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RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


2019 Annual General Meeting Agenda The 2019 Rundle College Society Annual General was held on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 at 7:00 pm. at the W.J. Collett School. 1. Call to Order 2. Welcome, Introductions, and Opening Remarks 3. Approval of November 28, 2018 AGM Minutes 4. Administration Report 5. Facilities Committee Report 6. Governance Committee Report 7. Treasurer’s Report 8. Appointment of Auditor 9. Adjournment

1 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Table of Contents 1 5 6 7 9 10 15 17 21 23 26 29 31 32 38 39 41 42 43 44 45 56

Annual General Meeting Agenda Chair’s Message Governance & School Leadership 2018 Annual General Meeting Minutes Headmaster’s Message Academic Results The Day That Changed Everything: Dr. Conklin & His Rundle Legacy by Carrie Ferguson & Jason Rogers Facilities Committee Report The Classrooms of Heaven by Robert E. Evans Alumni Association Report Giving at Rundle Mission Celebrated by Cheryl Meyer Treasurer’s Report Bylaws The Many Hats of Dr. Conklin by Dee Conklin Financial Statements Independent Auditor’s Report Statement of Financial Position Statement of Operations Statement of Change in Fund Balances Statement of Cash Flow Notes to Financial Statements Climbing Your Mountain by Taryn Knorren


A Tribute to our Founding Father — A Lasting Legacy Dr. Rodney Conklin 1937–2019 The 2018/2019 Rundle College Society Annual Report is dedicated to our remaining Founding Father, Dr. Rodney Conklin. This Annual Report reflects on the powerful words of Dr. Conklin and highlights the ways in which Rundle honours his vision and celebrates his legacy.

ANNUAL REPORT REPORT 2018–2019 2018/2019 ANNUAL

12


Children are not purely intellectual creatures but have other aspects which any schooling attempts should take into consideration. These other aspects are social, emotional, physical, and spiritual. It is the last aspect which may be the most important, for it is in this facet that young people come to realize the importance of self-love and love for their family and other human beings. Respect for others is a key value at Rundle College. Dr. Rodney Conklin A Cottage That Became A Campus

3 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


Celebrating Why Rundle is the Best Choice Top 1%

$

of all Alberta Schools

100% of Rundle College students receive the Alexander Rutherford Scholarship.

Fraser Report 2009–2018

Rundle College Students

87.5%

Grade 6 PAT Average Mark

1 in 4 of Rundle faculty

either has or is working towards their master’s degrees.

514.5

87.4%

Grade 9 PAT Average Mark

82.7%

2019 Alumni in 2019 What are the odds?

64.4%

Grade 9 PAT Average Mark

67.6%

Grade 12 PAT Average Mark

Rundle Academy Students

Alberta Students*

of Grade 6 students achieved the Acceptable Standard

93.5%

of Grade 9 students achieved the Acceptable Standard

2019

66.6%

Grade 6 PAT Average Mark

Grade 12 Diploma Average Mark

84%

Average # of hours per day our faculty give for additional help or co-curricular support outside of classroom time.

Alberta Students

93.8%

of Grade 12 students achieved the Acceptable Standard

69.3%*

of Grade 6 students achieved the Acceptable Standard

56.6%*

of Grade 9 students achieved the Acceptable Standard

83.2%

of Grade 12 students in all programs in Alberta achieved the Acceptable Standard * compared to other Alberta Special Ed Programs ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

4


Chair’s Message The conclusion of the 2018–19 school year was a period of deep reflection by many in our community, with the passing of our last founder, Dr. R.C. Conklin. Many stories and sentiments were shared, along with reminiscing and contemplation around Rundle’s humble beginnings, its magnificent growth through to today, and the aspirations for the future. Ultimately, one element holds steadfast through Rundle’s evolution and is still a crucial element to guide us today and tomorrow: Rundle’s mission. Accordingly, I begin this year’s message with a recitation of the mission statement of Rundle College: To create a nurturing, engaging environment that provides an enriched, personalized education, preparing students for an ever-changing world. Rundle College will: help students discover their potential; challenge students to attain their best; and celebrate with them when they do. This mission encapsulates the essence of what makes Rundle College unique. It establishes how we educate our students, how we interact with each other, and what we value. These words guide all that we do at Rundle and is the magic to the many successes that we are honoured to celebrate year after year. We have two gentlemen, in particular, to thank for this mission and the remarkable institution of education that evolved from it, for all that Rundle is and for the positive ways in which it has touched the lives of so many: Dr. W.J. Collett and Dr. R.C. Conklin. With the passing of our last founder, it is important in

5 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

moving forward to understand the people, the meaning and the history behind the mission referenced above. In understanding, we will continue to be guided by the foundational values of Rundle, and thereby preserve what our two founders sought to establish 33 years ago. To this end, we share with you the words of celebration in honour of Dr. Conklin from his Celebration of Life held at the commencement of this school year on pages 15, 21, 38, and 56. We profoundly thank you, Dr. Collett and Dr. Conklin, for your remarkable legacy — the gift of Rundle College. Continuing the ceremonial theme, students in all programs again celebrated many achievements in character development, academic accomplishments and cocurricular pursuits in the 2018–19 school year, some of which are highlighted in the “Headmaster’s Message” on page 9. In addition to the academic accomplishments outlined therein, it was another year enriched with entertaining drama productions, band performances, athletic championships, numerous travels, many initiatives undertaken by students to give back to the community, and much, much more. A warm congratulations to the graduates of 2018–19! We look forward to connecting with you all in the years to come. In 2018–19, the Board of Directors focused on its initiatives around governance, financial stewardship, strategy, risk management, and, of course, the protection of the mission and values of Rundle. We are pleased to report that Rundle continues to be in a sound fiscal position, as we strive to maintain financial sustainability and affordability of Rundle’s programs. In relation, the Board continued its work around advocacy for support of school choice and preservation of provincial funding. The Board remains strategic in determining what we can do today to ensure Rundle is a vibrant institution long into the future. The future of Rundle College is very reliant on our donors and we are very thankful for our 2018–19 donors. Your generous contributions preserve the legacy of Rundle College and make a significant difference in the educational experiences of Rundle’s students.


Because of your donations, a child with learning challenges can attend Rundle and begin to thrive in their educational journey, students can expand their horizons with new educational offerings, and students can learn in increasingly improved and enhanced environments. Details of your donations at work over the past year can be found in “Giving at Rundle” on page 26. We greatly appreciate the positive impact you’ve had on the journey of Rundle’s students. The successes that we are privileged to celebrate often only happen with the support of the Rundle community through many different avenues. In addition to our donors, thank you to the exceptional staff, administration, and educators for your hard work and dedication to excellence and the values of Rundle. Thank you to the parents and caregivers for your support, time and talents all year long. Thank you to the Rundle College Education Foundation members and the Rundle College Mortgage Fund for your time and commitment. To my fellow board members, thank you for your tireless efforts, vision, and passion. And finally, thank you to the students for your hard work, perseverance, mentorship and being thoughtful citizens, of which we are all so proud. Congratulations to everyone for a successful 2018–19 school year! We look forward to another year of promise as, together, we continue to help Rundle’s students discover their potential, challenge them to achieve their best and celebrate joyfully with them when they do. Thank you for choosing to be a part of our Rundle community and for contributing to the legacy of our founders. I have no doubt they are looking down from above with pride. Sincerely, Carrie Ferguson Chair, Rundle College Society

Governance & School Administration 2018–2019 Board of Directors Scott Burrows+ Ron Carrick** Charlotte Collett* Alan Collyer* Rod Conklin (1985–2019) Robert E. Evans* Carrie Ferguson Katherine Harmsworth+

Geoff Hill Dennis Locking Iain McCorkindale Jon McKenzie+ D.E. Buster Moult* Mehri Salimova Eric Toews Ross Wonnick+ * served in 2018 only ** served in 2018/2019 + appointed in 2018

2018–2019 School Leadership Team Superintendent Dave Hauk Headmaster Jason Rogers Assistant Headmaster Gary Sylven Rundle College Primary Principal Lisa Danis Rundle College Elementary Principal Ron Clark Rundle College Junior High Principal Claire Allen Rundle College Senior High Principal Allison Belt Rundle Academy Principal Jamie Burla Head of Student Support Wendy Sobey Rundle College Primary/Elementary Head of Faculty Support Andrea Friesen Rundle College Elementary Head of Student Life Patrick Lake Rundle College Junior High Head of Student Life Mary Baird Rundle College Senior High Rundle Academy Assistant Principal Nicole Jordan (Cheryl Phillips & Andria Slipp/acting) Director of Admissions Nicola Spencer Director of Alumni & Advancement Aaron Goettel Director of Communications Leslie Tecklenburg Director of Educational Technology Jason Maitland Director of Finance Doug Hodgins Director of Human Resources Laurie Duggan/ Fallon Gillespie

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

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Rundle College Society — 2018 Annual General Meeting Minutes November 28, 2018 Rundle College Jr. Sr. High | 7375 – 17 Avenue SW

MEETING MINUTES

WELCOME & INTRODUCTIONS

DIRECTORS PRESENT C. Ferguson (Chair) M. Salimova G. Hill E. Toews K. Harmsworth R. Wonnick D. Locking I. McCorkindale

Mrs. Ferguson welcomed attendees to the 2018 Rundle College Society Annual General Meeting. She advised that upon registration, Members will receive a copy of the 2017–2018 Annual Report. Members not in attendance at the AGM will receive a copy by mail. The Annual Report will be mailed in January.

DIRECTORS REGRETS S. Burrows R. Carrick R. Conklin VOTING SOCIETY MEMBERS PRESENT R. Clark K. Kingsmith C. Collett N. Pillay M. Dougan G. Sylven A. Goettel P. Thymaras D. Jones NON-VOTING ATTENDEES C. Allen D. Hodgins A. Belt P. Lake J. Burla J. Maitland L. Danis J. Rogers L. Duggan L. Tecklenburg M. Duncalfe J. Turc C. Hande D. Hauk BOARD RECORDER: R. Chehowy The Annual General Meeting (AGM) was called to order at 7:04 pm.

7

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Mrs. Ferguson thanked Ms. Leslie Tecklenburg and CBN Commercial Solutions for the organization and production of the 2017–2018 Annual Report. Mrs. Ferguson thanked Mrs. Tecklenburg, Mrs. Rhonda Chehowy and Ms. Elissa Nadeau for the organization of the AGM and noted Mrs. Chehowy as the Recording Secretary of the meeting. She expressed appreciation to Ms. Maria Gallo and the staff at the R.C. Conklin School for hosting the 2018 AGM and Mr. Chad Hande for his assistance. The Board of the Society was introduced, and regrets were noted. Mrs. Ferguson introduced Mr. Dave Hauk, Superintendent; Mr. Jason Rogers, Headmaster; Mr. Gary Sylven, Assistant Headmaster. Rundle’s Principals were introduced: Mrs. Allison Belt, Senior High; Ms. Claire Allen, Junior High; Mr. Ron Clark, Elementary; Ms. Lisa Danis, Primary; and Mr. Jamie Burla, Academy. Mrs. Ferguson also introduced Ms. Laurie Duggan, Director of Human Resources; Mr. Aaron Goettel, Director of Alumni & Advancement; Mr. Doug Hodgins, Director of Finance; Mr. Jason Maitland, Director of Technology; Mrs. Leslie Tecklenburg, Director of Communications; and Mr. Chad Hande, Manager of Operations.


APPROVAL OF NOVEMBER 29, 2017 AGM MINUTES MOTION Mr. Locking moved to adopt the minutes of the November 29, 2017 Annual General Meeting as circulated in the 20172018 Annual Report.

FACILITIES COMMITTEE REPORT Mr. McCorkindale, Chair of the Board’s Facilities Committee, summarized the Facilities Committee Report.

Seconded by Dr. Hill.

Mr. McCorkindale drew the attendees’ attention to the Facilities Committee report, which appears on page 13 of the Annual Report.

CARRIED

GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE REPORT

ADMINISTRATION REPORT

Mr. Locking, Secretary of the Board, announced that five candidates filed nomination papers for five available positions on the Board by the November 14, 2018 deadline set out in the Board’s official notice of October 30, 2018. The five Society members are: Mr. Ron Carrick, Ms. Mehri Salimova, Mr. Eric Toews, Mr. Ross Wonnick and Ms. Katherine Harmsworth. These candidates were acclaimed to serve three-year terms until the 2021 Annual General Meeting.

Mr. Rogers, Headmaster, thanked the leadership of the staff, administration and Board of Directors for their continued support. Mr. Rogers invited Members to review page 6 of the Annual Report, which emphasizes Introspection, Refinement and Growth. Mr. Rogers concluded: “It is very clear that, when looking back on the past year, I can say with confidence: Rundle’s grades were impressive however, they were the least impressive thing about the 2017-18 school year.”

TREASURER’S REPORT

Mr. Rogers invited questions from Members.

APPOINTMENT OF AUDITOR MOTION

Mrs. Charlotte Collett thanked the administration for managing the recent safety concern and asked what Rundle learned and what improvements could be made from the experience. Mr. Rogers reflected on the following; • The IT team responded and communicated the information to the administration in a timely manner. • One Call Now, Rundle’s automated group messaging system, is available. • Lockdown procedures are in place. • The outside doors at the W.J. Collett School are now locked. • Rundle’s practice continues to involve an ongoing review of risk and safety protocols.

