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RUI FERNANDES LANDSCAPE

ARCHITECT

PORTFOLIO S E L E C T E D

W O R K S


NAME(S): RUI PEDRO SURNAME(S): SILVA ALVES FERNANDES DATE OF BIRTH: 8 MAY 1989

NATIONALITY: PORTUGUESE

LOCATION:: ROTTERDAM, NETHERLANDS CONTACTS:

06 19 459 272

rui.f.arqpaisagista@gmail.com

EDUCATION: BSc & MSc - LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

ERASMUS PROGRAM

SCHOOL OF SCIENCES - UNIVERSITY OF PORTO

WARSAW UNIVERSITY OF LIFE SCIENCES

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE: MECANOO (02.2017 to current)

Urban Design/Landscape Architecture trainee

LINT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

(05.2016 to 12.2016)

Intern Landscape Architect

WALLPLAN ATELIER - ARQUITECTURA, REABILITAÇÃO E CONSTRUÇÃO

(03.2016 to 04.2016)

Collaborator Landscape Architect

PROJECT PULMÃO VERDE

(11.2014 to 02.2015)

SOLAR DA LUZ MANOR HOUSE GARDEN DESIGN MASTERPLAN GUIMARÃES’ CITY HALL, URBANISM OFFICE

(06.2014)

(12.2013 to 06.2014)

Internship

MAIN TECHNICAL SKILLS: AUTOCAD LANDSCAPE PLANNING ILLUSTRATOR LANDSCAPE MANAGEMENT URBAN PLANNING PHOTOSHOP MASTERPLANNING INDESIGN PARK & GARDEN DESIGN/MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL PLANS (PLANTING,TERRAIN,DETAILS,ETC) ARCGIS SITE SURVEY SKETCHUP LANDSCAPE CHARACTER ASSESSMENT V-RAY LANDSCAPE RESTORATION LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION RHINOCEROS VISUAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT OFFICE PLANT COMMUNITIES KNOWLEDGE

LANGUAGES: PORTUGUESE ENGLISH GERMAN SPANISH

I AM A YOUNG AND MOTIVATED PERSON, PASSIONATE BY THE LANDSCAPE MATTERS, FOCUSED IN DEVELOPING MY SKILLS AND COMMITTED TO HARD-WORK, HOPING TO PROGRESS FURTHER MY CAREER FIELD

OF

LANDSCAPE

ARCHITECTURE

IN THE

CAREER

BY

MAKING A POSITIVE IMPACT IN THE DAILY LIFE OF PEOPLE THROUGH THE LANDSCAPE, URBAN AND RURAL.

personal information

Landscape Archicterure team member Project coordination: TERESA ANDRESEN


CONTENTS MECANOO ARCHITECTEN MARKTPLEIN HENGELO

6

TAINAN PUBLIC LIBRARY LEARNING GARDENS

10

KAOSHIUNG RAIL CORRIDOR

16

KANAALPARK

22

BÉTAPLEIN

36

(2nd phase)

TAICHUNG GREEN CORRIDOR

40

LINT LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE HOEVE DE WATERKANT

48

MERWEDEKANAALZONE CLIMATE PROOF

54

PARK TER WALLE

60

LIVING LAB UTRECHT

62

PROEFTUIN ERASMUSVELD

66

FREELANCE WORK PULMÃO VERDE PROJECT

72

SOLAR DA LUZ

78

MSc LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

80

BSc LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

98


Roof garden + Playground, Zaandam Medical Centre

Kaohsiung Rail Corridor


professional


MARKTPLEIN HENGELO,

Hengelo

The Martkplein is one of Hengelo’s large public squares. Because of the many vacant retail spaces around the square, a somewhat “distant material” of gray concrete tiles, and a unfortunate connectivity to the square, the dynamism is lacking. One passes the square but does not feel invited to stay. Due to the diversity of architectural styles, the unity in the square is very thin.

THE CITY CENTER OF HENGELO The current centre is “decorated” with gray a carpet which, despite its unity, it does not radiate heat. Changing that carpet and make it pass through the entire city centre will bring a warm atmosphere. Anchored in the carpet are the Market Square, the Town Hall Square and the Church Square, which are related to each other by the characteristic high element of each one. Due to the different functions and surrounding architecture of the squares, the design for the Marktplein focuses on spatial and programmatic interventions in order to achieve a better embedding.

MARKPLEIN, KERKPLEIN AND STADHUISPLEIN Every square with its own experience and sphere of influence at the city centre.

The squares are characterized by the Brink Tower, Lambertus Basilica and the Town Hall and tower form strong landmarks.

The Telgenflat, Brink Tower, market master’s house and Cosapand are special buildings within or on the edges of the Marktplein.

Compacted carpet.

centre

There are two main cycling routes in the centre; north-south the Brinkstraat and Wemenstraat, east-west over the Enschedesestraat

6

in

a

“red”

brick


CONCEPT AND DESIGN PRINCIPLE The theme ‘food & culture’ serves as the design concept for the Marktplein.

A transparent market hall referring to the city’s industrial past is the bustling place of various stalls where a nice snack or meal can be enjoyed or where the (agricultural) region presents itself in the city through the selling of its products. Derived events, such as a food truck festival, or vegetable garden market, have a wide range and draw a large diversity of visitors. The surrounding buildings connect to the theme through related craft shops and catering. The ‘Food & culture’ functions as a link between the region’s landscape and the city.

Foodtruck festival

Weekly market

Ice skating rink

Fun fair

Trees’ frame around the square for clear spatial definition and diversity in space experience. Introduction of the market hall, a steel and open structure that refers to the former metal industry of the city. Food stalls and other events activate the structure and the square area itself. Removal of the plastic advertising columns, bicycle parking and planters along facades for a better involvement of the facades and the square.

