason, please board the sag bus.

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Course time limits — from the gun start GWPC runners must arrive at each mile mark by the time of day noted: Mile 1: 8:30am; Mile 2: 8:45am; Mile 3: 9:00am; Mile 4: 9:15am; Mile 5: 9:30am; Mile 6: 9:45am; Mile 7: 10:00am; Mile 8: 10:15am; Mile 9: 10:30am; Finish 10:45am.

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KIDS DASH START TIME: 10:30 AM

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DOWNLOAD THE APP NOW FOR FREE

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FOR THE BEST MOBILE EXPERIENCE AT THE GEORGE WASHINGTON PARKWAY CLASSIC

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Official schedule, course map and other helpful info at your fingertips Live GPS tracking for participants and spectators* View and share official race results and photos Official event news and announcements

*Live GPS tracking must be activated by the athlete and requires running with their mobile device.


TRANSPORTATION (CONT’D) PARKING

POST-RACE SHUTTLES

PARKING AT EISENHOWER AVENUE (ALEXANDRIA)

Shuttles will be available from 8:00AM – 11:45AM on race day to shuttle participants to King Street METRO, Pacers Alexandria, Eisenhower Avenue and Pentagon City (pick up located on Fairfax Street).

Ample parking at the Patent and Trade Office West Garage (29 Elizabeth Lane, Alexandria, VA 22314) and the Hoffman Monument Lot (2430 Eisenhower Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22314)

PARKING AT CANAL PLAZA (OLD TOWN, ALEXANDRIA)

These buses will run on a 10-15 minute loop. There are no post-race shuttles back to either start.

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PLEASE NOTE: Pre-race complimentary bus service is for registered runners only Family, friends and spectators WILL NOT be allowed to board any of the pre-race shuttle buses. Friends and family may board the post-race shuttle but must be accompanied by a runner.

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OLD TOWN, ALEXANDRIA STREET PARKING Limited street parking is available in and around the finish area. To avoid delay, consider parking west of Washington Street and walking the handful of blocks to bus loading.

New Plaza Delivering This Spring

Unparalleled On-site Amenities

BUILDING 11 Full Building Available

BUILDING 66 1,853 SF - 17,964 SF

BUILDING 44 One Spec Suite Left!

BUILDING 99 2,810 SF - 9,703 SF

FOR MORE INFORMATION +1 703 448 1200 canalcenterva.com


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It was a dark and stormy night... When Jillian got a call from her clients who’d recently purchased a beautiful condo in Alexandria. Jillian answered, as she always does, and quickly learned that water was pouring in through their ceiling from the unit above... Visit JillianKeck.com/TWIC to read how it ends! Jillian Keck, McEnearney Associates REALTORSŽ m 703.951.7655 d 703.286.1320 | jkeck@mcenearney.com Alexandria Office | www.mcenearney.com

109 S Pitt Street Alexandria, VA 22314 703. 549. 9292

Parkway Classic Special:


GEORGE WASHINGTON

Parkway Classic

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ARLINGTON / PENTAGON CITY SHUTTLE

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1. 10M / 5K FINISH 2. CHUTE EXIT (SECURED) 3. MEDICAL 4. VIP LOUNGE 5. BAG DROP 6. RESTROOMS 7. BEER GARDEN ENTRANCE 8. SPONSOR TENTS - A THRU D 9. INFORMATION TENT 10. BEER TENT 11. BAND STAGE 12. TIMING TRUCK 13. SOUND 14. POST-RACE WATER 15. POST-RACE MEDALS 16. POST-RACE FOOD & HYDRATION TENT 17. POST-RACE MASSAGE 18. BETTER STATE CREW KIDS ZONE 19. BOUNCE HOUSE 20. PHOTOBOOTH 21. STAFF TENT

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KID’S DASH

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PARENTS AND KIDDOS! » Meet at the Parkway Classic finish line for the Sugar Shack Kid’s Dash at 10:30am. First wave will step off shortly after.

