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YOUR RESOURCE FOR THE CREATION OF EDUCATIONAL AND ENTERTAINING EXPERIENCES AND PLACES

COMPREHENSIVE LISTING OF THE MEMBERS OF THE THEMED ENTERTAINMENT ASSOCIATION

ORIGINAL ARTICLES BY INDUSTRY LEADERS EXPLORING TRENDS AND INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS

2011

THEMED ENTERTAINMENT ASSOCIATION

ANNUAL & DIRECTORY

REPRESENTING THE CREATORS OF COMPELLING PLACES AND EXPERIENCES


ANNUAL

2011 TEA DIRECTORY

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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2011 TEA

&

ANNUAL DIRECTORY

Executive Editor Editor/Ad Sales Graphic Design Advertising Sales Directory Management Member Relations Special Events and Relations European Assistance Printing

TEA-Themed Entertainment Association 150 East Olive Ave Suite 306

Burbank, CA 91502

www.teaconnect.org

Networking with the future: The next 20 years TEA President Rick Rothschild, FAR OUT! Creative Direction

W

ith the Themed Entertainment Association’s 20th anniversary arriving on 11 Nov 2011, the coming year certainly offers a reason for celebrating the many past accomplishments of our association as well as provides the perfect opportunity to chart our course for the next 20 years. With the harsh economic realities of recent times, we’ve all found ourselves reflecting on what the future may provide and adapting our business plans accordingly. For many, it has been a time for establishing new visions and directions as well as reaffirming the underlying core strengths we each have built our businesses from. As THE association built from the collective energy of our industry, our association’s collective challenge is no different. It is clearly the perfect opportunity for the membership of the TEA to reconnect with its core strengths as well as broaden its usefulness as we all move towards an even more globally interwoven future. At its heart, the TEA is a wonderfully eclectic mix of kindred spirits. We are more like a tribe than a guild. We don’t share common disciplines as much as we share common passion. The opportunity to network in direct and personal ways with such a diversity of talent and skill sets is central to what unites us and forms the foundation of our association. We are all storytellers. At the heart of great storytelling is the ability to effectively convey not just thoughts and facts, but emotion in an honest and meaningful way that connects our diverse audience with the same passion we as storytellers have for the stories we chose to tell. Our collective passion is also at the center of our association’s reason d’être. What brings us together, unites us, has brought us together and will continue to be shared by all of us is our common recognition that what we all do requires an extraordinary collection of talents and skills that none of us alone possess. That by collaborating with one another in an honest, trusting and open manner, united by a common vision, we are collectively capable of creating the extraordinary, time and again. Our collective challenge for ever-improving our association is to work together to discover and implement exciting, meaningful and creative new ideas and programs to stimulate, educate and expand the TEA globally as well as invite the next generation of our industry’s creative dreamers and doers to join us. As we move forward through the next year, let us celebrate the value of this wonderful network we’ve shared for the past 19 years. Let us continue to enjoy what has been built by a dedicated membership, united in common purpose as storytellers and makers of compelling places and experiences. As creative talented professional colleagues who share a wide and wonderful diversity, let us dedicate our collective energies and commitment to making sure that we ever improve and purposefully expand the powerful network we all share. As we head towards our association’s 20th anniversary this coming year, as well as the exciting opportunities coupled with the continuing challenges the second decade of the 21st century will provide us all, let us draw strength from the value we share as members of the Themed Entertainment Association.

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1.818.843.8497

Gene Jeffers Judith Rubin Christian Hope & Meghalee Saikia Judith Rubin Ann Gallagher Brian Szarks Stefanie Cosman Annika Oetken CRESCENT PRINTING COMPANY 1001 Commercial Court Onalaska, WI 54650 1.800.658.9032 ©2011 all rights reserved