Mr. Toews, Treasurer of the Society and Chair of the Board’s Finance Committee reviewed the audited financial statements found in the Annual Report starting on page 32.

Mr. Toews moved to appoint Buchanan Barry as the Society’s auditors for the fiscal year ending August 31, 2019. Seconded by Mrs. Salimova. CARRIED ADJOURNMENT MOTION Mr. Sylven moved to adjourn the Annual General Meeting. Seconded by Mrs. Salimova. CARRIED The Annual General Meeting adjourned at 7:35 pm. ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

8


Headmaster’s Message

“What will your narrative be this year?”

At the onset of the 2018–2019 school year, I challenged our community to consider the question, What will your narrative be this year? As I look back on the year that was, I am happy to report that Rundle’s narrative was a perfect combination of predictability, curiosity, and inspiration.

program. The “Moving Walls Project” at the Academy continues to forge ahead and in the last 12 months, we have seen the redesign of their Junior High Lunch Room as well as the Assembly Hall. Our community came together and asked the question, “How can we optimize our spaces?” and through collective curiosity and collaboration, the results have been remarkable. Finally, we had our first “Rundle’s Value Grant Project” take root as we accepted grant applications for projects that adhered to our value, “Be Well.” Dozens of applications came from parents, students and teachers and in the end, we actioned five unique wellness-inspired initiatives. These initiatives established music clubs, friendship benches and redesigned workspaces for our faculty.

Predictability The results show in the following pages, that Rundle continues to reach its academic and post-secondary goals. We are seeing students reach their potential in all areas and we continue to celebrate with them when they do. There is no question that the academic standards at Rundle remain strong and our teachers and students continually rise to the occasion. Rundle’s grades are impressive; however, they are the least impressive thing about our programming. I believe that the predictability fostered by the ethos of small, relationshipcentric education is our most impressive achievement. We continue to see all members of our community connect on personal and professional levels. We see ongoing engagement through professional learning, attendance at school events and volunteering opportunities outside of school. I’d like to sincerely thank our entire community for their adherence to our values of togetherness and kindness in their daily interactions. Curiosity In 2018–2019, our community truly embraced and lived the mantra, “Be Curious.” We are seeing programs such as robotics and design-thinking take root in many of our programs. Furthermore, we have made tremendous improvements in the design and function of our Academy

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ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Inspiration Late last year we said goodbye to one of our founders, Dr. R.C. Conklin. Dr. Conklin’s life and legacy is an inspiration to us all which we will carry with us as we continue to fulfill the mission that he and Dr. W. J. Collett created over 33 years ago. In the coming year, we will use Dr. Conklin’s words as our guiding vision. In his book, A Cottage That Became A Campus, Dr. Conklin stated:

Groups of 12 to fifteen were more able to have full communication without the threat of too much intimacy. I called this the “empathy group. and When speaking of the best teachers, “[the top teachers] could see the world through the eyes of the students (p.13).

Next year I look forward to reporting back to our community on all the acts of understanding and empathy that have created the narrative for the 2019–2020 school year. Sincerely, Jason Rogers Headmaster, Rundle College Society


Academic Results for Rundle College Rundle College 2018–2019 Grade 6 Provincial Achievement Test Results SUBJECT

RUNDLE COLLEGE Acceptable Standard of Standard % Excellence %

PROVINCE Acceptable Standard %

AVERAGE GRADE

Standard of Excellence %

Rundle College

Province

Language Arts 6

100

65.7

83.2

17.8

83.3

68.4

Math 6

100

65.7

71.6

14.8

87

63.6

Science 6

100

90.0

77.4

29.2

90

67.4

Social Studies 6

100

90.0

76.1

25.1

89.6

67.0

Rundle College Five-Year Grade 6 Provincial Achievement Test Results SUBJECT

14–15

15–16

16–17

17–18

18–19

Language Arts 6

82.9

82.9

80.5

83.7

83.3

Math 6

79.8

80.8

79.9

84.4

87.0

Science 6

86.2

82.8

86.8

88.4

90.0

Social Studies 6

88.9

87.2

84.0

89.8

89.6

Academic Average

83.9

83.4

82.8

86.6

87.5

Rundle College 2018–2019 Grade 9 Provincial Achievement Test Results SUBJECT

RUNDLE COLLEGE Acceptable Standard of Standard % Excellence %

PROVINCE

NOTES • The indicator for Acceptable Standard is above 50% and for Standard of Excellence is above 80%. • Student final grades are calculated using 70% of the school-awarded mark and 30% of the diploma examination mark. GOALS On provincial achievement tests (PAT) for Grade 6 and Grade 9, Rundle College will • have 100% of its students achieve the Acceptable Standard; • have 50% of its students achieve the Standard of Excellence; and • score 15% higher than the province on average PAT grade.

AVERAGE GRADE

Acceptable Standard %

Standard of Excellence %

Rundle College

Province

Language Arts 9

100

67.9

84.9

16.7

84.2

65.8

Math 9

100

72.8

66.5

20.8

87.9

58.2

Science 9

100

80.2

84.1

29.7

90.2

68.2

Social Studies 9

100

74.1

76.9

23.1

87.2

65.4

Rundle College Five-Year Grade 9 Provincial Achievement Test Results SUBJECT

RUNDLE COLLEGE THREE-YEAR EDUCATION PLAN GOALS

14–15

15–16

16–17

17–18

18–19

Language Arts 9

85.2

83.2

82.9

83.6

84.2

Math 9

82.6

84.4

83.9

83.9

87.9

Science 9

88.2

89.3

89.1

90.4

90.2

Social Studies 9

82.0

82.8

87.6

89.6

87.2

Academic Average

85.3

84.9

85.9

86.9

87.4

On diploma examinations, Rundle College will • have 100% of its students achieve the Acceptable Standard; • have 50% of its students achieve the Standard of Excellence; • score 15% higher than the province on average diploma examination grade; and • achieve a discrepancy of less than 5% between the diploma examination mark and the schoolawarded mark.

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

10


Academic Results for Rundle College Rundle College 2018–2019 Diploma Examination Results* SUBJECT Diploma Exam

RUNDLE COLLEGE Acceptable Standard %

DIPLOMA COURSES SUMMARY

PROVINCE

AVERAGE GRADE

Standard of Acceptable Standard of Excellence % Standard % Excellence %

Rundle College

Province 69.3

Biology 30

100

83.3

83.8

35.3

86.1

Chemistry 30

98.7

65.8

85.7

42.5

81.4

71.7

English 30-1

100

31.2

86.9

12.5

75.8

64.4

Math 30-1

100

75.3

77.8

35.1

85.4

67.5

Math 30-2

100

50.0

76.5

16.6

81.3

62.3

Physics 30 Social Studies 30-1

100 100

85.7 61.3

87.4 86.4

43.1 16.9

88.5 80.6

72.5 65.5

Rundle College Five-Year Diploma Examination Results* 14–15

15–16

16–17

17–18

Biology 30

SUBJECT

87.4

86.3

85.0

86.8

18–19 86.1

Chemistry 30

82.3

78.8

83.3

80.7

81.4

English 30-1

76.4

77.1

77.1

77.1

75.8

Math 30-1

83.7

80.1

85.5

83.1

85.4

Math 30-2

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

81.3

Physics 30

88.0

89.0

88.8

87.5

88.5

Social Studies 30-1

77.9

79.5

80.1

81.3

80.6

Academic Average

82.6

81.8

83.3

82.8

82.7

• For all diploma courses written at Rundle College, the average school-awarded mark was 84.2%, the average diploma examination mark was 82.7%, and the average final grade was 83.8%. • The average discrepancy between diploma examination mark and school-awarded mark was 1.5%.

POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS ATTENDED BY THE RUNDLE COLLEGE CLASS OF 2019 Acadia University Alberta University of the Arts Babson College Bentley University Chapman University Dalhousie University Huron University McGill University McMaster University Queen’s University Simon Fraser University St. Andrew’s University University of Alberta University of British Columbia (Vancouver and Okanagan) University of Calgary University of California Berkeley University of Ottawa University of Toronto Western University York University * Diploma examination results reflect January 2019 and June 2019 exams.

11 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


Academic Results for Rundle Academy RUNDLE ACADEMY THREE-YEAR EDUCATION PLAN GOALS

Rundle Academy 2018–2019 Grade 6 Provincial Achievement Test Results SUBJECT

RUNDLE ACADEMY

PROVINCE

AVERAGE GRADE

NOTES • The indicator for Acceptable Province Standard is above 50% and for Standard of Excellence is above Language Arts 6 95.8 8.3 83.2 79.3 17.8 5.4 67.7 68.4 80%. • Special Education (Spec. Ed.) Mathematics 6 70.8 0 71.6 59.0 14.8 6.7 59.2 63.6 refers to the education of students Science 6 83.3 16.7 77.4 71.4 29.2 16.8 66.6 67.4 identified with mild, moderate or severe disabilities or as gifted Social Studies 6 87.5 16.7 76.1 67.5 25.1 12.6 67.1 67.0 and talented. Included in this definition are students with Rundle Academy Five-Year Grade 6 Provincial Achievement Test Results learning disabilities which refer to a SUBJECT 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 number of disorders that affect the acquisition, organization, retention, Language Arts 6 68.8 67.8 70.3 69.0 67.7 understanding or use of verbal or Mathematics 6 53.2 67.4 70.9 61.6 59.2 nonverbal information. Acceptable Standard of Acceptable Standard of Rundle Standard % Excellence % Standard % Excellence % Academy Overall Spec. Ed. Overall Spec. Ed.

Science 6

68.4

78.4

79.4

73.8

66.6

Social Studies 6

64.8

73.2

75.6

71.2

67.1

Academic Average

63.8

71.7

74.1

68.9

65.5

Rundle Academy 2018–2019 Grade 9 Provincial Achievement Test Results SUBJECT

RUNDLE ACADEMY

PROVINCE

Acceptable Standard of Standard % Excellence %

Acceptable Standard of Standard % Excellence % Overall Spec. Ed. Overall Spec. Ed.

Language Arts 9

100

14.8

75.1

64.4

Mathematics 9 Science 9

85.2

7.4

58.7

96.3

33.3

74.4

Social Studies 9

92.6

22.2

68

AVERAGE GRADE Rundle Academy

Province 65.8

14.7

4.8

76.9

40.4

18.4

6.6

64.8

58.2

66.7

26.3

13.1

79.3

68.2

54.9

20.4

9.3

71.6

65.4

Rundle Academy Five-Year Grade 9 Provincial Achievement Test Results 14–15

15–16

16–17

17–18

18–19

Language Arts

SUBJECT

68.5

73.3

70.1

70.2

76.9

Mathematics

65.4

75.8

63.6

59.5

64.8

Science

70.6

83.3

73.6

80.8

79.3

Social Studies

70.2

80.8

73.2

68.0

71.6

Academic Average

68.7

78.3

70.1

71.1

73.2

GOALS On provincial achievement tests (PAT) for Grade 6 and Grade 9, Rundle Academy will • have 100% of its students achieve the Acceptable Standard; • have 20% of its students achieve the Standard of Excellence; • score 5% higher than the province on average PAT grade; and • achieve the highest marks of all special education programs in the province. On diploma examinations, Rundle Academy will • have 100% of its students achieve the Acceptable Standard; • have 20% of its students achieve the Standard of Excellence; • score 5% higher than the province on average diploma examination grade; and • achieve a discrepancy of less than 10% between the diploma examination mark and the schoolawarded mark. ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

12


Academic Results for Rundle Academy Rundle Academy 2018–2019 Diploma Examination Results* SUBJECT Diploma Exams

RUNDLE ACADEMY Acceptable Standard %

Standard of Excellence %

PROVINCE

AVERAGE

GRADE

Acceptable Standard of Standard % Excellence %

Rundle Academy

Province

Biology 30

95.8

47.9

83.8

35.3

75.4

69.3

Chemistry 30

94.4

43.8

85.7

42.5

72.5

71.7

English 30-1

93.8

6.65

86.9

12.5

64.7

64.4

English 30-2

100

40.0

86.8

11.1

78.6

64.4

Math 30-1

75.0

16.65

77.8

35.1

63.6

67.5

Math 30-2

85.7

28.6

76.5

16.6

69.1

62.3

Physics 30

100

27.8

87.4

43.1

74.2

72.5

Social Studies 30-1

100

22.2

86.4

16.9

71.9

65.5

Social Studies 30-2

100

14.3

77.3

16.2

72.6

61.5

Rundle Academy Five-Year Diploma Examination Results* 14–15

15–16

16–17

17–18

18–19

Biology 30

SUBJECT

82.9

71.8

75.4

71.8

69.3

Chemistry 30

71.4

69.4

74.7

73.5

71.7

English 30-1

69.0

65.0

64.7

56.9

64.4

English 30-2

71.7

71.4

69.6

70.5

64.4

Math 30-1

67.5

67.7

60.5

67.2

67.5

Math 30-2

67.1

62.5

62.3

60.5

62.3

Physics 30

76.7

76.8

68.0

58.0

72.5

Social Studies 30-1

77.9

72.4

70.5

68.5

65.5

Social Studies 30-2

76.2

73.9

77.4

70.5

61.5

Academic Average

73.4

69.6

69.2

66.4

66.6

DIPLOMA COURSES SUMMARY • For all diploma courses written at Rundle Academy, the average school-awarded mark was 78% and the average diploma examination mark was 70%. • The average discrepancy between diploma examination mark and school-awarded mark was 8.0%.

POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS ATTENDED BY THE RUNDLE ACADEMY CLASS OF 2019 Bow Valley College Dalhousie University Huron University Mount Royal University Queen’s University SAIT St. Francis Xavier University University of Alberta University of British Columbia University of Calgary University of Lethbridge University of Saskatchewan University of Victoria Western University

* Diploma examination results reflect January 2019 and June 2019 exams.

13 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


[Let us be] reminded of our noble quest to create fine human beings from a diverse group of students — a quest to develop the potential of each individual — a quest that demands all that we have to give, one student at a time. Dr. Rodney Conklin A Cottage That Became A Campus

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

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The Day That Changed Everything: Dr. Conklin & His Rundle Legacy Jason Rogers & Carrie Ferguson Delivered September 18, 2019 Dr. Conklin Celebration of Life The Jubilee Auditorium Calgary [Jason Rogers] Platform guests, special guests, staff, faculty, students and members of Dr. Conklin’s family; I am Jason Rogers, Headmaster of Rundle College Society and with me is Mrs. Carrie Ferguson, Board Chair of Rundle College Society’s Board of Directors, and it is our pleasure to share a few words on behalf of the school’s leadership, staff and our boards of directors. Our journey starts a couple of months ago when Carrie and I met at the Society Office and reminisced about Dr. Conklin and his lasting impact. As we started to consider celebrating Dr. Conklin’s life and legacy, I shared a memory of Dr. Conklin. If you’ll indulge me, I’d like to share this memory with you today.

While reflecting on these moments, it has since occurred to me that Dr. Conklin’s legacy, were a little bit like the magical magnificence of a day in the life of the sun and the earth. With this context and metaphor in mind, it is our honour to share with a speech celebrating Dr. Conklin’s legacy, we’ve titled it:

The Day That Changed Everything: Dr. Conklin & His Rundle Legacy.

Less than a year ago, Dr. Conklin was sitting in my office at the College campus and it was early evening. As we sat and chatted, we watched the sun cross the sky towards the Collett building and over the mountains. In these moments, what Dr. Conklin said will stay with me forever.

[Carrie Ferguson] It was a privilege to have had the opportunity to sit down with Dr. Conklin over the past number of years, to have heard his personal account of the journey of Rundle, and to have experienced his pride and awe in what Rundle has become. Through these many conversations, it became apparent that to truly understand the essence of Rundle, one must appreciate how it came to be and its humble beginnings.

He stated:

I share these beginnings as The Sunrise.

When Dr. Collett and I first envisioned Rundle, this is exactly what we hoped it would become. We dreamed of a school that serves kids who benefit from an exceptional education that is provided by deeply caring teachers. The Academy and the College are the perfect settings for this dream, that is now a reality, to take place. I couldn’t be more proud of where Rundle stands today.

In the year 1937, a young Rodney Conklin was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan to the family of second generation Russian immigrants. His father, having been denied the opportunity to attend post-secondary school, impressed on his eldest son the importance of furthering education post high school. To this end, Dr. Conklin attended various post-secondary institutions, obtaining studies in engineering, arts (majoring in English), education, and educational psychology. After serving as an educator for a number of years, Rod’s true passion began to take root as he partnered with Dr. Jack Collett to form a consulting business offering psycho-educational assessments to school boards.

Dr. Conklin and I watched the sunset over the Rocky Mountains, where I’m sure you’ll appreciate, Mount Rundle resides. As darkness fell, our conversation moved from the founding of Rundle towards the future of learning, education, and society.

15 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


This work exposed Drs. Collett and Conklin to several educational settings and practitioners, and their observations helped them to formulate what factors contributed to a student’s success; leading to musings about establishing a private school. Bothered by the failures they witnessed, they believed more could be done to improve education. In their minds, it came down to two elements: the size of the institution and the characteristics of the teachers. In the classroom, Rod and Jack determined that groups of roughly 15 students provided the optimal learning experience, as they were more able to have full communication without the threat of too much intimacy. They named this an “empathy group”. In observing teachers, they found that teachers who could see the world through the eyes of the students and who were sure that people were more important than material things or lesson plans were far more successful. These two elements became the groundwork upon which Rundle would be built; one in which they believed a great learning environment would be guaranteed. They hoped to capture those students that had given up and were not thriving in the regular school system, in the belief that they would motivate these students to learn again. On September 3, 1985, Rundle College opened its doors for the first time to a small crowd of 20 students. From here, Rod often passionately shared the many challenges and sacrifices he endured, a period of much triumph and tribulation, as we enter Midday. [Jason Rogers] Midday — As is often stated, when the sun shines, make hay. And, Dr. Conklin certainly did this between the years 1985 and the early 2000’s. Rundle College Society grew from a singular junior high school to a Primary, Elementary, Junior High, Senior High and Academy school. As Dr. Conklin states in the naming of his book, Rundle went from a cottage to a campus (or more accurately, several campuses). These years saw Rundle’s student population grow from a modest 20 students to in excess of 1000 students, making it one of the largest private schools in Canada. The teaching staff went from just a few members to 100’s — and some of their careers have now spanned in excess of 30 years. And as of today we now have 2019 Rundle Alumni who are in all corners

of the earth doing all types of work. Many have joined us today - thank you for being here to celebrate Dr. Conklin with us. [Carrie Ferguson] Late Afternoon — In the late afternoon, Dr. Rod Conklin ruminated about Rundle’s’ rise from its struggling roots to its heights of stellar achievement. He reflected on the growth and change that transpired since Rundle’s beginnings: real estate growth, the variety of programs and activities offered, and the academic and extracurricular achievements. While celebrating this growth, he felt it was imperative at this time to emphasize Rundle’s uniqueness, to ensure the core founding priorities would be understood and continue for years to come. In a speech Rod gave on the eve of his retirement from Superintendent, he shared the Extraordinary Mission of Rundle — such mission being a school whose success is measured not by the average performance of a group of elite students, but by the individual success of a group of non-elite students. He added that Rundle should take greater satisfaction in moving a student from 50 to 70 percent, than from 90 to 95 percent. This, he claimed, could only be achieved in a school whose culture was built around its core beliefs and values and supported by everyone in the organization. To quote Rod, “When each of us individually embraces this mission, then we collectively create a culture which defines success as maximizing the potential of individual students, irrespective of where they began their journey. By maintaining a culture that celebrates Rundle’s extraordinary mission, we preserve the uniqueness of our school and impassion future generations of likeminded educators to explore and develop the magnificent possibilities that exist within the individual students whom we are privileged to serve.” It was an honour to work alongside Dr. Conklin in his final years. He was a jovial, courageous, humble and inspirational presence, who leaves a remarkable foundation upon which Rundle will continue to grow and thrive. Continued on page 19

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Facilities Report

Iain McCorkindale Facilities Committee Chair

The 2018–2019 Facilities Report provides general information on the operating costs of Rundle’s facilities (including leased buildings), notable capital projects and maintenance initiatives, as well as future focus items in the coming year ahead. Facility operating costs are consolidated to include: (1) required non-discretionary maintenance and repair costs, (2) scheduled preventative maintenance, (3) corrective maintenance, (4) inspection and review of major building elements and critical systems, (5)

ongoing minor capital upgrading, (6) janitorial services, (7) grounds and site services, (8) garbage collection, (9) utilities and, (10) other related costs. Rundle’s combined facilities comprise an impressive 197,525 sf GBA (Gross Building Area) over a total area of 17.50 acres across both campuses as detailed in the table below.

COMBINED FACILITIES GBA (SF)

RUNDLE COLLEGE CAMPUS

W.J. Collett School — Rundle College Primary/ Elementary

63,018

63,018

R.C. Conklin School — Rundle College Junior/Senior High

74,389

74,389

FACILITIES

Hauk Field

N/A

Rundle College Campus Site Infrastructure

N/A

RUNDLE ACADEMY CAMPUS

Rundle Academy Elementary (St. Raymond’s — CRCSSD lease)

15,955

15,955

Rundle Academy Junior/Senior High

31,602

31,602

Society offices

12,561

12,561

Buildings Total

197,525

149,968

47,557

Buildings Distribution %

100.00%

75.92%

24.08%

17.50

14.80

2.70

762,300

644,688

117,612

Site Density (%)

25.91%

23.26%

40.44%

Site Coverage Ratio (%)

16.34%

13.40%

29.97%

Site Area Total (acres) Site Area Total (sf)

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Facilities Report Facility operating costs for the past eight years are summarized as follows: FISCAL YEAR

REPAIR & MAINTENANCE (R&M)

JANITORIAL

UTILITIES

TOTAL OPERATING COSTS

OPERATING COST/GBA (SF)

2018–2019

$901,296

$504,114

$403,942

$1,809,356

$9.16

2017–2018

$940,448

$311,898

$300,995

$1,553,341

$7.86

2016–2017

$572,291

$282,721

$300,986

$1,155,998

$5.85

2015–2016

$508,526

$286,209

$246,155

$1,040,621

$6.41

2014–2015

$423,400

$296,900

$261,400

$981,700

$6.05

2013–2014

$503,400

$285,500

$308,500

$1,097,400

$6.77

2012–2013

$395,900

$298,500

$259,000

$953,400

$5.88

2011–2012

$448,000

$292,700

$259,600

$1,000,300

$6.17

As can be seen from the table above, and while janitorial and utilities costs are higher than the previous year, we have stabilized on R&M as we continue to catch-up on the deferred maintenance work backlog. While there are many individual cost drivers across the four buildings and two campuses, in a general sense the two key drivers for overall cost increases to the previous year are enhanced facilities procedural maintenance programs within janitorial and higher Enmax utility charges for power consumption. With respect to the latter, we joined the AISCA energy pool on June 2019 and are already benefiting from substantially lower power charges and the hope that this continues through the upcoming year and we moderate utilities costs in line with prior years. Costs have increased in an accounting sense, however the reality is that the risk profile of the facilities continues to be reduced with concurrent improvements in qualitative servicing of the facilities. As well the last two years can be seen as more representative of additional investment in our substantive assets across the four building on two campuses.

Further refinements in our facilities management program are expected year-over-year which are also coordinated with planning contemplated replacement of base building systems as they work through their individual life cycle(s). The primary objective of this exercise is not only to protect and operate our assets efficiently day-to-day to a high standard for our community, but to also invest and manage capital effectively where appropriate over the mid-longterm horizon. As noted in last year’s report as an ongoing focus item, and acknowledging that the Rundle Academy Jr. / Sr. High is the oldest campus building, we have now gone through two program area upgrades over the last two consecutive summers totalling +$1M in combined capital investment. Further sustained capital investment is planned to continue through upcoming years to create a comparable program standard for Academy campus facilities that aligns more closely with that of its sister College campus.

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Facilities Report The following table summarizes projects either contemplated or recently commissioned within our community. ITEM

FACILITIES

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROJECTS

BUDGETED / CONTRACTED AMOUNT

STATUS

RUNDLE ACADEMY 1

Rundle Academy Jr. / Sr. High

Multi-Function Area — Assembly Hall Renovation

+$650K Incl. FFE

On Time & On Budget — Commissioned August 2019

2

Rundle Academy Jr. / Sr. High

North Wing Classroom Renovation

TBD

Current Planning on Pilot Project for Classroom for Q1, 2020 Fundraising Campaign

3

Rundle Academy Jr. / Sr. High

Expansion Block (+6,000 sf) — 4 Classrooms, Gym & Multi-Purpose Room(s)

TBD

Early Planning Underway; Potential Commissioning Building September 2020–2021

Continued from page 16 In honour of his and Dr. Collett’s vision, it is incumbent on all in the Rundle community to remember and value the extraordinary mission of the unique school they created. With that in our minds, we move forward to the future.

about being human. Education is, and will always be, about empathy, feelings, communication and, above all else, love. A love for people, a love for connection and a love for learning.

[Jason Rogers] The Twilight — Over the course of the last few years, Dr. Conklin and my conversations had turned towards “The Future of Education.” Rod loved to share his thoughts on books such as The Fourth Industrial Revolution and Homo Deus, he stayed on top of educational trends and loved to balance these two sources against what was happening at Rundle. Over these months, we sipped tea in Radium and dreamed together while we looked up at the Rundle College flag that flew proudly above his patio, we hosted dinners with big thinkers on the topic of education and we recorded a podcast to capture some of his thinking on Rundle’s present and future. What I loved about Rod and these conversations were that he never stopped being curious, never stopped learning and never stopped dreaming.

I believe Rod would have wanted us to stay curious, continue to reach our individual potentials and celebrate with one another when we do.

If I could be so bold as to state what Dr. Conklin thought about the future of education, I would say this. It is all

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Rod, my friend and mentor, we miss you but you’ll never be forgotten. The Rundle College community is stronger by the day and with the support of our parents, board, teachers, alumni and students — your legacy is in good hands. As we enter the next “Day in the Life of Rundle” — although you will not be here in body, we will forever be guided by your spirit. In closing, on behalf of the schools and the boards, we would like to thank everybody for joining us today, to celebrate Dr. Conklin’s legacy.


