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Ăš 2013 marathon guide

Australian & New zealand edition

New Year, New You

Easy Ways To Get Fitter, Healthier & Happier! The New Rules Of Hydration

What and When To Drink for Peak Performance

8

Protein-Rich (and Super-Tasty!) Recovery Meals

The Easiest Way To Run Faster

january 2013

Beginners HOW TO PLAN YOUR WORKOUTS

BEST ADVICE EVER

Your FAQs Answered By The Experts must READ

TWEET!

Is Social Media Good For Your Running?

RUN YOUR BEST MARATHON New Training Plan Inside Page 50

incl. GST $8.50 incl. GST NZ $9.70 PP 349181 / 00853

3 SIMPLE FORM FIXES, Page 38

runnersworldmag.com.au


42 BETTER BURGERS

Easy ways to grill up a tasty, guilt-free recovery meal this summer.

50 MARATHON MASTER CLASS

From precise pacing and proper fuelling to getting over that pesky wall, we tell you how to run your best-ever marathon. PLUS: Comprehensive 2013 marathon calendar.

62 WATCH YOUR (BODY) LANGUAGE Sidestep soreness, training disruption and crippling physio bills with our expert pre-pain prevention plan.

69 DESTINATION: RACE Travel gurus, medical experts and RW editors help you plan a fun – and fast – running holiday.

77 GOOD QUESTION! GREAT ANSWER! Worried about stretching or pacing? Relax. Pros and peers respond to your pressing concerns.

TWEET! Running goes viral.

80

SOCIAL MANIA

Enhance your running life, one tweet at a time.


89

inside REGULARS

8 RAVE RUN 10 EDITOR’S LETTER 12 LETTERS 15 H  UMAN RACE When this runner joined a running club, little did he know how his life would change. PLUS: The Intersection (16) Ask Miles (18) Back Story: Sara Burgess (18) What it Takes To… (20) 98 I’M A RUNNER Charlie Bewley, actor.

WARM UPS

50

42

22 ON THE RUN Smart ways to cure race-day jitters. 27 TRAINING Lessons from past races can prepare you for future ones. PLUS: How to engage your brain to boost your speed. 35 MIND & BODY Adjust your routes, form and mileage to avoid injuries. 38 THE BODY SHOP Posture fixes to avoid a mid-run slump. 40 FUEL How to stay hydrated before, during and after every summer run. PLUS: Remake a picnic classic.

COLUMNS

46 R  OAD SCHOLAR A classic running book gets even better with age. By Peter Sagal 48 L  IFE & TIMES A special teenager thanks running for making her feel like a normal kid. By Casey Revman

32

89 GEAR Cool apparel to beat the heat.

69

93 R  ACES & PLACES A four-lap marathon course is perfect for a PB. By Brad Miller

ON OUR COVER Ú 2013 MARATHON GUIDE

AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND EDITION

New Year, New You

Easy Ways To Get Fitter, Healthier & Happier!

40

P.40 P.42 P.32 P.38

The New Rules Of Hydration

What and When To Drink for Peak Performance

8

Protein-Rich (and Super-Tasty!) Recovery Meals

The Easiest Way To Run Faster

JANUARY 2013

Beginners HOW TO PLAN YOUR WORKOUTS

BEST ADVICE EVER

Your FAQs Answered By The Experts MUST READ

TWEET!

Is Social Media Good For Your Running?

RUN YOUR BEST MARATHON New Training Plan Inside

P.30 P.77 P.80 P.50

Page 50

incl. GST $8.50 incl. GST NZ $9.70 PP 349181 / 00853

3 SIMPLE FORM FIXES, Page 38 JanCover.indd 2

runnersworldmag.com.au

27/11/12 10:29 AM

JANUARY 2013 Volume 15 Number 7 Apparel: ADIDAS Photographed exclusively for RW


rave run Photography by Darko Todorovic runner Andrew Dawson The Location Hovsgol National Park, Mongolia

➔ THE EXPERIENCE Nicknamed the “Dark Blue Pearl” of Mongolia, Lake Hovsgol lies at the foothills of the Sayan Mountains, which divide Siberia from northern Mongolia. In the region’s brief summer, the countryside is carpeted in wildflowers – that’s why the Mongolia Sunrise to Sunset 100km or 42km race is one of the most beautiful courses on the planet. Equipped with torches, runners kick off under a dome of stars following a lakeside singletrack, and traverse windblown lowlands before climbing 700 metres into the mountains. “The Mongolian landscape is truly inspiring,” says second-place 100K finisher Andrew Dawson of Melbourne, Victoria. “Experiencing the diversity of the mountains, woodlands, lake and meadows of the national park is something special.” – ultramongolia.com


training

TAKE GOOD NOTES: Jot down all you did before and during your race so you can remember the good and rethink the bad.