7


“DRAWING� THE MARKTPLEIN

The square is spatially defined by a row of Tilia (which traditionally appear on village squares, are native, attractive for insects and, when flowering, spread a delightful scent) and by different experience zones: A plinth area directly along the facades, where entrepreneurs are invited to present their goods and to offer terraces; The square zone that functions as a residence and movement area; The open square floor, suitable for a multitude of events, from the weekly commodity market to (food) festivals. 8


The pattern on the square floor is a reference to the salt towers in Hengelo’s countryside.

The lowered square serves as a buffer room in extreme rainfall

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TAINAN LIBRARY LEARNING GARDENS,

Tainan, Taiwan

As part of the new Public Library of Tainan plot, the municipality launched a competition for its park grounds design. There are many cultural and educational facilities around the site area, Furthermore it is a densely populated area of the ​​ city, which brings to the park a very important sense of community.

Learning gardens - unity with library

Rooms - different closed by trees

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atmospheres

en-

Linear water band grid

Continuous and connecting pattern


CONCEPT AND DESIGN PRINCIPLE Based on the fact that the plot is right next to the Library, the concept of the design is to create open areas that can function as both recreational and as “learning rooms�.These rooms are all surrounded by trees, giving the feeling of enclosure and diversity in between them. To keep coherent with the Library orthogonal design, a horizontal band grid was introduced, which has the function of guide the storm water runoff into the collection points present in the park.

A. Play grove B. Flowering meadow C. Vernal pool

D. Amphitheatre E. Urban farming F. Reading orchard

G. Scooter parking

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DIFFERENT POCKET ROOMS

Play grove

Vernal pool Urban farming 12


Flowering meadow

Amphitheatre

Reading orchard

13


POCKETS´ SECTIONS

Flowering meadow

Amphitheatre

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Vernal pool

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KAOSHIUNG RAIL CORRIDOR,

Kaoshiung, Taiwan

The urban “void� generated by transformation of the railway into an underground systems, revealed itself to be an opportunity to connect the city internly In order to keep a strong and cultural character, the design is much inspired by the meadering patterns of the streams that once were present in Kaoshiung.

Vision: restore a sustainable, robust water network to collect, store and infiltrate rainwater

Sustainable develpoment

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Better water quality and less pollution

Ammenitty, better places for people

More biodiversity

Flood risk control and protection of the water cycle


Concept and design principle Based on the need of carefull water management and smooth mobility, the new corridor will provide a robust and sustainable water system, enhancement of sustainable mobilty and a new vibrant urban space, not only becoming just a passage nfrastructure but also a destination in itself in Kaoshiung.

program islands, reacting on context

secondary paths, relation to local context

main route that creates unity of the corridor

4 different landscape zones

Main route esplanade

Tabebuia rosea along the corridor creates a sense oft unity 17


Program Each of the different landscape zones provides different context and surroundings, therefore the planned program in each area is related to those different contexts. Although some repetition of program, such as bicyle parking areas, playgrounds and support to sport practice, is found along the whole corridor.

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19


Thematic landscapes zoning Wet forest

buffer+evaporation

Native woodland with ponds and dense shrub layer, attemping to recreate the natural taiwanese mangrove habitats.

capture retention+infiltration emergency outlet to stormwater sewer

Wet meadows Open meadows with riparian vegetation along the wet areas, which include bioswales as water mangement features.

emergency outlet to stormwater sewer retention+infiltration buffering+storage buffer+evaporation retention+infiltration

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Grassy streams River plains with river brooks and native grasses such as Miscanthus, Pennisetum alopecuroides, Imperata cylindrica...

retention+infiltration capture temporary retention infiltration emergency outlet to stormwater sewer

Rain gardens Dense reedland area where rainwater can be collected and cleaned by species such as Saururacea sp and Zephyrantes candida.

evaporation

infiltration capture retention+infiltration emergency outlet to stormwater sewer

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KANAALPARK,

Leiden

The design for Kanaalpark soughts connectivity with the campus of the Leidsche Schans and the Bètaplein. A pedestrian zone with places to stay and a green area with route structures from and to the campus and Bètaplein that are separated from the car access, so that the campus feeling is extendend to the Kanaalpark. Car traffic is drawn by a clear one ring structure with an unambiguous parking solution. The traffic areas are made as compact as possible, so that the green and water surface can be enlarged. Kanaalpark distinguishes itself through biodiversity and sustainability in the outdoor space facility; visible rainwater drainage and infiltration in rain gardens, indigenous planting that attracts insects and birds, and a robust materialisation with sustainable materials. In this way, a bright and pleasant outdoor space is created.

Increasing the green and water surface and biodiversity...

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...pedestrian routes and stay areas...

...and clear, compact access structure for car traffic.


Hard paving

Water drainage

brickwork, thick format, squares

afwateringsrichting verkeersgebied

brickwork, thick format, elbow bandage

afwateringsrichting voetgangersgebied

cycle path, asphalt, red, white marking

regenwater tuinen (infiltratie wadi’s)

concrete tiles with natural stone top layer. 24x16x8 and 16x16x8cm, white-gray black nuanced

kolken

concrete tiles with natural stone top layer 24x16x8 and 16x16x8cm, anthracite concrete tiles with natural stone top layer. 48x16x16, 24x16x8 and 16x16x8cm, white-gray

Planting scheme (trees)

Planting scheme (ground)

gazon, ligweide, intensief gebruik

gazon, ligweide, intensief gebruik

gemengde bloeiende vaste planten regentuinen

gemengde bloeiende vaste planten regentuinen

bloemrijk grasland

bloemrijk grasland

kokosrollen ingeplant met oeverplanten

kokosrollen ingeplant met oeverplanten

gazon, ligweide, intensief gebruik

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SECTIONS (1:100)