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ANNUAL REPORT 2018/2019 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


The Classrooms of Heaven

Mrs. Conklin, Members of the Conklin Family, Mr. Hauk, Distinguished Speakers and Members of the Rundle Community. You have heard others today speak about Dr. Conklin’s legacy at Rundle College. I’m not here to focus on that. You have heard allusions to Dr. Conklin’s sterling character in this life. But that is not my principal topic. And thus far, you have heard others speak of Dr. Conklin in the past tense. But instead of concentrating on the past, I want you to know what Dr. Conklin is doing right now. And right now, Dr. Conklin is teaching a class. You see, in heaven there are classrooms and Professor Conklin teaches three courses. He has a busy schedule. But because there is an eternity of time in heaven, it doesn’t feel like you’re overwhelmed with deadlines and homework from Mr. Forman or Mr. Vesey. In fact, the pace is so relaxed that it feels like there’s a lot of recess in the classrooms of heaven. Now you might think that Dr. Conklin is teaching courses in education or psychology — after all, that’s his background. But God has something else in mind. Instead, Dr. Conklin is teaching some of the most important courses offered in heaven; and the first course is Courage 101. For today’s lesson, Dr. Conklin has invited a guest speaker — Spanish Conquistador Hernan Cortes. Exactly 500 years ago in 1519, Cortes set out to conquer Mexico for Spain and the first order that he gave upon arriving in Mexico was one that startled his crew. He ordered them to sink the ships in which they arrived! Cortes, you see, wanted his soldiers to focus on conquering Mexico and nothing else. And because the ships were Cortes’ personal property, he truly risked everything that he had in this venture.

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Robert E. Evans Delivered September 18, 2019 Dr. Conklin Celebration of Life The Jubilee Auditorium Calgary

In this same spirit, Dr. Conklin voluntarily left his position at the University of Calgary to start Rundle College with his friend Dr. Jack Collett. Dr. Conklin gave up his pension. He mortgaged his home. He and Dr. Collett sold their consulting business to raise money. Dr. Conklin risked everything for all of us here today in the same way that Cortes sank his ships 500 years ago. Dr. Conklin is wellsuited to be teaching that heavenly course in Courage. In fact, he may be team-teaching the course with Dr. Collett. The second course that Dr. Conklin teaches is a Master’s Degree course on Intellectual Creativity. He explains to his students that the human intellect is especially productive if it entertains new possibilities that have never been considered before. Dr. Conklin’s students are inspired to think beyond the present limits of their knowledge and understanding and that encouragement should not surprise any of us here today. After all, it was Dr. Conklin’s creative intellect that led to Rundle’s small classes at a time when class sizes were increasing for most schools. It was Dr. Conklin’s creative intellect and that of his friend Dr. Collett that led them to establish Rundle Academy. Seeing the possibilities of Rundle Academy was an extraordinary leap for the schools of almost 30 years ago. And if you attended Rundle Primary, then you are also benefitting from Dr. Conklin’s intellectual creativity. Why? Because it was Dr. Conklin who recognized the advantages of a complete K–12 program and spearheaded the acquisition of the Montessori school on Cliff Street that became Rundle Primary. You never know what unexpected and imaginative turns Dr. Conklin will take in his thinking; but to those of us who were privileged to be part of his intellectual safaris, it was always an adventure to be treasured.


Dr. Conklin’s current students are thrilled to hear from someone whose commitments to courage and intellectual creativity have benefitted so many people. And, finally, Dr. Conklin is conducting a PhD seminar on one of the most important subjects in heaven — Humility. Mr. Pieter Sarro, Rundle Pioneer and former Facilities Manager, recalls a summer from the early days of our school in which Rundle had purchased some used chairs for $1 apiece. That was all the school could afford. But the chairs were in poor condition; and Mr. Sorro was startled to see Dr. Conklin in the parking lot of the Barlow Campus personally refinishing chairs so that students would have classroom furniture in the fall term.

Goodbye for now, Dr. Conklin and may we meet again some day in the classrooms of heaven. Robert E. Evans

Mrs. Marianne Johnston, also a Rundle Pioneer and former Principal of Rundle Elementary and Rundle Primary, recalls Dr. Conklin working alongside herself, Mrs. Conklin and Mr. Johnston throughout the summer of 1996 to renovate Chief Crowfoot School so that Rundle Elementary would have a home of its own. In this life, Dr. Conklin was a courageous gentleman with a powerful intellect; but because he was also a humble person, he was not above doing whatever was required to help Rundle’s students, teachers and staff. And that is why Dr. Conklin is conducting that PhD seminar in Humility right now. Courage 101, Intellectual Creativity and the seminar in Humility… with teaching assignments like these, Dr. Conklin will enjoy himself for many lifetimes. At Rundle, we were privileged to have Dr. Conklin with us for only a short while on the road to eternity; but how fortunate that our paths crossed, leaving us with cherished memories and the hope that someday we too will enjoy those magnificent heavenly classrooms. Goodbye for now, Dr. Conklin and may we meet again some day in the classrooms of heaven.

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Alumni Association Report

Creating a Culture – 2019 in 2019

In 2019, Rundle has 2019 alumni. What an interesting coincidence! Each year, we continue to reconnect with more of our alumni as they engage in a variety of events at our schools. Whether it is through coaching, mentoring or presenting to our current students, our alumni are always selflessly willing to help out in any way they can. Our goal is to maintain a strong relationship and connection with our graduates to create a valuable alumni community and network that everyone can benefit from. We highlighted our Rundle alumni superheroes within the pages of this year’s Ascent Magazine. We are extremely proud of our alumni’s many successful accomplishments and we were thrilled to highlight them in our annual publication. In 2018–19, the Rundle Alumni Committee was in its second year of operation. The 11-member committee is comprised of dedicated alumni from both the Academy and College programs who “desire to create an engaged alumni community.” During the year, the committee hosted several events, new and traditional, to reunite and bring our alumni community together. Two new successful events included a bowling social in the fall and a networking reception in the spring. The Rundle Alumni Department would like to thank the following Alumni Committee members for their commitment and enthusiasm in fostering a positive and inclusive alumni culture: James Bouchard ’14 Emily Buchanan ’13 Meg Buchanan ’15 Anya Curtis ’11 Meghan Gray ’12 Lidia Jones ’11

Faraz Sachedina ’05 Alexa Scarcello ’11 Chetan Shory ’11 Jatin Shory ’09 Cassandra Will ’11

We are looking forward to continuing the growth in our connections among our 2019 alumni — now and in the future. Aaron Goettel Director of Alumni & Advancement Rundle College Society

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Rundle taught me to never stop pushing the boundaries of what [I] thought was possible. Learning that anything is possible not only got me to where I am today, but gave me the confidence to keep fighting for [my] patients in seemingly dire situations.

Dr. Herman Johal ‘01 Clinical Scholar Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon Delivered June 4, 2019 Rundle College Graduation Quest Speaker The Jubilee Auditorium Calgary


Rundle Graduates Around the World CANADA Acadia University • Alberta University of the Arts • Ambrose University • Athabasca University • Bishop’s University • Bow Valley College • Brock University • Camosun College • Carleton University • Concordia University • Dalhousie University • Emily Carr University of Art & Design • Fraser Valley University • Georgian College • Grant MacEwan University • Humber College • Huron University College • Lakehead University • Lakeland College • Lethbridge College • McGill University • McMaster University • Medicine Hat College • Memorial University • Minot State University • Mohawk College • Mount Allison University • Mount Royal University • Mount St. Vincent University • Northern Alberta Institute of Technology • Okanagan College • Olds College • Ontario Institute of Technology • Prairie College • Queen’s University • Quest University • Red Deer College • Rosebud School of Fine Arts • Royal Military College • Ryerson University • Simon Fraser University • Southern Alberta Institute of Technology • St. Francis Xavier University • St. Mary’s University • Thompson Rivers University • Trent University • Trinity Western University • University of Alberta • University of British Columbia • University of Calgary • University of Guelph • University of King’s College • University of Lethbridge • University of Manitoba • University of New Brunswick • University of Ottawa • University of Regina • University of Saskatchewan • University of Toronto • University of Victoria • University of Western Ontario • Vancouver College of Art and Design • Vancouver Film School • Vancouver Island University • Waterloo University • Wilfred Laurier University • York University USA Arizona State University • Babson College • Baylor University • Bentley University • Berklee College of Music • Boston University • Brigham Young University • California State University • Chapman University • Coastal Bend College • Colorado School of Mines • Dartmouth University • Drexel University • Florida Southern College • George Washington University • Harvard University • High Point University • Hofstra University • Lewis & Clark University • Loyola Marymount University • Lynn University • Mars Hill University • Montana State University • New York University • Parsons School of Design • Pomona College • Princeton University • Rollins College • San Diego State

University • Scripps College • St. John’s University (New York) • Stanford University • Syracuse University • Texas State University • University of Arizona • University of California, Berkeley • University of California, San Diego • University of California, Santa Cruz • University of Colorado • University of Denver • University of San Francisco • University of Southern California • University of Michigan • University of Missouri • University of Nevada, Las Vegas • University of Oregon • University of Rochester • University of San Diego • University of Texas • Western Washington University • Wellesley College • Whitman College INTERNATIONAL Ayub Medical College • Bond University, Queensland • Bristol University • Cardiff University • City University London • Demontfort University • École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne • Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Germany • King’s College • London Business School • Metropoloia University • Stockholm University • Solent University • Tsinghua University, Beijing • Universidad de Los Andes, Chile • University of Alcala de Henares, Spain • University of Cambridge • University College London • University of Edinburgh • University of Exeter, UK • University of Glasgow • University of Melbourne • University of Oxford • University of Queensland • University of South Australia • University of St. Andrews • University of West Scotland • University of Westminster – London • University of Wollongong, Australia • Utrecht University in the Netherlands

Catch up with our alumni in The Ascent 2019 Alumni Magazine. READ HERE

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Rundle College is more about family than anyone could have ever imagined! Dr. Rodney Conklin A Cottage That Became A Campus

25 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


Giving at Rundle in 2018–2019 At an awards night celebration in June in the early 2000s, Dr. Conklin appealed to our community to give back to Rundle in any way they could to help us maintain and grow our exceptional program. It was at that moment I became inspired to advance the mission of Rundle College. With that clarity, I shifted my focus to advance our school into the future by leading the fundraising initiatives on campus.

Donor Built Learning Spaces Thanks to our donors, we were able to build these engaging, creative student spaces.

Assembly Hall — Academy Campus

We are pleased to report that this year, our community raised $236,000. On behalf of Rundle College Society, I would like to thank all of our donors for their support. Their generosity has allowed us to continue to deliver one of the best learning experiences in the country. As a result, we were able to create several new learning spaces for our students in the Conklin and Academy schools, along with sound mitigation and an upgraded sport court at the Collett School. I would also like to recognize all of the Parent Advisory Committees for their hard work and fundraising efforts this year. This year’s fundraising campaign saw both highs and lows. We had an 18% increase in the number of donors in 2018–19, however the total amount of donations received was down by 110% from the previous year. We are very proud to share that 97% of our 2019 graduating classes from the Academy and College supported our Bursary Fund. Our alumni giving last year increased by a staggering 400%. Finally, we continued to see the culture of giving by our faculty and staff as 56% of our faculty donated $15,700 this year. Every year, approximately 30 students require financial assistance to continue their education at Rundle. We are truly grateful and thank those who have supported these students’ future through their education at Rundle.

Base Camp — Conklin Campus

Reading Nook — Conklin Campus

Moving forward, we invite all of our community to help shape our students' futures by considering a donation in 2019–20. Your support is greatly appreciated and directly helps us achieve our goals. Together, we will make Rundle an even better place to learn. With gratitude, Aaron Goettel Director of Alumni & Advancement Rundle College Society ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

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Thank You to Our Generous Donors Cumulative Donors $100K+ Anonymous (1) Ross Glen Allan Markin Ron Mathison Robert and Suzanne Shewchuk Gifts by the Board & Foundation Anonymous (1) Carrie Ferguson Katherine Harmsworth Eric Toews Ross Wonnick Gifts by Faculty & Staff Anonymous x12 Kellie Adams Laurel Adolphe Claire Allen Alexandra Amundson Mary Baird Allison Belt Kristen Briggs James Burla Carla Carnovale Rebecca Carr Steven Carr Michelle Cawthorpe Rhonda Chehowy Ron Clark Barb Collin Mitch Cooper Jade Connor Amy Defoy-Lamphier Neil Domstad Sarah Dunsford Brian Eremko Stephanie Falkenberg Andrea Friesen Ben Gibson Katie Gibson Karen Goepen-Wee Aaron Goettel Chad Hande Alistair Hardie

Shannon Harte Dave Hauk Joanne Hewlett Lauren Holt Kerry Hummel Sarah Kapitza Jenna Kerney Kristen Klingvall Taryn Knorren Patrick Lake Alexander Large Richard Lawson Natalia Lipowska Sheldon Locking Kristen Lowe Charles Martin Holly Martin Valerie McClements Brad Mellor Anna Miller Marcella Moodie Peter Morrow Stuart Palmer Chris Paz Christina Petropoulos Cheryl Phillips Jessica Pidkowa Jenna Prest Mary Pumphrey Colin Risi Jason Rogers Maria Santos Lisa Schaffner Heather Scott Lynn Scott Andria Slipp Wendy Sobey Nicola Spencer Amie Staniloff Jodie Switzer Gary Sylven Leslie Tecklenburg Dana Teh Lauren Thompson Eric Vesey Shilo Vesey Zoe Weddell