Race Recap

How to analyse the details of your key events to improve your performance next time BY CINDY KUZMA

A

S YOU WRAP UP YOUR 2012 training blocks and goal events, it’s wise to review how things went so you can make adjustments in the coming year. “If you had a great race, you’ll want to know how to repeat the experience,” says Alexa Martin, a running coach. If you fell short of your training target, whether it was a time goal in a race or a key workout, you can learn from that, too. “As gutwrenching and heartbreaking as these experiences may be, if you assess the carnage thoroughly and honestly, you will uncover the clues that will lead to your next big running breakthrough,” says Martin. Discover what went right – or wrong – by

conducting the following post-mortem as soon as you catch your breath.

RECORD THE FACTS Write down everything you did the week before and during a race or big workout. Include when and what you ate and drank, how you slept, what you wore and how it felt, and how your warm-up went. Also include weather conditions and any aches and pains. No detail is too small. If you wear a hat you’ve never worn before and it’s bugging you, that can throw your race. Separate the things that went well – like your fuelling and hydration strategies, for example. These are now part of your formula for success. Then identify the things you had no control

over, like the freak thunderstorm. What’s left are the factors you can improve. Prioritise them during your next training cycle, but focus on just one or two at a time so you don’t get overwhelmed, says Tom Holland, author of The Marathon Method.

EXAMINE YOUR HEAD Did you fall apart or stay strong throughout your run? Were you distracted or energised? Did you have fun? Jot down everything about your mental state that day, taking care to note fluctuations in mood, says Martin. “I know that at about 60 per cent through a race, I typically decide racing isn’t fun,

If you missed your goal by a lot, you might be aiming too high. Run a short tune-up race before your next event to gauge your readiness.

RUN better


warm ups

Advice from the world's best runners

third of the race, then speed up, says Martin. Or break your run into thirds: complete the first third comfortably (15 to 20 seconds slower than goal pace), the second at a hard but sustainable pace, and the final third at maximum effort. To hone your race-day focus, practise tempo runs. Beginners can alternate five minutes of comfortably hard running with two to three minutes’ rest for 20 minutes; more advanced runners can run about 20 seconds slower than 5K pace for 15 minutes, building up to three 20-minute tempo bouts in a single workout.

What Went Wrong? Easy solutions for common race problems THE PROBLEM

THE SOLUTION

SLUGGISH START

Revise your warm-up. Do three to eight 100m strides and drills like high knees and skipping to prime your body for speed.

HEAVY LEGS

Review your taper. Reduce mileage by 30 per cent the week before a 5K; by 50 per cent 1.5 weeks before a half; by 30 per cent two weeks before a marathon; and by 70 per cent the week before a marathon.

RUSHED PRE-RACE ROUTINE

Compile a gear, food, and to-do checklist. Begin marking things off the day before – and get to the race earlier.

GUT DISTRESS

Practise eating and drinking during training. Write everything down and make small changes to find what sits well.

by CHRIS LEW

STUDY YOUR SPLITS Whether you met your time goal or not, analysing your splits will help you assess your pacing strategy, says Holland. If your pace was consistent or got slightly faster in the second half of your run (a negative split), put pacing under your “Done Good” column. If you sped up substantially after the halfway point – running, say, one to two minutes faster in the second half of a 5K, or more than five minutes faster in a half-marathon – consider a more ambitious goal. Should your splits reveal a slowdown in the middle or later kilometres, you likely started too fast or lost focus. Next time, plan to run near a pace group targeting a finish time about 10 minutes slower than your target, stick with them for the first

Follow the Leader

David P. Lewis / Shutterstock.com

and it really doesn’t matter,” she says. PAINFUL REMINDER: Record race details soon, when everything is fresh “Then suddenly, about 85 per cent of the (and perhaps still oozing). way through, I care again.” Identifying such patterns can help you devise coping strategies. To overcome tough stretches, Martin uses mantras like “Stay loose and relaxed” and “This is only temporary.” Also note any circumstances that brought you down – a huge crowd stifled your start, perhaps, or your iPod died. “Stress is a choice,” says Holland. “It’s a process, and it’s often unnecessary.” You can’t control what’s happening around you, but you can control your reaction: Practise positive self-talk to counter anxiety, like “I did my homework, I am ready” and “I feel great.”

Kelly Lee Hetherington, 23, of Mordialloc in Victoria, won the 2012 Adelaide Track Classic 800m in 2:02.4. 1 Train Better “In the offseason I do 5 x 1km repeats with a short recovery to build the aerobic system. When transitioning into the track season I shorten the reps and increase recovery time (5 x 500m at race pace). This builds my speed endurance.”

2 Recover Better “I have weekly massages, walk in the ocean and wear compression gear. All of this helps prevent injuries and increases my recovery process, allowing me to train at my best.”

3 Race Better “I use visualisation techniques to prepare for an important session or competition. This improves my confidence, so that when race day comes around I feel like competing comes naturally to me.”

runnersworldmag.com.au

27


athlete's palate

warm ups

EAT THIS

NOW Sweet Cherries GOOD FOR YOU Sweet cherries get their colour from anthocyanins, which are found in red and blue fruits and vegetables. These antioxidants help protect against cancer and heart disease, as well as reduce post-run inflammation. One cup of pitted cherries contains three grams of fibre, two grams of protein, and fewer than 420 kilojoules.

