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Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education


“EDUCATION IS A HUMAN RIGHT WITH IMMENSE POWER TO TRANSFORM. ON ITS FOUNDATION REST THE CORNERSTONES OF FREEDOM, DEMOCRACY AND SUSTAINABLE H U M A N D E V E L O P M E N T. ”

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IMPACT OVER 95 YEARS

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MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

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ST R AT EG I C P L A N I N I T I AT I V ES

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ALUMNI AROUND THE WORLD

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GSE’S 95TH YEAR

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COMMUNITY OUTREACH

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SPOTLIGHT ON PARTNERSHIP LEADERS

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SPOTLIGHT ON PARTNER DISTRICT

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E N D OW E D C H A I R I N E D U C AT I O N A L EQ U I T Y

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FA C U LT Y H O N O R S

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N E W FA C U LT Y & S TA F F

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1923 Rutgers Establishes the School of Education After two years of planning, the Board of Trustees establishes the School of Education on October 12, naming Elliott as the first Dean.

1929 Enrolls 5,375 students The School of Education enrolls 5,375 students in 71 courses. Extension classes are offered at 28 sites in New Jersey and at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Rutgers School of Education is the largest division of Rutgers University. The school’s enrollment doubled during the following decade.

1963 Moves Into New Building Faculty move into new building at 10 Seminary Place under Dean Herge’s Administration.

1986 Develops First 5-year Teacher Ed Program GSE approves development of first five-year teacher education program leading to Ed.M. degree.

1960 Becomes Graduate School of Education In April, the Board of Governors changes the school’s name to Graduate School of Education, recognizing the role of the school as a graduate institution in the preparation of educational personnel.

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1997 First Endowed Chair First endowed chair at GSE is named in honor of Samuel D. Proctor, Martin Luther King Jr. Professor of Education.


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1998

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Develops Ph.D. in Education

2017

The GSE develops the Ph.D. in Education.

95th Anniversary Celebration GSE celebrates 95 years of Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education.

2007 Develops Ed.D. for Scholarly Practitioners Rutgers GSE joins twenty other universities in the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate to revise its Ed.D. program to better meet the needs of educational practitioners and leaders.

2018 Ranked #43 and among top 11%

2017 Launches Urban Social Justice Teacher Ed Program

GSE is ranked #43 and among top 11% of schools of education in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

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ACHIEV ING O U R S T RAT EG IC G OALS AT R U TG ER S G S E

As we celebrate over 95 years as Rutgers GSE, I am delighted to share with you this special edition of our 2018 Impact Report. This year’s Impact Report shares our 95-year journey to where we are now in 2018, ranked among the top 43 schools of education in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. This past year, in honor of our 95th Anniversary, we launched our Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education Distinguished Lecture Series with then President of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Dr. Deborah Loewenberg Ball, who led a discussion on (How) Can Teaching be a Force for Justice? In 2016, under the leadership of GSE Dean Wanda J. Blanchett, the GSE faculty and staff engaged in a collaborative strategic planning process to articulate our vision for the future of the GSE. This edition shares our progress towards achieving our strategic priorities. This year’s report showcases our distinguished faculty and their scholarship in our three strategic priority areas: (1) Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice; (2) STEM Education; and (3) Effective Teaching and Learning. The report features four outstanding alumni who are working to advance social justice in the nation and across the globe. GSE alums are working to make higher education accessible to the nation’s most vulnerable populations. They are advocating on behalf of refugees to give voice to the crisis they are facing. They are creating innovative ways to teach that have had a global impact and are leading the way in creating supportive academic and emotional environments for all students in public schools. In this year’s report, you will learn about the GSE’s Conversation Tree Program, which was honored in 2018 with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education’s Best Practice Award in support of Global and International Perspectives. The report highlights the impressive outcomes of this innovative program that builds bridges of understanding, breaks down stereotypes, and empowers both Rutgers students and immigrant communities. Last year, we shared the launch of our new Urban Social Justice Teacher Education Program. This program affirms our commitment to preparing educators to advance

both equity and excellence in education. Our goal is to prepare all of our pre-service teachers to become outstanding educators in urban schools. An integral part of this program is our innovative Community School Partnership Network (GSE-CSPN), which was developed in conjunction with our seven partner urban school districts in New Jersey. These partnerships are instrumental to advance our commitment to diversity, equity, and social justice, and effective teaching and learning. This year’s report spotlights the superb work of GSE’s Partnership Leaders, who are instrumental in working with our partner districts where our student teachers are placed to put theory to practice in urban settings. To provide you with a portrait of how our partnerships have developed, we are highlighting our partnership with New Brunswick Public Schools (NBPS) as one of the seven districts in GSE-CSPN. NBPS is part of our neighborhood community at the GSE and the mission of GSE to Advance Excellence and Equity in Education aligns very well with the NBPS mission to prepare, inspire, and empower lifelong learners and leaders. Celebrating over 95 years of significant achievements would not be possible without the hard work, commitment, and dedication of our fantastic staff, and in this year’s report we acknowledge their many contributions to the success of the GSE. We are excited to announce the establishment of The Charles A. DeMarzo and Keith N. Lamb Endowed Chair in Educational Equity. We are grateful to Charles DeMarzo and his partner Keith Lamb for their commitment to Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education. And finally, we recognize the honors our faculty received and welcome the new faculty and staff who joined the GSE family this year. It is wonderful to share with you our 95-year journey in Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education, and the GSE looks forward to celebrating a century of Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education with you soon!

Clark Chinn, PhD I N T E R I M

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ADVANCING EXCELLENCE AND EQUITY IN EDUCATION: GSE HAS SECURED $26.6M TO ADVANCE OUR STRATEGIC PRIORITIES In 2016, under the leadership of GSE Dean Wanda J. Blanchett, the GSE community came together to engage in a strategic planning process that embodied our values and our commitment to Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education. Under the leadership of Dean and current Interim Provost Blanchett and Interim Dean Clark Chinn, the GSE has made significant strides in advancing our strategic priorities. They include gaining national and international distinction as centers for research and innovation in three interconnecting areas. Since 2016, the GSE has been awarded 120 grants totaling $26.6 million to advance our strategic priorities:

DIV ER S IT Y, EQUIT Y, AND SOCIAL JUSTICE This interdisciplinary research area focuses on a cluster of issues related to these three critical democratic values. Our faculty analyze social class, ethnicity, language, race, gender and sexual identity, religion, and other forms of human diversity. We investigate such policy questions as the opportunity gap, the school-to-prison pipeline, public school finance, and globalization. We develop theories that illuminate inequality, human and civil rights, ideology, and ethics, among others. n Since 2016, the GSE faculty have been awarded 20 grants totaling $6.2 million to advance Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice in Education. n In 2017, we launched GSE’s Urban Social Justice Teacher Education Program, which is

designed to develop teachers to be engaged in and committed to excellence, equity, and social justice in their teaching practice. n We also created the Community School Partnership Network (GSE-CSPN) with seven

urban partner school districts to advance our commitment to equity in education. n We added 12 new hires to join our award-winning faculty with expertise in Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice. n Our faculty are world leaders in research on equity in education from early childhood

to higher education on topics such as globalization of teacher education and global programs; teacher education for justice in partnership with local districts; engaging youth in civic action; linguistic diversity as well as the intersection of migration and education; multicultural issues in schools and in counseling; political, religious, and cultural influences on education; education and mass incarceration; gender equity and LGBTQ education; and disability rights education.

