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D I S COV E R . C R E AT I V E . R AW. E M E RG I N G .

ISSN 2205-1031

THE ELEMENTS

ISSUE 03 | OCT/NOV/DEC 2015 | AUS: $15.95


EDITOR’S LETTER

D I S COV E R . C R E AT I V E . R AW. E M E RG I N G .

ISSUE 03 / THE ELEMENTS FOUNDER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rennan Dizon GRAPHIC DESIGN Rennan Dizon SUB-EDITORS Junie Chen, Rachael Brown, Jess Mackay CONTRIBUTORS Alex Pike, Amy Hibbard, Andy Miao, Caitlin A. Kearney, Chris Fatseas, Dapper Lounge (Robbie Eror), Eugenie Zhan, James Ormiston, Jess Mackay, Jillian Boustred, Kristina Yenko, Madeleine Gill, Maria Boyadgis, Megan Doyle, Natasha Killeen, Rachel Webb, Rochelle Gregory, Vinh Huynh

Come closer to the edge, breathe the misty air, feel the fire burning inside your heart. Now spread your arms and take a big leap forward. Feel the water flowing around you, the coldness making you quiver. Tilt your head back, close your eyes and listen to the Earth’s soothing voice. Let the sound of nature calm you. Now lift yourself up, feel all the Elements running through your blood – feel refreshed, feel inspired. You’re brave for taking the risk.

COVER Featured: Robbie Eror Photography & Art Direction: Richard Hedger Production & Styling Assistant: Melissa Gooley Hair & Make-up: Linda Ha Grooming & Hair Cut: Tiarna Carmont @ Detail for Men Salon Sydney

Now repeat.

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Ren. SUBMISSIONS submissions@rummagemagazine.com GENERAL hello@rummagemagazine.com WEB rummagemagazine.com facebook.com/rummagemagazine @rummage_magazine

Rummage Magazine is proudly published 4 times a year in Australia by Rummage Magazine, PO Box 20341, World Square, NSW 2002. ISSN NO: 2205-1031. Any reproduction, in whole or in parts of the magazine is strictly prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. All creative work, images and articles remain the copyright of their respective artist, designer, illustrator, photographer, writer, creator or owner. Rummage Magazine has been granted permission from individual contributors to feature and publish their work. The views expressed in Rummage Magazine are those of their respective contributors and not necessarily shared by the publisher. Rummage Magazine assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material, manuscripts or creative work sent to us. We’ve done our best to ensure accuracy and we apologise in advance for mistakes that have been overlooked by the team.

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Photography KRISTINA YENKO


CONTENTS

018

026

054

040

054

086

102

128

008

THE ELEMENTS

066

MARIA BOYADGIS

104

ROCKY RAFAELA

010

SHADES

070

IN SEARCH OF

114

WEATHER SYSTEMS

018

VA JOURNAL

080

COVER FEATURE

122

SEA BREEZE

024

ARTICLE:

DAPPER LOUNGE

130

JAMES ORMISTON

LMTDSPACE GALLERY

088 UNDERCURRENT

136

EUGENIE ZHAN

026

MONET’S LAST SEASON

096 ARTICLE:

140 ARTICLE:

034

ALEX PIKE

THE WORLD

BRINGING PORN BACK

040 CYCLES

ACCORDING TO WES

DOWN TO EARTH

056

098

MADELEINE GILL

6

IN HER ELEMENT

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INTRODUCING ISSUE THREE’S INSPIRING, R AW A N D E M E R G I N G C R E AT I V E TA L E N T S .


Words CAITLIN A. KEARNEY ‘For You’ / Artwork JOSHUA MOY

EARTH

FIRE

In the centre of everything, right at the core, in the midmost of all of it, madness goes still, and wand’rers cross trails by the moon’s soft spill to share what they will. Came there two travellers, long kept apart. Said Fiol to Marka (by way of a start): “Fond greetings, dear wayfarer! Lay down your heart. Who’s in your news now, with what have you met? Come rest beside me- you’ve stories, I’ll bet. She trilled at his ardour, pulled up some grass, and began. “Of the gentlefolk, ancient, unending and strong, he was rough-cut and stoic and steeped in song, often green but never for long. He stayed underfoot as I made my way and trod a fresh path and lost track of the day; lost track of all days as they swung with the nights ‘til the good scent of newness soon brought me to rights. For he grew, was renewed and in turns was cut down, sage and humble beneath his crisp crown, ordered me breathe as the planet rolled ‘round. Deeper I moved, learning lives with bare feet, and I lay with the piper as the sky went sweet…”

“Fiol, my lovelace; Fiol, my charm, I did cross a figure who’s caused some harm.” “To whom, my fine friend?” he flickered, “Not you? Not to yourself, for that figure will rue the day if they brought you one lick of despair-“ “No more than another, don’t pull out your hair. We’ve all been seared sometime, it has to be done, and sometimes it’s meant in fun.” “Go on.” “Well, she tipped us whiskey and waxed of Inferno, impossibly bright and alluring-“ “Hello!” “-though, if one got too close, she could sizzle and spit, truly inviting but prone to hot fits. Relentless in motion and blazing with colour, left the rich mark of her passion and fervour. I cannot forget her and often muse over how she could run wild but danced in the corner. The source of her sweat; was it pain or regret? Was it rapture ignited and how could I let her smoke me to sleep, to febrile dreams, to chasing, embracing her, not what she seems; not merely warming, but burning, longing…” “May your wings never melt.” “Love, that’s all well and good, but no soul ever did just what they should.”

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WATER

AIR

“Marka, my justice; Marka, my beam, have you ever caught eyes with a ceaseless gleam?” “Pray, tell.” “Why, alright! They- being fluid- are no trick of light. Mirage is the jealous one, glittering in vain, for no force can mirror the releasing rain of Their cool and kind oneness with all that They saw, as they gleamed like a medal from shore to shore, smooth-talking…passenger? Transporter? Both. They rescue blindly and bring some strife, sore to be managed and pouring with life. I bathed in their lull, numb to the world, calmed and carried with the soothing swirl of their thoughts, trickling forth. They surround us all without spreading thin, they tremble with power and name us most kin, then crash. I was lucky- am still; they were frosty for some, in icy slips of a stiffened tongue, but I did get my fill as they swelled with good will and made me feel weightless but dragged others down to a far grimmer fate, yes; I knew they could storm off and let me dry out.” “Was that draining?” “To think of, but I know no drought. We ate a cold supper and looked to the sea, and they were many places but always with me.”

Sighed Marka to Fiol “Someone’s about; you’ve brought an acquaintance.” “You’ve found me out,” he murmured, quite bashful, but swift to explain; “This is a lady both secret and plain. She is all-present but tough to be found, and she speaks in whispers that make their way ‘round. You know her, you know her.” Marka just stared. “You see how the landscape, politely prepared, trembles and shivers, the bark blown bare as a bone? A benevolent caress. She gives folk a whipping if they don’t stay wise, and shies well away from searching eyes, keen or otherwise. She’s gentle this evening, but may take high flight later tonight.” “She does feel familiar,” quavered his chum, “and so close upon me, I’m…(overcome.)” They listened together. Then, over to-ing and fro-ing of She, said Fiol to Marka, “We’ve been here before, so many whiles, and there’ll be plenty more. We’ve spoken of old friends, can you not tell?” Said Marka to Fiol, “I know them all well.” They stayed side by side as everything changed. A moment of muteness, a pocket in time, arranged and rearranged.

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SHADES

Photography RACHEL WEBB instagram: @rachelwebbphotography web: rachelwebb.com.au Make-up Artist HOLI JADE facebook: facebook.com/holijademua instagram: @holijade_mua Stylist CAITLIN QUICK instagram: @caitlin_quick web: caitlinquickstylist.com Model INDIANNA ROEHRICH @ WINK MODELS & LONDON MGT


Top RENA HANG Skirt KEEGAN THE LABEL Shoes WAYNE BY WAYNE COOPER


(Left & Right) Top & Snood KEEGAN THE LABEL Trousers RENA HANG Shoes WAYNE BY WAYNE COOPER


Top & Trousers RENA HANG Coat KEEGAN THE LABEL Shoes BARED FOOTWEAR


Dress & Poncho KEEGAN THE LABEL


PHOTOGRAPHER MELBOURNE, VIC

I D E F I N I T E LY H AV E A N O B S E S S I O N W I T H M Y N E W LY A D O P T E D C AT ‘A N G E L’, A N D B L AC K A N D W H I T E I M AG I N G AT T H E M O M E N T.