27 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Lisa Whiting John Wolf Gifts by Alumni David Braakman (‘13) Emily Buchanan (‘13) Michael Charney (‘09) Abby Collyer (‘12) Garrett Copp (‘13) Holly Fritz (‘98) Robby Graham (2017) Michael Klassen (‘09) Drew Morsky (‘06) Victoria Silva (‘17) Lee Stanford (‘00) Cal Tecklenburg (‘16) Holly Tecklenburg (‘18) Danielle Vanderbeek (‘12) Cassandra Will (‘11) Davis Wong (‘13) Gifts by the Class of 2019 Mukhtar Abdsalami Amman Adat Alex Adolph Erin Alderson Alexandra Argenal Cameron Bailey Kenneth Beveridge Alessandra Boehm Thrissa Bortl Ari Bouma Seonae Breckenridge Jakob Chicoyne Brandon Chiew Luigi Colombo Taya Colwell Joel Cormack Kendall Cox Reuben Davis Paras Deol Jean-Mornay du Plessis Emil Duguay

Kaleb Edwards Elisabeth Faircloth-Nunn Eric Fan-Lou Jarad Fischer-Essar Aiden Foster Annalise Foster Chanel Gerla Carolyn Graham Sarah Graham Sophie Greer Jenna Gregg Christian Gruending Carter Gruending Jared Hamilton Ian Hards Taylor Hecker Morgan Heinz Minea Hill Layn Holtby Julia Hueppelsheuser Caitlyn Huizinga Tai Hunter Sophia Johns Aryan Kahlon Anthony Kende Cameron Kerr Gabriel Kim Liam Kramer Jacob Krayzel Mia Kruger Samantha Lamb Jordan Lapins Ridge Lehmann Alex Lepa Nathan Litvinchuk Katelyn Lo Brayden Maier Noel Mar Anthony Martopullo Ben Maxwell Owen McIntosh Ella McKenzie Sophie McKenzie Maya McKirdy

Tess McLaughlin Matthew Mehra Nicole Menard Quinn Molnar Theo Morgan Megan Morrison Carson Mowat Isaac Neild Lauren Olney Matthew Olsen Spencer Onslow Samuel Patton James Powell Crystal Radinski Surya Ranganathan Lucas Roessel Jenna Saponja Curtis Sauer Nicole Sauer Livtar Shergill Jeremy Shukin Sebastian Somerset Hannah Stephens Julian Suire Desiree Sun Benjamin Sutton Ben Taylor Emily Teare Daniel Theal Sam Toews Alyssa Tran Kyra Turner Andrew Valentine Ishan Vermani Adam Walters Graeme Watt Jordan Wilson Fatima Wong Michelle Wong Kai Yadav Stephen Yeung Adham Young Andrew Zutter


Gifts by Current Parents, Students, Grandparents, & Friends Anonymous (1) Fraser Abbott Paul & Kristal Allen Cindy & Garnet Amundson Susie Pon & Andrew Lowe Lin Bai Jennifer Bailey Benevity Community Impact Fund Teresa Bentsen Kalyna Bilinski Bluestar Engineering Jeffrey Bowers Jill Bridges Tom Budd Capital Power Corporation Isabella Carinelli Caspar Holdings Inc. Chris Chan Xiaoquan Chi Tim Collins Robi Contrada Robert Cook

Salvatore & Jacqueline Corea Spencer & Kim Coupland Colleen Danielsen Gary & Allison Davies Laura Davis Anthony Deegan Andrea & Rick Derksen Shawn Dietrich Ashley Donohoe Chris & Tania Eaton Enerplus Corporation Rui & Lou Fan Ken Faulkner Kent & Carrie Ferguson Alexandra Fisher Isabelle Frizzle Rosa Garcia & Russell Reder Laurie Goldbach & Brett Code Alyson Goldman Good Pin Marilou & David Goodhart Jared Green Blaine & Barb Gregg Benedikt Hallgrimsson

Shelley Heinz Reid & Karen Henuset Doug & Janice Hodgins Dahong Hu Alice Hua Darren Hueppelsheuser Jennifer Huizinga Amelia Hyde Jeffrey Hyde Melissa Jackson Evelyn Jain Jason Leong Jodi Jenson Labrie John Miller Marc Joiner Stephen B. Kaganov Kaizen Education Services Ron Kanashiro John & Barb Keirle Robert King Davin Kivisto Lambros & Ingrid Tsaprailis Jeffery Lawson Nigel Long Ludwar Law Firm Pollie Lumby Munro MacArthur

Kathryn Marinakos José Martinez Spiro Martopullo Owen McIntosh Paul McLaughlin Amit Mehra Leanne Meier Kristen Mikulcik Erin Mulligan Farzan Nathoo Jud Niven Kevin O’Hearn Amar Pandila Jorge Pinzon Pirie Foundation Colin Poole Peter & Jacqueline Proverbs Read Family Foundation Tyler Robinson Theresa Roessel Barry Rogers Alex Ross Royal Bank of Canada IsaBelle & Jefri Saliba Jennifer Salt Shanon Sandquist Scotiabank Rob Scott

Kelly Shannon Jennifer Shaw Robert Shewchuk Sierra Dental Dave & Narda Simpson Sandra Smith Stacie Smith David Somerset Stanford & Company Professional Corp. Jan Stanford Top Marks Canada Inc. Bonnie Trathen University of Lethbridge Tammy Vanderbeek Richard & Carolina Walls Michaela Walter Daniel Wares Philip & Francine Welch Chris & Helen Whittaker Jennifer Pierce & Ross Wonnick Brett Wrathall Bob Yarish Chitak Yee Brett Young Orieta Zelazo Karen Zutter

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Mission Celebrated Personalized Learning in an Ever-Changing World

Bon soir. Good evening. Tonight, I’d like to offer you the “newbie” perspective of the Rundle mission statement. I’ve worked at the Primary going on about my third and a half-year now. You know you’re new when you’re still counting half years. I got my start in a mat leave position as a Kindergarten assistant. Shout out to Holly Martin and Michelle Foley… thanks for having those babies! I was actually warned when I joined the Primary staff that getting pregnant is practically contagious there, so perhaps it’s no surprise that a double maternity leave position could even occur. Nonetheless I am grateful for all my momma-to-be co-workers, because it opens up the doors for newbies like me to join the team. Now I’m working as the French teacher and absolutely loving my role. It feels good to finally be in a position in my career life where I feel passionate about what I’m doing and so grateful to be doing it in a place where I feel valued for my own strengths and personal contributions while still being given lots of opportunities to grow and learn. It’s on that note that I have chosen to address two particular aspects of our mission statement: Personalized learning in an ever-changing world. Right off the bat, the first things I’ve noticed at Rundle, I believe are also our top selling features. For starters, the small classes are a breath of fresh air, especially after several years of having taught in various classrooms with

29 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Cheryl Meyer Delivered September 6, 2018 Staff Appreciation Dinner Red and White Club Calgary

as many as 45 students. With only 15 little ones at a time, I feel like I can really get to know each student, and as someone who sees 12 different classes of kiddos every week, that’s especially important. Secondly, I noticed the strong sense of community at Rundle. I believe that the history of Rundle starting as a small cottage schoolhouse and growing into the beautiful campuses we have today has been a key factor in this development of community. Also, the staff; from what I can see, you care about each other and take pride in being part of the Rundle team. There’s a level of accountability amongst teachers here that makes me want to be the best I can be as well. So, small classes and a strong sense of community; I believe that these are two key components to providing personalized learning at Rundle. We have the ability to really get to know each student, to make them feel like they are safe and have a sense of belonging at our school, so that they can develop their whole self and figure out the human being they want to become in this world. Speaking of the world, how does Rundle adapt to its constant change? Well, my “newbie” self is thoroughly impressed with what I’ve seen so far! Since joining the Primary team, I’ve seen every classroom get new Activboards, new teacher laptops, students are on their way to becoming one-to-one with technology, we’ve moved into a brand new school, we lost the pre-school program but gained a new kindergarten, grade one and grade two class,


we are largely paperless in most administrative correspondence, with Google Docs, all the forms, online sign ups, online calendars, and so on, and we’ve gone through a number of changes with our report cards, of which I think we are slowly still working out the kinks, right Fiona? Nonetheless, I can confidently say that Rundle is not scared of change.

goals for their learning throughout the school year, thinking about their educational goals, but also thinking about how they can work on showing more kindness or integrity. Each year, as students get older and can think more abstractly about the world, it’s interesting to see how these ideas change. Instead of working on sharing their toys, students start to think about how they can help other people.

One of my favorite things at the Collett school is the Character program; Mountains of Character as we’ve branded it. I’ve watched this program evolve and merge into one with the Elementary school.

Just like our students, it’s important for us teachers to always be thinking about our goals as well. What personal attributes or strengths can we contribute to our school team? How can we adapt to new curriculum, to new student interests or needs, or to changing concepts in education? Personally, I want to announce here and now — and Andrea Friesen, you can feel free to take note for my TPGP if you like — that I would like to make one of my teaching goals this year to be about embracing change and trying new things — and not being afraid to make mistakes in the process. As a newbie teacher, mistakes are guaranteed. But here at Rundle, I feel like I’m supported, sometimes even more so when I’ve hit those really difficult times, and that is, suffice it to say, pretty awesome.

I think Rundle’s focus on character is one of our best selling features, because no matter how many changes occur in the world, in our modern digital age, character development needs to remain consistent, if not more important than ever. It’s easy to lose our sense of humanity as we spend more and more time behind computers or telephone screens. Sometimes, we need to be reminded to look up and really look someone in the eyes when you’re speaking, and that’s something these kiddos are being taught from day one in Kindergarten. Personally, I would love to see more congruency between the character programs at the various campuses, as I think it would help solidify the development of these traits in our students as they make their way to graduation day. With similar vocabulary to describe each trait, I think students understanding would be better reinforced, helping them grow to be even better citizens.

Now I just need to avoid the mistake of getting pregnant, at least until I find myself a husband. On that note, thank you and merci!

For me, the Mountains of Character program is where personalized learning and our ever-changing world meet. Each month at Collett, we highlight one of the character traits to correspond with the time of year. For example, we’ll focus on gratitude around Christmas time. Students create

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Treasurer’s Report On behalf of the Finance Committee, I am pleased to report on the financial position of Rundle College Society (the “Society”) for the year ended August 31, 2019. The financial statements included in this Annual Report are prepared in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations as confirmed by the Society’s auditor. For the year ended August 31, 2019, the Society’s deficiency of revenues over expenses was $470,000 compared to a deficiency of revenues over expenses of $70,000 in the prior year. This current year deficiency was primarily due to the incurrence of approximately $280,000 of unbudgeted repairs and maintenance and building improvements completed in the year to bring our facilities up to appropriate standards for our staff and students. More detail on this can be found in the Facilities Report. In addition, there was a shortfall of approximately $220,000 in donations revenue compared to the budget. Other revenue and expenses for the current year were broadly in line with the budget that was approved by the Board for the year. The Statement of Financial Position shows that the Society had cash on hand of $14.2 million at August 31, 2019 compared to $12.8 million at August 31, 2018. Cash on hand accumulates in the ordinary course of business at the end of each fiscal year due to the collection of tuition fees for the following school year. This cash is

31 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Eric Toews Board Treasurer Finance Committee Chair

required to fund operating expenses for the next school year. The accounts receivable balance of $2.1 million at August 31, 2019 represents amounts due for tuition for the upcoming school year and is generally in line with the previous year’s balance of $1.7 million. The $18.6 million of deferred revenue, reflected as a liability on the Statement of Financial Position at August 31, 2019, is an approximate measure of the cash, accounts receivable and prepaid operational and instructional supplies that has been set aside to fund operations in the 2019–2020 school year. The Statement of Financial Position reflects a loan receivable of $3.6 million. This represents a loan to the Rundle College Education Foundation (the “Foundation”) that had been planned for in connection with the construction of the W.J. Collett School. The Foundation is current with its payments to the Society. At August 31, 2019, the Unrestricted Fund of the Society had a balance of $2.1 million. This represents the accumulated operating surplus of the Society since inception. The Board believes it is prudent to maintain an accumulated surplus to ensure that the Society is able to undertake ongoing maintenance and capital expenditures as required at our campuses and to adhere to Alberta Education’s Accountability Pillar expectation that accredited private schools maintain a positive accumulated operating surplus.


Rundle College Society Bylaws Preamble

(Amended November 26, 1992)

The purpose of Rundle College is to create alternative educational programs whose goals are to maximize the potential of young people leading to the development of successful, responsible citizens with leadership capabilities. (Amended November 30, 2000) Consistent with the views of its Founders and Members, the Society embraces the following educational priorities and guiding principles which govern the unique approach of Rundle College to achieving its stated purpose.

1.02 Dues The dues or fees payable by Members shall be as from time to time fixed by vote of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors may in its discretion waive the assessment of dues or fees for any person or class of persons.

• Rundle College will maintain small class sizes and maximize student potential by “teaching to the individual.” • Rundle College will retain high quality faculty and staff. • Rundle College will maintain a culture of respect – respect for self, respect for others and respect for property. • Rundle College will encourage good communication among parents, students, faculty and staff. The Members of Rundle College Society hereby enact the following bylaws in support of the Society’s purpose, priorities and principles as set out in this Preamble. (Amended November 29, 2007) ARTICLE I: MEMBERSHIP 1.01 Members The Members of the Society shall be the original subscribers of the application for incorporation and bylaws (the “Founding Directors”), parents or guardians of students registered full time at Rundle College and such other persons as, upon application, are admitted as Members of the Society by a favourable vote passed by a majority of the Board of Directors at a regular meeting and who register their membership annually with the Secretary.

