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RUCHI DATTANI ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


CONTENTS 01 AVIARY

BIRD RESIDENCE+VISITOR CENTER

02 MUSIC PAVILION OUTDOOR CONCERT HALL

03 VENICE TOWERS

TWIN SKYSCRAPERS IN MESTRE REGION OF VENICE

04 PATH STATION

TRAIN STATION WITH RESTAURANT & RETAIL

05 STUDENT HOUSING MARRIED GRADUATE STUDENT APARTMENTS

ART WORK


Architecture : spirit of place Architecture has always been about the experience for me. Experience that is enhanced in the context of function. A relentless process of iteration to make the user pause, and encounter the beauty of the moment. Architecture’s ubiqoutous presence is inescapable. I see it as an art of space making connected to the society, the atmosphere. the environment and the person. It is existential and theoretical. It connects and separates. It is spirtual and physical and I endeavour to materialize the spiritual through the physical. This portfolio is an exploration of spaces created to capture the spirit of place.


01 AVIARY

SECOND YEAR | INSTRUCTOR: JON SCHRAMM On top of the cliffs of Woodland Park in NJ among the woods sits the Aviary. This partially enclosed modern hut serves as housing for birds in need of care around the park and outside of it. The Aviary was built from wood steel and concrete to blend in with the existing context. The chosen materials wood and concrete are also symbolic of the materials a bird chooses to build its own nest. This helps the process of healing for the wounded birds. The aviary’s focus is the entrance space where the birds are held. The light pouring onto the aviary through the cages forms a nest like pattern on the ground. In addition to giving nest like feel to the adjacent spaces the dynamic of the seemingly random enclosures make the space more exciting for the occupants.


PROJECT TYPE: Institutional / Educational DATE: 2012 LOCATION: Rifle Camp Park- Woodland Park, New Jersey

Circulation Bird cage

Offices

Visitor Center

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

Separated from the rest of the woods with glass. The visitor’s also get views past the cliff.

Bird cage

Restrooms Gift shop Exhibition hall

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

Open to the views of the city skyline beyond the cliff.

Reclained unfinished wood The wood from the surrounding forest is used to build parts of the Aviary

SITE PLAN+ROOF PLAN

The program of the space consists of two main cages for the resident birds. The cages are separated by species of the bird that are brought in for treatment. The cages lead direclty into the visitor center that is only separated from the forest through glass. Right next to it is the exhibition hall with the views of the NYC skyline across the cliff. EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC


The exhibition hall is visually open to the forest. The openness of the hall is meant to allow the visitor to connect with the contextual setting.

LONGITUDNAL SECTION

The two main cages surround the entrance and meet on the top, forming a tunnel like entrance. The daylight filters through the cages onto the the aviary ground. The shadows formed on the surrounds the visitor with a nest-like feel. (see next page)

CROSS SECTION


02 MUSIC PAVILION SECOND YEAR | INSTRUCTOR: BRIAN DE LUNA

The Music Pavillion was designed after Steve Reich’s Wooden Block Music Piece. The music piece was entirely based off of two wooden pieces coming together to make a sound. This one sound was repeated throughout in layers and repitition at varying intervals to form the basis of the entire track. The hollow module was inspired by the elegance of the music piece. This module was replicated throughout to build the entire pavillion. When wind blows through the pavillion, the lightness of the component allows for the pavillion to seem as though it is dancing to the music piece.


PROJECT TYPE: Exploration / Installation DATE: 2012 LOCATION: Newark, New Jersey The component designed after the music piece was explored in different conditions of light. It was then mirrored horizontally and vertically to form the pavillion.

1: MODULE 2: MODULE DIAGRAM

MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS


03 VENICE TOWERS

COMPETITION : 1ST PLACE | COLLAB PARTNER: DARIO CATOZZI Venice is one of the most attractive regions of Italy. The history and the culture of the city is clearly evident from the food to the streets. Where it is important to maintain this eccentricity it is also important to develop with a fast moving pace of the world. The architecture of Venice is probably most beautiful within its own region but as the architecture continually keeps developing vertically so should architecture in a city like Venice. Designing a skyscraper in the outskirts of Venice could be one way to catch up with the progressing architecture around the world. The two skyscrapers are designed around the idea of pushing and pulling the floor plates in a way that facilitates the formation of public spaces. While designing a skyscraper the focus was on the interaction between the different floors. This move ensured the creation of double height public spaces.The remainder of the floors consisted of dwelling units. Both towers are meant to represent a change in the architectural landsape of Venice.


TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

PROJECT TYPE: Residentrial DESIGN DURATION: 2 weeks DATE: 2014 LOCATION: Venice (Mestre region), Italy

SITE PLAN : GROUND FLOOR

The green wall starts all the way at the top of skyscraper ends up in the green plaza on the bottom where the building first originates, while following the balconies throughout the pair of skyscrapers. The green wall is beneficial to the building because it brings down energy costs, temperature, reduces noise pollition and clarifies the air.

The main skyscraper consists of two functions, recreation and dwelling. The public recreational spaces are enclosed with clear glass and the dwelling units that call for more privacy are enclosed with tinted glass. The difference is evident in the elevation. The secondary skyscraper consists of various public spaces that serve cultural functions such as Museum Spaces, Libraries etc. Both buildings are designed in a way that they exist in perfect harmony while complimenting each other while giving a subtle nod to the beautiful coexistence of nature and architecture that is the city of Venice.