“WORK WITH HARD WORKING INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE GOING TO PUT IN AS MUCH EFFORT.”

T

he creative team that came together to create the editorial ‘Shades’are from the backgrounds of Photography, Makeup, Modelling, Styling and Design. All the creatives involved are Melbourne based and are emerging in to the Fashion industry in Australia. Rachel specialises in Photography, Holi Jade in makeup, Caitlin in Styling and Indianna as a very experienced Model. In collaboration with the designers from Rena Hang the Label, Keegan the Label, Bared Footwear and Ryder the Label, our creative team has a massive range of ability in this industry. Rummage: What was the concept and inspiration for ‘Shades’? Rachel: ‘Shades’ was a concept that Myself and stylist; Caitlin had been discussing for a while, we wanted to create something muted and moody. We had looked a lot of inspiration and previous shoots that captured very modern fashion styling with darker and muted tones. We looked a lot of black and white work as well to look at the idea of light and shade and finding a medium there while creating depth and using minimal colour. The idea was definitely to create something that wasn’t desaturated and flat, but less vibrant and

well contrasted. Personally I had been using a lot of colour and bright lighting in my previous shoots so I’d been really wanting to expand and create something different and sharper for a while. So with all of this in mind we created a mood board to reflect all this and started to put everything together to create ‘Shades’. How did the team form? Have you worked together before? Myself and our stylist Caitlin had worked together previously and discussed on occasions that we were looking to do something different. So after putting together our inspiration and mood boards we started to connect with our contacts to pull the team together and get the ball rolling. Caitlin had connections with the brands and designers that she chose and got them on board with our project. I got in touch with Holi Jade (our MUA) who had fantastic references and was experienced in the kind of makeup looks we were after. Lastly we we trying to find a model with a very sharp look to pull the whole series together, which is when we came across Indianna @ Wink Models, who was exactly what we were after. We ended up with a very large creative team from all walks of the industry and a lot


of experience which is what drove the fantastic outcome of our series. Can you share some thoughts about Australia’s creative scene? What kind of things would you like to see or happen in the future? I think the Australian creative scene has so much talent and experience but from what I’ve seen, the majority of ‘the best’ are heading overseas, because there’s just so much more in terms of opportunity in places like London and New York. Some amazing Australian talent in the industry are really making names for themselves overseas, but I think what I would like to see happen is cities in Australia become just as well recognised for fashion and creative talent as those overseas, because we just have so much to offer. Our scene is already quite large and bursting with emerging artists which is so inspiring, and yet I think to a lot it feels like the metaphor of “Big fish in a little pond” and by moving overseas they’re getting the opportunity to become ‘the big fish in the big pond’ and achieve the most they can from their work. So for the future it would be amazing to think that we could have that same reputation and ideals to have the best of the best wanting to be here in Australia. What advice can you give when collaborating with other talents? One of the most important things I find when collaborating with other talents is to make sure everyone is on the same page and is after the same thing. Being well organised and communicating a lot with your team (especially if you haven’t worked together before) is imperative throughout all stages of the collaboration; Planning, organising, shooting, post shoot editing and finalising. I’ve found from experience when you lose communication during any of those stages, not everyone involved is on the same page and can end up unhappy with the final result. So all in all the advice is to work with hard working individuals who are going to put in as much effort as each other to create something you’re all proud of and excited about!

Dress RYDER LABEL Photography RACHEL WEBB Make-up Artist HOLI JADE Stylist CAITLIN QUICK Model INDIANNA ROEHRICH @ WINK MODELS & LONDON MGT

Which element best describes ‘Shades’? Definitely earth is the first thing that comes to mind for shades. We may have gone for a muted look but with all the brick and concrete we used on location to create the piece its definitely the most suited description to our editorial.

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Alexandra / Artwork VA JOURNAL


A N DY M I AO P H OTO G R A P H E R V L A D I S L AV T R O F I M OV PA I N T E R SY D N E Y, N S W

A N DY: C L E A N A N D U N I N T E R R U P T E D L I N E S V L A D : H U M A N CO N S C I E N C E , P L E AS U R E , PA I N , D E S I R E , R E L AT I O N S H I P S . BAS I C A L LY H U M A N L I F E

“FORCING OURSELVES TO ADAPT TO NEW SURROUNDINGS SEEMS TO ALWAYS HELP US THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX.”

V

A Journal, named for its creators Vlad Trofimov and Andy Miao, is an online visual arts journal that details their journey as collaborating artists. Trofimov is a painter specializing in the human form, and Miao is a fashion and fine art photographer. The two have been collaborating on portraits that amalgamate both of their respective disciplines since 2014. They create artworks that mix genres and mediums to play with ambiguity, emotions and passions. Rummage: Can you tell us more about VA Journal? How did you come up with it? Andy: The idea of VA Journal came to us when Vlad and I were discussing plans to travel in late 2014. We are both avid storytellers and we try to reflect this in our art, whether it is the emotional journey while making the artwork or something totally unrelated. We discussed travel ideas for a few weeks, and we reached the point where we realised that the best use of our time would be to use this trip as an opportunity to tell the story of the people and places we encounter. We then came up with the idea of combining our

artworks to tell these stories so we could then showcase them at an exhibition after the trip. We later expanded the idea to also create smaller web-exclusive pieces that we would post on our blog. Your concept of combining both skills is intriguing. Where do you get your inspiration for new pieces? Vlad: We definitely get a lot of inspiration from each other. We have a strong mutual respect for the othertel discipline. We often see the other’s art-making process as a way of adding extra dimension to our own work in a way that would ordinarily not be achievable with a single medium. We also get heaps of inspiration from the new people we meet and new places we visit when we travel abroad. We went to New Zealand this year and set out to see as many different places as possible before our money ran out. Much of our trip was filled with uncertainty, since we only did some loose planning beforehand. I think it’s in moments of vulnerability that a lot of the inspiration for our recent works come into existence. Forcing ourselves to adapt to new surroundings seems to always help us think outside the box.

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What obstacles or disagreements have you experienced during the process? Vlad: By far our biggest obstacle has been communication. We both play a vital part in every project and being on the same page creatively can become a project of its own. It can be a challenge to find a balance between our two vastly different styles. We don’t want any aspect of our pieces to be too overpowering, and sometimes we have to compromise to make the piece work. A lot of our work revolves around travelling to new

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places and experiencing new things, so one unexpected source of conflict is my cautious driving. I prefer to drive on the slow side, and Andy gets frustrated. He thinks my laid-back attitude and lack of urgency will cause us to fall behind schedule and arrive at destinations late. What plans do you have for the near future? Andy: We have been working on this collection since October 2014 so the plan is to finish the collection and exhibit by

October this year ­— fingers crossed. We also want to streamline our work process because wecausrealised how inefficient we are. The time it takes us from when we come up with an idea and starting work on that piece has plagued us for quite some time. As soon as our exhibition is finalised we will probably hit the road again. Right now the two options are travelling from Moscow to either Vladisvostok or Ulaanbaatar via the Trans-Siberian Railway, or an anything-goes adventure in Iceland. Wherever we decide to go, our goal is


(Left) Valerie / (Right) Elsa / Artworks VA JOURNAL

to learn about the local culture, see new man-made and natural landscapes, and to translate our experiences into inspiration for new artworks. Which element best describes you? Andy: I’d definitely be fire. I can be really emotional sometimes, and my state of mind is reflected in each of my pieces. I am also super blunt about my feelings, which works out to be either great or downright terrible. I also like to think that I do not adhere to many social boundaries when it comes to some of my personal projects. If I have a good idea, I’m going to follow through with it; it’s not like me to let someone or something limit my creative options.

Vlad: I think I would have to be air. I’m a very carefree person, I don’t worry about many things I should worry about and I pretty much go with the flow. I also have a tendency to daydream a lot, especially about abstract things. Like Andy, I think my personal projects are also highly reflective of my inner state; I love painting abstract pareidolia-related pieces, which is a reflection of my constant daydreaming. SEE MORE OF VA JOURNAL’S WORK web: andymiao.com, vladtrofimov.com, vajournal.com facebook: facebook.com/andymiaojpeg, facebook.com/vladtrofimovart, facebook.com/vajournal instagram: @andymiao.jpeg, @vladtrofimovart, @va_journal

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V&A / Artwork VA JOURNAL


LMTDSPACE

GALLERY Words JESS MACKAY Images KELLY MAC MEDIA / KELLYMACMEDIA.COM

3/32 NERANG STREET S O U T H P O RT, Q U E E N S L A N D 42 1 5

S

etting out to change the culture of the place you live in is no easy feat or half-baked daydream. For a young group of artists, creatives and dedicated sponsors, the opening of Lmtdspace Gallery in the heart of the Gold Coast is a great leap toward the cultivation of fine arts in South-East Queensland and the ability to give a voice to emerging artists. The pop-up gallery opened its doors in mid-August, with its debut exhibition ‘Human Identity’ showcasing local and national artists, whose work investigated and challenged our concept of the human condition through a range of mediums. Spearheaded by co-founders Christopher McKenzie and Joshua White, Lmtdspace was first developed in 2011 with the view to create an innovative artist collective that could help support and discover upcoming artists.