24


25


26


27


28


29


DETAILED FRAGMENT (1:50)

30


31


32


33


34


35


BÉTAPLEIN

(2nd phase),

Leiden

The plan concept for Beta Square consists of three main principles: Direct connections for pedestrians in between the main entrance of ROC, Alphatoren and Leidsche Schans campus. Cyclists is led across the square towards Kanaalpark and the campus. stairs for the ROC main entrance separete pedestrians and cyclists. Creation of larger green and gathering spaces in the square. The green ‘shards’ are the “negative” of the routes across the square.

pedestrian routes

36

cyclists routes

green areas


Hard paving

Concrete tiles with natural stone top layer. 48x16x16cm, 24x16x8cm and 16x16x8cm, white-gray, black nuanced. Concrete tiles with natural stone top layer. 24x16x8cm and 16x16x8cm, white-gray, black nuanced. Concrete tiles for service areas, 24x16x8cm and 16x16x8cm, anthracite. EPDM rubber floor, two colors.

Urban furniture

Light pole, 9-12m, Iguzzini Multiwoody LED Light pole, 4-5m, Friso Kramer LED Existing light pole LED strip integrated in seat edge Concrete strip, low, 5cm, precast concrete Concrete strip, transition element, 5-45cm, precast concrete Concrete strip, high, 45cm, precast concrete Bicycle support brackets, Clip Streetlife, RAL 7016, concrete foundation Seating elements, Escofet Sit Electrical point, hatch cabinet Water point, hatch cabinet

BĂŠtaplein (1st phase) - Mecanoo

BĂŠtaplein (1st phase) - Mecanoo

Friso Kramer LED

Iguzzini Multiwoody LED

37


Water drainage

Pedestrian area drainage Glutton Drainage tube Grass ‘wadi’ Infiltration square (crates or gravel bed)

Water Square Benthemplein - De Urbanisten

Planting scheme

Lawn, grass ‘wadi’ Mixed flowering perennials New tree (Quercus rubra)

Bétaplein (1st phase) - Mecanoo

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Bétaplein (1st phase) - Mecanoo


Sections (1:200)

39


TAICHUNG GREEN CORRIDOR,

Taichung, Taiwan

The urban “void�, object of this project, has been generated by the infrastructure of the deactivated railway system. In order to maintain this strong character, the rail structures are treated as track which shape the entire plan and give a coherent, recognisable theme to the whole project.

sustainable life, sustainable history & culture

the railline was historically connecting

now the remains of the railline is a divider

1. green belt - green diagonal connector for bike/pedestrians and flora/fauna 2. zoning - three zones (dike-station-lake)

re-use the railline to connect city parts in a sustainable way (bike/pedestrian connection)

40


CONCEPT AND DESIGN PRINCIPLE The green corridor should not only be a passage space (either crossing the dike or riding on top of the dike) but needs to become a destination in itself.

Original condition

The green corridor should not only allow for crossing under...

...crossing over...

...move on top the dike...

...but should become a destination in itself and invite users to explore, and enjoy the green qualities of the park.

41

of


Thematic areas & program Three thematic areas with distinct base conditions: south section where the former railinfrastructure is raised on a dike; the middle section around the new station; and the north section, where the green corridor connect s to the lake of the former sugar refinery factory. In the station area and the lakeside area, the main programmatic theme is to integrate existing/planned functions in a coherent way, adding only a few new programmatic items; urban forest and sculpture park. The dike section of the green corridor currently lacks public programme. In this area we aim to activate the former railway and reconnect the surrounding neighborhoods to the new green corridor. The newly proposed programme reacts on the surroundings: in the more quiet area we envisage herb gardens, or a teahouse pavilion. In the more vibrant locations, near the school, we propose sport-related activites, and reactivate the connection to the water by introducing a boardwalk. All proposed programme is clearly aiming to intensify the useof the area, both for local residents and for residents from all Taichung.

Herb garden

Playground 42

Tribune

Viewpoint

Sports

Bikeway

Boulevard

Waterfront

Bike park


DIKE • Connectivity over and under the dike • Re-connect to small scale urban fabric • Dike as destination

LAKE • Re-purpose old warehouse (art gallery, food) • Old track as routing to lake area • Green ground area, history as key item

STATION • Clean nodes and services • Pass in front, middle, back • Public space as carpet for all development • Human scale • Create clear building block structure and define public space

Plaza

Bikeway

Old railway

Urban woods

Art park

Bridge 43


Sketch design

44


45


Merwedekanaalzone Climate Proof

Park ter Walle


professional Tutoring: Alexander Herrebout Gerwin de Vries


HOEVE DE WATERKANT,

Herk-de-Stad, Belgium

The Hoeve de Waterkant is cattle farm located in Herk-de-Stad which experiences frequent floods and waterlogging, making the farm related activities difficult to perform. The intervention, however, must be thought not only within the farm limits but also to the valley itself and supported by the following visions: Mixture of activities and functions Recreational destination in the rural environment Spatial and financial development

Herk-de-Stad Zwarte winterbeek Schulen

Donk Dalemveldbeek

Kleine Vennebeek

Houwersbeek

Oude Herk

Schulens Meer Herk

Abtsgracht

Demer

Current condition

Hoeve de Waterkant land ownership 48


The current water system can not handle the large amounts of water at peak flows which causes the Schulens Meer to be flooded every year, resulting in damages to agriculture and natural systems. This issue is expected to increase due to climate changes and urbanization expansion which can potentially cause harm to the housing and businesses on the edge of the area. Thus arising the need to adjust the water system to the new conditions through an integrated vision between the stream valley and other dynamics like the natural welfare of the area and strengthen of its recreational potential.