ELEVATIONS

SECTION


04 PATH STATION SECOND YEAR | INSTRUCTOR: ANGUS EADE

Harrison, New jersey is a fast developing city. It is situated just outside of Manhattan and provides quieter residential areas and an easy access for commuters that work in the city. The PATH Station at Harrison serves as the primary transportation for these commuters. The ever increasing number calls for a replacement for the existing station. The new PATH Station however, is built to attract more residents. This particular station was built around the fast paced commuter. The circulation of the design was meant to make the commuter pause and experience the setting. This was done through the use of ramps instead of direct stair to the concourse. The essence of the design lies in the spaces formed as a result of the overhead canopy wrapped around the juxtaposed polygonal forms. The design also involves manipulating space through compression and expansion throughout the path to the concourse to play with the commuters expectation. The commuter k enters the building through the wide semi-open stairs that narrows into the ramp leading upto the completely open concourse. The alternating feeling of enclosure leading to the exposure is meant to make the occupants sense the freedom of the waiting area.


PROJECT TYPE: Urban Planning DATE: 2013 LOCATION: Harrison, New Jersey

Steel Canopy Roof

The PATH station was designed to be a landmark. This was achieved through the canopy roof wrapping itself around the unconventional polygonal forms. During the day, the suns position changes with respect to the station and creates various conditions of shadows. At night. the light within the station forms a rich experience for the passengers. Viewing ramp

1: SITE PERSPECTIVE: DAY 2: SITE PERSPECTIVE: NIGHT

Station Concourse

Kitchen Retail Spaces

Ramp to Concourse

Restaurant 1: EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC 2: MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS


The program primarily consists of commercial spaces and waiting areas. The lower level consists of the commercial spaces - restaurant + kitchen and retail spaces. The restaurant is connected to the station through the roof canopy that folds to make the floor. The kitchen and the restaurant are positioned in a way that allows for the customers to look into the kitchen without directly interfering the restaurant staff. The upper level consists of the station’s primary waiting area with a ramp leading to the views of the city. The roof canopy fans out the widest at the primary waiting area, thereby creating a variety of patterns through light and shadow as the day goes by.

Viewing ramp

INTERIOR RENDER: RAMP TO STATION UPPER LEVEL PLAN

Concourse

The entrance leads to two different avenues. One divides into the retail spaces leading upto the restaurant and another path leads to the concourse. The path to the train was intentionally made unconventional. The entry stair is connected to the concourse via a ramp that lets the occupant experience the drama of the light formed by the steel canopy structure above.

Kitchen Retail Spaces

LONGITUDNAL SECTION

TRAIN STATION SKETCH

Restaurant

Kitchen Retail Spaces

LOWER LEVEL PLAN


05 STUDENT HOUSING THIRD YEAR | INSTRUCTOR: MARGARET SANTOS

The student housing apartments are designed for Rutgers married graduate level students. Throughout the entire building the goal was to provide the occupants with open spaces with abundance of natural light and conversation inducing design. The building consists of duplexes and single height apartments. The mixture of two types of housing provide for a unique opportunity to let natural light inside the core circulation of the building.


PROJECT TYPE: Mixed-use Residential DATE: 2013 LOCATION: Newark, New Jersey LOBBY LEVEL PLAN

The site strategy dealt with bringing in a major street walkway into the site while providing it with a destination – the plaza space. This generated a footprint for the location of my building. The peculiar shape of the footprint then served as a starting point for the language of the building. The building program consists of a Kindergarten on the lower level, study rooms on each floor, four open public balconies, a swimming pool and a gym along with double height and single height apartments integrated throughout.

FLOOR PLATES

DOUBLE HEIGHT UNITS

SINGLE HEIGHT UNITS

Walkways created

Circulation

Building footprint determined

Entry points

“Green walkway” extended

Site

Existing Buildings

SECOND LEVEL PLAN

THIRD LEVEL PLAN

1: SITE DIAGRAMS 2: SITE PERSPECTIVE

FOURTH LEVEL PLAN

FIFTH LEVEL PLAN

SIXTH LEVEL PLAN


Infiniti pool + Roof Garden

Single height unit

Total: 82,434 sq ft

Shared: 11,540 sq ft

Private : 70 % Shared : 14 % Public : 16 %

Balcony : 62 % Study rooms : 20 % Game rooms : 18 %

Public: 13,189 sq ft

Private: 57,703 sq ft

Kindergarten : 76 % Gym : 13 % Pool Deck : 11 %

Duplex Units : 43 % Single Ht Units : 57 %

Shared balcony

Shared balcony

Double height unit

CROSS SECTION PERSPECTIVE

LONGITUDNAL SECTION


GROUND EDGE CONDITIONS

EDGE CONDITIONS THROUGHOUT

Throughout the project, the focus has been on producing various conditions to allow the daylight into the building. This was achieved through laying out duple units and single height units in such a way that facilitates this agenda.

Above are some sketches studying the various conditions that have been achieved through this technique. These conditions also helped create public spaces throughout the building. The public spaces serve the collaborative functions.

INTERIOR PLAYGROUND [KINDERGARTEN]

The apartment consists of a Kindergarten at the lobby level. To accommodate for the sunlight and some open spaces in the kindergarten the above floors are designed in a way that allows maximum levels of sunlight into the kindergarten.

INITIAL MODEL PHOTOGRAPHS


ARTWORK 2008 - PRESENT


TIME AND HEART

OM - THE INTERPRETATION

BLUE

HERITAGE


Architecture arouses sentiments in man. The architect’s task therefore, is to make those sentiments more precise. -Adolf Loos


UNDERGRAD WORK _ M.ARCH I 2017