Lmtdspace Gallery

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“WE NEED TO LOOK AT THE 18 TO 25-YEAR-OLDS IN THE ART COMMUNITY TO BUILD THE NEXT GENERATION.”

McKenzie, who is also the creative director of Corporate Art on the Gold Coast, believes that altering the model of commercial art locally was one of the biggest elements within the establishment of the gallery. “We are somewhere in between an art gallery and an artist-run initiative. We still want artists to sell work but we don’t want to make money off them, which is hard because if we don’t make money we don’t stay open. But it’s more about keeping our integrity [and] the importance of the word ‘help’,” he explains. The gallery launch attracted a following of over 300 professionals and members of the community that have continued to support Lmtdspace’s second exhibition ‘12 x 12’ with the same passion and dedication. “We need to look at the 18 to 25-year-olds in the art community to build the next generation… it’s going to be us that changes the way for them to then say ‘yeah I’m a Gold Coast artist,’” McKenzie says. Run by a small team that includes Chroma Student Artist of the year (2014), Aish Saffigna, Creative Director Virginia Lea and artist and Marketing Co-ordinator Melissa Spratt, Lmtdspace is proof of how creative courage can transform an environment and contribute to a more diverse artistic culture. Saffigna, who is assistant curator of the gallery, explains that the humble artist-run initiative is a safe space to explore a place’s identity and concerns:

Artworks by Christopher McKenzie

“I want our gallery to be this friendly space for the Gold Coast area. Maybe not necessarily the answer and solution to its much needed recognition of culture and identity through artistic appreciation, but a nice little reminder that you can go there as a safe haven for artistic enquiry and appreciation”. Saffigna’s work – together with McKenzie and a growing number of artists – was one of the first to show in the new space, investigating the issues surrounding the human condition and identity. She continues, “I think more places should pop up like this so that the message gets across that we need art on the coast to give its people new experiences, and lead them to think differently and feel a sense of connection to the place and themselves. “This is what art does, it’s about more than looking pretty. You’re buying an idea”. Lmtdspace gallery is an initiative supported by H&S Consulting Group, the City of Gold Coast, and Found Gold Coast. It is open for artist proposals throughout the year.

For more information on upcoming exhibitions you can visit their website or follow them on social media:

Lmtdspace Staff

web: lmtdspace.com.au instagram: @lmtdspacegc facebook: facebook.com/lmtdspacegallery

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MONET’S LAST SEASON

Photography ANTHONY GATTARI Hair & Make-up HILARY HO Stylist & Designer VINH HUYNH Model JOHANNA ROBIN @ VIVIEN’S


Photography ANTHONY GATTARI Hair & Make-up HILARY HO Stylist & Designer VINH HUYNH Model JOHANNA ROBIN @ VIVIEN’S


PHOTOGRAPHER WO L LO N G O N G , N S W

AT T H E M O M E N T I ’ M OBSESSED WITH RIDING MY BIKE ANYWHERE I CAN.

F

or as long as I can remember, I’ve been obsessed with the natural world. Raised by hippy parents on an organic farm in North West NSW, most of my time was spent outside camping, bushwalking or simply following my dad around the farm learning about the intricacies of the environment. I was always out looking for new animals I could find, capture and then let go later on once I was satisfied I’d learned enough about them. When I inherited my uncle’s old 35mm Minolta SLR, it was only natural that I felt the urge to use it to document

all the amazing things I found in outside. From that point onwards I fell in love with photography and its ability to somewhat capture the essence of what I was seeing and feeling in the great outdoors every day. I pursued both my scientific and creative passions into university, studying Journalism and Biology, which heavily influenced the way I approach photography now. I aim to combine the vast, awe-inspiring beauty of the geological processes of nature with the


(Left & Right) Photography ALEX PIKE

“ON EVERY LEVEL YOU LOOK, YOU CAN FIND SOMETHING TOTALLY AMAZING IN NATURE.” small, often overlooked organism that inhabit the environments these processes create. I also want to tell the stories of the people who are dedicated to conserving and studying the natural world. It probably comes as no surprise then that the strongest influence on my photography comes from my interest in biology and the environment. On every level you look, you can find something totally amazing in nature, and that never ceases to astound me. I find the tiny array of arthropods that inhabit the rainforest

floor just as impressive as the huge mountains or tall waterfalls that dwarf the rainforest itself. And then there can be entire communities of bacteria living on a single one of those arthropods, which is pretty incredible! Some people don’t really look close enough to realise those things, but once you notice they’re there it’s impossible not to see them. That means that every time I go outside and into the wild, I’ll find something new and interesting, even if it’s in a place I’ve been to countless times before.

I also get really inspired when I see people making a living from their creative passion, particularly in the field of photography, as that’s something I can relate and aspire to. There’s NSW South Coast locals such as Ray Collins and Warren Keelen who are constantly creating the most amazing images, and the fact that people so close to home are doing that is really motivating. SEE MORE OF ALEX’S WORK web: alexpikecreative.com instagram: @alexjpike


Photography ALEX PIKE


Photography ALEX PIKE


CYC A film by CHRIS FATSEAS Featuring LAUREN BENSON @ DALLYS Production KELLY HOCKEY Fashion Styling CHAPTER.TEN Make-up Artist ALYSSA SELIN Hair Stylist JENNA & TERRI @ RIXON Music ‘HARBINGER’ BY NINTH MOON BLACK Sienna silk shirt CHRISTIE NICOLE Bias silk slip LEE MATHEWS Angelina dress CHRISTIE NICOLE


LES WAT C H CYCLES Scan QR code or go to: vimeo.com/137829871


Angelina dress CHRISTIE NICOLE


CYCLES Words CHRIS FATSEAS The earth is at her feet Her wrist turns, water flows A finger tip summons the wind She shuts the door Master of fire Beautiful Human The earth is at her feet Her tap, the morning dew With wings to embrace the wind Under she crawls Pinned to a board Beautiful Shell

Angelina dress CHRISTIE NICOLE


Lace kiss bralette WACOL Elytra leather harness CHAPTER.TEN Deity dress GEORGE WU


Lace kiss bralette WACOL Elytra leather harness CHAPTER.TEN Deity dress GEORGE WU


Divinity dress GEORGE WU


Cropped bouson bomber JACK HUANG Cindy II bralette CHRISTIE NICOLE Army green trapeze pant JACK HUANG Elytra leather garters CHAPTER.TEN Glow knee highs MIX APPAREL


Cropped bouson bomber JACK HUANG Cindy II bralette CHRISTIE NICOLE Army green trapeze pant JACK HUANG Elytra leather garters CHAPTER.TEN Glow knee highs MIX APPAREL


A film by CHRIS FATSEAS Featuring LAUREN BENSON @ DALLYS Production KELLY HOCKEY Fashion Styling CHAPTER.TEN Make-up Artist ALYSSA SELIN Hair Stylist JENNA & TERRI @ RIXON Music ‘HARBINGER’ BY NINTH MOON BLACK


IN HER ELEMENT

Photography NATASHA KILLEEN Make-up Artist AMY COLLA Hair Stylist CAROLYN JAYUN GAHAN Stylist PHOEBE CLARE MCKAY Model ANNIKA-MARIE LEICK @ LONDON MGT


Dress TAMIE ANTHAS Earrings LOVISA


Knit ATTIK modified by stylist with vintage scarf attached to sleeve Skirt ATTIK Socks COTTON ON


Dress TAMIE ANTHAS Socks TOPSHOP Earrings LOVISA Shoes PRADA


Shirt U-TURN Earrings LOVISA


Dress ATTIK Socks COTTON ON Earrings LOVISA Shoes PRADA


Poncho U-TURN Flared Trousers VINTAGE Socks TOPSHOP


Vest ATTIK Bralette COTTON ON Trousers PRINCESS HIGHWAY Bead Necklace U-TURN Crystal Necklace STYLIST’S OWN Earrings LOVISA


P H O T O G R A P H E R A N D I L L U S T R AT O R SY D N E Y, N S W

WATC H I N G V I D E O S O F C AG E D H E N S SEEING THE SKY FOR THE FIRST TIME!