Hoeve de Waterkant

Flood area

stream overflow

vacant farmstead

vacant farmstead

stream overflow vacant farmstead

sewer overflow drought higher peak storage

stream overflow

seepage higher peak storage

Problematic issues

49


General landscape intervention A. Water management During the course of time were carried out several interventions such as the construction of a water basin and channelled streams. Although the valley is naturally wet, currently unnatural actions occur in the system, providing floods in the summer and long-term water on land as a result of close siphons. At higher grounds the water will be retained and infiltrated on sandy soils, slowing down its flow, and discharged through the streams so that the peak storages disappear of the system. It is important as well to keep the clean water seepage flow separated from the contaminated water from the high agriculture fields. Tree plantation along the edge of the valley will allow retaining of water on the edge. Wet forests can absorb water on the edges and produce biomass. The streams at higher levels are also part of this planted network. The current water management is on the hand of both nature organizations and a single farmer, although the process Is not discussed between the parties. The proposal is to establish more networks, both organisational and physically. This cooperation will only benefit both parties by,for example, sharing knowledge.

retention infiltration

retention

retention

infiltration

storage

retention

discharge storage

discharge

50


B. Recreation and development In addition to contributing to the water retention and delayed discharge, the planting along the streams will enhance the environmental quality of the area while providing opportunities for recreational trails. New routes can be built along the edge of the valley, connecting farmers and entrepreneurs while providing beautiful views of the valley. Typical farms will get connected to a new recreational network, offering opportunities for farm sales and visibility and revitalization of this historic farms. These actions can also prevent the erosion of fertile agricultural land and mold a valuable green network for both people and wildlife. Until the 1930’s ian land use and strong landscape industrial park,

the valley was a recognizable landscape by the presence of agrarby the absence of forest and buildings. It displayed an open and character. By forest plantations and construction such as Van Halen this is partly lost.

Plantation along the edge of the valley

Recreational trails and farm connectivity

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The proposed models can be sorted into two main stratagies: COMPENSATE

“Ultimo grutto”

The main focus of this model is keeping on with current business strategy. The excess water is reduced through the incorporation of two locks and a pump. Other structures such as microdigesters provide energy and heat, while reducing costs. The digestate matter that remains may be used in fermentation and manure. This model also creates a grazed pasture landscape where cattle breeding is enabled.

“Verbredehoeve”

This model lessens the role of cattle and provides several additional revenues. The pastures are dug parallel to the Herk along the Houwersbeek, which creates a wet and dry zone and the excess water is collected by the water stream. Also, it provides helophyte cleaning of the nutrient-rich water. Cattle breeding, camping, selling meat and receiving groups also generate income.

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ADAPT

“Natuurhoeve”

The nature farm operation model is based on ecological principles, in which the natural area is used for cattle breeding, whereby the production of meat and dairy goods is associated with the creation and conservation of habitats and biomass through food forests and wet forests. The water stream is released from the dike, distributing the water drainage over the whole valley. Aditional income can be generated from leasure activities such as campimg site or canoe and mountain bike rental.

“Waterhoeve”

The water-rich conditions of the area play a central role in this model. In ponds, plants such as duckweed, algae, water fern, reeds and bulrush are grown so that the nutrients are absorbed and do not require any fertilization. The cleaned water is then discharged into the nature reserve. The cultivated species are high in protein and grow fast and can be used to not only feed the animals but also as a raw material in the bio-based industry. Also fish breeding can be added to the model. 53


MERWEDE ZONE,

Kanaleneiland,

Utrecht

Collaboration: Josje Hoefsloot | Mans Weghorst

Climate adaptation design research “LINT envisions a combination of increasing urbanization and an innovative design of public space. Within the public space different themes are addressed, for example a new public space could provide a good climate adaptation, increasing ecological wealth, space for new mobility, food production and improved spatial quality.” http://landscapeinterventions.nl/news

A new urban ecology enhancing the “urban habitats” for birds, insects and vegetation. The usage of vegetation can collect particulate matter and improve air quality, as well as contaminated soil cleansing.

Rainwater is collected in winter and used in summer. The water can also be filtered by using vegetation. The sound of falling or flowing water can prevent noise and be used as a play element.

Fruit, vegetables and herbs grow in the public space and are directly delivered to the inhabitants of the city. Fresh food products are brought as close as it can be to the residents.

The residential quality of the public space is increased and global warming related issues are tackled by the creation of shady spots and interesting microclimates. Movement for slow traffic is optimized, improving the quality of life.

Concept planning

Grand Structures

Europalaan City Boulevard

Park Rondje City Island

Public space as part of park structure and slower traffic 54

Core Structure

Inner Structure

Streets

Water Squares

Green Roofs Collective Gardens


concept vision current

current

concept vision

GRAND STRUCTURES

Europalaan

Kanaalweg

INNER STRUCTURE

Street with open drainage

Water Square as a combination of square, water and greenery 55


CORE STRUCTURE

Different options for the blocks (representation on a 220x150m grid) 56


POSSIBLE RAINWATER ROUTE

1. Roofs and walls absorve the water

2. Green areas take in the water

4. The canal receives the discharged water

3. Streets direct the water

4. The water squares store and delay the water discharge

Merwerde Zone concept overview representative part

57


OPTION MATRIX Water roof

Roof garden

Mixed use roof

Green façade

Water collector

Green balcony

Food balcony

Permeable paving

Rainwater barrel

Water filters

Vegetable garden

Ecological swimming pool

Seasonal storage

Water courtyard

Collective farm

High street

Cycle gutter

Open duct

Below ground level street

Underground storage

“Wadi”