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T

SUGAR SHACK

START FINISH

» You may enter the start line from the finish chute exit (see #2 on Finish Line Festival Map); please make sure your child has their bib number to show security for access. » Due to crowding, we request only one parent per participant at the start/finish line. Parents are allowed to run along their children. » Medals and Sugar Shack donuts are distributed to kid’s dash participants with valid runner bibs only. We regret we will not have product for parents or non-registered kids dash participants.

Legend >>>>

Runner’s Path Runner’s Turnaround Start/Finish

Pacers Running

RacIng With KIDS! Kids who run are happy, healthy kids! Here is the schedule of Pacers Running races as well other local events that both welcome and champion the smallest runners. Grab your kids and make memories out there! 5/21

Capitol Hill Classic 10k, 3k and Fun Run

6/10

Lawyers Have Heart 10k, 5k and Fun Walk

7/22

Crystal City Twlighter 5k

6/4

Girls on the RunDC Spring 5k

6/18

Kids Superhero Dash for Dad (ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk)

9/23

DCXC Project

9/24

Clarendon Day Run 5k, 10, Double, and Kids Dash


THANK YOU

FROM PACERS RUNNING

We want to thank you for participating in this year’s Parkway Classic. Your run helps support our local chapter of the Boys and Girls Club raising funds for their annual operating needs. We are also thrilled that over 50 club members have trained for months to participate in this year’s event! The Parkway Classic is rooted in the Alexandria community, produced by Alexandria’s preeminent running retailer, Pacers Running, and with such noted partners as Alexandria’s own Port City Brewing, Sugar Shack Donuts, the Old Town Boutique District, Jillian Keck/McEnearny Associates, the City of Alexandria, Mount Vernon Estates, and the National Park Service. We would like to invite you to not just run the race but walk our streets and explore our amazing city restaurants and shops, as featured by our partner the Old Town Boutique District and Visit Alexandria. Be sure to check our race app for great deals from local boutiques, restaurants, and hotels. On behalf of our staff, partners, vendors, volunteers, and beneficiaries, we wish you a wonderful race experience at Alexandria’s Hometown Race!

KATHY DALBY

CEO// PARTNER PACERS RUNNING

CHRIS FARLEY

OWNER// GENERAL MANAGER PACERS RUNNING

PACE THE NATION!

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34th Annual SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2018


JULY 15

AUGUST 26

DC ROAD RUNNERS TRACK

BLUE CRAB BOLT 5K/10K

CHAMPIONSHIP

CLARKSBURG, MD

RUN FOR THE ROSES 5K

WASHINGTON, DC

WHEATON, MD

JULY 16

AUGUST 27

ALEX’S RUN OLNEY, MD

JUNE 17 LOSING TO LIVE 5K ANNANDALE, VA

JUNE 18 FATHER’S DAY 8K WASHINGTON, DC ZERO PROSTATE CANCER RUN ARLINGTON, VA FATHERS HELPING FATHERS 10K/5K SPRINGFIELD, VA RUN WITH DAD 5K RESTON, VA