“I JUST WANT TO BE THE BEST THAT I CAN BE.”

N

atasha Killeen is a fashion photographer and illustrator who lives and works in Sydney. She is self-taught and often mixes photography with her creativeart background to make dynamic and unique imagery. Despite having picked up a camera only two years ago, she has been featured in multiple magazines and exhibitions. She is currently striving to carve her own path in the fashion industry and bring back the creativity that she thinks is often lacking in today’s fashion imagery. Rummage: How did you get into fashion photography? Natasha: I have always been a creative person; drawing and painting were my main focus until I was about 17. I studied art all through high school and often dabbled in fashion illustration, but I never took it seriously. I officially started taking photos when I lived in Dunedin, New Zealand. I moved there when I was 18 and began doing a few test shoots with local models. After moving back to Australia, I got serious about planning shoots after I joined the photography group at my university. I think I was just drawn to

the freedom and the creative aspect of fashion photography. Now, I am focused on refining my skills and finding my niche within the fashion industry. Name a photographer who inspires you? Wow, I have so many! I guess the one I find most inspiring is Steven Klein. His work is so unique and has such variety. He also knows how to utilise a range of lighting techniques with stunning results. I am also really inspired by local photographers such as Bonnie Hansen. Her work is soft and raw, and she has found a particular aesthetic that didn’t seem to be around prior to her. Finally, I am inspired to always improve and refine my work by photographers I am in direct competition with, most of whom are also my close friends. Seeing their work progress always motivates me to keep working hard. What’s your aim or aspiration as a photographer? I just want to be the best that I can be, and I’m hoping to eventually make this my full-time career. My aim is to develop a range of skills across all aspects of


Photography NATASHA KILLEEN Make-up Artist AMY COLLA Hair Stylist CAROLYN JAYUN GAHAN Stylist PHOEBE CLARE MCKAY Model ANNIKA-MARIE LEICK @ LONDON MGT

photography so I’m proficient in studio and location work, as well as events and portraiture. I feel that once I refine all my skills and become the well-rounded photographer I’m working hard to become, it will be time to move overseas and try my luck in London and New York. After all this, I then see myself opening a small boutique photography and design studio that focuses on editorial, look-book photography and fashion branding. What advice can you give others who are just starting out? Network and get on social media. Email stylists, hair and makeup artists to connect with others in the industry, and make contacts with modelling agencies early on. It’s so important to have a base of awesome creatives, and I didn’t realise at first the role social media plays in establishing your presence. It’s not just important – it’s a necessity. Regular posting on Instagram is what brings me most of my work and puts me in touch with potential collaborators. Another thing to remember is to never be content with your work. It’s all right to appreciate it and be proud of yourself, but never think I’m as good as I can be. You aren’t! You can always learn from others, expose yourself to the top photographers, assist other people on shoots and push yourself to achieve more. Which element best describes? I guess water best represents me. I studied marine science at university and really love the ocean; I also love all biological sciences and animals. Water represents fragility to me. The ocean is something we really need to cherish and take care of, or its amazing ecosystems and organisms won’t be around for much longer. Where we would be without it? Water is the life force behind everything – our bodies are primarily water and each of our cells needs water to function. I think people don’t value the beauty and significance of what this tiny, simple molecule gives to each of us, and everything on earth for that matter. SEE MORE OF NATASHA’S WORK web: natashakilleen.com instagram: @ahsatankilleen Blazer ATTIK Top SPORTSGIRL Flared Trousers MILICENT DARLINGS Necklace LOVISA Shoes PRADA

fb: facebook.com/natashakilleenArtphotography

rummage / NATASHA KILLEEN

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PHOTOGRAPHER SY D N E Y, N S W

A R M Y B O OT S & M O S H P I T S

“I STRIVE FOR EXCELLENCE AND PUSH MY BOUNDARIES AS MUCH AS I CAN.”

I

grew up with a creative background with no restrictions on imagination, which gave me a keen eye and a different perspective for viewing the world. At the age of 3 my parents bought me my first ‘Barbie’ instant polaroid (wish I kept it, talk about retro). This lasted until I plonked it in the rubbish, disheartened as I watched my parents using their fancy range of Canon 35mm film cameras, which I have only just rediscovered. After this I wasn’t to pick up a camera again until high school. Our house was always full of music and art to the point where the Triple J radio station was permanently blasting in the background and murals from each family member were on the walls. This led to my personal passion for music and art. At present, I am known as Four Minutes To Midnight Photography. I am driven and determined to get that perfect shot. My love for music has taken me to places I would have only dreamed of when I was younger. Live music photography is now my life, with no regrets. I also love to travel to cultural cities to be inspired by different lifestyles but am always happy to come back home to Australia. I recently undertook abstract photography in New York City, which was an amazing opportunity for me. In the beginning of the trip I felt a little overwhelmed in the big city however after a while I settled in and absorbed the inspirational art scene in NY. I hope to one day be featured in a gallery – or perhaps my own gallery – in NY. I strive for excellence and push my boundaries as much as I can. I travelled to Yosemite, California on my own to photograph

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rummage / MARIA BOYADGIS (FOUR MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT)


Photography MARIA BOYADGIS


the stars. Ha! What a joke! I got lost, the accommodation was wrong and I ended up in a deserted motel – that looked like something out of ‘The Shining’ – on the ‘highway to hell’. But I got GREAT shots and I lived to tell the tale (talk about an adventure). I am currently a venue photographer at Oxford Art Factory, who have been very supportive over the last year and a half. This gave me the opportunity to meet some amazing industry photographers

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and bands and enjoy the Australian music scene that OAF provide. I also have the opportunity to shoot for the awesome team at Music Feeds, where I have been able to photograph festivals and international bands. After a gap year, I completed a degree in Visual Communications, and I am now in my second year of a Bachelor of Design in photography and situated media at UTS. I have big dreams and positive goals for Four Minutes to Midnight as I take it in a

rummage / MARIA BOYADGIS (FOUR MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT)

new direction. I hope in the future I will be able to achieve my goals as an Artistic Director and continue shooting music on a broader scale. Feel free to check out Four Minutes to Midnight on Instagram and Facebook.

SEE MORE OF MARIA’S WORK

web: fourminutestomidnightphotography.com

instagram: @fourminutestomidnight fb: facebook.com/4M2Mphotography


Photography MARIA BOYADGIS


Photography KRISTINA YENKO Hair & Make-up RACHEL SOPHIE Stylist BLAKE SUTHERLAND @ WORK AGENCY Model KADE @ CHIC

IN SEARCH OF


Suit KIAYA DANIELS Boots DR. MARTENS


Shirt & Trousers KIAYA DANIELS Boots DR. MARTENS


Dress ALEX HIGGINS


(Left & Right) Shirt JACK LONDON SHIRT Skirt & Necklace STYLIST’S OWN


Necklace THIRTY TWO POINT FOUR


Top & Trousers JACK HUANG CONCEPT


Blazer STYLIST’S OWN Top GAIL SORRONDA Trousers SABA Belt KIAYA DANIELS


Sweater SAXONY Trousers JACK LONDON Shirt on waist KIAYA DANIELS Boots DR. MARTENS


“IN THE END, FASHION SHOULD BE FUN AND IS ESSENTIALLY A MEANS OF EXPRESSION.”

Dalton navy tux CALIBRE Duke tux white shirt CALIBRE Black bow tie CALIBRE Lux black patent belt CALIBRE Yachting Series watch BAUSELE AUSTRALIA


COVER F E AT U R E

Art Direction, Styling & Featured Model ROBBIE EROR Photography & Art Direction RICHARD HEDGER / Production & Styling Assistant MELISSA GOOLEY Hair & Make-up LINDA HA / Grooming & Hair Cut TIARNA CARMONT @ DETAIL FOR MEN SALON SYDNEY

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obbie Eror is a Sydney-based creative who began his design career working in the fashion business for the likes of big Australian brands such as Morrissey, and Marcs, before moving into a senior graphic design role where he worked with top entertainment brands. Now as an emerging men’s fashion blogger and freelance creative, his effortless yet earnest eye for dapper threads opens up a new venture in the world of men’s fashion blogging. In Robbie’s last role designing and art directing shoots for numerous national campaigns – and receiving a design award along the way – his experience within fashion and graphic design positioned him in good stead to tackle the blogosphere, while staying committed to freelancing as a designer. Using his own personal style: a cross between contemporary and classic pieces, as well as inspired looks, his new blog dapperlounge.com.au is set to showcase everything from fashion, interiors, art and lifestyle.