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Launched GSE’s Urban Social Justice Teacher Education Program to advance excellence, equity, and social justice in the teaching practice.

Created the Community School Partnership Network (GSE-CSPN): 7 urban partner school districts to advance our commitment to equity in education.

Added 12 new hires to join our award-winning faculty with expertise in Diversity, Equity, and Social Justice.

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Seated front (left to right): • Nichole Garcia, Assistant Professor. Research: Higher education, women of color, feminism, critical race theory and Latinx/a/o communities. • Karishma Desai, Assistant Professor. Research: The politics of knowledge and aspiration at the intersections of gender, globalization, and education. • Nicole DiCrecchio, Assistant Research Professor. Research: Exploring racial differences in preschool suspension and expulsion on a national scale. • Beth Rubin, Professor. Research: Investigate how young people develop, both as learners and as citizens, amid the interwoven contexts of classroom, school, and community. Seated middle (left to right): • Carrie Lobman, Associate Professor. Research: Performance and improvisation in education and teacher education. • Kisha Porcher, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: The effectiveness of teacher preparation programs in preparing pre-service teachers to impact the academic achievement of students of color. • Florence Hamrick, Professor. Research: Institutional and governmental policies, structures, practices, and cultures relevant to achieving or hindering equity, access, and success. • Tasha Austin, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Urban education. • Lisa Knox, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Ensures a school culture that encourages continuous improvement for teachers and students. • Benjamin Justice, Professor. Research: Religious and cultural diversity, civic identity formation, education in non-schooling settings, and education as an imperial policy. • Lauren Kelly, Assistant Professor. Research: Adolescent critical literacy development and hip-hop pedagogies. • Nicole Mirra, Assistant Professor. Research: Exploring the intersections between critical literacy and civic engagement with urban students and teachers across classrooms. • Mary Curran, Professor. Research: The impacts of engagement with local-global community members on pre-service teachers. • Melinda Mangin, Associate Professor. Research: Developing standards of care or best practices for transgender and gender non-conforming children at schools. • Kedra Gamble, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Developing, supporting, and refining structures that empower, prepare, and inspire educators to meet the diverse needs of the students they serve.

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Standing (left to right): • Gerald Goldin, Distinguished Professor. Research: Systems of internal and external representation, affect, engagement, and motivation in mathematics classrooms. • Caroline Clauss-Ehlers, Associate Professor. Research: How do culture and environment foster resilience in children? • Catherine Lugg, Professor. Research: How politics shapes public education; who gets what sort of education, when and how. • Maqueda Randall-Weeks, Assistant Professor of Professional Pratice. Research: Teacher engagement in school policy, management, and instructional practice reforms. • Nora Hyland, Associate Professor and Associate Dean. Research: Examine the ways that race, class, gender, and sexuality position individuals within the sociocultural context of schools. • Michelle Macchia, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: The impact of educator mindset on teacher practice and student achievement. • Tanja Sargent, Associate Professor. Research: Pedagogical and curricular reform in China.• Wanda J. Blanchett, Distinguished Professor. Research: Disproportionate representation of students of color in special education, urban education, and issues of race, class, and culture. • Matthew Mayer, Associate Professor. Research: School violence and disruption, cognitive-behavioral interventions, and the emotional-behavioral needs of children and adolescents. • Dan Battey, Associate Professor. Research: Racial bias in mathematics education. • Leslie Guarino, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Urban education. • Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke, Professor. Research: Underrepresented students in the ecucational pipeline; facilitating creativity and innovation through STEAM and arts integration. • Alisa Belzer, Professor. Research: Analyze adult basic education policy for the ways in which it marginalizes lowest skilled adults who are disproportionately poor people of color. • Sharon Ryan, Professor. Research: How early childhood educators might improve their practices to achieve educational equity for all students in their classrooms. • Steven Barnett, Board of Governors Professor. Research: Improving the cost-effectiveness of early childhood programs particularly for the most disadvantaged.

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Awarded 28 grants of $5.9 million+ to advance STEM Education.

Our world-renowned faculty have won national and international awards and recognition for their scholarly work in STEM Education.

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ADVANCING EXCELLENCE AND EQ U IT Y IN EDU CAT IO N: S T EM EDU CATION

Research on STEM Education addresses a broad range of issues related to promoting more effective learning and teaching in the disciplines of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Our scholarship addresses diverse topics, such as the development of effective learning environments to support student growth, promoting more effective reasoning practices, assessment in STEM, understanding teaching quality, the professional development of teachers, social justice in STEM Education, integration of STEM with other parts of the curriculum, and promoting interest in STEM careers.

n Since 2016, GSE faculty have been awarded 28 grants totaling over $5.9 million to advance STEM Education. n During a time of national shortage of physics educators, the GSE has been ranked #1 in producing physics teachers two years in a row by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition. n GSE faculty members were awarded prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER grants and a prestigious National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship for their STEM research. n In honor of our 95th anniversary, the GSE launched the Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education Distinguished Lecture Series. Then AERA President, Dr. Deborah Loewenberg Ball, was the inaugural speaker and her lecture titled (How) Can Teaching be a Force for Justice? focused on the intersection of all three GSE strategic priority areas. n We have established the Charles A. DeMarzo and Keith N.Lamb Endowed Chair in Educational Equity and last year sought a scholar to fill this position focusing on the intersection of STEM and educational equity. n Our faculty are international leaders in areas such as learning and instruction in STEM, learning to reason in science, physics education, proofs in mathematics, integration of STEM with the arts, collaborative learning and argumentation in STEM, racism in mathematics education, improving STEM assessments, and the use of technology to support STEM learning.

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Front row seated (left to right): • Ravit Golan Duncan, Associate Professor. Research: The role of domain-specific knowledge in the development of scientific literacy. • Juan Pablo Mejia-Ramos, Associate Professor. Research: Mathematical argumentation and proof comprehension. Middle row seated (left to right): • Dan Battey, Associate Professor. Research: Racial bias in mathematics education. • Janice Gobert, Professor. Research: Technology-based education with visualizations and simulations in scientific domains. • Clark Chinn, Professor and Interim Dean. Research: Epistemic cognition, argumentation, and promoting growth in reasoning in science classes. • Drew Gitomer, Professor. Research: Assessment and evaluation of teaching and related policy issues in teaching and teacher education.

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Back row standing (left to right): • Dake Zhang, Associate Professor. Research: Interventions for students with learning difficulties in mathematics. • Carolyn Maher, Distinguished Professor. Research: Having students engage in productive arguments that lead to constructing “proof-like” justifications for their mathematical solutions.• Gregory Camilli, Professor. Research: Developing and applying research methodologies to address issues in education. • Gerald Goldin, Distinguished Professor. Research: Physics, Computer Science, and Math Education. • Chia-Yi Chiu, Associate Professor. Research: Quantitative methods and models in educational testing and measurement. • Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke, Professor. Research: Underrepresented students in the educational pipeline; facilitating creativity and innovation through STEAM and arts integration. • Eugenia Etkina, Distinguished Professor. Research: Physics, student reasoning, epistemology, language, and representations.