JUNE 24 FREEDOM HAPPENS 5K MCLEAN, VA TWLIGHT FESTIVAL 4 MILER

RESTON, VA

CENTREVILLE, VA

AUGUST 28

JULY 22

QUANTICO, VA

ARLINGTON, VA

MCM QUANTICO TRI

JULY 23

QUANTICO, VA

POTOMAC RIVER RUNNING BIRTHDAY

SEPTEMBER 1

BASH 5K

HEMLOCK HALF MARATHON/10K

FAIRFAX, VA

CLIFTON, VA

JULY 29

SEPTEMBER 4

DASH-FOR-DASH 5K

GREAT AMERICAN LABOR DAY 5K

WASHINGTON, DC

FAIRFAX, VA

BLUE CRAB BOLT 5K/10K GERMANTOWN, MD

JULY 30

BLUE CRAB BOLT 5K/10K

RILEY’S RUMBLE HALF

GAITHERSBURG, MD

MARATHON/8K

SUDS AND SOLES 5K

BOYDS, MD

ROCKVILLE, MD

MIGHTY MILE

JULY 1

FAIRFAX, VA

LITTLE BENNETT XC

AUGUST 4

CLARKSBURG, MD

GOING GREEN TRACK MEET

JULY 2

ROCKVILLE, MD

FREEDOM 5K

AUGUST 5

FAIRFAX, VA

NAUGHTICAL BEER MILE

JULY 4

WASHIGTON , DC

FIRECRACKER 5K

AUGUST 19

RESTON, VA

EASTERN COUNTY 8K

AUTISM SPEAKS 5K

SILVER SPRING, MD

POTOMAC, MD

AUGUST 20

JULY 7

LEESBURG 20K/5K

MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S MILE

LEESBURG, VA

JULY 14

MCM QUANTICO 12K

CRYSTAL CITY TWILIGHTER

ASHBURN, VA

ROCKVILLE, MD

SOUTH LAKES 10K

SUNDAE 5K

Upcoming races is not a comprehensive listing of road races, but are chosen for their proximity to the Washington, D.C. area. Listings are based largely on information provided by race directors on the free online race calendar at www.runwashington.com. Race directors should be advised to add their races to the calendar as soon as possible to aid inclusion in this listing. It is wise to confirm event details with organizers before registering for an event. Date and times are subject to change. If you would like to have your race being run between September and November listed in our next print edition, please add it to our online calendar by July 15.

BASTILLE DAY 4 MILER WASHIGTON, DC

RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY SWIM BIKE RUN PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 37


IDA and BOB DRAIM. RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY DUSTIN WHITLOW/ D.WHIT PHOTO

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BY LAURA S CADUTO When life is dictated by 6-minute increments and responding to multiple competing demands every single day without breaking a sweat, you have a high-stress job. People who practice law are driven, competitive and have a massively high tolerance for pain and repetition. They aren’t strangers to hard work. And, when they do take time for themselves, running seems like an easy transition: just a different set of rigors. They can compete when they run — against others or their own goals. They can push their limits each and every time they throw on their shoes. But strangely, they can simultaneously use the sport to clear their heads and lose themselves in the sheer joy of pounding pavement. And it just so happens you can’t seem to swing a pair of shoes in this region without hitting a lawyer. The personality profile of those who proudly attach “esquire” to their name is exactly what Jenny Paul, 29, attributes much of her success to in both running and law. Paul does litigation and enforcement work at a large law firm and typically puts in a 50-60 hour week. “Type-A, type-A, type-A!” Paul says. “I like structure, and I like goal setting, so I tend to be pretty rigid about making sure I follow my training plan and try to assess which workouts work and which don’t.” For her, the match between being an attorney and a runner is a perfect pairing of her passions and personality. Paul not only won the 2016 Baystate Marathon last October, but also went sub-3, a huge mental barrier that she was extremely proud to break, reinforcing the driven, competitive nature of both lawyers and runners. She is also a member of a running club called The Dojo of Pain, composed of many local lawyers. Despite the ties between determination and achievement, Paul also notes that “[running is] a great stress relief and it’s an excuse to leave the house without your Blackberry.” Kelsey Feeheley, an insurance claims attorney who lives in Bethesda, agrees. “A lot of what happens during my day is out of my control,” Feeheley says. “Planning runs gives me control over a small part of my day and getting fresh air helps clear my mind.” While Feeheley doesn’t consider herself a competitive runner, she has found that running has added many positive attributes to her day, mostly giving her something positive to look forward to. While Paul and Feeheley admit to being part of a profession known for its high-stress, high demand expectations, they also feel that attorneys in the D.C. area aren’t that different from other professionals. One great thing about running is it that your age, sex, religion or profession don’t matter — we’re all just here to run.