Rummage: Can you tell us more about the idea of Dapper Lounge? Why did you start it? Robbie: As a designer, I think you’re always looking for new outlets of creativity and I really wanted to try something new. What started as posting shoots of a few flat lays on Dapper Lounge’s Instagram (@dapperlounge) to share some of my wardrobe ways, has grown into a real vision to express a holistic approach in showcasing some great Australian brands, while also sharing some of my own ‘pics of the day’, a look at apparel activities abroad and images that I think are unique and inspiring. For me Dapper Lounge is a view on men’s fashion and lifestyle as well as an avenue to enjoy art directing, shooting and creating some of my own content. Dapper Lounge also creates the prospect of collaborating and working with brands and influencers to develop unique posts to share with everyone, all while ultimately having a bit of fun in the process. We’re looking forward to seeing your official blog. What can we expect to see? There are so many areas I’d like to explore and publish on the Dapper Lounge blog and I’m really looking forward to unearthing some great content for readers and subscribers. With its core being fashion-focused for the discerning dapper gent, it will evolve and grow over time to include more than just men’s fashion.

Each and every blog has a different outlook or perspective on areas of fashion and lifestyle with no one voice ever the same, which I think is great and helps to create a varied and dynamic space for readers. Dapper Lounge is an exciting space to share posts that might help or inspire gents to try a look they never thought they would and one that will also cover seasonal trends, cocktail and cuisine ideas, grooming tips and tricks, and design posts on living spaces and lifestyle. The list is endless. Which labels or designers have influenced your style? My wardrobe is filled with pieces from Australian brands like Calibre, Saba, Marcs, Arthur Galan AG, Brent Wilson and Morrissey. I’ve long been a fan of international brands like Tom Ford and Gucci along with Dior Homme, Saint Laurent, Armani, Alexander Wang, Balmain, Givenchy, Alexander McQueen and Balenciaga. One Australian designer I’m most looking forward to watching grow in his new direction of men’s fashion, is Jayson Brunsdon; he has long been known for creating brilliant women’s collections and with his first ever men’s collection hitting the stores for Spring / Summer, it’s great to see the Australian men’s fashion scene expanding.

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In your honest opinion, how would you describe men’s fashion in Australia? What would you like to change and why? I think there is a great pool of established and emerging Australian brands that are helping shape our fashion landscape as being one with a modern identity and versatility. Our unique lifestyle of expansive coastline will always play an influence in how we dress. We have many great creative minds and teams of people behind what we see on the racks in store and I don’t think the landscape needs to change but rather continue in a direction that is taking more risks to provide options. The growing number of overseas brands and stores calling Australia home is an indication of change and the realisation that our men’s market is ready to turn it up a notch , and that men are eager for something new, all while broadening our palette. With that said, fashion doesn’t stop at just threads, shoes and bags; if we look at the growth of grooming trends and the resurgence in old-school straight edge razor or cut-throat shaves along with the increasing number of beard products on the market, men are quite open to a new experience or adopting a new regime. In the end, fashion should be fun and is essentially a means of expression of your individuality, personality and what makes you feel great. Which element best describes you (Earth, fire, water or air) and why? I’m a Sagittarian, which makes me the element of Fire. After a quick Google search I found that apparently “Fire’s greatest gift is being able to inspire... They hunt for things that light them up… They’ve got a lust for life that is enviable.” – (Molly Hall from astrology.about.com). An interesting read and I guess this could confirm my passionate nature and desire to try and inspire people through my new project Dapper Lounge. However I do think we have a little of each element in us all which makes for interesting personalities and conversation.

Blue check blazer CALIBRE White cotton shirt CALIBRE Marzo paisley silk pocket square CALIBRE White denim jeans ZARA MAN Watch BAUSELE

SEE MORE OF DAPPER LOUNGE web: dapperlounge.com.au instagram: @dapperlounge

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Seamfoam cotton-linen suit CALIBRE Knit collar navy shirt CALIBRE Polka dot silk pocket square CALIBRE Royal tassel navy loafer CALIBRE Sunglasses TOM FORD


Red double breasted blazer CALIBRE Paisley print polo CALIBRE Poppy paisley silk pocket square CALIBRE Storm grey pant CALIBRE Wiley grey leather oxford lace up shoes BY BRANDO Sunglasses TOM FORD


Black sateen suit FRISONI FINETTI Red satin cravat WELLINGTON Ocean Moon Red Earth watch BAUSELE AUSTRALIA Black patent dress shoe Doucals CALIBRE


Navy wool suit CALIBRE Triple stripe navy tee shirt CALIBRE Blanc white sneaker CALIBRE Navy leather belt CALIBRE White rubber strap watch BAUSELE AUSTRALIA


UNDERCURRENT

Photography BYRON SPENCER Model SAVEJA ELLISON Designer JILLIAN BOUSTRED Hair & Make-up MARGO REGAN


“I THINK I LOOK UP TO ARTISTS MORE THAN DESIGNERS.”

FA S H I O N D E S I G N E R A N D S T Y L I S T SY D N E Y, N S W

I’M OBSESSED WITH

ORANGE IS THE NEW B L AC K . I T H I N K I T ’ S H I L A R I O U S , A N D I LOV E ANYTHING WITH A BIT OF G I R L P OW E R I N I T.

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illian Boustred is a Sydneybased creative with a focus on fashion design and styling. She graduated from the University of Technology Sydney in 2014 with a Bachelor of Design in Fashion and Textiles with honours in womenswear. Boustred’s artistic past gave her an appreciation for creativity in all forms, and she draws inspiration from this background when developing ideas and concepts. Her major project collection Undercurrent explored the notion of contemporary art and its translation into fashion. Boustred has experience with various Australian fashion labels including Emma Mullholland, Bec and Bridge, and Ellery. She currently works on a freelance basis focusing on fashion, textiles and styling. Rummage: How has life been since graduating from University of Technology Sydney? Jillian: It’s definitely challenging finishing up at university and trying to figure out what you want to do and where you want to go. I think it’s a combination of exciting and scary. For me, it has mostly been about maintaining creativity, learning about the fashion industry and trying to determine where I see myself in it. Can you tell us about your style and technique? Where do you get inspiration from? I get inspired by a lot of things, but I mainly look to art, architecture and graphic design for inspiration. I’m a very visual person and I love creativity in all of its forms. I studied art at school, which gave me a good foundation that I still draw from now. In terms of my technique, I do a lot of printmaking, which is often the catalyst for my designs when developing a collection. I like using both manual

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rummage / JILLIAN BOUSTRED

printmaking techniques as well as digital techniques such as Photoshop. Being so print and colour focused, I mainly like to keep garment shapes simple and structural in order to give the textiles a chance to speak for themselves. Is there a designer that you look up to and why? I think I look up to artists more than designers. I’ve always loved Cy Twombly because there is so much freedom and expression in his art. In terms of fashion designers, I have a lot of respect for Dion Lee. He’s very clever and talented, and he seems really down to earth and hardworking, which I respect. What are your plans in the near future? I’m working on another collection at the moment. It’s something a bit more commercial and wearable in comparison to my previous collection. I’d really like to start developing my own label and make it something that fits with the Australian lifestyle: sporty, wearable and somewhat casual. I’ll start with a small production run and sell it through my website. I’m going to continue with my styling work as well because I enjoy that – it’s great for networking and learning about that side of the fashion industry. Which element best describes you? It would definitely be water. I love the beach and just being near any type of open water. I was brought up swimming and surfing, and I spent months up the coast with my family every summer. There’s something really relaxing and humbling about being at the beach or just near a large body of water, and fortunately for me living in Australia means there’s no shortage of that! SEE MORE OF JILLIAN’S WORK web: jillianjboustred.com instagram: @jillianboustred


Photography BYRON SPENCER Model SAVEJA ELLISON Designer JILLIAN BOUSTRED Hair & Make-up MARGO REGAN