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ADVANCING EXCELLENCE AND EQ U IT Y IN EDU CAT IO N: EFFECT IV E T EACHING AND LEAR NING

This research area focuses on research and design innovation in the area of teaching, learning, and effective educational practice in multiple contexts and across the lifespan. Relevant topics in this area include culturally responsive pedagogy, curriculum design, effective instruction, technology integration, pedagogical content knowledge, professional development, and learning science.

n Since 2016, GSE faculty have been awarded 72 grants totaling over $14 million to advance Effective Teaching and Learning. n We have redesigned our core teacher preparation program to advance effective culturallyresponsive learning and teaching at all levels (PK-Ed.M.) through collaborative experiences with our partner districts and their local communities. n We are developing the GSE Community School Partnership Network (GSE-CSPN) into research-practice partnerships that support collaborative and sustainable innovations to improve teaching and learning in urban schools. n We have hired 10 new faculty with expertise in Effective Teaching and Learning since 2016. n Our faculty have been awarded a prestigious National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship and grant funding from the Spencer Foundation, the William Penn Foundation, PNC Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the William T. Grant Foundation among many others. They have also been appointed to the standing committee of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Civics for the 2020 pilot administration. n Our faculty are innovators in research on instruction and policies that promote student well-being and growth. We are global leaders in literacy, English, language, civics, and STEM education, with a special focus on urban education. We design learning environments that promote excellence and equity — from multimodal literacies and culturally responsive pedagogies to youth participatory action research and hip-hop pedagogies.

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Awarded 72 grants totaling $14 million+ to advance Effective Teaching and Learning.

Redesigned our teacher preparation programs for effective culturally-responsive teaching and learning at all levels.

Added 10 new hires to join our award-winning faculty with expertise in Effective Teaching and Learning.

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Seated (left to right): • Carrie Lobman, Associate Professor. Research: Exploring the value of improvisation and play for learning and development. • Gail Verona, Assistant Professor. Research: Providing clinical supervision and support for educational administration and supervision programs.• Janice Gobert, Professor. Research: Projects that address technology-based science learning and assessment. • Carolyn Maher, Distinguished Professor. Research: The conditions that are required for students to build durable understanding of mathematical ideas and ways of reasoning. • Ravit Golan Duncan, Associate Professor. Research: Pre-service teachers' understandings of the nature of science and the development of these understandings. • Kedra Gamble, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Students' access to rich, relevant, and culturally responsive education, particularly in contexts of inequity in the public education system. • Clark Chinn, Professor and Interim Dean. Research: Develop instructional methods that help students reason more effectively in authentic situations such as reasoning about information found on the Internet. • Beth Rubin, Professor. Research: How youth civic identity and belonging take shape within local contexts marked by history, culture, politics, and economics. • Lauren Kelly, Assistant Professor. Research: Critical media literacy as a lens through which young people can better understand, navigate, and influence their social and cultural environments. • Tasha Austin, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Urban education. Standing (left to right): • Juan Pablo Mejia-Ramos, Associate Professor. Research: The ways in which university students and mathematicians construct, read, and present arguments and proofs. • Nicole Mirra, Assistant Professor. Research: Exploring the intersections between critical literacy and civic engagement with urban students and teachers across classroom, community, and digital learning environments. • Amy Lewis, Assistant Professor. Research: How teacher educators can frame their curriculum and course design to best support future elementary school teachers of science. • Cindy Blitz, Research Professor. Research: Translating research into best practices to enhance the capacity of educational stakeholders. • Nora Hyland, Associate Professor and Associate Dean. Research: Examining the ways that race, class, gender, and sexuality position individuals within the sociocultural context of schools. • Sharon Ryan, Professor. Research: Reconceptualizing the early childhood knowledge base to one that incorporates teacher knowledge,

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critical, feminist, and postmodern theories. • Judith Harrison, Assistant Professor. Research: The effectiveness, acceptability, feasibility, and sustainability of classroom-based services to increase academic and behavioral success. • Mary Curran, Professor. Research: The impacts of engagement with local-global community members on pre-service teachers. • Matthew Mayer, Associate Professor. Research: School violence and disruption and structural equation modeling and methodological issues in school violence. • Wanda J. Blanchett, Distinguished Professor. Research: Disproportionate representation of students of color in special education, urban education, and issues of race, class, and culture. • Alisa Belzer, Professor. Research: Professional development and program and classroom practices that can improve learning outcomes for adults in basic and higher education. • Kisha Porcher, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: The effectiveness of teacher preparation programs in preparing pre-service teachers to impact the academic achievement of students of color. • Dan Battey, Associate Professor. Research: Engaging teachers in opportunities to learn to challenge metanarratives that limit opportunities for students of color in mathematics. • Lesley Mandel Morrow, Distinguished Professor. Research: Early literacy development dealing with motivation, fluency, classroom environments, and professional development. • Lisa Knox, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Urban education. • Christelle Palpacuer-Lee, Assistant Professor. Research: Providing world languages teachers with opportunities to learn in public settings such as museums and community-based service-learning programs. • Benjamin Justice, Professor. Research: Religious and cultural diversity, civic identity formation, education in non-schooling settings, and education as an imperial policy. • Leslie Guarino, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: Urban education. • Gerald Goldin, Distinguished Professor. Research: Systems of internal and external representation, affect, engagement, and motivation in mathematics classrooms. • Michelle Macchia, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice. Research: The impact of culturally sustaining pedagogical practices and teacher knowledge on student achievement. • Eugenia Etkina, Distinguished Professor. Research: Interactive inquiry-based physics instruction in multiple physics teaching methods.

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GSE ALUMNI THROUGHOUT THE C

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GSE Alumni Across the Country The GSE has tremendous impact across the state, the

3 / Alaska

country, and the world, with over 16,000 alumni, nearly 5,000 of whom reside in New Jersey. GSE alumni have gone on to become outstanding and transformative education leaders in the United States and throughout the world. Our alumni serve as teachers, administrators, researchers, authors, performers, software developers, higher education professionals, and assessment experts. Our alumni include outstanding educational scholars,

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over 20 university presidents, and over 150 school superintendents, as well as higher education administrators in institutions throughout the world. GSE alumni are highly sought after — the New Jersey Department of Education reports that Rutgers graduates consistently have the highest rate of employment in New Jersey’s school districts. The GSE empowers change agents who become effective practitioners, transformative leaders, and accomplished researchers. Whether it is teaching in a classroom, or leading education practice and policy in the public or private sector, or engaging in cutting edge scholarship to innovate in education, our graduates make us proud every day with their commitment to and tremendous impact in Advancing Excellence and

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Equity in Education.

GSE Alumni in Total * only those with current address are reflected on the map

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207 / California


18 / Minnesota 7 / Idaho

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9 / Nevada

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65 / Arizona

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.

..

4 / Wyoming

498 / Florida

. . . . 3 / Montana

43 / Washington

28 / Oregon

7 / Utah

20 / New Mexico

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44 / Colorado

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82 / Texas

3 / South Dakota

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3 / Nebraska

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8 / Oklahoma

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6 / Kansas

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10 / Arkansas

13 / Louisiana

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12 / Missouri

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1 / North Dakota

8 / Iowa

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11 / Mississippi

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15 / Wisconsin

. . .. . .