1.03 Withdrawal Any Member may withdraw from the Society by delivering to the Secretary of the Society a written resignation. (Amended November 30, 2000) 1.04 Termination The membership in the Society of any Member may be terminated: (a) by a resolution of the Members to that effect passed in a general meeting called for that purpose; or (b) by a resolution of the Board of Directors to that effect. 1.05 Effect of Termination Any Member who resigns, withdraws or is expelled from the Society shall forfeit all rights, claims and interests arising from any association or membership in the Society. 1.06 Membership Not Guarantee of Admission Membership of parents in the Society does not guarantee admission of students to any school or facility operated by the Society. ARTICLE II: MEETINGS OF THE SOCIETY 2.01 Meetings of the Society With the exception of the first Annual General Meeting, which shall be held on a day fixed by the first Board of Directors, the Annual General Meeting of the Members of the Society shall be held at least once in every calendar ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

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Rundle College Society Bylaws year and not more than eighteen (18) months after holding of the last preceding Annual General Meeting at such time and place as may be determined by the Board of Directors. 2.02 Notice Notice of the time and place of all meetings and the general nature of the business to be transacted shall be given to each Member by mailing or delivering the same at least seven (7) days before the holding of the meeting to his last address as shown on the records of the Society, except for the Annual General Meeting for which notice shall be given at least fourteen (14) days in advance. (Amended November 17, 2005) 2.03 Quorum Five (5) Members of the Society present in person shall constitute a quorum at any meeting of the Society. Each Member in good standing present at a meeting shall have one (1) vote and, in case of ties, the Chair of the meeting shall have a second or deciding vote. (Amended November 28, 2002) (Amended November 26, 2009) 2.04 Special Meetings A Special Meeting of the Society may be called by the President or by a resolution of the Board of Directors at any time. In addition, the President or the Vice-President shall call a Special Meeting within one (1) month of the receipt of a written request for the same signed by at least twenty (20) Members of the Society and setting forth the business to be dealt with at the requested meeting. (Amended November 30, 2000) 2.05 Business at Meetings (a) All business shall be deemed special that is transacted at any Special Meeting and all that is transacted at an Annual General Meeting shall be deemed special, with the exception of the consideration of the accounts and financial statements, the ordinary reports of Directors and auditors, the appointment of the auditors and the election of Directors.

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(b) Any special business to come before either a Special Meeting or an Annual General Meeting must be particularized and circulated by written notice to the Members of the Society along with any proposed resolutions or proposed bylaw changes at least one (1) month in advance of the Special Meeting or Annual General Meeting. (Amended November 17, 2005) ARTICLE III: BOARD OF DIRECTORS 3.01 General Mandate The property and affairs of the Society shall be managed by a Board of Directors in which shall be vested full control of the revenues and expenditures of the Society. The Directors may exercise all such powers and do all such acts and things as may be exercised or done by the Society and are not by the bylaws of the Society or by the law expressly directed or required to be done by the Society at a meeting of the Members or otherwise. 3.02 Eligibility The qualifications for a Director shall be coincident with qualifications for membership in the Society. A Director shall cease to be a Director upon delivery of a written resignation to the President or Secretary of the Society. (Amended November 30, 2000) 3.03 Number of Directors The Board shall be comprised of not less than four (4) nor more than fifteen (15) persons. (Amended November 28, 1996) Dr. R. C. Conklin shall be a Member of the Society and a Director of the Board of Directors for life. (Amended November 29, 2005) (Amended November 17, 2005) (Amended November 27, 2008) 3.04 Term of Directors The directorships of the Society shall be divided into three “Term Classes” as follows:


Rundle College Society Bylaws Term Class 1 consists of five (5) directorships with terms of three years commencing with election at the 2008 Annual General Meeting. Term Class 2 consists of five (5) directorships with an initial term of four years commencing with election at the 2008 Annual General Meeting and terms of three years thereafter. Term Class 3 consists of four (4) directorships with terms of three years consisting of those Directors who were elected at the 2007 Annual General Meeting and whose Term Class will therefore be subject to re-election at the 2010 Annual General Meeting and at three-year intervals thereafter. If a person ceases to be a Director prior to the end of that Director’s term, then that directorship may be filled by appointment under bylaw 3.06 or election under bylaw 3.05. The Director so appointed or so elected will join the Term Class associated with that directorship; and therefore the initial term of the new Director may be one, two or three years depending on the term remaining for that directorship’s Term Class. (Amended November 28, 1996) (Amended November 30, 2000) (Amended November 27, 2008) 3.05 Election of Directors From and after the first Annual General Meeting, the Board of Directors shall be those persons duly elected at the Annual General Meeting. Those Members seeking election or re-election to the Board of Directors must make their intentions known in writing accompanied by the nominations of five (5) Members in good standing and a signed copy of the current Rundle College Society Code of Conduct for Directors to the Secretary no later than forty-five (45) days prior to the Annual General Meeting. All Society Members shall be notified at least fourteen (14) days prior to the close of nominations. The term of a Director shall be three (3) years from the date of election. (Amended November 28, 1996)

(Amended November 27, 2008) (Amended November 26, 2009) 3.06 Casual Vacancies Any casual vacancy occurring among the Directors may be filled by the Directors. Any person so chosen shall join the Term Class of the vacating Director, thereby retaining his office only so long as the vacating Director would have retained the directorship as if no vacancy had occurred. (Amended November 27, 2008) 3.07 Ability to Act The continuing Directors at any time may act notwithstanding any vacancies in their body, provided always that in the case that the Directors shall at any time be reduced in number to less than the minimum number fixed by or in accordance with those present, then the Directors shall act for the purpose of filling up vacancies in their body, but not for any other purpose. 3.08 Board Meetings Meetings shall be held at such times and at such places and upon such notices as the Directors may from time to time determine. 3.09 Quorum A majority of Directors shall constitute a quorum at meetings of Directors. 3.10 Voting Questions at any meeting of the Board shall be decided by a majority of votes. In case of a tie vote, the Chair, in addition to his original vote, shall have a second or deciding vote. 3.11 Resolution in Writing A resolution in writing signed by all the Directors personally shall be valid and effectual as if it had been passed at a meeting of Directors fully called and constituted.

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Rundle College Society Bylaws 3.12 Remuneration Directors, as such, shall not receive any remuneration for their services, but, by resolution of the Board, the expenses of their attendances may be allowed for their attendance at each meeting of the Board and they may be paid for outof-pocket expenses incurred through the exercise of their duties as Directors; provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to preclude any Director from serving the Society as an officer or in any other capacity and receiving compensation therefore. 3.13 Error in Notice No error or omission in giving notice of a meeting of Directors shall invalidate such meeting or invalidate or make void any proceedings taken or had at such meeting. Any Director may at any time waive notice of any such meeting and may ratify and approve of any or all proceedings taken or had thereat. 3.14 Executive Committees The Board of Directors shall have authority to elect an executive committee consisting of the President, and such other Members as the Board of Directors may determine, such committee to have power to carry on the affairs of the Society subject to the direction of the Board of Directors, and to be responsible to the Board of Directors for this action. 3.15 Limited Liability The liability of the Members and Directors is limited, and neither the Members nor the Directors shall be liable for any obligations of the Society. 3.16 Removal of Directors A Director’s membership on the Board may be terminated if the Director is found to have been in violation of the Board’s current Code of Conduct for Directors by either: (i) the unanimous agreement of the Officers of the Society; or (ii) a 2/3 vote of the full Board. The member in question is not entitled to vote on the matter of the alleged violation

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of the Code of Conduct or the member’s termination as a Director. (Added November 30, 2016) ARTICLE IV: OFFICERS 4.01 Officers The officers of the Society will be a President who shall be the Chair of the Board of Directors, a Vice-President who shall be Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors, a Secretary, a Treasurer and any other officers as the Board of Directors may determine from time to time. (Amended November 30, 2000) 4.02 Election The Chair, Vice-Chair, Secretary and Treasurer shall be elected by the Board of Directors from among their number at the first meeting of the Board after the Annual General Meeting, provided that in default of such election then the incumbents, provided they are Members of the Board, shall hold office until their successors are elected. The other officers of the Society need not be Members of the Board and may be appointed at such times and for such terms as the Board deems fit. (Amended November 30, 2000) 4.03 Appointment of Agents The Board of Directors may appoint such agents and engage such employees as it shall deem necessary from time to time and such persons shall have such authority to perform such duties as shall be prescribed by the Board. The remuneration of all such agents and employees shall be fixed by the Board of Directors. 4.04 Chair of the Board The President shall, when present, preside at all meetings of the Members of the Society and of the Board of Directors. During the absence or inability of the President, his duties and powers may be exercised by the VicePresident or during the absence or inability of the VicePresident, such other Directors as the Board may from time to time appoint for the purpose.


Rundle College Society Bylaws If the Vice-President or such other Director exercises any such duty or power, the absence or inability of the President shall be presumed with reference thereto. 4.05 Duties of Officers The duties of all officers of the Society shall be such as the terms of their engagement call for, or the Board of Directors requires of them. ARTICLE V: BORROWING 5.01 Borrowing The Board of Directors may from time to time borrow money in any manner and without limit to amount on the credit of the Society and in such amounts as they may think proper, and may cause to be executed mortgages and pledges of the real and personal property and rights of the Society and may cause to be signed bills, notes, contracts and other evidence of securities for money borrowed or to be borrowed, provided that debentures shall not be issued without the sanction of a special resolution of the Society. ARTICLE VI: FISCAL YEAR AND AUDIT OF ACCOUNTS 6.01 The fiscal year end of the Society shall be August 31st. (Amended December 14, 1988) 6.02 The first auditor of the Society shall be appointed by the Directors not less than one (1) month before the date of the first Annual General Meeting and the auditor so appointed shall hold office until the first Annual General Meeting. 6.03 The Members shall at each Annual General Meeting appoint an auditor or auditors to hold office until the next Annual General Meeting.

6.05 The remuneration of the auditors of the Society shall be fixed by the Board of Directors. 6.06 The auditors shall make a report to the Members and Directors on the accounts examined by them and on every balance sheet and statement of income and expenditures laid before the Society at any Annual General Meeting during their tenure of office. 6.07 Every auditor of the Society shall have a right of access at all times to all records, documents, books, accounts and vouchers of the Society and is entitled to require from the Directors and officers of the Society such information and explanation as may reasonably be necessary for the performance of the duties of the auditor. 6.08 The auditors of the Society are entitled to attend any meeting of the Members of the Society at which any accounts that have been examined or reported on by them are to be laid before the Members for the purpose of making any statement of explanation they desire with respect to the account. ARTICLE VII: CUSTODY AND USE OF THE SEAL OF THE SOCIETY 7.01 The Board of Directors may adopt a seal, which shall be the common seal of the Society. 7.02 The common seal of the Society shall be under the control of the Secretary of the Society. It shall not be affixed to any document except in the presence of: (a) any two (2) of the President, Vice-President, Secretary or Treasurer; or (b) any one (1) of the officers listed in subparagraph (a) together with any one other Director:

6.04 The Directors may fill any casual vacancy in the office of the auditor.

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Rundle College Society Bylaws and such persons so present shall sign every document to which the seal of the Society is affixed. (Amended November 30, 2000)

management and operation of the Society, as they deem expedient.

ARTICLE VIII: AMENDMENT OF BYLAWS

10.02 The Board of Directors shall be empowered to make rules and regulations which are not inconsistent with existing laws and statutes for all projects under its control.

8.01 The bylaws of the Society shall not be rescinded, altered or added to except by special resolution of the Society.

ARTICLE X1: SUCCESSION

ARTICLE IX: PREPARATION AND CUSTODY OF MINUTES OF PROCEDURES AND OTHER BOOKS AND RECORDS 9.01 The Secretary or some other officer specially charged by the Board of Directors with that duty shall maintain and have charge of the minute books of the Society and shall record or cause to be recorded therein minutes of all meetings of Members and Directors. (Amended November 30, 2000) 9.02 The Directors shall see that all necessary books and records of the Society required by the bylaws of the Society or by any applicable statute of law are regularly and properly kept.