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 39


For Bob Draim and his wife, Ida, of Alexandria, running has been the backdrop of their lives. Now 62, Bob is breaking records left and right but he doesn’t focus on the parallels with his profession when he contemplates his accomplishments as a runner. “Yes, running has benefited me indirectly by keeping me focused physically and mentally,” he says. “I don’t know if there are a lot of lawyers who run since we do not usually discuss work at races — we might not even know someone’s profession.” Bob’s passion for running began after he finished law school while he was serving as a federal law clerk in Virginia. One day, a fellow clerk turned to Bob and asked if he’d like to join him in running the Shamrock Marathon in Virginia Beach. Almost on a lark, Bob took the plunge and ran the race. He was hooked. Over the years, Bob ran the Marine Corps Marathon, the Richmond Marathon and countless other running races before switching to triathlons in the 1980s. During the 1980s and early 1990s, he completed over 50 triathlons. All the while, Bob was also busy building a career as a civil litigator, a career now spanning over 30 years. Bob is currently a partner with the Hudgins Law Firm in Alexandria. He is the author of two legal treatises: one on Virginia products liability law and the other on Virginia tort and personal injury law. Bob is the poster child for the hard-driving, committed lawyer and runner. Ida’s record is impressive, too. She ran her first competitive running races, mostly 10Ks, when the two were dating and engaged in the early 1990s. While raising their two sons, Ida kept in shape with early morning treadmill workouts, often at 4:30 a.m. so she could catch the early morning shuttle to New York City. Recovery from a health scare prompted her to resume competitive racing. In 2011, she had emergency surgery for a near-fatal twisted bowel and spent two weeks in the hospital. Back home, she would walk the neighborhood as part of her recovery and then started running with the goal of doing the Marine Corps Marathon, which she ran in the fall of 2013 at the age of 57. She qualified for the 2015 Boston Marathon, which she ran

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in 3:56. Her marathon PR came this past fall in the New York Marathon, and her 3:53 was good for 7th in her age group. One year after Ida’s surgery, Bob underwent radiation and chemotherapy for treatment of stage 4 neck cancer, and when treatment was over, Bob followed Ida’s lead and started training for running races and the Nation’s Triathlon. After marrying Ida and starting a family, Bob was happy to race less while helping to manage a travel soccer team and officiate at swim meets. He may not have been running as much but the drive and competitiveness were still there. They were just focused on the success of their two sons. Ida had a pretty impressive legal career in her own right. After serving as Special Counsel to the Chairman of the Securities Exchange Commission, she subsequently practiced securities regulation law for over 30 years, including as a partner in a Wall Street law firm. She retired in 2015. Running has been part of the fabric of this dynamic couple for their entire marriage, and has helped them cope with adversity in a way their impressive legal talents could not. Together, Bob and Ida joined Potomac Valley Track Club and were part of the team that won the Master’s National Indoor Championship two years ago. They also joined D.C. Road Runners and each won the past two race series (Snowball and Bunion). While Bob and Ida might not link their careers to their passion for running, it is pretty clear that their personal characteristics have equipped them well to tackle both. There are lots of lawyers out there who have found their way to running and are pretty good at it, just like Jenny Paul, Kelsey Feeheley and Bob and Ida Draim. In fact, the Lawyers Have Heart 10k and 5k in June gives them a chance to compete, individually and as part of their firm or agency’s teams, all while raising money for heart disease research — a vulnerability for many attorneys. If there’s anything these runners can agree on, it’s that running is for everyone, no matter your profession.