18 / Alabama

51 / Illinois

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68 / Georgia

17 / Indiana

13 / Kentucky

22 / Tennessee

103 / South Carolina


4775 / New Jersey

30 / Vermont

27 / New Hampshire 115 / Maryland

110 / Massachusetts

. . .

41 / Michigan

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334 / New York

... . . .. . .. .

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143 / Virginia

476 / Pennsylvania

45 / Ohio

52 / Delaware

18 / District of Columbia

5 / West Virginia

69 / Connecticut

15 / Rhode Island

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32 / Maine

158 / North Carolina

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12 / Puerto Rico

2 / U. S. Virgin Islands

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1 / Guam


.... . ....... .. ..... . .

GSE Alumni Across the World Brazil Canada China Dominican Republic Egypt Estonia Germany Greece Honduras India Israel Italy

Japan Latvia Luxembourg Malta New Zealand Nigeria Oman Philippines Singapore South Africa Taiwan Thailand

Turkey United Kingdom Ukraine Venezuela Zimbabwe

GSE Alumni Across the State 50 205 207 174 27 8 214 67 77 219 376 840 680 311 305 32 15

Atlantic Bergen Burlington Camden Cape May Cumberland Essex Gloucester Hudson Hunterdon Mercer Middlesex Monmouth Morris Ocean Passaic Salem

540 Somerset 45 Sussex 315 Union 68 Warren

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680

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ALUMNA GIVES VOICE TO REFUGEE CRISIS THROUGH ACADEMIC AND PUBLIC SCHOLARSHIP “I was the first in my family to get a Ph.D. and I could not have done it without Rutgers GSE,” stated Sally Wesley Bonet (Ph.D., 2016). “I am grateful to Dr. Thea Abu El-Haj who has been an incredible advisor to me all along the way, and continues to do so, to Dr. Catherine Lugg who always pushed me to think about writing strategically, to Dr. Beth Rubin who helped me articulate my questions about research and methods, to Dr. James Giarelli who shared his wisdom with me, and to Dr. Ariana Mangual Figueroa who gave me so much of her time and enabled me to mirror some of her methods in my work.” Dr. Bonet, an Assistant Professor at Colgate University, migrated from Sudan to Egypt as a young child. Her experience growing up in Egypt inspired her line of research on the expenciences of Iraqi and Syrian refugees in the United States. While at Rutgers GSE, Bonet conducted ethnographic research over the course of three years with Iraqi refugee families to better understand how refugee youth and their families were becoming particular types of citizens through their interactions with state institutions, including public schools. These families were fleeing places of violence and conflict and had lost everything — their extended family, their way of life, their possessions, their livelihoods, their home, and their country. Bonet followed these families across all the institutions with which they were interacting, including schools and welfare offices, in an effort to understand how they were being framed in terms of citizenship. This gave Bonet important insights into the multiple roles that youth play in the lives of the refugee family. As many of the parents did not speak English upon migrating to the United States, their children became caregivers for their families as well as interlocutors to the outside world, as they were the first to learn English. Their parents were often able to secure low-wage employment with no health benefits. It became clear to Bonet that although these families had escaped war, they were forced to try to survive another war in United States — one that was perhaps more pernicious — namely the war on the welfare state, which includes all of the institutions that the most vulnerable among us count on, such as public assistance agencies, public schools, and free clinics. An agency employee who worked at one of Bonet’s field sites stated, “We [America] are essentially resettling people into poverty.” The matron of one refugee family echoed an equally bleak sentiment: “In Iraq if you die, you die once — here in the United States, you

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die a little every day.” Bonet argues that most Americans don’t understand the experience of refugee families. Through her work Bonet hopes to advocate for these families. “In 2016, we allowed 110,000 refugees in the United States. This year that number went down to 50,000, and next year it is going to be 25,000,” said Bonet. “It is really important to fight the good fight of allowing refugees fleeing violence and conflict into the United States. But we can’t stop there. Once they do enter, we need to offer them a good quality of life through a better resettlement process. I am honored that these families trusted me with their stories, and I hope to be worthy of that trust by bringing attention to this crisis.” Bonet is committed to making her work accessible not just to academia but also to the general public as she hopes that sharing these stories will ignite change. Bonet’s work has been recognized through the Evelyn Headley Award for Outstanding Dissertation at Rutgers GSE, the Concha Delgado ` Early Career Presidential Fellowship by the Council Gaitan on Anthropology and Education of the American Anthropological Association, and the Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship by the Ford Foundation. “I was the first in my family to get a Ph.D. and I could not have done it without Rutgers GSE,” stated Bonet. “I am grateful to Dr. Thea Abu El-Haj who has been an incredible advisor to me all along the way, and continues to do so, to Dr. Catherine Lugg who always pushed me to think about writing strategically, to Dr. Beth Rubin who helped me articulate my questions about research and methods, to Dr. James Giarelli who shared his wisdom with me, and to Dr. Ariana Mangual Figueroa who gave me so much of her time and enabled me to mirror some of her methods in my work.” n


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AWARD-WINNING ALUM’S PHYSICS EDUCATION GAMES PLAYED BY OVER 6 MILLION GLOBALLY Matthew Blackman (Ed.M., 2009) attributes his success as a physics educator to the great courses and professors he had at the GSE and especially to Dr. Eugenia Etkina, who set high expectations and provided a high level of support to engage him and his peers in physics education. Blackman is an innovative physics teacher who was recently recognized as a local PhysTEC Teacher of the Year by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition. This award recognizes the graduates of physics teacher preparation programs across the country who have had an impact in the field. In 2011, Blackman’s passion for physics led him to create and launch web-based educational physics games “The Super Ultimate Graphing Challenge” as part of his website, www.theuniverseandmore.com. Since then he has launched 4 additional games, which have been played by over 6 million people from all 50 states and over 150 countries. This was a labor of love, as he took classes on programming, art design, and marketing to create these games. “Each game has a different content area to help students master an intuitive understanding of physics. You have to apply different physics concepts to play the game. By the end of the game the player develops intuitions about physics and how to apply it,” stated Blackman. “The goal of the games is not to replace the teacher — I see it as a technological resource to enhance classroom learning. Teachers don’t have to spend time preparing class materials and can simply access these games to teach physics concepts.” Although Blackman considered selling these wildly successful physics games for a small price, he decided against that in order to make them accessible to everyone. “Physics is the most effective way to teach students about scientific thinking and I want to ensure that everyone has an avenue to learn how to think critically as that is a skill that they can use in any walk of life,” said Blackman. Through his efforts, a solid grasp of critical physics concepts is within the reach of a very diverse range of students worldwide. Blackman currently works at Ridge High School (RHS) in Basking Ridge, New Jersey. Blackman has distinguished himself as an engaging physics teacher who has overseen a doubling of the enrollment in physics courses in the schools that he has taught. Prior to RHS, Blackman taught physics at Madison High School (MHS) in Madison, New Jersey. Like at RHS, he did an outstanding job in raising AP physics scores at MHS so that 65% of his students scored a 5 and

over 95% of his students scored a 3 or higher. He also raised $20,000 through grant funding to start what became a championship winning Robotics Club at MHS. The NJ State Legislature’s Ceremonial Resolution recognized him for his outstanding contributions to MHS. Blackman attributes his success as a physics educator to the great courses and professors he had at the GSE and especially to Dr. Eugenia Etkina, who set high expectations and provided a high level of support to engage him and his peers in physics education. “Even after we graduated, Dr. Etkina continued to host monthly meetings for us to come to the GSE and support each other. We didn’t feel alone, and our passion for teaching children is what brought us together,” said Blackman. Blackman is excited about how physics education is changing and now engaging students actively around the learning process. He is looking forward to the new innovative teaching techniques that will result from this approach. n