Open water way

Broad berm

Sponge square

Water crate

Waterplay square

Water bowl

Urban forest

Water filter park

Ecology park

PARK

SQUARE

AVENUE

STREET

COLECTIVE GARDEN

PRIVATE GARDEN

FAÇADE

ROOF

Green roof

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CLIMATE ADAPTATION DESIGN RESEARCH

Eco spots

Urban swamp

Courtyard forest

Street ditch

Streetsquare

Broad berms

Pocket garden

Boulevard

Benefits

Required conditions

Water management

Water table level

Heat

Soil type

Ecology

Typology

Food

Density

Social activity

Height difference

Mobility

€

Cost 59


PARK TER WALLE,

Menen, Belgium

Collaboration: Wolf Compernolle

The design points to the transformation of the Park ter Walle into a city park with a natural and active character, through re-using the old structures existing in the landscape. Current and new functions are integrated in order to promote sports (football, krachtball and skate), leisure and multifunctional use. The different areas and sceneries are connected and integrated into a green framework and a path system that ensures the intended connectivity. In the central area, the sport fields create an open and long viewshed across the park. The park’s water regulation is emphasized by the presence of bioswales, to where the runoff is directed. The leftovers of the groundworks nearby will be used to create grassy slopes with siting elements and play opportunities.

0 60

10

50 m


PATH AND OLD FORTIFICATION WALL

PROGRAM

Playground areas Sports areas

Path

Building

Fortification wall

FURNITURE

WATER REGULATION SYSTEM

Light post Ground light Bench Trash bin

GROUND VEGETATION AND HEDGE

Bioswale

TREE LAYER

22 Acer saccharinum 12 Alnus glutinosa 22 Fraxinus angustifolia 3 Liquidambar styraciflua 10 Prunus serrula 8 Quercus coccinea 12 Quercus rubra 12 Salix atrocinerea

Lawn

4 Sophora japonica

Meadow

13 Taxodium distichum

Hedge

14 Tilia platiphyllos 61


b b

y

x c’ y’ x’ b’ a’

c

a a’

a

b’

b’

b

c

c’

d d’

x

x’

y

y’

62


PATHS GENERAL PROFILE

Stormwater runoff through path incisions in selected points of the pathway.

BENCH MODULES In order for the relation between the pathway and the urban furniture to be as harmonic as possible, several custom order bench modules were designed.

B1

B2

C1

C2

D

F

Lenght: 2,6 m Radius: 5,6 m

Lenght: 2,1 m Radius: 15,5 m

Lenght: 2,6 m Radius: 5,6 m

Lenght: 3 m Radius:33,7 m

Lenght: 2,1 m Radius: 15,5 m

Lenght: 3 m Radius: -

H

Lenght: 2,5 m Radius: -

Bench model test 63


LIVING LAB UTRECHT

(initial stages)

This assignment consists on a design research on the circular development of the west side of the station area. The overall development strategy is related to issues such as energy, ecology, waste, water and mobility. Places like the port, Hof van Cartesius and the development of a Werkspoor Path for walkers and cyclists were identified catalysts for the area’s development.

AQUAPONICS SYSTEMS

GFT

Fish Harvest 18,85 k

waste

Clean water

Vegetables, Fish

97,5 kilo

Bacteria and worms

Convert waste into plant nutrients

Filter the water

Harvest

Plants

11kg/m3

1m3

1,5m2

64

500m2

3800kg

20kg


WATER FAÇADES

Plants Waste Filter the water

Waterfall

Noise mitigation

Drinkable water and other beverages

Human consuption

Urban noise mitigation

Transform

Rain water

Clean water

Evaporation

Store

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VEGETABLE FAÇADES & ROOFS

Compost Waste

Fruits, vegetables and herbs

Recreation activity

Vegetable garden

Human consuption

Transform

Food 1 person

Market

Food

66

20m2

Recreation activity


MOSS FAร‡ADES

Healthier environment Atract wildlife Biodiversity Wildlife lure Improved air quality

Moss faรงade

Healthier urban environment Traps particulate matter

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PROEFTUIEN ERASMUSVELD,The

Hague

(initial stages)

The experimental green and healthy living! LINT landscape architecture was selected for the BPD competition “Proeftuin Erasmusveld”. Based on the core values ​​ of health, city and green, the sketch design aims to bring together these key points through a coexistence progrsm of households, accessabilities, recreation gardens and wildlife habitats provision. The housing is displayed in two types (low density blocks and single dwellings) with both types presenting a collective garden. The access and mobility are provided by a pedestrian and bicycle path network and by a car path to the psrking area beneath the blocks.

B 68


PROGRAM Habitats

Housing

Access & movement

Recreative areas

professional Land habitats

Blocks

Car access

Sports area

Water habitats

Single dwellings

Pedestrian and bicycle paths

Collective gardens Private gardens

B’

A

A’ B

A

A’

B’ 69


FREELANCE WORK


PROJECT PULMĂƒO VERDE,

Porto Metropolitan Area

Team coordination: Teresa Andresen, landscape architect

This is the first stage of a project between the municipalities of Gondomar, Paredes and Valongo with the ultimate goal of creating a Metropolitan Park in order to optimize the existing assets (both cultural and natural). It is intended to a sustainable, intelligent, inclusive and participative project. This collaboration presents a management model based on an advisory part, a tutelary part, an executive part and a management plan.