Running with, not from, your problems

RUNWASHINGTON PHOTOS BY MARLEEN VAN DEN NESTE

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 41


BY KATIE BOLTON The Washington D.C. metropolitan region ranks near the top of most lists of things that cause stress—from traffic to cost of living, poverty, work demands and more. And since November, tensions have seemed to run higher than usual in the city, with the fate of federal jobs seemingly hanging in the balance. But you don’t have to buy a coloring book or move to Canada to feel better. Whatever your worries, locals in the know agree that running is a vital tool to care for yourself in stressful times. Just ask Dr. Keith Kaufman, a runner and a clinical psychologist specializing in sport and exercise psychology. At his Northern Virginia practice, he works with highperforming athletes and beginners trying to develop exercise routines. He’s seen it all —student athletes pushing themselves to the breaking point, elites trying to achieve new heights in performance and of course the stereotypical Type-A D.C. professional whose day is scheduled down to the minute. A self-described Type A himself, Kaufman is an evangelist for running to manage stress or anxiety. Stress, put simply, is the body’s physical response to perceived danger. It’s our fight or flight instinct transposed onto modern society, where we worry more about money, jobs or relationships than, say, being attacked by a bear. Anxiety is the emotional response, the dread or discomfort from those unresolved threats. Both tax the body and mind and can, if left unmanaged, lead to exhaustion, a weakened immune system, poor sleep and eating and other symptoms that look a lot like depression. “It’s almost like you’re driving your car with your foot slammed down on the gas,” Kaufman says of stress. “Eventually, something’s going to break down if you drive that way.” The key to fighting stress is to replenish energy, not through idle stimulation like television or social media, but through release and reward, he said. “I feel best when I’m in motion,” said Amy, of Alexandria, a runner who has long been prone to anxiety and uses running and training to release that tension. Of the sources of her stress, she said, “I feel like in some ways, I always operate at just a heightened level…. I really struggle to turn my head off. It’s not one thing that keeps me up at night.” Stress makes her feel wound up and she sometimes grinds her teeth. In the worst moments, it robs her of sleep. Laying awake at night, she would worry about not sleeping, or the work awaiting her the next day that she would be too tired to complete, and the night would become a self-fulfilling cycle of stress. And when her dad passed away a few years ago, her anxiety and depression spiked. Over the years, Amy tried a variety of fixes to manage her anxiety with limited success. She ramped up her training beyond its usefulness, leading to injury and adrenal

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problems. She fixated on healthy eating until eating made her anxious. Over time these fixes became stressors themselves, rather than the relief she’d hoped for. “If somebody is doing too much of a good thing and it’s starting to take on a life of its own or interfering with life functioning or somebody is getting a little too fixated on it,” the exercise becomes counterproductive, Kaufman said. He emphasizes flexibility to minimize reliance on one source of stress relief. Eventually, Amy worked with her doctor to build a holistic plan to manage her anxiety and depression. She uses breathing exercises and meditation to calm her thoughts so she does not rely solely on exercise. She also takes antianxiety and antidepressant medications, in addition to supplements. “I don’t think medication solves problems,” she said. “I think medication just adjusts your threshold a little bit so that you have the ability to actually deal with things yourself.” She feels that the medication gives her the space to manage her own stress and anxiety without becoming overwhelmed, something she had been struggling with. With time, patience and this multipronged approach, she has regained the health benefits of running. Physically, she is stronger and less injury-prone. Mentally, she once again feels enjoyment, relief and a sense of control when she runs. “I have the same reaction on a beautiful 55-degree day that’s sunny, no wind, sort of that perfect running condition as I do on a day where it’s terrible out, pouring or really windy or whatever. It almost doesn’t matter,” she said. “I just really like being outside and I like the act of the run and moving from point A to point B. Ninety-nine-point-nine percent of the time, if I’m having a bad day or stressed, if I go out and just do something, it’s a nightand-day difference.” Running is a popular way to relieve stress because it’s readily available with relatively little fanfare. “All you basically need is some decent clothes and shoes and you can go out and run and it’s such great exercise, such a wonderful way to release,” Kaufman said. Endorphins make you feel better and the exercise shakes up tense muscles. The physical exertion distracts your racing mind and afterwards, your concerns seem to weigh less on you. That release repays the debts we accumulate in stressful times, when we ask more of our bodies than they can comfortably provide. A few miles away in D.C., Jamie Hospers runs for the reward. As his first year at toptier Georgetown Law School winds down, Hospers is worried about finding a legal internship for the summer. He is worn down from studying and attending classes for 5060 hours per week, many more than he used to work as a paralegal in Rochester, N.Y. He dwells on the debt he has taken on to enroll in the program. He frequently worries that he might not get everything done, that he might