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ALUM INNOVATES TO MAKE HIGHER EDUCATION ACCESSIBLE TO THE NATION’S MOST VULNERABLE POPULATIONS “My time at the GSE gave me the guidance and foundation I needed, and I was able to apply this to my professional career,” said Donald Generals, Jr. (Ed.D., 1998). “The GSE helped me to foster reasoning and understanding behind what we could do by looking at the outcomes of student learning, driving accountability in the academic experience, and producing results.” Dr. Generals is the President of the Community College of Philadelphia. Over the course of his 35-year career in community colleges, Generals has led a transformative effort to make higher education accessible to the nation’s most vulnerable populations. Data at his institution revealed that over the course of a year, over 3,000 students dropped out due to the financial burden of higher education. Under Generals’ leadership, the Community College of Philadelphia was among the first community colleges across the nation to develop a collegepromise program, through their 50th Anniversary PROMISE Scholarship program. Qualifying students who maintained a 2.0 GPA would graduate with no debt. To make this possible, Generals engaged the broader community and raised private dollars to fund students’ education. The outcomes of the 50th Anniversary PROMISE Scholarship program were extraordinary, with most students succeeding in graduating from the community college in a three-year time frame. Generals’ innovative approach caught the attention of the Obama administration, and he has become a national leader in the effort to make higher education accessible. In 2016, Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Dr. Jill Biden visited the college to celebrate the success of the 50th Anniversary College Promise Program. Recently, one of the Community College of Philadelphia’s alums was honored as a Rhodes Scholar. “Philadelphia has a 25% poverty rate, which is the highest poverty rate of the 10 largest cities in the nation – the only way to break the vicious cycle of poverty is through education,” stated Generals. “My vision of accessibility is focused on social justice, and the amazing faculty and staff at the Community College of Philadelphia have rallied around this cause.” Generals started his career as a tutor working in tutoring labs in the evenings and instantly knew that he wanted to devote his career to advancing social justice at

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community colleges. He volunteered his time on various committees and took leadership roles, which enabled him to rise through the ranks from tutor to a Director at Passaic County Community College. Once he graduated from the GSE with his Ed.D. in Social and Philosophical Foundations of Education, he was offered the role of a Dean. Generals chose to pursue his Ed.D. at the GSE because he wanted a more grounded understanding of curriculum and human development. “My time at the GSE gave me the guidance and foundation I needed, and I was able to apply this to my professional career,” said Generals. “The GSE helped me to foster reasoning and understanding behind what we could do by looking at the outcomes of student learning, driving accountability in the academic experience, and producing results.” Generals was inspired by his mentors at the GSE, including Dr. Daniel Tanner and Dr. James Giarelli. He has also been inspired by the work of Dr. Steven Barnett over the course of his career while dealing with early childhood education. He is a proud GSE alum, and he and his wife — also a Rutgers alum — often come to the university for Rutgers football games. His research interests include progressive education, and he is the author of Booker T. Washington: The Architect of Progressive Education. Generals believes that curricula should be aligned with the life of the learner. “I always try to find those foundational elements that lead to student success,” stated Generals. “The progressive paradigm is well evidenced in community colleges which demonstrate that you can take a learner from where they are to where they want to be if you provide them with the proper structure that is relevant to their life’s experiences.” n


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ALUMNA CREATES SUPPORTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR ALL STUDENTS AS SUPERINTENDENT

Linda Madison

(Ed.D., 2002) attributes her professional

success to the GSE and her many mentors. “Dr. Gardner was my personal guru, Dr. Bliss was always very supportive, and my dissertation committee was always there for me,” stated Madison. “I am eternally grateful to all of them.” Dr. Madison is Superintendent of Middlesex Borough Public Schools in New Jersey. She is committed to a district-wide culture that sustains a supportive learning environment for all students. Through her leadership, her district has implemented teacher-led initiatives to create opportunities for students to self-regulate and practice mindfulness. The district has also built programs to support the social emotional learning of children in the district so as to help them to reduce anxiety and develop their ability to focus. “Children spend more than half of their waking lives in school, and so school has to be a safe place — a respite from the rest of the world — where students feel supported so they can achieve their potential in life,” explained Madison. In the last 5 years, the student population of Middlesex Borough has changed to include many emerging bilinguals. “Recognizing that we have more emerging bilinguals now than we ever did before, we have worked hard to provide resources to the families. We have a parent group who meets regularly with their children’s teachers. The district has collected school and other supplies and partnered with agencies that can provide support. Many of our elementary school teachers have also been trained in Sheltered Instruction to better meet the needs of emerging bilinguals,” said Madison. Madison started her career as a science teacher and was honored in 1991 with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. In 1994 she secured a supervisor endorsement from the GSE as part of her master’s degree. This propelled her to the role of Supervisor of Mathematics and Science in the Flemington-Raritan Schools. She realized during her time as a supervisor just how much she enjoyed working with students; this led to her becoming a Principal — a role in which she could work more closely with children. Upon securing her doctorate from the GSE, Madison became Superintendent of Milltown Public Schools and later of Middlesex Borough Public Schools. She has enjoyed her tenure as Superintendent in mid-sized districts, as it affords her the opportunity to work closely with children in her schools.

“I enjoy being connected to our students and supporting them by attending most evening activities. The students know that I am their biggest cheerleader, and I feel very gratified when they seek me out to share their successes with me,” said Madison. Madison attributes her professional success to the GSE and her many mentors. “Dr. Gardner was my personal guru, Dr. Bliss was always very supportive, and my dissertation committee was always there for me,” stated Madison. “I am eternally grateful to all of them.” n

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n our 95th year, the GSE boasts over 16,000 living alumni, including 20 university presidents and more than 150 school superintendents as well as

9 5

T H

Y E A R

AMONG TOP

%

11

of Schools of Education in the nation.

Our graduates are highly sought after — the New Jersey Department of Education reports that GSE graduates consistently have one of the highest rates of employment in New Jersey’s school districts.

a number of other distinguished leaders in P-12 schools and in institutions of higher education, including deans.

3,682 degrees awarded at masters and doctorate levels over the last 10 years.

RANKED

#

43

out of 385 graduate schools of education in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

879 teaching interns placed by GSE in

142 school districts across 18 counties in New Jersey over the last five years.

10,000 + #

1

in producing Physics Teachers in the nation two years in a row as recognized by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition.

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students (full and part-time) over the last decade.


O U R

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Y E A R

GSE won the 2018 AACTE Best Practice Award in support of Global and International Perspectives for the Conversation Tree Program. In the program, 150 RU students have empowered almost 1,000

GSE Offers:

50 +

community members with English conversational skills, clocking in

8,000+ hours of service.

graduate degree programs

130 faculty members (full and part-time)

15 + certificate programs

$ With the launch of our Urban Social Justice Teacher Education Program, every GSE student teacher engages in 760 hours

10 + fully online programs

26.6 +

MILLION awarded in competitively funded research to support GSE’s strategic priorities since 2016.

of clinical engagement in our seven partner high-needs school districts through the course of

Our five centers provided professional development to

their study.