TEA - A Global Alliance of Storytellers Gene Jeffers, TEA Executive Director

S

torytelling is what connects TEA members and their projects. Through their collective efforts, amazing places and experiences are being created every day, ranging from museum exhibits to massive theme parks, from corporate brand lands to educational environments, from restaurants and retail to zoos and aquariums. Wherever there is a story to tell, you most likely will find TEA members at work. The directory pages in this book tell a story as well, or really, more than 650 stories, about our members and their capacities to deliver the products and services you may need to realize your project. Abbreviated, condensed to fit on these pages, and accessible with more details and updates on our website (www.TEAConnect.org), the story of each TEA member is as unique and compelling as the projects they create. These are people and organizations you should know and know about, and that is the purpose of the Themed Entertainment Association – helping to connect talent, skills, and expertise with project needs worldwide. Owners, Developers, Operators If you have a story to tell through a physical space or a special event, if you want to reach your guests in a memorable, entertaining, educational or exciting manner, then you need TEA. As an association, TEA exists to help our members connect with each other, and more importantly, with clients, developers, owners and others who need exceptional creative talent to realize their vision of compelling guest experiences. You can find it all here, in these pages, from feasibility experts to master planners, from legal consultants ultants to t scenic designers and fabricators, from AV integrators and lighting designers signers tto acoustic consultants and control system manufacturers. This directory ory is only on one of the many ways our association can help you find the right creative eative team tea for your needs. Creative Talent and Vendors If you feel you have the potential ential to contribute to one of o the most exciting industries in the world, if you feel el your skills, products produ and expertise can help owners and developers realize their visions, then you belong in the TEA. We are a competitive, cooperative, collaborative alliance of firms from all corners of the globe working on projects in all corners of the globe. The work is special, engaging, challenging, and demanding, and if you feel you, too should be included in the pages of this directory in the future, contact TEA to discuss the many ways we can connect you to an international industry that requires the best people and solutions. Projects of the Future The need to engage visitors and guests, to create compelling places and experiences, will only grow stronger in the year ahead. The competition for the public’s time, attention and resources will only grow more intense. Fundamentally, TEA’s mission is to encourage, support, connect and make accessible the world’s great talents and capacities to create unique, story-based places and events. Whether you have a project to build or a talent to sell, TEA can help you realize your ambitions.


2011 TEA ANNUAL

5


Building Blocks

Buzz Price’s Legacy: The Art and Science of Economic Feasibility Studies for Themed Entertainment Projects By Lesley Morisetti

S

ome 25 years ago, soon after I joined The Tussauds Group, I was handed a report assessing the potential to roll out Madame Tussauds Exhibitions in 15 European and North American cities. The report followed a simple logic, with a strong focus on the available markets for each city, the existing attraction context in the city and an assessment of the opportunity which was rooted in the reality of the market penetration rates and operating performance achieved by similar attractions elsewhere. That report was my introduction to Economics Research Associates (ERA - now Economics at AECOM) and the art of the economic feasibility study. The birth of attraction feasibility analysis Whilst visitor attractions have existed for many centuries, the development of a formal, independent process to evaluate their viability is relatively new. In 1953, (about three decades before I saw my first ERA report) the late Harrison “Buzz� Price was working for the economics division of Stanford Research Institute and was given an assignment to evaluate the potential for a new type of visitor attraction. The client was Walt Disney and the project was a theme park based on Disney’s cartoon characters, a new concept which featured a host of what were then revolutionary ideas for attraction development. Buzz adapted and applied established feasibility methodologies from other industries, and the attraction economic feasibility study was born.

years, explains, “Buzz identified problematic issues with regard to attraction development, such as how many people might visit, and then applied intuitive mathematical procedures to arrive at answers, such as calculating market penetration rates.� Left, right and congenial Price’s attraction feasibility studies – of which he did more than 3,000 over the course of his career - were a balance of science (statistics and metrics) and art (judgement based on experience and wisdom). Through ERA, and later the Harrison Price Company, he trained many consultants in attraction feasibility metrics. He sought to employ individuals capable of providing the independent economic analysis required by the investors, but also able to inform the creative process and work alongside the master planners and designers. As he stated in his book, Walt’s Revolution by the Numbers, “We were after both left- and right-brain and congeniality in-between.� Jack Rouse, founder of JRA, explains the importance of the economic evaluation to the design process: “The economic opinion needs to work as a team with the design, operations and developer opinion. Problems can occur further down the design and implementation stage if the economic appraisal process does not stay close to the project as it develops.� Indeed, it was not just fellow consultants who were trained by Buzz Price. Working closely with attraction operators, developers, master planners and design companies meant that they all became familiar with the metrics and terminology he had created and by the time that I read my first ERA report, the methodologies that it used had become widely accepted as the industry standard. The emphasis on destination attractions affects feasibility When I joined the London office of ERA in 2002, the core processes in undertaking an attraction feasibility study were very similar to Buzz’s original, and this remains the case today. The primary role of an economic feasibility study for the development or the expansion of a visitor attraction is still to answer three questions: ‡ ‡