GET THE BEST Choose cherries that have firm flesh and a glossy sheen, free of blemishes or bruises. Bing cherries are among the most popular of the sweet varieties and have a deep red colour. Another is Rainier – its skin is golden yellow with a red blush. Store cherries unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to four days.

KITCHEN SIMPLE Fresh sweet cherries provide a burst of juicy flavour in homemade muffins. For a sweet-spicy salsa, combine chopped cherries with green onions, coriander, garlic and jalapeno. Or make a post-run smoothie by blending together 1 cup pitted cherries, ¾ cup plain yoghurt, 2 tablespoons honey, and ¾ cup ice. – YISHANE LEE

44

january 2013

Mint Potato Salad

Potatoes are rich in potassium, which is important for heart function. “Serve the salad as part of a summer buffet with grilled fish or chicken,” says contributing chef, Patricia Wells. 450

grams potatoes

6

small spring onions, white part only, trimmed, peeled and thinly sliced

¼

cup capers, drained

950mL water ¼

cup extra-virgin olive oil

2

tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

1

tablespoon French mustard

Fine sea salt to taste ¼

c up fresh mint leaves, cut into thin strips

Scrub the potatoes but don’t peel. Bring the water to a simmer in a steamer. Place the potatoes on a steaming rack over the simmering water, cover, and steam until fully cooked, about 25 minutes. (Alternatively, boil the potatoes.) Meanwhile, in a large salad bowl, whisk the oil, lemon, and mustard. Add the spring onions and capers, and toss to blend. Add salt to taste. Once potatoes are cooked, cut them crosswise into thin slices. Add potatoes directly to the dressing while they are still warm (so they will absorb the dressing). Toss to thoroughly coat the potatoes with the dressing. Add the mint and toss again. Taste for seasoning. Serve warm. Serves four. KILOJOULES PER SERVING: 985 CARBS: 25g FIBRE: 3g PROTEIN: 3g FAT: 14g

With 13 books and one iPhone app (The Food Lover’s Guide to Paris) to her name, PATRICIA WELLS spends lots of time on the road to promote her latest projects and lead cooking lessons. Travelling allows her to explore new locales her favourite way: “I strap on my running shoes and go,” says Wells, who’s training for the 20 Kilomètres de Paris, a race she’s run almost every October since 2000. For more, see patriciawells.com.


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SPECIAL NUTRITION ISSUE

AUSTRALIAN & NEW ZEALAND EDITION

NOVEMBER 2012

109 BEST FOODS FOR RUNNERS >> Lose Weight >> Boost Energy >>Run Stronger

BEGINNERS It's More Fun With A Friend

12-PAGE SHOE GUIDE

Expert Advice, Lab Tests And Reviews For Every New Shoe

ANY YEA R

TRAINING DIARY

Pancakes!

The Perfect Fuel

(12 Fully Loaded Recipes Inside)

SPECIAL REPORT The Truth About Running And Heart Health, p.58

Train For An Hour, Burn Fat For 3 Days

Your Ultimate Strength-Training Workout, p.40

7

A daily dos of motivation,e trainin

g tip nutrition adv s, TASTY and much moice POWER re For eve SNACKS & ry kind WHEN TOof runner EAT THEM $8.50 04 $9.70

incl. GST ISSN 1440-5229 incl. GST NZ

PP 349181 / 00853 ISSN 1440-5229

04 9 771440 522018

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PACE: 5 MIN/KILOMETRE FOR A SUB-3:30 TIME

GLYCOGEN DROPPING: HAVE A CARB GEL

Marathon Master Class Your body has done the hard kilometres of training. Now make sure your mind learns the lessons that will power you to run faster, stronger – and easier – right to the finish line 50

january 2013


DIET: 85-95% CARBS TO AVOID THE WALL

by Pavelsvoboda/shutterstock.com

Marathon School


FRONT OF HIP

The whisper Pain above the groin. “Your main hip flexor travels across your groin, which is where you’re going to feel tightness first with this one,” says physiotherapist Paul Hobrough. “In particular, you’ll start noticing pain in the groin area while lying on your front in bed.”

What it’s telling you… FACET JOINT OVERLOAD Chronic lower back pain, usually caused by tight hip flexors pulling on your facet joints (located either side of your spinal column) while running. Stop it becoming a scream “You need to optimise flexibility through the front of your hip to solve this one,” says physiotherapist Simon Lack, who prescribes Rotating Squats. “Go into a squat position, with your lower back neutral and your arms across your chest. Rotate left to right with your lower back stationary but your upper back moving. Do this for four sets of 30 seconds, twice a day. Your hip flexors will become supple and flexible, propelling you forwards, fast.” As opposed to yanking your spine out of place slowly. 62

january 2013


injur ypreven tion special

watch your

(body) language Tuning in to the whispers of your body’s early warning signs means you can head off injuries at the earliest stage. Sidestep soreness, training disruption and crippling physio bills with our expert pre-pain prevention plan By Jonathan Thompson

runnersworldmag.com.au

63

Runner's World - Inside January 2013  

Runner's World Australia & New Zealand, Inside January 2013

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