6,000 + teachers and education leaders across NJ, the nation, and the world last year.

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R U T G E R S G S E W I N S 2 018 A A C T E N AT I O N A L B E S T P R A C T I C E AWA R D F O R T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N T R E E P R O G R A M

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SE program breaks down stereotypes and empowers community members and Rutgers students by bringing them together in informal settings.

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) honored the GSE with the 2018 AACTE Best Practice Award in support of Global and International Perspectives for its local-global initiatives through The Conversation Tree: Community-Based Language Partnerships Program. The Conversation Tree Program — a partnership between Rutgers GSE and the Collaborative Center for Community-Based Research and Service — provides opportunities for adults to participate in English, Spanish, and Mandarin conversations in informal settings called Conversation Cafés. Rutgers students participate through curriculum-based service learning in three academic courses offered in the GSE Urban Social Justice Teacher Education Certification Program and the Global Education minor. The Conversation Tree is a critically important program as about 30% of households in New Jersey speak a language other than English. Since its launch in Spring 2012, more than 150 Rutgers student facilitators and 85 community facilitators have served over 8,000 hours interacting with nearly 1,000 community members at twelve different community partner sites. The program affirms multilingualism, while empowering both community members and Rutgers students. Community partners for the program include the New Brunswick Free Public Library, Youth Empowerment Services, New Labor, Highland Park School District, Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, Rutgers Global Services, Rutgers Center for Latino Arts and Culture, and more. This award is given annually by AACTE to recognize exemplary educator preparation in the intercultural, global, cross-cultural, and international arenas. AACTE selected The Conversation Tree Program to receive the award for its engagement of students in culturally responsive pedagogy and ethical action in their community as well as in academic discussions of how their teaching reflects best practices in social justice and language education research.

“The Rutgers GSE faculty and staff members have developed many opportunities to support the development of GSE students’ global and international perspectives, and our students have a robust, comprehensive array of research, teaching, and service options through which they can develop and enhance their global competence. The GSE’s global and international efforts align with the GSE’s strategic plan distinction goals of promoting diversity, equity, social justice, and effective teaching and learning,” stated Rutgers—New Brunswick Interim Provost Wanda J. Blanchett. “We are grateful to AACTE for recognizing our work as having met the high standard of ‘Best Practices in Global and International Perspectives’ as it is truly a tremendous honor, and I applaud our students, faculty, and staff for their efforts as we continue our journey of Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education in New Jersey and beyond.” “Rutgers GSE is dedicated to building inclusive communities, and accordingly, has developed significant and intentional partnership activities with New Jersey school districts and communities. The Conversation Café is one illustration of this work that provides opportunities for students and community members to build new social networks and foster intercultural understanding,” said Rutgers GSE Interim Dean Clark Chinn. “We are honored by the AACTE’s recognition of our work to bridge research and practice in communities and build relationships between diverse community members who are learning from each other.” The Conversation Tree Program is empowering for both community members and Rutgers students according to Mary Curran, Director of Local-Global Partnerships at the GSE. “One of the goals of the program is to develop the intercultural competence of Rutgers students,” stated Curran. “We want them to gain the skills to sympathetically interact with those for whom English is a new language. Thus, the program is mutually beneficial to both Rutgers students and community members.” n

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GS E EMP OWERS T HE NEX T G ENERAT IO N OF SO CIAL JU S T ICE EDU CATO R S : CO MMU NIT Y S CHO O L PAR T NER S HIP NET WO R K LEADER S S P OT LIG HT

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he most rewarding aspect of my work is when our students understand that we all have biases and when I am able to help them shift those biases so that they can help their students reach their potential.”

“Having a Rutgers GSE Partnership Leader is a rare gift. It is not often that a school district has a point person who directly liaisons between the schools and the university. Our Partnership Leader — Dr. Kedra Gamble — is very visible, supportive, and an amazing resource to help our future teachers get a better understanding of their place in the school community,” stated Dr. Scott Taylor, Superintendent of Highland Park School District. “She has learned about Highland Park, knows our values and expectations and can impart those to student teachers. The partnership has led to the district hiring a number of GSE students who have turned out to be phenomenal teachers in our district.” Partnership Leaders are the lynchpin of the GSE Community School Partnership Network (GSE-CSPN), according to Dr. Nora Hyland, Associate Dean & Faculty Director of Teacher Education at GSE. GSE-CSPN is an important component of the GSE’s Urban Social Justice Teacher Education Program. It is a select network of seven urban school districts that partner with the GSE to support the education of P-12 students and advance the practice of high quality teaching and learning for pre-service teachers. “Partnership Leaders build and develop our relationship with district personnel, identify cooperating teachers to work with our students, and also work with the districts on meeting their specific needs,” explained Hyland. “They are also leaders — envisioning and inventing ways in which educator preparation programs, school districts, and communities can work together to both prepare excellent teachers for urban schools and to create outstanding opportunities for the P-12 students in urban schools.” The GSE’s commitment to equity in education is what attracted Dr. Kedra Gamble to the role of Partnership Leader. “We know that although urban districts are high-needs communities, they are usually under-resourced, and it’s empowering to be able to change that with the GSE’s commitment to prepare educators with a social justice focus,” stated Gamble. “It is also empowering to help my students realize that urban communities have many strengths — families who are passionate about their children and their education, and children who have a real hunger for learning.” Dr. Maqueda Randall-Weeks is the Partnership Leader working with North Brunswick Township Public Schools. Randall-Weeks emphasizes that engaged and knowledgeable teachers are key to increased student achievement. “It is critical for students to trans-

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late theory into practice with clinical experience. The most rewarding aspect of my work is helping students bridge the gap between research, practice, and policy in education,” stated Randall-Weeks. Dr. Kisha Porcher, the Partnership Leader for the New Brunswick Public Schools (NBPS), always knew that she wanted to pursue a career in urban education, as she is a product of urban education herself. In her first year as an educator, she noticed that most teachers left urban schools shortly after joining. She realized that there were a lot of gaps in teacher preparation. She wanted to address that gap and this led her to the GSE. “I enjoy being an integral part of the village needed to prepare great educators. I teach our students to advocate for their students and have an asset not deficit mindset when working with diverse communities,” stated Porcher. She also works to connect administrators and teachers at NBPS to professional development opportunities at Rutgers. Partnership Leader Lisa Knox was a Principal in Newark Public Schools before she decided to pursue a career in higher education. “Our students will leave us and impact the lives of many students in their school districts. Working to shape the next generation of education leaders is both gratifying and very intense,” stated Knox. “The most rewarding aspect of my work is when our students understand that we all have biases and when I am able to help them shift those biases so that they can help their students reach their potential.” In addition to working with GSE pre-service teachers, Knox also worked to develop strategic plans to focus on the needs for each of the schools that she works with in Franklin. Daniel Loughran, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction at Franklin Township Public Schools (FTPS) underscored the aligned missions of GSE and FTPS. “We are a large and diverse district, and we require teachers who are committed to advancing equity in education. The partnership allows student teachers placed here to get experience working in the field, and helps our teachers learn new and innovative practices in education,” Loughran affirmed. “Partnership Leaders go above and beyond what is expected and are really invested in meeting the mission of both the GSE and our school district.” This year, Tasha Austin, Leslie Guarino, and Dr. Michelle Macchia joined the ranks of the Partnership Leaders’ team serving the school districts in Bound Brook, Neptune, and Rahway respectively. n


Standing (left to right): DR. KEDRA GAMBLE DR. MAQUEDA RANDALL-WEEKS MS. LESLIE GUARINO

Seated (left to right): MS. TASHA AUSTIN MS. LISA KNOX DR. KISHA PORCHER DR. MICHELLE MACCHIA

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GSE’ S CO MMU NIT Y S CHO O L PAR T NER S HIP NET WO R K ADVANCES EXCELLENCE AND EQ UIT Y IN EDU CAT IO N: MAKING A DIFFER ENCE IN THE NEW B R U NSWICK CO MMU NIT Y

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ith aligned visions focused on excellence and equity, GSE and New Brunswick public schools cultivate tranformative education leaders.