PIAS SANTA JUSTA

River Ferreira S. Pedro da Cova

KEY: Mountain River Town/Village 72

River Sousa

CASTI(N)ÇAL

Couce

Aguiar Covelo

Alvre


A COMMON LANDSCAPE, A COMMON PROJECT

SANTA IRIA BANJAS FLORES

River DOURO

Melres

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EVOLUTION OF THE MOUNTAIN RANGE LANDSCAPE This first stage of the project was documented in seven attachments.

WORK METHODOLOGY

Iconography

1:25 000 scale Forest Inventory

Land ocupation 1945/47

1974-1979 Land ocupation 1960’s Class uniformization

Aerial photographs 1945 1960’s 1995-2000 Google Earth

1:25 000 scale Military maps/charts

Land ocupation 1977 Area measurement Land ocupation 1998/99

Land ocupation 2012

1945/47 1977 1998/99 2012

Village of Valongo 74

Santa Justa


The gathered data was decipted into five different land ocupation classes: Dense grove - areas with high density of trees. Sparse grove - areas in which land ocupation is characterized by trees, although glade occupation is present. Scrubland - areas characterized by shrub and soil covering vegetation with no significant tree vegetation. Agricultural areas - farming areas, with or without houses surrounding. Landscape evolution

Agglomerations - areas with high concentration of built structures.

This attachment is about a first interpretation of the landscape evolution through transformations in the territory occupation over the last 60 years. The information was mapped into five different categories of territory occupation: 1945|1960s|1977|1998|2012

Casti(n)รงal

Aguiar de Sousa 75


5 MOMENTS OF ANALYSIS

1945 60’s 1977 1998

Land ocupation classes

Agglomerations

76

2012

Dense grove Sparse grove Scrubland Agricultural areas


In 1945 the scrubland and sparse grove were the prevailing classes.

LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION

In the 60’s decade the areas of dense grove and scrubland rose and there was a loss of the sparse grove areas. In the dense growth losing

next analysis moment (1977) the grove areas had a significant and the sparse grove areas kept their in occupation area.

Regarding 1998/99 the dense grove areas kept beeing the most dominant ones, while there was a big growth of the sparse grove areas that took the place of most of the scrubland areas. Finally, in 2012, most of the sparse grove areas turned into dense grove areas.

1945 60’s 1977 1998 2012

77


SOLAR DA LUZ MANOR HOUSE,

Fafe, Portugal

One of the oldest and noble manor houses in the Portuguese region of Minho, built between the 17th and 18th centuries. The design aims to bring back to the gardens the greatness long lost, with three main areas containing elements that characterize the Portuguese properties in the 17th century:

6

Gardens with trimmed edges of Buxus sempervirens; Recreational woods with native and exotic ornamental vegetal species; A small orchard.

Main vegetal species samples - main garden -

78

Camellia

Yew-tree

Boxwood

Camellia sp

Taxus baccata

Buxus sempervirens

10

30


2

1 3

Legend 1 Main garden 2 Woods with lake 4 5

50 m

3 Grass glade

N

4 Orchad 5 Swimming pool 6 Front yard

79


-University of Porto-Warsaw University of Life Sciences-

academic

MSc Landscape Architecture


AVE/BASTO CASTRO’S LANDSCAPE,

Northen Portugal

Collaboration: Ana Medeiros| Ana Moreira|Igor Domingues|Isabel Aragão|Joana Pizarro|Margarida Gonçalves|Sara Carvalho|Sofia Ribeiro

This three part exercise aims to promote strategies and ideas for the “castros” preservation. A “castro” is archeologic remains of agglomerations characteristic from the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula, dated from the Copper Age and Iron Age. Usually are located on top of the mountains due to these locations are the best providing natural defences spots.

TOURISM NETWORK Create a “castro” tourism network, taking advantage of the Porto airport proximity and other interesting sites nearby, such as Porto itself and Guimarães. Four distinctive were idealized:

routes

-Low Ave Valley -Medium/High Ave Valley -Basto Lands -Guimarães

INFORMATIVE PANELS Panels containing information on the “castro” itself and the general “castro” culture, featuring an interactive concept.

Creation of a forest pattern in the “castros” site and in the surr

Current state with the mounts covered by eucalyptus 82


High historic and cultural value of the “castro” landscape.

Create a unit between the “castro” and the population, combining the urban park and museological concepts.

Very strong tourism potential due to the presence of a large architectonic, religious and archeologic heritage.

DESIGN FOR “CASTRO STº OVIDIO”

Legend 1 Car parking 2 Meal/Picnic area N

3 Castro’s Museum 4 Castro’s remains 5 Chappel courtyard

rounding landscape

Desired state with the mounts covered by native flora 83


RIO TINTO - PORTO GREENWAY,

Porto

Collaboration: Francisco Costa|JoĂŁo Rodrigues|Nelson Vidal|Tiago Ortega

The city of Porto pocesses a wide range of urban green areas and signifficant potential links between. It is essential to create a green network within the city and its surrounding locations, improving both the social and ecological dimentions.

Structuring vegetation identified

By having knowledge about spontaneous and cultivated vegetation in the portuguese context, the conception, planning and design of the greenway between Porto and Rio Tinto is driven by that knowledge. Therefore it is potentied a biodiverse connection and continuity. Platanus x hispanica Quercus robur Quercus suber Alnus glutinosa Populus alba Liquidambar styraciflua Prunus cerasifera Tilia tomentosa

Arbutus unedo Laurus nobilis Corylus avellana Rhododendron arboreum Hibiscus syriacus Rosa sempervirens Buxus sempervirens Ilex aquifolium

Parks & public gardens

Areas with no use

Streets

CONNECT 3 DIFFERENT AREA TYPLOGIES IDENTIFIED IN THE URBAN ENVIRON

84


GREENWAY AND ECOLOGICAL CORRIDOR

SOCIAL

URBAN

Recreation Culture

Mobility Green areas

Ecological funtions,

by contributing for habitat protection and specices mobility.