FEATURED B LO G G E R

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO

WES

Words MEG DOYLE Illustration CÆCILIE DYRUP

T

he fashion industry is future focused. Collections are shown long before they’re available to buy, trend forecasters have already decided what we’ll be wearing in two years, and technology is woven into fashion in new and strange ways all the time. We live in a world of possibilities! It’s a wonder we still have to dress ourselves, really. But every once in a while, we steal our eyes away from the shiny future to glance back. Not too far back mind you, leave your Jacobean ruff in the closet for now, but just far enough to elicit nostalgic sighs from retirement villages, caravan parks and golf courses across the world. This year, retro 70s inspired offerings from Prada, Miu Miu, Gucci and Bally provided the kindling that reignited the decade’s flame – a heat akin to that felt under all the layers of corduroy, crochet and turtlenecks we stacked on enthusiastically. Steamy. Inspired by the colour scheme of your Nan’s kitchen 40 years ago? Maybe. Though a more likely culprit can be found in the form of whimsical film lord, Wes Anderson. Anderson is known for creating highly stylised, symmetrical and kitsch fictional worlds to house his occasionally morose, often quirky and always well-dressed protagonists. And while they may be dysfunctional, neurotic and deadpan, many of his characters have become sartorially iconic. The director’s impact on fashion might stem from the breezy nonchalance with which his characters pull off even the most incongruous outfits. It’s Margot Tenenbaum’s tennis dress and fur coat, Steve Zissou’s wonky red hat and blue

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tracksuit, and the dapper grey ensembles in which three brothers journey through India in The Darjeeling Limited. And who could forget the sweatbands? All worn with unfaltering self-assurance. These characters are remembered not only for their actions, but for their style. We can only aspire to that kind of legacy, and our aspirations are fuel to the fashion industry’s fire. From billion-dollar brands to indie labels, Anderson’s impact is widespread. Alice Lunardi, who designs for Italian label Lazzari, agrees that Wes is a major source of inspiration for his ability to bring a retro aesthetic into a modern context. Lazzari has been making vintage-inspired clothes for over 30 years. “I think there are certain styles from the 60s and 70s that become more interesting when given a contemporary definition,” she says. “We’ve loved each of Wes’ works and we’ve found a lot of us in them too.” Style is so inherent to Anderson’s direction that working with brands like Prada is a natural move for the filmmaker. Together with long-time collaborator Roman Coppola, Anderson has made a series of commercials for the Prada Candy scent as well as a short film featuring his affable muse, Jason Schwartzman. The fusion of Prada, which has a penchant for retroinspired collections, and Anderson’s world is a match made in heaven. No longer do we have to dream of being the Prada girl who got stuck in the real world, almost too chic for the banalities

rummage / THE WHOWORLD MADE MY ACCORDING CLOTHES?TO WES


of everyday life. See, we don’t just want the clothing, we want to be the star in the world of Wes. His work with the fashion giant lets us be the Prada girl, only now there’s a whole cutesy world built around us, and we’re in a hot air balloon having a picnic with Bill Murray. Where Miuccia Prada is a fashion designer, Anderson is a lifestyle designer. Located in Milan, Fondazione Prada is now home to Bar Luce, a cafe designed by Anderson. And while we can’t guarantee Bill will be there, it’s a setting that the Wes himself has said he would happily spend his “non-fictional afternoons” in: a candycoloured Formica actualisation of what Anderson’s mind undoubtedly looks like, if you will. We can only hope there’s the blueprint for a real-life Grand Budapest Hotel in that head somewhere too. It’s the allure of a twee, pastel-toned existence that draws us into Anderson’s world. For those who lived through the 70s, his work is nostalgic. For us ungrateful youths, it’s how we imagine life without the internet might be. You’d hardly expect to see Moonrise Kingdom’s Suzie Bishop agonising over her Instagram likes or the Grand Budapest’s Monsieur Gustave at 3am, midway through a Mad Men Netflix marathon. Although we’d forgive them if they did, we’ve all been there. A romantic land full of old books, record players and uninterrupted conversations, we can only dream of such a time and place! Their problems are much simpler – all they have to deal with are the crippling existential crises that come with being an Anderson character. It’s almost enviable, really. MEG DOYLE is a 22 year old aspiring fashion journalist from Perth. She is inspired by down to earth, funny and honest fashion writers and tries not to take herself or the industry too seriously. Fluent in both English and sarcasm, she runs on a combination of strong coffee, dad jokes and the sense of achievement only thinking of puns can provide. The constant evolution

“WE’VE LOVED EACH OF WES’ WORKS AND WE’VE FOUND A LOT OF US IN THEM TOO.”

of the fashion world and it’s links to music, art, politics and society provide a never ending resource of new information that fascinates and motivates her to grow and learn as a journalist. web: darlingwearetheyoungones.com instagram: @dwtyo_blog

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“I WANT TO CREATE WONDERFUL ARTWORK THAT MAKES PEOPLE STOP AND GO, “OH WOW!”” PHOTOGRAPHER AND DESIGNER MELBOURNE, VIC

D R I N K I N G S OY C H A I L AT T E S I N T R E N DY C A F E S .

M

adeleine Gill is a designer and photographer currently based in Melbourne. Madeleine discovered her love for all things creative

What’s your aim or aspiration as a photographer? I want to create wonderful artwork that makes people stop and go, “Oh wow!”.

while growing up in a small country town in South Australia. Her passion, determination and positive attitude have led to many wonderful opportunities and made her a well-respected artist in her course at RMIT University.

I would love to think that one day I could be creating concepts for shoots and photographing them for magazines like Vogue or Lula. I love the process of coming up with a concept, organizing the team, finding the location and then seeing the dance that happens between the model and photographer. I love working with people and coming up with creative concepts, and if I have the chance to do that as a career I’ll be happy.

Rummage: What are you currently studying at RMIT? How has it changed your way of thinking creatively? Madeleine: I am in my third and final year of studying a Bachelor of Communication Design. Before this course, I considered myself someone who was just a good photographer. However, after enrolling I have been able to develop skills in creating brand identity, packaging, conceptual thinking, publication and even film. If it wasn’t for a number of inspirational lecturers, I might not have been able to unlock that creative part of myself. Plus, I love coming to classes and engaging with my peers – they inspire me to think innovatively! How do you keep yourself motivated and where do you look for inspiration? I have some wonderful parents who support me and allow me to choose my own career path. They have helped me financially, mentally and emotionally throughout my studies, which definitely keeps me motivated. I find inspiration in so many places, mostly just from everyday life and the environment around me. When I just want to focus on one thought, I’ll head to my local gym; I do some of my best thinking there.

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rummage / MADELEINE GILL

What’s your personal style of photography? I’m a girly girl. I love anything vintage and having to do with fairy tales, and I think that is sometimes reflected in my work. I also use natural lighting in every shoot. I aim to create images that connect with viewers and can make them think, dream or reminisce about something. Which element best describes you? This is a tricky one, because I would say I am a combination of all four. However, I am known among my friends and family as a strong-willed and passionate person. I’m not afraid to take on any challenge and I will do so with a friendly nature, but most importantly with determination. I guess that means the element that best describes me is fire.

SEE MORE OF MADELEINE’S WORK web: madeleine-gill.format.com instagram: @madeleine_gill_993


Photography MADELEINE GILL web: madeleine-gill.format.com instagram: @madeleine_gill_993 facebook: facebook.com/MadeleineGillPhotography Hair & Make-up EFFIE TZAGARAKIS instagram: @efi_t_makeup facebook: facebook.com/www.makeupbyefi.com.au Assistant CHRISSY TZAGARAKIS Model EDEN HANSEN @ PRIDE MODELS Clothing THE GLOBAL VINTAGE COLLECTIVE web: globalvintagecollective.com facebook: facebook.com/globalvintage instagram: globalvintagecollective


Photography MADELEINE GILL Hair & Make-up EFFIE TZAGARAKIS Assistant CHRISSY TZAGARAKIS Model EDEN HANSEN @ PRIDE MODELS Clothing THE GLOBAL VINTAGE COLLECTIVE


Photography YASMIN SUTEJA Stylist ROCHELLE GREGORY Model ZAHARA DAVIS

ROCKY RAFAELA


FA S H I O N D E S I G N E R MELBOURNE, VIC

T H E S T Y L E , S T R E N G T H A N D B E AU T Y O F T H E B E R B E R WO M E N I N M O R O CCO T H E CO S T U M E S A N D J E W E L S A R E A B S O LU T E LY S T U N N I N G A N D I N S P I R E M E .

“THE ENERGY AND THE BALANCE BETWEEN MASCULINE AND FEMININE”

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ochelle Gregory’s fast-paced, active mind brings creativity to her designs. Her strengths are in design, experimentation and pushing boundaries. Gregory’s signature style comes through in her manipulation of materials to create texture and print through different mediums of fabrics. Throughout her life, Gregory has tried to find shelter in creativity and found her calling when she entered the fashion world. Only when she started studying fashion did she understand how much it would influence her existence. Now, she likes to describe herself and particularly her mind as a maze because it reflects the hyperactivity of her feelings and thoughts. She never stops creating.

energy while Rafaela is feminine and soft. Together they create the perfect balance, which my brand stands for.