,VWKHDWWUDFWLRQGHYHORSPHQWĂ&#x20AC;QDQFLDOO\YLDEOHJLYHQWKHSURposed concept and the selected location? :KDWVFDOHFDSDFLW\VKRXOGWKHDWWUDFWLRQEHEXLOWWR WKHÂśGHVLJQGD\¡ LQRUGHUWRVDWLVI\WKHH[SHFWHGGHPDQG" ´<HVLIÂľ²DUHWKHUHDPHQGPHQWVWRWKHFRQFHSWORFDWLRQHWF ZKLFKZRXOGJLYHWKHGHYHORSPHQWDJUHDWHUFKDQFHRIVXFcess?

By 1958 Buzz had set up his own consultancy firm (ERA), and went on to a wide range of other attraction studies both commercial and not-for-profit. Bob Rogers, Chairman of BRC Imagination Arts, says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buzz was perfect for his time. In an era when our industry was being invented, Buzz served our industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest dare-takers. He did the economic, location and sizing studies that shaped our major attractions. He was a master of the possible. His approach was always â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Yes, if,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; rather than â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;No, because,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and he found the economic possibilities that could make the dreams come true.â&#x20AC;?

However, as the attraction industry has matured, there are changes such as consolidation of ownership and shifts in funding sources, that have influenced the needs and requirements of clients.

Buzzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studies were rigorous in their statistical analysis, but the mathematics behind the metrics were relatively simple. Nick Winslow, who worked with Price for many

Even in the relatively early days of working with Disney there was a realization that it was better to sell a guest seven days rather than seven hours.

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Â&#x2021;


ditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note

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+DUULVRQ´%X]]Âľ3ULFH ognized as the pioneer in the field of theme parks, resort and leisurerecreation project feasibility. He got off to a good start in 1953 when Walt and Roy O. Disney chose him to study and recommend the best location for building Disneyland. He also became a specialist in worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fairs, and his 1994 article on how to go about planning and hosting a world expo appears in this issue. Buzz never completely retired - and over the past several years his stature grew as he helped pack the house in popular sessions at IAAPA (organized by Bob Rogers) where he was a featured speaker along with other Disney legends. He received many honors in the course of a stellar career. When TEA first presented the Thea Awards in 1994, there was a single recipient - for lifetime achievement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and that recipient was Buzz Price. At the next Thea Awards Gala in March 2011, TEA will further celebrate the life and contributions of Harrison Price. -- J.R.

As Ray Braun of Economics at AECOM says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;There has been a shift from free-standing theme parks to building destinations. The theme park acts as the catalyst to drive volume, but the development requires the cash flow from hotels, retail and entertainment to make the project viable.â&#x20AC;? As a result, there is a requirement for feasibility consultants to understand the economics of complementary land uses and public private partnerships to provide a context for attraction development. Applying the reality check As the entry costs for attraction development grow, the need to provide realistic feasibility assessments becomes ever more important. Commissioning a feasibility study does not guarantee that a project business plan will be rubberstamped as viable. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes, if â&#x20AC;? role of the feasibility consultant at times has to become a â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, becauseâ&#x20AC;? one, to inform clients and investors early in the development process of the challenges that the development faces. As Jim Higashi of Management Resources explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clients are passionate about their projects and as a result may have expectations of return on investment which are not feasible. The task of operations consultants is considerably simpler if the attendance and income numbers that they have to base their calculations on have already been validated by an economic feasibility study.â&#x20AC;? The advent of the computer and the Internet enable levels of analytical analysis and data access which would have been unthinkable when Buzz started out. Tools such as spreadsheets, GIS mapping systems, psychographic analyses all allow consultants to provide more iterative and deeper analysis. However, as John Robinett of Economics at AECOM points out, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tools are great, but technology cannot be allowed to drive the answer in isolation. There is still a need for long-term experience to allow sensible judgements to be made. Similarly, the Internet opens up access to worldwide statistics, but this alone cannot replace the insight and sensitive data which can be gained from a faceto-face interview with a local expert â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the need to get on the ground and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;kick the dirtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; remains.â&#x20AC;? Feasibility analysis in emerging markets Over the past decade there has been a growth in attraction developments in Asia and the Middle East, and to a lesser extent in Central and Eastern Europe:

markets with different cultures and, in many cases, limited experience of many types of visitor attraction concept. For clients developing in these markets there is frequently a concern that using lessons from established markets will ignore the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;local effectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and as a result underestimate the potential of their project. Nikki Nolan of SBM Consulting explains, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Analysts had to ask themselves â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;is empirical evidence gleaned from existing attractions in Western cultures applicable?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Proprietary research and new forms of market qualification, and other supplementary data analysis are required.â&#x20AC;? Experience indicates that people are people and the desire for family experiences is similar all round the world. David Camp of Economics at AECOM explains this with his 80:20 rule. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eighty percent of what people do for leisure is the same the world over (going out with friends, having fun, meals etc). Global trends and factors can be used to consider these. But there is a 20 percent local factor that can make or break a project â&#x20AC;&#x201C; local behaviour patterns, family makeup, religious or social factors etc. We work on the quantitative comparable data for the 80 percent and then layer in the qualitative local factors for the 20 percent.â&#x20AC;? New methodologies A number of new methodologies are being developed to further help assess â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;localâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; effects. For example, Duncan Campbell, New Business Strategy Director of Merlin Entertainments, has worked on strategies that incorporate consumer research to identify the relative appeal of the Merlin concepts across different cultures. Vision XS has researched the psychographics of leisure across geographic markets to consider how the appeal of attractions might vary by culture and has developed a model based approach to evaluating the visitor experience delivered by new concepts . Both methodologies are being used in conjunction with the more traditional penetration rate methodology for assessing the potential for a new attraction in a new market. Undoubtedly feasibility studies must continue to evolve over time, supported by new technologies and consumer insights and driven by shifts in client, concept and location requirements. But for the alumni of Harrison â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buzzâ&#x20AC;? Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school of attraction feasibility studies, amongst which I am happy and proud to include myself, the legacy of Buzz and the metrics and terminology that he developed will remain at the heart of such studies for many years to come.

Lesley Morisetti (lesley.morisetti@lm-associates.com) is Director of LM Associates, providing economic and research consultancy services to the attractions industry. She has 26 years experience in the attractions and entertainment industry, through both operational and consultancy roles. Her areas of expertise include strategic and business planning for attractions, feasibility studies for new developments, pricing and revenue management, concept review and development and market research management. Morisetti was previously a Director of the London office of the Economics Practice of AECOM ( formerly Economics Research Associates/ERA). During her eight years there, she led a wide range of projects across the UK, Europe and the Middle East and North Africa, for both the private and public sectors. Prior to joining ERA, she worked for The Tussauds Group from 1984 until 2001.

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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Building Blocks

HOw Carnegie Mellonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Entertainment Technology Center Cultivates our next Generation of Storytellers By Don Marinelli

I

t was 1998 when Carnegie Mellon University brought together a professor from the School of Drama (me) and combined him with this young, charismatic professor from the School of Computer Science (the late Randy Pausch). As the right brain/left brain components of the revolutionary Carnegie Mellon Entertainment Technology Center (ETC), we created a two-year graduate program for what is sometimes called the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dream Fulfillment Factoryâ&#x20AC;?: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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The SATE parallel As it turns out, the basics of our curriculum mirror the elements of SATE, TEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual conference exploring Storytelling + Architecture + Technology = Experience. Storytelling All ETC students learn that storytelling is a craft. They must comprehend â&#x20AC;&#x153;Climactic Plot Structureâ&#x20AC;? and learn the elements of the New Poetics, comprised of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;oldâ&#x20AC;? Poetics of Aristotle (plot, character, theme, diction, rhythm, and spectacle); and the poetics of interactivity as defined by Janet Murray in her seminal text, Hamlet on the Holodeck: Immersion; agency/navigation; and transformation. All ETC students take Improvisational Acting as it embodies both non-linear narrative and team building. Yet the focus is always on how technology facilitates story. It is important though that we teach the story behind story: the psychological and philosophical underpinnings of story. We stress that storytelling is an embodiment of the following attributes: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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Architecture The digital world has given us significant architectural analogies to both the real and virtual worlds. For instance, within the realm of digital media, architecture has a mathematical basis in the form of polygons. Polygons are the molecules of virtual 8

2011 TEA ANNUAL

space and like molecules they can be combined to form various shapes with specific properties. Polygon quantity enhances verisimilitude (high polygon count versus low polygon count.)