not be good enough. And now that he’s left his hometown, he doesn’t have much time to keep up with the supportive family he used to live near. So he runs between classes. This means he usually runs alone, but he likes the break. “I use it as a way to reset my day,” he said. “I’ve been thinking about nothing but the law or jobs, the two things that are the sources of stress in my life, for the entire day up until the run. On the run, I try to not think about anything, which I’m usually successful doing.” Afterwards, Hospers said, “I feel accomplished. I have a feeling of satisfaction that I just did something that not everyone finds time to do. That’s a confidence booster.” This clarity and confidence prepare him for an afternoon in class or the library. Such a feeling of satisfaction relates to self-efficacy, or the basic belief that we can do something. It’s one of the most important things a restorative activity like running can provide when we’re otherwise feeling overwhelmed or anxious. “The more self-efficacy we have, that can be very protective against stress, right?” Kaufman said. “So maybe work is going poorly right now, but my gosh, I just, for the first time in my life, ran three miles and I can’t believe I did that. So building that sense of accomplishment and self-efficacy can be really powerful.” Besides release and reward, routine is the third ‘r’ in managing stress. Kaufman recommends some amount of stress relieving activity every day for maximum benefit, but it doesn’t have to be running. “Life happens,” he notes. Sometimes you get sick, or work late, or forget your shorts at home. So be flexible and forgiving when you need to. If you don’t feel like running, swim, do yoga, or spend a quiet night in. This variety can also help you avoid injury, which causes its own stress. If your motivation is lagging, research suggests that joining a group helps participants stick with an endeavor like running. Groups provide accountability, structure, support and a social outlet that can take your mind off nagging problems. With dozens of local groups for every speed, distance and personality, local runners can find their niche from run-walking to elite competition. And increasingly, virtual communities allow runners from far-flung corners of the globe to share advice and encouragement. Amy has been a member of a local running team since 2011, and she has trained remotely with another coach since 2015. Both have offered friendship, structure and accountability, she said, and the Facebook activity of her virtual team is a welcome reprieve from worrisome news and stressful political posts. For his part, Hospers looks forward to Friday night runs with the Argonaut Running Club, since his midday workouts often leave him running solo. Another reason running works as a stress

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 43


reliever? You change venues. If you’ve been sitting at a desk all day, moving outside or to a treadmill can pull your mind away from the things it’s been dwelling on. Amy and Hospers both like to get off the city blocks to clear their minds. Hospers heads to the Rock Creek Park trails along the Potomac River and Amy can access the Metropolitan Branch Trail from her office. The city blocks can be stressful, but “Once I’m on the river, there’s no interruptions,” Hospers said. “There’s a lot of space. That’s definitely my favorite spot. I can open up and breathe a little bit.” Finally, if running starts to feel like an obligation, Kaufman recommends taking a cue from yoga class. Setting an intention can help you reframe the effort as a reward, not a requirement. “If you’re going to wake up at 5:30 in the morning to go for a run, [remember] to take a pause maybe while you’re putting your shoes on or while you’re getting ready to go outside or go on the treadmill,” he said. Ask yourself, “Why am I doing this? Am I doing this because I have to? Am I mindlessly following a checklist of things for my day? Or am I doing this because I know it helps me feel better because it’s what I want to do and I love this feeling and am proud of myself for getting up and making this effort?” Whatever is at the root of your stress or anxiety these days, take comfort in knowing you’re not alone and you’re not powerless. Resist the urge to curl up in a ball on a tough day. When you need it most, lace up those sneakers and go. You’ll be glad you did.

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RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY JOY ASICO

