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but with countless mornings waking at dawn to beat treasure hunters at estate sales and junk yards; long days delivering place settings to the event planners and art directors who quickly caught wind of Casa de Perrin’s exclusive inventory; late nights reading ‘The Practical Book of Chinaware’ (Copyright 1936) to memorize china patterns and makers’ stamps. Solid relationships were built, and fragile Depression glass was broken. An interest in collecting became an obsession with the hunt, conveniently disguised as an exhilarating, challenging, and creatively

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satisfying endeavor. “This history of this stuff is incredible,” says Diana. An exuberant brunette, she could sell porcelain to Wedgewood himself and will not bat an eyelash when you suggest a duo of ponies be delivered to her backyard. Josh—a smidgeon more restrained than his wife but just barely—adds, “The more we learn about it, the more amazed we are. We started Casa de Perrin because we love collecting tableware, but now we can’t get enough about the role of it in history, about the stories it tells.” And their journeys have left them with more than

Rue Holiday Issue  

Rue Holiday Issue

Rue Holiday Issue  

Rue Holiday Issue

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