Recreation,

providing leasure opportunities close to natural environment in a urban area.

Mobility Cultural Biodiversity Ecosystems

QUALITY OF LIFE & SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

NATURAL

NMENT

Implementation of green elements Instalation of SUDS on the streets that would allow to.

Define a new use for areas with none. Transform the deactivated railway into a soft mobility way.

City Park

S. Roque Park

Botanical Garden 85


CONNECTING TWO CITIES AT A BIODIVERSE LEVEL

86


I n t e g r a t i n g “abandoned� areas in the greenway, recovering these areas by turning into green areas. This is the case of one of those areas, transforming it into a new urban park at the service of the university community and the general population.

N

Take advantage of the existing green areas and the widest streets, in order to implement a continuous ecologic and recreational trail.

N

0

500

1000

1500 m 87


RIVER TINTO & RIVER TORTO WATERSHED,

Porto Metropolitan Area

Collaboration: Nelson Vidal

Define strategic measures for the sustainable development in the rivers’ watershed, an area that had little to no planning and development strategies. These measures aim to set higher quality of life and higher quality of the landscape in general. In order to achieve these goals, a three part framework was followed.

88


89


DIAGNOSIS

ANALYSIS Components

BIOPHYSICAL

PERMEABILITY

Geology Elevation Hydrography Sun exposure Slope Soil

FLOOD PLAINS

CULTURAL Road and railway network

SOIL APTITUDE

Parks and gardens

Urban

Agricultural

Heritage Land use

HAZARDS Erosion Wildfire Building in flood plain

TERRITORIAL MANAGEMENT TOOLS

UNITS

National Ecological Reserve National Agricultural Reserve

Biophysical units Landscape units & character

STRATEGIC MEASURES P l a n t a tion of adequate species on water streams.

90

Identification of the pollution cores that affect the water streams, creating, if needed, water treatment stations.

Relocation of families who live in buildings constructed on hazardous sites, avoiding human and economic losses.


PROPOSAL PARK AND GARDEN NETWORK Creation of new parks and gardens joining with the ones that already exist, in order to address the lack of it.

BICYCLE PATH NETWORK Connect the landscape units. Easily accessible. Improve the visual quality by accessing hotspots in terms of view shed. Access to heritage sites and equipment. Integrate with Ecological Structure.

ECOLOGICAL STRUCTURE Promote biodiversity with high regard for native vegetal and animal species and, at the same time, bring Nature and population closer. Keep the production functions, therefore maintaining the cultural values, while aiming for a sustainable landscape in environmental, economic and social ways.

The previous sites should be turned into areas of recreation such as urban parks, and/or water stream protection areas.

Consolidation of the urban areas and rehabilitation of degraded areas.

C r e a t i o n and/or revision of forest plans.

91


S. ROQUE DA LAMEIRA PARK,

Porto

Collaboration: Guilherme Vieira|Inês Loureiro|João Rodrigues

Preserve and reinforce the cultural heritage and identity of Porto. The design aims to bring back the character of this former farm villa, while intending to create a new dynamic to fit the evolution of the city and its

Construction of the main house 1759

MASTER PLAN FOR S.ROQUE PARK THE IDENTITY OF A CITY

NO DATA

1 Main house expansion RAMOS PINTO FAMILY

1911

2 The City Hall acquires the property

3

1

PORTO MUNICIPALITY

1979

4

Possible work on the gardens by Jacintho de Mattos 1900-1939

Various interventions promoted by the City Hall 1990-2009

2 2 3

8 5

6 9

N

7 10

50

100 m

Legend

10

1 Woods

5 Orchard

2 Viewpoint

6 Playground

3 Alpine Garden

7 Boxwood maze

9 Greenhouse

4 Restroom

8 Pedagogical kitchen gardens

10 Main house

92


The old farm lands were owned by one of the oldest and wealthiest families of Porto. Their wealth came from producing one of the most iconic symbols of the city: Port wine

93


PORT PRASKI,

Praga district, Warsaw

Collaboration: David Perez|Julia Hanke

Transform a degraded area into a fully functional recreational, residential and service area, as well as a sustainable nature spot in the city of Warsaw.

STRENGHT

WEAKNESS

Existence of Natural elements (part integrated in RN200 site)

Territorial ning”

Pleasant views to Old Town and Wistuła River

to” area

Small private garden presence

“unplan-

Somewhat of a ”Ghet-

Proximity to railway and highway creates disturbance

OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

Connection between natural elements (forest and river)

Natural elements at risk of being lost

Leisure and city development opportunities Biodiversity tion

promo-

Poor edification choices that disturbs the visual quality Risk of pollution

CONCEPTUAL PROPOSAL FOR PRASKI HARBOUR REQUALIFICATION AND POSSIBLE SCENARIOS FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENT.

Areas directed for conservation and protection of native flora and fauna. Along the trails, it is available information about wildlife and the role the Natura 2000 sites.

94

Infrastructures that allow connectivity among different conservation areas.


SITE ANALYSIS

(SAMPLES)

Reconversion of the degraded industrial zone into a new urban park, which might include services for the local community, such as restaurants, shops, events’ area and a dock.

N

PortPraski town

new

generation

miasto

nowej

generacji

E

POLICE

Steps allowing access to water, despite the water level variations throughout the year.

Low density residential areas, with green areas attached. It is given priority to degraded building rehabilitation. .