11.01 In the event of the Society’s being wound up or dissolved for any cause, its assets shall be realized and the surplus, after paying all of its liabilities, shall be paid over to Rundle College Education Foundation (RCEF), or if RCEF has ceased to exist or has ceased to be a registered charity, to the University of Calgary, upon trust, for the application of the income thereof in perpetuity in establishing and maintaining scholarships, to be called the “Rundle College Scholarships” to be, from time to time, awarded to deserving scholars at the University of Calgary. Nothing herein confers or vests in the University of Calgary any rights whatsoever respecting the Society or its assets unless and until the Society is wound up or dissolved. (Amended November 27, 2008) ARTICLE XII: INTERPRETATION

9.03 Records related to financial transactions of the Society and the minutes of all Meetings of the Society shall be available for inspection by the Members at all reasonable times at the place where such minutes and records are ordinarily kept. Any Member wishing to inspect the same shall apply in writing to the Secretary who shall arrange a convenient time for such inspection within five (5) days from the receipt of such application. ARTICLE X: RULES AND REGULATIONS 10.01 The Board of Directors may prescribe the philosophy and policy of the Society and such rules and regulations as are not inconsistent with these bylaws relating to the

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12.01 In these bylaws, unless the context otherwise requires, words importing the singular number or the masculine gender shall include the plural number or the feminine gender, as the case may be, and vice versa. (Amended November 27, 2008) Enacted this 12th day of June 1986. (Last Amendment November 30, 2016)


The Many Hats of Dr. Conklin Members of the Conklin Family, Mr. Hauk, Platform Guests, Members of the Rundle Community and friends of Dr. Conklin On behalf of the family I would like to thank everyone for attending today. And a very special thank you to all the organizers and special platform guests. And to the Rundle High School concert band—my how far the music program has come! I remember very clearly the first band concert Dr Conklin and I attended in the early 90’s. Tears welded up in my eyes but not sure if they were for pride of the students accomplishment or tears of joy that it was over—they had a long way to go but what a beginning. Dr. Conklin would have been so humbled by today. We spent many hours talking on every subject imaginable as his time was coming closer. One topic was on the Celebration of Life that the Rundle Community had for Dr. Collett back in 1998 up at the Barlow campus of which many of you were in attendance. Rod was instrumental in helping plan that event as he had lost his friend and mentor and needed to celebrate and mourn accordingly. I stand here today knowing that many of you in the Rundle Community have also lost their friend and their mentor. Rod did not want anyone to fuss over him but everyone here needed an opportunity to say good bye and to remember him for all he did for Rundle College. So we thank you all for taking the time to come and reflect on the impact he had on all our lives. As his wife, I knew Rod not only as an educator and founder of Rundle but as Rod the man. We met in 1991 as

Dee Conklin Delivered September 18, 2019 Dr. Conklin Celebration of Life The Jubilee Auditorium Calgary Rundle had just turned the corner from the initial challenging start up. Being a private school girl myself I was fascinated by his vision, his tenacity and his down to earth way of getting things done. The Vision of Rundle is “to develop inspired minds and unparalleled character”. I had to look up what unparalleled meant—No Equal or Match— Unique in Kind or Quality. Oh WOW—that was so Rod!!! I now truly understand why it is the Vision for Rundle.

I want to leave you with more insight into the man you called your Founder. As we all know each of us wears many hats in our day to day life – each with a purpose and each making us whole. Rod was no different and to accentuate this I brought a few of his hats along with me. Mr. Rogers, would you please come up and assist me here? Thank you. When it snowed out in Radium, Rod used to hop out of bed quickly put on his snow boots, jacket, and of course his HAT. He took his role on as snow clearer with the same determination he did teaching, planning a meeting or building a school—no corner was left uncleared. When he decided to open a wine bar, it meant more learning, even in his 70’s. It meant trips off to France and Italy to learn from the very best. He never went anywhere without his special HAT. He felt more learned when wearing it and proud of his new accomplishments and was pleased to show it off. Continued on page 57

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To the Board of Directors of Rundle College Society

Opinion We have audited the financial statements of Rundle College Society (the "Society") that comprise the statement of financial position as at August 31, 2019, and the statements of operations, changes in fund balances and cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies. In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Society as at August 31, 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for notfor-profit organizations.

Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditors' Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements section of our report. We are independent of the Society in accordance with ethical requirements that are relevant to our audit of the financial statements in Canada, and we have fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with these requirements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.

Responsibilities of Management and Those Charged with Governance for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations, and for such internal control as management determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial statements, management is responsible for assessing the Society's ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless management either intends to liquidate the Society or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so. Those charged with governance are responsible for overseeing the Society's financial reporting process.

Auditors’ Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements (continued) Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditors’ report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of these financial statements.

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Independent Auditors’ Report to the Members of Rundle College Society (continued) As part of an audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards, we exercise professional judgment and maintain professional skepticism throughout the audit. We also: • Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. • Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Society’s internal control. • Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by management. • Conclude on the appropriateness of management’s use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Society’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditors’ report to the related disclosures in the financial statements or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditors’ report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Society to cease to continue as a going concern.

FINANCIALS

• Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial statements, including the disclosures, and whether the financial statements represent the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation. We communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit.

November 14, 2019 Calgary, Alberta

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RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

Operating Fund

Total 2019

Capital Fund

Total 2018 (restated, Note 2)

ASSETS Current assets Cash and cash equivalents (Note 4) Accounts receivable Current portion of prepaid operational and instructional supplies (Note 5) Current portion of loan receivable (Note 7)

$ 14,216,223 2,116,920

Total current assets Loan receivable (Note 7) Prepaid operational and instructional supplies (Note 5) Capital assets (Note 8) TOTAL ASSETS

$

-

$ 14,216,223 2,116,920

384,884 113,782

-

384,884 113,782

2,187,875 110,468

16,831,809

-

16,831,809

16,766,771

3,587,769 703,843 -

2,975,653

3,587,769 703,843 2,975,653

3,701,548 394,321 2,576,462

2,975,653

$ 24,099,074

$

23,439,102

$

$

378,745

$ 21,123,421

$

$

$

$

12,785,968 1,682,460

LIABILITIES

FINANCIALS

Current liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

392,266

-

392,266

Deferred revenue

18,593,395

-

18,593,395

17,475,114

Total liabilities

18,985,661

-

18,985,661

17,853,859

2,975,653

5,113,413

5,585,243

2,975,653

$ 24,099,074

FUND BALANCES TOTAL LIABILITES AND FUND BALANCES

41ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

2,137,760 $ 21,123,421

$

$

23,439,102


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

Operating Fund

REVENUE Tuition Grants Busing Before and after school care Interest, rent and miscellaneous Fundraising and donations Casino School generated funds

$ 17,044,476 7,358,083 143,980 441,183 708,985 182,989 1,687,307

Total revenues

Total expenses EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES OVER EXPENSES

$

52,958 -

$ 17,044,476 7,358,083 143,980 441,183 708,985 235,947 1,687,307

16,531,581 7,414,726 150,590 358,576 648,960 496,190 65,967 1,629,286

27,567,003

52,958

27,619,961

27,295,876

18,465,300 1,851,353 277,037 235,133 3,800,792 696,497 178,238 266,323 1,687,307

633,811 -

18,465,300 1,851,353 277,037 235,133 3,800,792 696,497 178,238 266,323 633,811 1,687,307

17,713,598 1,817,501 278,599 222,750 3,470,950 500,000 616,204 227,241 254,811 638,925 1,629,286

27,457,980

633,811

28,091,791

27,369,865

109,023

$

Total 2018

$

(580,853)

$

(471,830)

$

(73,989)

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

42

FINANCIALS

EXPENSES Salaries, benefits and professional development Instructional materials and supplies Busing Bursaries and awards Facilities and rent Donation Office and administration Professional fees Interest and bank charges Amortization School generated funds

Total 2019

Capital Fund


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

Operating Fund

Total 2018 (restated, Note 2)

Total 2019

Capital Fund

FUND BALANCES - BEGINNING OF YEAR As previously reported Prior period adjustment (Note 2)

$

Restated

Interfund transfers (Note 10)

FINANCIALS 43 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

$

3,008,781

Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenses

FUND BALANCES - END OF YEAR

3,308,178 (299,397)

$

2,576,462 -

(580,853)

(980,044)

980,044 $

2,975,653

5,884,640 (299,397)

$

(73,989)

(471,830)

-

$

5,113,413

5,958,629 (299,397) 5,659,232

5,585,243

2,576,462

109,023

2,137,760

$

$

5,585,243


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

2019 OPERATING ACTIVITIES Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenses Items not affecting cash Amortization Changes in non-cash working capital: Accounts receivable Prepaid operational and instructional supplies Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Deferred revenue Cash flows from operating transactions INVESTING ACTIVITIES Purchase of capital assets Repayment of loan receivable Cash flows from investing transactions

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

Cash and cash equivalents consist of: Cash Term deposits

(471,830) 633,811

$

(73,989) 638,925

(434,460) 1,493,469 13,521 1,118,281 2,352,792

489,381 (220,923) 83,830 480,303 1,397,527

(1,033,002) 110,465 (922,537)

(523,461) 106,591 (416,870)

1,430,255

980,657

12,785,968

11,805,311

$ 14,216,223

$ 12,785,968

9,675,540 4,540,683

12,785,968 -

$ 14,216,223

$ 12,785,968

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

44

FINANCIALS

Increase in cash and cash equivalents

$

2018


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

1.

NATURE OF THE ORGANIZATION

Rundle College Society (the "Society") is a not-for-profit organization incorporated under the Alberta Societies Act. The Society delivers education programs under the authority of the Education Act, Chapter E-0.3, Statutes of Alberta, 2012. The Society receives allocations for instruction purposes under the Private Schools Regulation (Alberta Regulation 93/2019). The Society is a registered charity. Section 149(1)(f) of the Income Tax Act provides that registered charities are exempt from income tax. In 2011, the Society gave gifts of certain restricted funds and capital assets to Rundle College Education Foundation (the "Foundation"), an unrelated not-for-profit organization, which was formed to plan, develop and secure the longterm interests of the Society. Simultaneously, the Foundation assumed certain term loans of the Society; and the Society entered into a lease agreement with the Foundation for the long-term rental of the capital assets donated. 2.

PRIOR PERIOD ADJUSTMENT AND RECLASSIFICATION

a)

Prior period adjustment

FINANCIALS

In September 2018, the Society introduced a Fee Management System to collect school generated fees. As a result of this transition, management determined that deferred revenues related to school generated funds were understated by $299,397 for the year ended August 31, 2018. This has resulted in the 2018 opening operating fund balance being overstated by $299,397 as the errors resulting in the understatement of deferred revenue occurred in years prior to 2018. There is no impact to the 2018 Statement of Operations or the Statement of Cash Flows as a result of this adjustment. The cumulative effect of the corrections to prior periods on the financial statements as at August 31, 2018 is as follows:

45 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

As previously reported

Adjustment

Restated

Deferred revenues Operating fund balance

299,397 (299,397)

17,475,114 3,008,781

17,175,717 3,308,178


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

2.

PRIOR PERIOD ADJUSTMENT AND RECLASSIFICATION (cont’d)

b) Reclassification A portion of prepaid operational and instructional supplies reported in 2018 was found to be long-term in nature. This included technology devices purchased for student use that have a useful life of 4 - 5 years (Note 5). This has resulted in the current portion of prepaid operational and instructional supplies being overstated by $394,321 and the long-term portion of prepaid operational and instructional supplies being understated by $394,321 as at August 31, 2018. The cumulative effect of the corrections to prior periods on the financial statements as at August 31, 2018 is as follows: As previously reported Current prepaid operational and instructional supplies Long-term prepaid operational and instructional supplies

3.

2,582,196 _

Adjustment (394,321) 394,321

Restated 2,187,875 394,321

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Fund accounting The Society follows the restricted fund method of accounting. The Operating Fund accounts for the revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities relating to the general educational operations and administrative activities of the Society. The Capital Fund accounts for the purchase and maintenance of capital assets. Transfers between the Operating Fund and the Capital Fund can be made at the discretion of the Board of Directors. Cash and cash equivalents Cash consists of cash on hand and bank deposits. Highly liquid investments that may be converted to cash at any time or with maturities of three months or less at the date of purchase are considered to be cash equivalents.

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

46

FINANCIALS

The financial statements of the Society have been prepared by management in accordance with Canadian accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations ("ASNPO"). The financial statements have, in management's opinion, been properly prepared using careful judgment with reasonable limits of materiality and within the framework of the significant accounting policies summarized below.


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

3.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (cont’d)

Capital assets Capital assets are stated at cost less accumulated amortization. Capital assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives at the following rates and methods: Computer equipment 5 years straight-line method Furniture and fixtures 20% declining balance method Vehicles 30% declining balance method Leasehold improvements 5 – 18 years straight-line method The Society assesses the carrying value of capital assets for impairment when events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of those assets may not be recoverable. When an indication of impairment is present, the Society tests for impairment by comparing the carrying value of the asset to its net recoverable amount. Impairment is recognized if the carrying value of the asset exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from that asset. If the carrying value is greater than the net recoverable amount, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value. School generated funds Funds generated from school-based activities are included as assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses of the Society because the accountability and control or ownership of these funds rests with the Society's officials or their appointee.

FINANCIALS

Contributed services Volunteers contribute an indeterminable number of hours to assist the Society in the delivery of programs within the schools. Due to the difficulty of determining their fair market value and the fact that such assistance is generally not otherwise purchased, contributed services are not recognized in the financial statements.

47 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

3.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (cont’d)

Revenue recognition Revenue is recognized as follows: a) Instruction and support allocations are recognized in the year to which they relate. b) Fees for services related to courses and programs are recognized as revenue when such courses and programs are delivered. c) Unrestricted donations, fundraising and grant revenues are recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund when received or receivable. d) Restricted donations relating to scholarships and bursaries and school programs are recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund when the related expenses for which the funds were received are incurred. e) Restricted donations relating to capital items are recognized as revenue of the Capital Fund when received or receivable. f) Donations of in-kind materials and services that would otherwise have been purchased are recorded at fair market value when an estimated fair market value can be reasonably determined. Casino funds are recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund when received or receivable. Interest is recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund when received or receivable if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated, and collection is reasonably assured. Rental income is recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund when received or receivable if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated, and collection is reasonably assured.