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 45


BY ANDREW G ATES It’s Saturday morning on Fletcher’s Cove. A crowd of runners huddle together on the C&O Canal Towpath, ready to start their watches and run. At first glance, this may look like just a normal 5k, but on closer inspection, something is off. There are dogs in the crowd... children... strollers... No one is wearing numbers, there is no timing clock, no one is firing a starting gun. Only a few miles away, a similar crowd gathers on the wooded trails of Theodore Roosevelt Island. Another gathers on the paved path of College Park’s Paint Branch Trail. It’s something different: it’s a parkrun, a weekly running event growing in popularity around the world. In just one year, three parkrun events have started in the D.C. area alone. “Don’t call it a race,” said Darrell Stanaford, head of parkrun USA and event director at Roosevelt Island. “It’s a ‘timed run.’ We have a lot of people doing their first 5k. It’s free, it’s easy.” That’s right, a free 5k. To register for an event, it’s as easy as going online, typing in your name and clicking print. Participants receive personalized barcodes, which allow them free access to any parkrun in the world. Times are posted online within just a few hours of the run, sooner even than many paid races. To keep it free, events are entirely volunteer-led. It all began in England. There are now more than 40 parkruns in the metropolitan area of London alone. These are among more than 1,000 around the world. The first run had 13 participants. Now, every Saturday, more than 200,000 runners and volunteers turn up at parkruns in 17 countries. Yet parkrun is still fairly new to the D.C . area, and were it not for Henry Wigglesworth, might not be here at all. Wigglesworth has enjoyed running for a long time, though his preferred distance has changed over the years. “The older I get, the shorter distances I like to run,” he said. “I really like the mile. I like track races.” In 2014, he won his age group in New York’s highly competitive Fifth Avenue Mile. Wigglesworth was on a trip to England in June of 2015 when he casually asked his friend if he knew of any runs nearby. His friend told him about a low-key event called parkrun. No entry fees. No prizes. Mostly families and casual runners. It didn’t sound like the type of event he was used to, but Wigglesworth decided to give it a shot, not anticipating much competition from its 200 participants. But when the run began, four or five fast guys took off right in front of him, leaving him in the dust. With such a vast range of runners, it was so different from anything Wigglesworth had seen in the United States. His first thought, “Wouldn’t it be great to start one of these in D.C.?”

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And he did. When Wigglesworth returned to the United States later that summer, he was introduced to Darrell Stanaford through a mutual friend. Both were interested in starting a parkrun together. “Once I met Darrell, I thought, okay, this really could happen.” Stanaford was not new to parkrun. While living in Moscow, Stanaford grew sick of sticking to the treadmill and yearned for more places to run. So he got involved with parkrun in Gorky Park. When he returned to the United States, however, he wanted to stay involved with the parkrun community. “Anyone can start a parkrun,” Stanaford said, though it’s not as easy as drawing a starting line and saying “go.” There are some necessary requirements. To begin a parkrun, you need a park permit, a team of volunteers and a one-time startup fee for equipment. To acquire all of this was no easy feat. In August of 2015, Andres Falconer joined the team, along with Diarmuid Coughlan. Falconer, who had lived in London, had been running parkrun for years. “It was second nature,” he says, “so I obviously missed parkrun a great deal when I left the UK and I was longing for the opportunity to run it again.” When he arrived in D.C., Falconer emailed Paul Sinton-Hewitt, the UK-based founder of parkrun, asking if there were any events in the area. Sinton-Hewitt responded, putting Falconer in touch with Wigglesworth and Stanaford. The team got together and held regular meetings at the Pret A Manger in Union Station. “It was like our office,” Wigglesworth says. They discussed things like getting permits from the park service, raising the money and best location, eventually settling on the C&O Canal Towpath for their first event. The inaugural race was held Jan. 9, 2016. It was attended by 160 participants, including D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser. Andrea Zukowski and Colin Phillips, a couple from College Park, were also among those participants. Like many who discover parkrun, Zukowski and Phillips were first introduced to it during their annual trip to England. “You practically trip over a parkrun in England,” Zukowski jokes. “This is what happens if you get enough parkruns in an area. If you’re traveling, you can just look at a map and say ‘where is the nearest parkrun to me?’” “Every year we went to England, we would come home and say ‘man, we really need a parkrun in College Park,’” Zukowski said. “I was a late runner myself and I can