Rummage: How did you come up with Rocky Rafaela? Rochelle: Rocky has been my nickname since birth. My grandfather was a boxer, and when my parents asked my brother, at age 4, what they should name me he requested Rocky. Rafaela means ‘God has healed’. My label and concept represent the energy and the balance between masculine and feminine, like ying and yang. Rocky is the more masculine

Who or what is your biggest inspiration and why? I have inspiration all around me. From a young age I was mesmerised by my grandfather’s sewing skills, and my mother always took me on buying trips with her to Florence. These experiences shaped my perception of beauty and design, and I became more aware of what surrounded me.

What’s been your proudest moment? The proudest moment would have to be at Melbourne Spring Fashion Week when my university designs were chosen to be in the emerging designer’s parade in 2014. At that moment, I knew I was born to do this. Nothing has ever felt as good as that achievement. Another significant moment would be when Ruby Rose chose to wear my jacket for the new Maybelline commercial “No Maybes by Maybelline New York”, which was filmed in New York.


Photography YASMIN SUTEJA Stylist ROCHELLE GREGORY Model ZAHARA DAVIS

In the fashion business, I admire a handful of designers from Alexander McQueen, Olivier Rousteing and Alexander Wang. They continue to inspire me through the beauty of their designs. How would you define your style? I would define my style as rebel luxe. I’ve always had a strong attraction to a rebellious, girly look exemplified by the strong, powerful, independent women that know what they want and how to get it — tomboy meets girly-girl. Balance is essential, and I like a feminine piece styled with an edge to finish the look. I have always worn lots of jewellery; my wrists are always covered in jewels and my fingers are covered with rings. I am always inspired by my surroundings, whether I am in a city like Paris or on an island like Bali. I can style my look any way from evening luxe with a blazer and pretty heels to boho-gypsy with head scarves. My style is definitely shown through my label because that comes naturally when I design. Which element best describes you? My immediate answer to this question would be fire and I think anyone who knows me would strongly agree, haha. I associate fire with energy, power,Passion, sexuality and creativity, which are all things I stand for. I am very passionate, instinctive, highly energised and I take action. I am quite sturdy on my feet and confident, and I try to influence people in positive ways. Rocky Rafaela also represents these symbolic qualities through its strong, confident brand recognition. Through my instinctive nature I am willing to take risks and step out of my comfort zone. Sometimes this can seem extreme but the only reason for me to live this way is because I have a constant fire burning inside of me. SEE MORE OF ROCKY RAFAELA web: rockyrafaela.com instagram: @rockyrafaela

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W E AT H E R SYS T E M S

Photography NATASHA KILLEEN Hair & Make-up KAT MARGARITA USING MAC PRODUCTS Model MATTHEW GAMBRILL


Coat, Top & Trousers AHMAD TAUFIK


Vest & Shirt AHMAD TAUFIK Jeans MODEL’S OWN Shoes DR MARTENS


Vest AHMAD TAUFIK Jeans MODEL’S OWN Shoes DR MARTENS


Vest AHMAD TAUFIK Jeans MODEL’S OWN Shoes DR MARTENS


Jacket & Trousers DEMETRA KAKOPIEROS Shoes DR MARTENS


SEA BREEZE

Art Director MAYARA NAVARRO instagram: @maynavarro web: cargocollective.com/mayaranavarro Model GEORGIA MAY @ LONDON MGT instagram: @gmdavis facebook: facebook.com/pages/Georgia-May-Davis web: georgiamaydavis.com.au Modelling Agency LONDON MGT instagram: @londonmgtgroup web: londonmgtgroup.com/models/women/sydney Hair & Make-up ERIKA COPELAND instagram: @erikacopelandmua fb: facebook.com/ErikaCopelandProfessionalMakeupArtistry Stylist MICHELLE LORETO instagram: @michelleloreto web: michelleloreto.net Photography AMY HIBBARD instagram: @amyhibbardphotographer facebook: facebook.com/amyhibbardphoto web: amyhibbard.com


In which bird watching may require the aid of a telescope Artwork JAMES ORMISTON


I L L U S T R AT O R SY D N E Y, N S W

T H E D E A D AU T H O R S P O D C AS T . A R E C E N T F I N D T H AT I A M C U R R E N T LY D E VO U R I N G .

“I LOST INTEREST IN BLATANTLY TELLING THE VIEWER WHAT TO FEEL. ”

J

ames Ormiston is a self-taught, New Zealand born illustrator who now lives and works in Sydney. He works predominantly in graphite and colour pencil to create bizarre scenes defined by loose, dreamlike logic. He balances the implausibility of these scenes with a detailed and realistic drawing style. Ormiston draws as much influence from comedians such as Monty Python and The Mighty Boosh as he does from more traditional surrealist touchstones such as Dali and Ernst. This results in a style that is an amalgamation of humour, silliness and absurdity. Rummage: At what age did you start drawing? How did you get into it? James: Like everyone, I drew a lot as a child. Then in high school, when everybody else seemed to stop drawing, I kept going for some reason – though I should note that these drawings are truly embarrassing in hindsight, both in subject matter and execution. However, I cannot

bring myself to part with them. They now sit in a secure, undisclosed location for fear of anybody ever seeing them. I didn’t get serious about drawing until I was 19 years old, when I found myself completely directionless. It’s funny to think about now, because hardly anybody knows what they want to do at 19. But back then I was particularly good at blowing things out of proportion, so at the time it felt like it was only me who didn’t have a plan. I found solace in drawing: It gave me a sense of purpose and direction, and I felt that as long as I had my art to focus on, everything would be all right. How has your style and technique changed since then? My work now is pretty unrecognisable from teenage-James’ work, both in style and technique. The only consistent thing is the sense of purpose drawing gives me. My older work was about getting my emotions out, which resulted in the embarrassing drawings you would expect


In which a moth is enticed by the light of the moon Artwork JAMES ORMISTON


from an emotional teenage boy with limited skills (poorly rendered skulls and ravens featured prominently). Once I got to art school, I started to focus on my technique and reined in those feelings a little to make them a tad more nuanced. Eventually, I lost interest in blatantly telling the viewer what to feel. I also thought more about the artists that inspired me – artists such as Laurie Lipton and Brain Despain – and started trying to replicate their styles. I experimented with a lot of different techniques and mediums, and eventually I landed on a hatching technique with pencil, where the image is built up slowly from lots of tiny lines; it’s what I still use today. If you look at my work up close, you will see it’s all just tiny lines. What’s your main source of inspiration for a new piece? I belong to an anti-inspiration school of thought, or rather an ‘inspiration is great but not 100% necessary’ school of thought (but that wouldn’t fit on the business card). I can’t help but hear the word ‘inspiration’ without it conjuring this image of the feckless artist waiting helplessly for their muse, which probably strikes a nerve because I’ve been this character so many times. I know from experience, though, that if I had to wait for inspiration I would never get anything done. It’s more about starting a project and whittling away at an idea until it resembles something that excites me. That being said, when I am lost for ideas I find that anything that gets the imagination going is a big help. Reading helps with that. Scrolling endlessly through art blogs also helps as long as I remind myself that I can’t spend my whole day doing it! What kind of environment do you like to work in? When I’m searching for ideas I have to be outside because being indoors stresses me out too much. I think it has something

to do with growing up on a farm. But now I live in a city so I have to find whatever the next best thing is, like sitting in a park or even just on the lawn. I will just sit with my notebook (I always carry one) and scribble whatever comes to mind. And I do mean scribble – my notebook is appalling. I see all these pristine notebooks from artists such as Patt Perry and they are works of art in and of themselves. When I look at mine I feel slightly ashamed because it’s all ill-defined shapes and crude outlines, or weird quotes from sources I have long forgotten. I draw in a sort of shorthand that only I know how to decipher. It’s not pretty, but it’s the only way I’ve found that lets my hand keep up with my mind. Once I have got the basic idea planned out in my notebook, I will work on the final product in my studio. I am lucky enough to have a room in my house dedicated to my craft, so I can shut myself off from the world for as long as I like. In there, I like to listen to anything that distracts me from the fact that I’m stuck inside: music, podcasts, movies, audiobooks and plenty of British panel shows. Which element best describes you? I am going to go with air. Air is curiously immaterial, which gives it a cool, ghostlike quality that I like. I think the connection there might be that we both have a preference for doing our thing without others seeing it. You don’t see air, but it still wields influence, and you can see its effect on things around you through wind. The idea of still participating in the world while remaining largely unseen is a nice compromise between my reclusive hermit tendencies and my desire to still share my work with the world. Also, air and I both enjoy rustling autumn leaves and ruining people’s hairdos.