Rowen Kanj was a sophomore at Rutgers pursuing an engineering degree and tutoring in his spare time when he realized that his true passion was instructing and mentoring. He quickly switched over to pursue a degree teaching mathematics. “I love breaking down misconceptions about math. Students will often think that they are bad at math, but I really believe that with the right guidance, anyone can do math,” said Kanj. “The coolest part about teaching math for me is when a student thinks of a concept in a way that they hadn’t before and spontaneously says that ‘Math is cool!’ — I love that!” This past year, Kanj was placed as a student teacher at the New Brunswick Middle School — the New Brunswick Public Schools (NBPS) are part of the GSE’s Community School Partnership Network (GSE-CSPN). Launched in 2017, GSE-CSPN is a network of seven urban school districts that partner with the GSE to support the education of P-12 students and advance the practice of high quality teaching and learning for pre-service teachers and for students throughout the districts. “The partnership is a natural fit – not just geographically as we are so closely located with the GSE in New Brunswick but also in terms of the GSE and NBPS mission alignment,” stated Dr. Marnie McKoy, the Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources at NBPS. “The GSE prepares educators to Advance Excellence and Equity in Education and here at New Brunswick Public Schools, we prepare, inspire, and empower lifelong learners.” As the NBPS Partnership Leader, Dr. Kisha Porcher believes that the partnership is mutually beneficial to both the GSE and NBPS because GSE students develop hands-on experience working in urban schools committed to equity and excellence, and the school district works with GSE to develop a shared vision of teaching and teaching preparation. As one outcome, the GSE has placed many graduates in the urban districts where they did their student teaching. Dr. Porcher works with as many as 30 NBPS cooper-

ating teachers in the district who partner with GSE student teachers in the district. “It is vital for teacher education programs to work hand in hand with P-12 school districts — you can’t have one without the other,” stated Dr. Porcher. “Academia has traditionally worked in isolation from school districts, and this partnership is critical to bridging that gap between research and practice.” Ms. Shawn Gay was Kanj’s cooperating teacher at the New Brunswick Middle School this past year. “In Kanj, I met someone who is going to be a lifelong colleague. I enjoyed planning our lessons together and tag teaming while teaching. He gave me a new perspective on how to incorporate technology and 21st century skills into the classroom,” stated Ms. Gay. “I learned how to provide emotional support to students from Ms. Gay so as to create a safe space to voice ideas and experiment,” said Kanj. “Beyond the classroom, Ms. Gay knew the parents and communities of her students and their home life — she was invested in their success. I found that to be very inspiring.” “New Brunswick students participated in the Youth Participatory Action Research project this year at Rutgers, spearheaded by GSE’s Dr. Beth Rubin. The project teaches students to identify, investigate, and propose solutions to address problems in their communities which was very empowering for them,” said McKoy. “Dr. Rubin also met with our social studies and English teachers to share ideas about how to make curriculum relevant to students around issues they may be experiencing presently such as concerns around immigration while focusing on academics. This benefitted our school community tremendously.” All of the GSE’s partner districts are also part of an Advisory Council comprised of parent, teacher, and district representatives. Porcher explained, “This partnership empowers GSE student teachers to Advance Excellence and Equity in Education, and we want to ensure that we are also working collaboratively to meet the district’s needs.” n

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ROBERT ALLISON, Senior Director of Finance and Admisnistration

VALLARINE PAYTNER, Business Manager

TERRI BOLLA, Business Specialist

TRACY BUSH, Administrative Assistant for Business

AUDRY BURNETT, Personnel Manager

EVIE DUVERT, Public Relations Specialist

DONNA ZALESKI, Director of Development

MATTHEW WINKLER, Ed.D, Assistant Dean for Advisement

LISA KRUGER, Director of Teacher Education

MARIE PAVELCHAK, Senior Student Services Coordinator

TREVOR JOHNSON, Administrative Coordinator for Student and Academic Services

KENNETH TUFO, Program Coordinator for Student and Acedemic Services

ERICKA DIAZ, Administrative Assistant for Student and Academic Services

MELISSA FREEDMAN, Assessmnet Coordinator

TIFFANY MAYERS, Senior Administrative Assistant to the Dean

TANNAN WILSON, Admistrative Assistant for Learning and Teaching

COLLEEN MCDERMOTT, Admistrative Coordinator for Rose and Nicholas DeMarzo Chair in Education

DARREN CLARKE, Ed.D., Senior Director of Strategic Alliances and Online Programs

VALERIE WERSTLER, Associate Director, NIEER

AMY HORNBECK, Early Childhood Research Project Manager, NIEER

MICHELLE RUESS, Associate Director for Communications & Marketing, NIEER

CAROL CONTRERAS, Projgram Coordinator, NIEER

KARIN GARVER, Early Childhood Education Policy Specialist, NIEER

CHARLES WHITMAN, Assistant Research Project Coodinator, NIEER

ELISA VALLE, Assistant Research Project Coordinator, NIEER

VIVIAN ALLEN, Project Manager, CESP

JEANETTE MCCREARY, Assistant Director, CESP

HEATHER NGOMA, Alternate Route MARY ELLEN MORRIS, Alternate Route STACY YOUNG, Alternate Route Assistant 36 R U T G E R S G R A Program D U AT E SCHOO L O F E D U C A T I O N Director, CESP Director, CESP Coordinator, CESP


GEMMA JAYME, Admisistratve Assistant for Personnel

GORDON STANKAVAGE, Information Technology Manager

BRENT HORBATT, IT Systems Specilist

G S E ’ S

CHARLES BASDEN JR, Senior Academic Program Coordinator for Recrutment

NICOLE SYMONDS, Administrative Assistant for Educational Psychology

LORI CONNORS-TADROS, Senior Project Director, NIEER

MARC CEASAR, IT Support Analyst

S T E L L A R

AFSHEEN SHAMSI, Director of Communications and Marketing

S T A F F

A D VA N C I N G E X C E L L E N C E A N D E Q U I T Y I N E D U C AT I O N : G S E ’ S S T E L L A R S TA F F The GSE is celebrating over 95 years of achievements in Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education, which would not have been possible without the commitment, dedication, and accomplishments of our outstanding staff. The GSE staff go above and beyond the call of duty to advance our mission and our strategic priorities. Our Office of Administration and Personnel works every day behind the scenes to support the finances, grants, facilities, and human resources needs of the GSE. The Office of Student and Academic Services serves as our ambassadors in recruiting, advising, and meeting student needs in many different ways. The Office of Communications and Marketing engages in strategic storytelling to share our many successes with the broader community, and the Department of Development empowers the GSE to advance our strategic priorities. The Office of Local and Global Partnerships advances the GSE’s goal of equity here in New Jersey and across the world. The Office of Strategic Alliances builds the relationships necessary to further our goals. The Dean’s superb administrative team provides support at all levels to ensure that our team can continue to move forward to meet our mission. The staff of GSE’s five centers does a fantastic job of supporting the critical work of our centers. Thank you, GSE staff, for the many ways in which you support the GSE to Advance Excellence and Equity in Education! n