appreciate what a transformative experience [running] can have on someone’s life.” So she went online and did the research, but thought it would be too difficult to raise the money and find volunteers. During the inaugural parkrun in Fletcher’s Cove, Zukowski and Phillips spoke with Wigglesworth and Falconer about starting a run of their own in College Park. That meeting gave them the confidence they needed. “The very next Saturday, we knew where we were going to have it,” Zukowski said. Roosevelt Island came next, Aug. 25, and College Park on Oct. 15. There are also plans for a new parkrun on the Anacostia Riverwalk Trail, beginning in late March or early April. Each run has its own unique vibe and attracts a slightly different crowd, though there is a sense of commonality among them all. While parkrun attracts all types of people, those looking for a fast run should not feel deterred. Parkruns are not without competition. The current course record at Fletcher’s Cove is 15:45. Many runners and volunteers attend regularly and form friendships. Participants of the College Park parkrun meet weekly for coffee afterwards at a local shop not too far from the finish line. “If you start a parkrun, you know what you’re going to be doing Saturday mornings for a while,” Stanaford says with a smile as he planted turnaround signs across the course at Roosevelt Island. In order to help others across the country begin their own parkruns, Wigglesworth and Stanaford formed parkrun USA, a nonprofit designed to promote parkruns across the country. Stanaford is the head of the organization. Wigglesworth says parkrun is not out to take over the running market, but to grow it. “We are not competing with local races. We actually view ourselves as adding ourselves to the running community,” he said. “I know from my own experiences, it’s fun to enter a big race and have a lot of competition and get a free t-shirt… Sometimes it’s worth paying the money for it… If you think of running races as a pie, parkrun is not taking a sliver out of that pie, we’re just making the pie bigger.” This could mean attracting low-and medium-income runners who don’t have $35plus dollars to spend on a race. “Parkrun is really about more people running,” Falconer said. “We’ve done parkruns with 160 people; we’ve done parkruns with 9 people. If there’s one runner and one volunteer, we’re doing it. The numbers really don’t matter.”

SUMMER 2017 | RUNWASHINGTON.COM | RUNWASHINGTON | 47


MATT CENTROWITZ and CHRIS KWIATKOWSKI on the book tour circuit. RUNWASHINGTON PHOTO BY CHARLIE BAN

BY MAGGIE LLOYD Sitting at the dinner table with his college roommate’s family, Chris Kwiatkowski first got to know the man who would eventually become his boss, coach and friend. But before any of that, he knew there was a story to be told. Now an assistant track coach at American University, Kwiatkowski penned Like Father, Like Son: My Story on Running, Coaching and Parenting with two-time Olympian Matt Centrowitz, AU’s head coach. The process started years ago, and in the early stages, the duo met twice a week — Tuesdays after AU workouts and once on the weekend. Their discussions could last hours depending on Matt’s mood and the topic of conversation. “If we were traveling for competition, we would just bring our material on the road with us — which at times was more productive because we were in different environments and Matt would think of things we hadn’t talked about before,” Kwiatkowski said.

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In his time in D.C. Centrowitz has coached various post-collegiate runners, including 2012 Olympian Julie Culley, and since taking the job at AU in 1999 has produced AllAmericans and led the cross country team to the NCAA Championships. “Everyone from the president of the university, to the deans of the different schools on campus, to the dining workers not only know who Matt is, they light up when he walks into the room,” Kwiatkowski said. “He treats everyone the same.” The book was a working draft by mid2016, but Matthew’s shocking win in the 1500m Olympic final last year led to some adjustments after co-author Nathan Williams suggested weaving in the gold medal performance. Still, Kwiatkowski says the Centrowitzes are the same loving family that watched Matthew yell “Are you kidding me?” into the stands on his victory lap at Rio. “His sisters Lauren and Marisa still pick on him. His mom Beverly still has priority on phone calls. And his dad will always be there to humble Matthew in any given arena.”


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CAPITOL HILL

CLASsIC

38th ANnual

May 21st

2017

Race brought to you by

Come be a part of a great neighborhood tradition! It’s the only race run entirely on the streets of historic Capitol Hill, and all proceeds benefit the Capitol Hill Cluster School.

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» Timed, USATF-certified course » Age-group awards » Benefits the Capitol Hill Cluster School (a DC Public School)


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