FINANCIALS

g) h) i) j)

Revenue from school generated funds is recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund when the related expenses for which the funds were received are incurred.

Pension Plan The Society operates a defined contribution pension plan for its employees. The assets of the pension plan are held separately from those of the Society in independently administrated funds. Contributions paid and expensed under salaries and benefits for the year ended August 31, 2019 amounted to $856,672 (2018—$800,941).

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

48


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

3.

SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (cont’d)

Financial instruments

Measurement The Society initially measures its financial assets and liabilities at fair value. The Society subsequently measures all financial assets and financial liabilities at amortized cost. Financial assets subsequently measured at amortized cost include cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable and loan receivable. Financial liabilities subsequently measured at amortized cost include accounts payable and accrued liabilities.

Impairment Financial assets subsequently measured at amortized cost are tested for impairment when there are indications that impairment exists. The amount of the write down is recognized as an impairment loss in excess (deficiency) of revenue over expenses. A previously recognized impairment loss may be reversed to the extent of an improvement, provided it is no greater than the amount that would have been reported at the date of the reversal had the impairment not been recognized previously. The amount of the reversal is recognized in excess (deficiency) of revenue over expenses in the period the reversal occurs.

Transaction costs Financial instruments subsequently measured at amortized cost are adjusted for financing fees and transaction costs which are directly attributable to the origination and acquisition of the financial instrument.

FINANCIALS

Measurement uncertainty The preparation of financial statements in conformity with ASNPO requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the period. Estimates and assumptions include the estimated useful life of capital assets for amortization purposes, student enrolment for deferred revenue calculations, allocation of expenditures to expenses versus capital, the net recoverable amount of accounts receivable, the estimated financial effect and outcome of the contingent liability, and the assessment of fair value for the purposes of determining impairment of capital assets. By their nature, these estimates are subject to measurement uncertainty, and the effect on the financial statements of changes in such estimates in future periods could be significant.

49 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

4.

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

Cash and cash equivalents includes term deposits in the amount of $4,540,683 (2018—$nil). The term deposits mature in September 2019 and have interest rates ranging from 1.99% to 2.17%. 5.

PREPAID OPERATIONAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLIES

2018 (restated - Note 2)

2019

Current prepaids Prepaid technology devices Prepaid instructional supplies Prepaid other Prepaid rent Total current prepaids

$

Long-term portion Prepaid technology devices Prepaid instructional supplies Total long-term prepaids

246,848 137,178 858 384,884

$

593,437 110,406 703,843 1,088,727

394,321 394,321 $

2,582,196

Prepaid technology devices are computers and other devices (iPads) purchased for student and staff use to support learning and the delivery of instruction. The cost of the device is expensed as an instructional cost over its useful life. In the current period $250,959 (2018—$209,991) of instructional materials and supplies expense relates to the cost of technology devices expensed. Prepaid instructional supplies include software licenses as well as classroom supplies such as textbooks. These are expensed within instructional materials and supplies as they are utilized or consumed in the course of instruction.

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

50

FINANCIALS

$

250,959 163,159 8,686 1,765,071 2,187,875


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

During the year the Society reviewed the useful life of the technology devices purchased for student use which are recorded on the statement of financial position as prepaid operational and instructional supplies. It was determined that devices used by junior and senior high students have a useful life of four years and devices used by elementary students have a useful life of five years. In previous years, all devices used by students were expensed over a three year period. As such, the amortization period of these assets has been changed in the current period. The effect of this change in accounting estimate in the current period is a reduction in instructional materials and supplies expense of $72,396 from what would have been reported under the previous estimates. 7.

LOAN RECEIVABLE

In 2017, the Society loaned $4,000,000 to Rundle College Education Foundation (“the Foundation”). The loan is secured by a Promissory Note, bears interest at 3.25% per annum and is repayable in monthly blended payments of $19,393. The loan balance as at August 31, 2019 is $3,701,551 (2018—$3,812,016) and total interest revenue earned on the loan during the year was $122,245 (2018—$126,121). The loan matures on November 30, 2031. 8.

CAPITAL ASSETS

FINANCIALS

2019 Cost Accumulated Net book amortization value Computer equipment Furniture and fixtures Vehicles Leasehold improvements

$ 2,975,272 4,073,794 466,769 1,436,826

$

$ 8,922,661

$ 5,947,008

51ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

2,518,996 2,747,298 401,472 279,242

2018 Net book value

$ 456,276 1,296,496 65,297 1,157,584

$

712,692 1,341,265 93,282 429,223

$ 2,975,653

$ 2,576,462


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

9.

OPERATING LINE OF CREDIT

The Society has secured with the Toronto Dominion Bank (the "Bank") an available operating line of credit in the amount of $1,000,000 (2018—$1,000,000) to be utilized for daily operations and a special credit, up to a maximum of $200,000 (2018— $200,000), which can be used by way of special credit cards issued by the Bank in the name of the borrower. The operating line bears interest at prime plus 0.125% per annum (2018 - prime plus 0.125% per annum). The operating line is secured by a General Security Agreement providing a first charge over all present and future assets of the Society. As of August 31, 2019, the balance of the operating line of credit was $nil (2018—$nil). 10.

INTERFUND TRANSFERS

During the year, $980,044 was transferred from the Operating Fund to the Capital Fund (2018—$262,486) in order to fund the cash outlays for capital asset acquisitions. 11. COMMITMENTS The Society has entered into various leases for the rental of facilities utilized by the Society. In 2015, the Society entered into a lease agreement with the Foundation for the use of capital assets donated. The anticipated minimum aggregate annual payments, including the non-refundable portion of goods and services tax, for the Society's leases are as follows:

FINANCIALS

Contractual obligation repayment schedule:

2020 $ 1,874,701 2021 1,874,701 2022 1,874,701 2023 1,874,701 2024 1,874,701 Thereafter 21,193,425 $ 30,566,930

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

52


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

12.

CONTINGENT LIABILITY

The Society is subject to an action commenced by a parent of a former student who claimed the Society was negligent for not diagnosing the former student's learning disability. The amounts involved in this action are not reasonably estimable due to uncertainty as to the final outcome. The Society does not believe this proceeding will have a material effect on the Society's financial position or results of operations. 13. GUARANTEE The Society has guaranteed loans secured by the Foundation in connection with the construction of a new school facility. The loans are secured by certain real properties of the Foundation. The maximum potential amount of future payments that the Society could be required to make under this guarantee is equal to the carrying amount of the loan as at August 31, 2019 of $17,868,226 (2018—$18,462,413). 14.

CONTROLLED NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

The Society is the sole shareholder of Rundle College Mortgage Fund Ltd. (RCMF) which was incorporated in 2013 to act as the agent for investors who subscribe to a bond offering made by the Foundation. There were no transactions between the organizations. RCMF currently has no assets, liabilities, revenues or expenses. 15.

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

FINANCIALS

The Society is exposed to various risks through its financial instruments and has a comprehensive risk management framework to monitor, evaluate and manage these risks. –The following analysis provides information about the Society's risk exposure and concentration as of August 31, 2019.

(a) Credit risk

Credit risk arises from the possibility that third parties may default on their financial obligations. The Society is exposed to credit risk on accounts receivable and the loan receivable from the Foundation. The Society's accounts receivable are due from a diverse group of customers and as such are subject to normal credit risks. The loan receivable risk is minimized as management has assessed that there is currently no indication that the Foundation will default on its payments.

53 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


RUNDLE COLLEGE SOCIETY NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS YEAR ENDED AUGUST 31, 2019

15.

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (cont’d)

The Society's credit risk exposure on cash and cash equivalents is minimized substantially by ensuring that cash and cash equivalents is held with credible financial institutions.

The Society's maximum credit risk exposure is limited to the balances reported on the statement of financial position in respect of cash and cash equivalents and accounts receivable. (b) Liquidity risk Liquidity risk is the risk that the Society will encounter difficulty in meeting obligations associated with financial liabilities. The Society is exposed to minimal liquidity risk.

(c) Market risk

Market risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices. Market risk is comprised of currency risk, interest rate risk and other price risk as described below.

• Currency risk

Currency risk is the risk that the value of financial instruments denominated in currencies other than the reporting currency of the Society will fluctuate due to changes in foreign exchange rates. The Society is exposed to foreign currency exchange risk to the extent that its US bank account fluctuates based on changes in foreign exchange rates. The US bank account balance in US dollars as at August 31, 2019, is ($10,876) (2018—$28,612). The Society is exposed to minimal currency risk.

• Interest rate risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument might be adversely affected by a change in the interest rates. The Society is exposed to interest rate risk to the extent that the operating line of credit is at a floating rate of interest, and to the extent of any withdrawals on this line of credit.

• Other price risk

Other price risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market prices caused by factors specific to the individual financial instrument or its issuer, or factors affecting all similar financial instruments traded in the market. The Society is not currently exposed to other price risk.

16.

COMPARATIVE FIGURES

FINANCIALS

Some of the comparative figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year's presentation.

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

54


All of us at Rundle then face the...task of moving each student as far up the mountain as we can. We are truly mountain climbers and not just those who care about the final assault on the summit. Dr. Rodney Conklin A Cottage That Became A Campus

55 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019


Climbing Your Mountain

Good afternoon Rundle staff, students, alumni, and family. My name is Taryn Knorren, I am an alumni of the College and am now a teacher at the Collett campus. I’m standing here having not known Dr. Conklin personally; I didn't have the privilege of spending quality time with him; I only had a few brief interactions in my three years as a student at the College. That being said, I do feel I know him through what he has built and left behind. I know his values of family, caring, and helping every child strive for their full potential. I would genuinely not be the person I am today without the creation of Rundle. I want to speak to what makes me love Rundle so much that I continue to be a part of the community, because I believe it is that understanding that is the greatest legacy of Dr. Conklin: family, caring, and potential. Rundle is a place of heart and hope. It is a place that truly believes in the potential of every single person in its community—students, staff, faculty, parents, and alumni—it believes that through caring, every person can discover just how capable they are. Dr. Conklin spoke about helping students take just one more step up their mountain, caring only that they took the step and supporting them to do so. It was never about reaching the peak, but taking a small step forward. I have experienced those moments as a student when a teacher sat with me everyday at lunch going through my English essays again and again or when a committee of teachers believed I was capable of living overseas and representing Rundle during a six-week exchange. Now, as a teacher, it’s the belief and caring that supports me through the rewards and challenges of sharing this vision

Taryn Knorren Delivered September 18, 2019 Dr. Conklin Celebration of Life The Jubilee Auditorium Calgary

with the students. Rundle is there for the big steps, the little steps, and all of those in between. The legacy of Dr. Conklin is in the deep belief that every child has potential, and every child is capable of climbing their mountain. I was shown my own capability and potential through the tireless effort, caring and support of Rundle staff. They treated me like family throughout my education and then beyond as I started my life as an adult. When I became a teacher, it was no different. I had Rundle to support me, and most importantly to believe in me. Now, along with my fellow teachers, I get to believe in and support today’s Rundle students. Dr. Conklin created Rundle to help every student reach their potential and not get left behind or fall through the cracks. I am so proud to be apart of carrying on his vision, and grateful that I was able to be apart of it as a student. So in the end I do feel connected to him, because I have been living his vision for the last ten years. Every student, alumni and staff here knows Dr. Conklin because they show everyday, the caring for one another that he strived for; they create the feeling of family that he built, and they work to go one step further towards their potential that Dr. Conklin believed in so strongly. So whether you knew him well, met him in passing, or never met him at all, as part of our community you know him. And to honour Dr. Conklin's memory, I can't see any better way but to live out his philosophy. So I ask you, the students, to make your goal not climb to the summit of your mountain, but to be courageous and just take that one small step that moves you closer to the top.

ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

56


Dee Conklin Delivered September 18, 2019 Dr. Conklin Celebration of Life The Jubilee Auditorium Calgary

Continued from page 38

Rod was passionate about his beliefs as well. When a good friend wanted to run for provincial politics Rod put on a sandwich board and walked through the 28 day writ period from Revelstoke to Kimberley. He also had no problem standing up for what he believed in no matter the controversy. JUMBO Mountain Resort was a huge controversial issue in our area that pitted neighbour against neighbour and Rod wore this hat proudly and would argue the merits of this project or any issue, with anyone, at anytime. And last but not least, Rod used to say to me and our kids, “you can take the boy out of the farm but you cannot take the farm out of the boy.” He was raised in Saskatchewan until the age of 12. He loved his cowboy hat—it reminded him of his roots and where he had come from. He worked hard, he helped out friends in need, he was a giver not a taker and he may have looked tough and rugged on the outside but he was so kind and gentle on the inside! Thank you Jason for being my Vanna!

57 ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

Hopefully this gives you all a VISUAL memory of the man you call your Founder, and I called my husband, Tanya, Matt and Drew called him Dad, Evan, Cameron and Sydney called him Gampa. And Marianne and Howard called him brother. I asked Rod if he had any last words of advice or inspiration for you all—he responded with the following: 1. Find your passion 2. Believe in yourself 3. And cherish life-long learning As Henry Ford once said: “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing in life is to keep your mind young.” And Dr. Conklin did just that! Thank you.


ANNUAL REPORT 2018–2019

58


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