SEE MORE OF JAMES’ WORK web: society6.com/jamesormiston instagram: @j.p.ormiston facebook: facebook.com/jamesormistonart

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Lunar Fruit Artwork JAMES ORMISTON


Celestial Cephalopod Artwork JAMES ORMISTON


“ESSENTIALLY, IF YOUR DREAMS DON’T SCARE YOU THEN THEY AREN’T BIG ENOUGH..”

FA S H I O N I L L U S T R AT O R S U N S H I N E COAS T & B R I S BA N E , Q L D

C U R R E N T LY O B S E S S E D WITH MAKING MY HANDS LO O K P R E T T Y W I T H N A I L A RT, F L AS H TAT TO O S A N D W E A R I N G S I LV E R R I N G S – I ’ M A L L A B O U T T H AT D E TA I L .

O

nce upon a time, in primary school, I was stuck in lunchtime

detention with my best friend. Sitting in silence, we had nothing else to do, so instinctively (of course) we decided to draw and that moment – little did I know then – sparked my immense passion for fashion illustration. I’ve been drawing ever since. I don’t know why I chose to draw fashion, but I just feel compelled to design clothes, perhaps it’s the details that I love. For me, fashion illustrating has become an obsessive addiction and I often find myself with pen marks on my hands. The funny thing is I’ll draw in those restaurants with table paper and even on the complimentary notepads in hotels; I like to leave my mark. Basically, fashion illustrating has become second nature to me. But ultimately I hope that one day I can make my mass multitude of designs into wearable garments for people like you to wear them! Aside from illustrating I love playing the piano and guitar, I danced vocational ballet for a long time and enjoy playing volleyball. In the past I’ve had my artwork selected as a finalist in the national Silk Cuts award, topped visual art at my school, won a local painting competition which was run by the Noosa Junction Plaza, had my work published in the local Sunshine Coast Daily newspaper, had artwork exhibited for the creative generation at the Sunshine Coast University, illustrated for Finders Keepers the Label and in October I’ll be live fashion illustrating for the Sunshine Coast Fashion Festival. I also have a

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blog dedicated to my illustrations. My school art teacher told me that I’ll keep improving the more I draw, so I know that my skills are still developing and I’m constantly trying to improve my illustrations. I really admire the creative works produced by Australian artists/illustrators like Kerrie Hess, Alex Douglas Newton and Elliot Nimmo. They all have very unique styles that are so true to themselves, which is what I really wish to portray in my illustrations. That’s why I love sticking to pens. I actually don’t use anything fancy. In most of my designs I’ve been using highlighters that I bought from Shanghai when I was 13. My illustrations for Rummage Magazine were produced using highlighters, ink pens and some common colour pencils – nothing too fancy. I’m currently 18-years-old and studying optometry, which is a little distant from the arts. But perhaps after understanding the eye better I can create optical illusions and push the boundaries of how we view art or fashion. So I’ll be an optometrist for a little while, then I’ll delve into fashion and perhaps my creative mind will take me on another path. I’m a strong advocate of aiming high and following my passions, so when I look back on my life I’ll be really happy with what I’ve achieved. Essentially, if your dreams don’t scare you then they aren’t big enough. SEE MORE OF EUGENIE’S WORK web: eugenieillustrates.wordpress.com instagram: @eugeniezhan facebook: Eugenie Zhan


Artwork EUGENIE ZHAN


Artworks EUGENIE ZHAN


BRINGING PORN BACK DOWN TO

EARTH Words KATE NEILSON Images CHIO LUNAIRE

K AT E N E I L S O N TA L KS W I T H F E M I N I S T P O R N O G R A P H E R E R I K A LU S T A B O U T W H Y P O R N A N D F E M I N I S M A R E N ’ T N E C E S SA R I LY M U T UA L LY E XC LU S I V E .

F

eminist pornographer, Erika Lust, creates pornography that extends beyond the bodacious, busty blonde and the oiled-up muscle-man, and into a cinematic experience that caters to the sexual desires of both men and women. Her work takes porn away from the dark, seedy corners of the internet and creates a sexual discourse within the public arena. In her recent TED Talk, It’s time for porn to change, she says porn itself isn’t the problem but rather, the way in which it’s portrayed. She challenges the porn industry over its representation of women saying, “everywhere else the role of women is under debate, everywhere except for the porn industry.”

Photo of Erika Lust

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In a recent e-mail exchange, she discusses the importance of the role of women in revolutionising the pornography industry and why it’s important to get more women behind the camera.


“I work with a team [made up] almost entirely of women who are hard-working, professional and creative in their approach to sex and portraying it through film. That way every film has sexual liberation and equality at its roots,” Lust says.

“I DON’T WANT TO GET WOMEN OUT OF PORN, I WANT TO GET THEM INTO PORN.”

“I live by the motto: the sex can stay dirty, but the values must be clean!” At the University of Lund in Sweden, Lust studied a degree in Political Science and Gender Studies. Her boyfriend at the time suggested they watch a porno. Lust recalls going in guns blazing, ready to re-live her first porn experience from a teenage sleepover. After watching she recounts, “the feminist me felt cheated, the activist me felt mad, the sexual me felt aroused.” She pinpoints her interest in adult filmmaking to that moment, the moment where she decided to bring pornography back down to earth and create films that didn’t just cater to her boyfriend’s desires. Lust clarifies that she has nothing against the male point of view, but her purpose isn’t to create just another ‘female friendly’ category on Porn Hub; she wants to revolutionise the way in which we view sex. It’s about two people (or more if you’re into that kind of thing) engaging in sexual activity for pleasure. It shouldn’t matter whether they are male or female, the experience should be equally shared.

Lust’s latest project, ‘Xconfessions’, allows her viewers to submit their sexual fantasies to her website with the best of the best being made into short films.

Sex educator Carlin Ross says that the reason that some women don’t enjoy porn is because “taken as a whole, the sex acts depicted are the sex acts that bring men to orgasm, not women”. So for some people, it may be surprising that statistics show women are actually quite interested in the world of porn. In fact, according to Nielsen ratings, one in three adults who visit porn sites identify as female.

“All the fantasies are completely crowd sourced, written by real people from all over the world – it’s a really inclusive project,” she said. “This is miles away from showing one type of sex on loop, like a lot of ‘regular’ porn does.”

Lust believes that in order to create a new wave of adult cinema, more women need to get behind the camera: directing, producing and scriptwriting. She says, “I don’t want to get women out of porn, I want to get them into porn.” Now, fifteen years later she has done just that. Alongside her popular short films, she has created award winning feature length films such as, ‘Cabaret Desire’ (2011) and ‘Five Hot Stories For Her’ (2007) and written a variety of novels, including her latest, ‘Let’s make a porno: a Practical Guide to Filming Sex.’

Lust points out that one third of internet traffic is pornography and that every fourth Google search is usually someone looking for porn. Is this the kind of stuff that we want our younger generations to see? Is this how we want to teach our kids about sex? In her TED talk she says, “porn is today’s sex education and it’s impacting on our gender education.” “I have two daughters… and I don’t want them to learn about self-esteem and body image from photo shopped supermodels. I don’t want them to smoke, I don’t want them to eat crappy fast food and I definitely don’t want them to learn about sex from bad, sexist porn,” Lust says. Erika says that whether we like it or not, porn is big part of society, there is no point in trying to deny that. “What we try to do at Lust Films is to add more realistic, happy sex to erotic film-making…and try to be a force for sex-positive thinking.” With Lust’s work you’re no longer watching porn, you’re watching sex. And yes, there is a big difference between the two. Just because Erika titles her work as feminist porn, this doesn’t mean it’s any less hardcore than the mainstream stuff that we’re used to. Lust is always pushing the sexual envelope, challenging herself and her audience to think outside the box when it comes to porn and catering to some of the more interesting fetishes out there. Ever wanted to know what it’s like to have group sex at the gym? Erika’s got you covered.

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CYCLES A film by CHRIS FATSEAS / Featuring LAUREN BENSON @ DALLYS / Production KELLY HOCKEY

Fashion Styling CHAPTER.TEN / Make-up Artist ALYSSA SELIN / Hair Stylist JENNA & TERRI @ RIXON Music ‘HARBINGER’ BY NINTH MOON BLACK

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Rummage: Issue 03 / The Elements  

Rummage: Issue 03 / The Elements