CONCEPTUAL ILLUSTRATION P R A S K I

H A R B O U R

95


OLIVEIRA DO DOURO RIVERSIDE BEACH,

Vila Nova de Gaia

Collaboration: Ana Gomes|Benedita Pinto

This course aimed for the acquirement of capabilities in the evaluation of environmental and visual impacts. The design intends to promote the recovery of old traditions, the marsh restoration, the extension of the Gaia Biological Park and the restoration and sustainable uses of old manor houses.

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM Automobile circulation Main Secondary

Bicycle & pedestrian circulation Pedestrian Bicycle and pedestrian

Restoration of a degraded area following three kinds of valorisation: Biodiversity Recreational activities

and

leisure

Social interaction between locals and visitors

96

50

100

200 M


SERVICES DIAGRAM

Beach

Coffee house

Meal site

Gaia Kayak Club

Sports pitch Playground

Gaia Biological Park Research Unit

Flora protection area

Gaia Biological Park Administration Center

Parking lot

Camping

Dock

Locker room

N

Legend Tree layer Bush, shrub & herbaceus layer Meadow Pedestrian way Bicycle and pedestrian way Automobile way Wooden deck Sports pitch Beach Marsh 1 Oliveira do Douro dock 2 Gaia Kayak Club 3 “Areinho” square 4 Gaia Biological Park (new area) 5 Quinta do Mirante Camping Proposed contours 97


-University of Porto-

academic

BSc LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


U. PORTO SCHOOL OF SCIENCES CAMPUS,

Porto

Collaboration: Alexandre Parente|Benedita Pinto|Lourenço Machado|Luís Rodrigues

Through different strategies of planting and management it is intended to export to the School of Sciences Campus a design model based on the open glade-edge-wood concept, where each vegetal layer is treated with management strategies that fit the different aspects of each layer. The overall intervention was based on the following directions: 1) Assure a low budget maintenance plan. 2) The maintenance operations must not have negative effects on biodiversity.

MAINTENANCE PLAN

100


Main maintenance operations and specifications Trimmed meadow

Trimming: 1x/month from Oct. to Mar. and 2x/month from Apr. to Sep. Irrigation: the needed throughout the year. Re seeding: every time needed, preferably during Spring/Summer Scarification: May. and Sep.

Meadow

Trimming: 1 to 2 times/year Cleaning of dead vegetal material

Flowering meadow

Trimming: 2x/year, in Apr. and Nov. Re seeding: every time needed, during Spring Scarification: 1x/year Remotion of undesired plants

Sub-shrub and herbaceous plants

Re plantation: loss of visual performance or too many density of plants Gap re plantation: Autumn and Spring

Free growth shrubs

Pruning: occasional times, keeping the plant natural shape Occasional remotion of dried, ill and badly shaped branches

Semi-free growth shrubs

Pruning: more often than the free growth shrubs, while keeping the plant natural shape Occasional remotion of dried, ill and badly shaped branches

Free growth trees

Pruning: very specific spots in order to not compromise safety and circulation, while keeping the plant natural shape. Occasional remotion of dried, ill and badly shaped branches

Semi-free growth trees

Pruning: when needed of adjustments and rejuvenation.

Legend Trimmed meadow Wild meadow Flowering meadow Sub-shrub and herbaceous Free growth shrubs Semi-free growth shrubs Free growth trees Semi-free growth trees

N

5

10

20

50 m

101


CADOUÇOS SQUARE,

Porto

Collaboration: Cláudia Fernandes|Cláudio Folha|Filipe Silva|Vitor Monteiro

This public garden is located in a privileged site next to the sea and the river Douro. The design focused on the terrain modelling in order to create a perfect view spot. The design also follows an environmental, social and aesthetic optimization line, hoping to turn this site into a public space of excellence.

Planting Plan Tree layer

Legend 10As - Albizia saman 2-2,5 m height

8-10 cm PBH

7Dr - Delonix regia 2-2,5 m height

8-10 cm PBH

4Me - Metrosideros excelsa 2-2,5 m height

8-10 cm PBH

4Ns - Nyssa sylvatica 3-3,5 m height

16-20 cm PBH

8Pa - Populus alba 2 m height

6-8 cm PBH

12Pn - Populus nigra ‘italica’ 2-2,5 m height

102

8-10 cm PBH


MASTER PLAN

Legend Lawn Meadow (“semifree” growth) Subshrub layer Asphalt pavement Yellow granite pavement Wall

N

3

5

10

20 m

103


SENSORIAL GARDEN,

Porto

Collaboration: Igor Domingues|Luís Dias|Marco Castro|Sofia Figueroa

The main focus of the design is to bring and transmit uncommon sensations into the urban environment. This sensations are brought by the use of vegetation characteristics such as colours, textures and countryside smells. Also the different types of pavements and soil cover aims to bring unusual sensations into the space.

Tree layer

Prunus serrulata

Design the space and its functions through the various vegetation layers...

... and take advantage of the plants’ visual characteristics:

FORM LINE & PATTERN

Lavandula stoechas

Sub-Shrub Herbaceous layer

Shrub layer

Arbutus unedo

TEXTURE COLOUR

VISUAL ENERGY

Betula alba Cornus alba ‘sibirica’ Liquidambar styracyflua Lavandula stoechas Liriodendron tulipifera Prunus lusitanica Prunus serrulata Spring 104

Summer

Autumn

Winter


Legend Trees Shrubs

Sub-shrubs & herbaceous plants

Meadow

Water element

Wooden deck

Flowering meadow Trimmed meadow

Paths (different paving) Library

Proposed Contours

N

5

15

30

50m 105


Rui Fernandes

Landscape Architecture

+31 (0)6 19 459 272 rui.f.arqpaisagista@gmail.com pt.linkedin.com/pub/rui-fernandes/b3/685/656/

Rui Fernandes Landscape Architecture  
Rui Fernandes Landscape Architecture  
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