MARIEL ACEVEDO, Project Coordinator II, NIEER

LISA MULLIN, Program Coordinator, Center for Literacy Development

SHARON MASSO, Program Coordinator, Center for Literacy Development

KELLY CLARIDA, Project Coordinator, Center for Literacy Ddevelopment

JOSUE FALAISE, Director of Rutgers Institute OLIVIA WALKER, Administrative G S EStudent . R U T Achievement G E R S . E D U / 8 4 8 - 9 3 2Assistant - 3 2 3 2for Rutgers Institute37 for Improving for MARC CAESAR, IT Support Analyst Improving Student Achievement


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RUTGERS GSE RECEIVES $3M GIFT T O E S TA B L I S H T H E C H A R L E S A . D E M A R Z O A N D KEITH N. LAMB ENDOWED CHAIR IN E D U C AT I O N A L E Q U I T Y

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his gift speaks to our core educational mission of building our distinguished faculty. This endowed chair will demonstrate a profound impact in advancing educational equity in New Jersey and beyond.”

Rutgers GSE is pleased to announce a gift of $3 million from The Charles A. DeMarzo and Keith N. Lamb Fund to establish the Charles DeMarzo and Keith Lamb Endowed Chair in Educational Equity. With this endowed chair, GSE will recruit a distinguished education leader whose scholarship advances educational equity to help our school, communities, and university understand and improve the educational experiences of P-20 students who are underserved in America’s classrooms. “The leadership of Charles DeMarzo to advance excellence and equity in education is exemplary,” stated Rutgers University—New Brunswick Provost Wanda J. Blanchett. “This gift speaks to our core educational mission of building our distinguished faculty. This endowed chair will demonstrate a profound impact in advancing educational equity in New Jersey and beyond.” “We are grateful to Mr. Charles DeMarzo, his family, and his trustee Mr. Donald Bovee for this gift because empowering historically underserved communities is critical to addressing major world issues,” said GSE Interim Dean Clark Chinn, “and this endowed chair will

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empower GSE faculty to further our mission of Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education.” A New Jersey native, Charles A. DeMarzo graduated from the Rutgers School of Business in 1949. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Air Force for four years. Later, his career in sales led him to call California his home, and he retired there as vice president of sales and marketing for Lab Industries. He resided in San Francisco with his partner Keith N. Lamb for over 40 years. They traveled extensively on frequent trips abroad and were noted for their dinner and cocktail parties in a magnificently restored Pacific Heights mansion they saved from the wrecking ball. Mr. DeMarzo was also active in many charitable fundraising efforts and civic projects. Among his philanthropic interests were the American Cancer Society, Food For Thought, World Wildlife Fund, and the National Hospice Organization. To honor the memory of his parents, Charles DeMarzo also established the Rose and Nicholas DeMarzo Chair in Education at Rutgers GSE. He died in 2006. n


GSE.RUTGERS.EDU / 848-932-3232

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F A C U LT Y

H O N O R S

FA C U LT Y H O N O R S EDITORSHIPS: In addition to the many journal articles and texts published by our faculty, Rutgers GSE was home to several leading national journals in the past year:

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Dr. Wanda J. Blanchett: Lead Co-Editor of Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners

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Dr. W. Steven Barnett: Co-Editor in Chief of International Journal of Child Care and Education Policy

Dr. Alisa Belzer: Co-Editor of Adult Literacy Education: The International Journal of Literacy, Language, and Numeracy n n

Dr. Ravit Golan Duncan: Section Co-Editor of the Learning Section, Science Education

Dr. Ariana Mangual Figueroa and Dr. Beth Rubin: Associate Editors of Anthropology and Education Quarterly n

Dr. Carolyn Maher: Editor of The Journal of Mathematical Behavior, Elsevier, New York, and London n

Dr. Matthew Mayer: Associate Editor of School Psychology Quarterly

AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH ASSOCIATION (AERA) FELLOWS: n

Dr. W. Steven Barnett

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Dr. Gregory Camilli

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Dr. Clark A. Chinn

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Dr. Angela M. O’Donnell

AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION (APA) FELLOWS: n

Dr. Clark Chinn

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Dr. Caroline Clauss-Ehlers

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Dr. Angela O’Donnell

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Dr. Saundra Tomlinson-Clarke (2019)

PROMOTIONS:

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DR. MARY CURRAN

DR. ALISA BELZER

DR. DAKE ZHANG

Professor of Professional Practice, Learning and Teaching

Professor of Learning and Teaching

Associate Professor of Educational Psychology

R U T G E R S G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F E D U C AT I O N


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F A C U LT Y

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S T A F F

N E W FA C U LT Y & S TA F F FA C U LT Y :

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TA S H A A U S T I N

KARISHMA DESAI

NICHOLE GARCIA

LESLIE GUARINO

MICHELLE MACCHIA

Assistant Professor of Professional Practice

Assistant Professor of Educational Foundations

Assistant Professor of Higher Education

Assistant Professor of Professional Practice

Assistant Professor of Professional Practice

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S TA F F :

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CHARLES BASDEN JR.

K E L LY C L A R I D A

EVIE DUVERT

Senior Academic Program Coordinator, Recruitment

Project Coordinator, Center for Literacy Development

Public Relations Specialist

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J O S U E FA L A I S E

MELISSA FREEDMAN

AMY HORNBECK

Director of the Rutgers Institute for Improving Student Achievement

Assessment Coordinator

Early Childhood Research Project Manager, NIEER

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G E M M A J AY M E

SHARON MASSO

DONNA ZALESKI

Administrative Assistant for Personnel

Project Coordinator, Center for Literacy Development

Director of Development


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W H Y

W E

G I V E

For nearly a century, Rutgers GSE has been committed to Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education. This is truly embodied in the work of the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Endowed Chair, that advances diversity, equity, social justice, and effective teaching and learning. That is why we have supported the Samuel DeWitt Proctor Chair fund since its inception in 2002. Over the years, this outstanding Endowed Chair has attracted students who seek to advance efforts to understand and improve the educational experiences of P-20 students who are underserved in America’s classrooms, particularly in urban and rural areas. The late Dr. Proctor’s belief in Advancing Excellence and Equity in Education inspires us to invest in the future of students, particularly those from underrepresented communities because, like many, we stand on the shoulders of those who came before us.

—BERNICE & CARL VENABLE

Rutgers GSE 2018 Impact Report  
Rutgers GSE 2018 Impact Report