Virtual architecture is anatomical in that it sports a â&#x20AC;&#x153;skeletalâ&#x20AC;? wireframe foundation upon which is laid a â&#x20AC;&#x153;musculatureâ&#x20AC;? of texture, color, light, reflection qualities, and detail. Walls are created via collision detection algorithms. This establishes a truth that any quantum physicist would relish, namely, that mass is essentially an illusion.

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Meanwhile, the ETC has made it a point to fashion a physical space reminiscent of the finest themed environment. We opted for the metaphor of a spaceship (with students boldly going where no one has gone before), and have decorated our space accordingly. Many other metaphors and stories also come to life within the ETC as we have one diorama dedicated exclusively to Batman, another to famous cinema robots, along with myriad other representations of famous (and infamous) entertainment forms, initiatives, locations, characters, and such. Technology The ETC embraces the development of unique entertainment platforms; re-engineering existing platforms (multi-touch, VR, caves, etc); animation, graphics, enhanced rendering techniques and more. We are also very interested in developing new technologies and over the years have created digital puppeteering software; synthetic Interview technology; and have been a long-time developer for the Panda3D open source game and animation engine created originally by Disney.

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The newest technology trends of which we are interested and involved include: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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We try to instill humility in our students when it comes to technology, encouraging them to observe how technology is used rather than prescribe how it should be used. Experience In Building Virtual Worlds, the class Randy Pausch created, computer science becomes a performing art. Students must create five interactive virtual worlds, the best of which worlds are compiled into a BVW Show that for many is the high point of the semester.

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Whereas so many young people today have lived varied lives virtually we also need to make sure they replicate this sense of adventure corporeally. In other words, force them outside and into adventures that establish an experiential vocabulary (hiking/ biking/horseback riding, spelunking, whitewater rafting, paintball, ocean cruisesâ&#x20AC;Ś) These trips reintroduce danger and adventure into experience. Equally important, they require an artistic/creative interpretation that must be shared with everyone and which will be posted online. Students also participate in an annual West Coast trip to visit myriad companies engaged in the videogame, animation, post-production, and location-based entertainment industries.

Don Marinelli (â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Tornadoâ&#x20AC;?) is Professor of Drama and Arts Management at Carnegie Mellon University and Executive Producer of the Entertainment Technology Center (www.etc.cmu.edu). As a young hippie, he wanted to be an actor or a rock star. He majored in Drama and eventually got a doctorate in theatre history, literature, and criticism and went into teaching. Tiring of his routine as a theatre professor at Carnegie Mellon, he offered his services to the School of Computer Science. This led to his alliance with the late computer science professor Randy Pausch (author of the critically acclaimed The Last Lecture) and the founding of the ETC. The ETC brings artists and technologists together to work on substantive, real-world projects combining the latest digital media technologies with myriad artistic, educational, and entertainment efforts. It has branch campuses in Silicon Valley (California) and Osaka, as well as dual degree arrangements with universities based in Australia, Korea, Mexico, and Singapore. Marinelliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book, The Comet and the Tornado, about cofounding the ETC with Pausch, was published in the spring of 2010 by Sterling Innovation, a division of Barnes & Noble.

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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The Integrated Attraction

he New Audiences

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China’s “Sunshine” Generation By Christian Lachel

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EA and AECOM sa said it best in the 2009 Global Attraction Attendance Report – the future of our industry is in Asia and, more specifically, China. For starters Chinese audiences have just experienced two of the greatest events ever produced anywhere in the world. The Beijing Olympics in 2008 and the Expo 2010 Shanghai have enlightened Chinese audiences to a new level of engagement. High tech displays, immersive projections and exhibitions of every shape and form have changed what the Chinese audiences will expect from future attraction visits.

Other experiences have also changed what Chinese now expect. The recent success of Avatarr has left audiences wanting and demanding more from their film experiences, especially 3D. The remarkable rise of social networking, media creation and video games has led people to expect high levels of interactivity and participation. And soon Shanghai will welcome the Walt Disney Company. The Shanghai Disneyland will be MORE of everything – more spectacular, more immersive, more interactive, and more entertaining. Disney knows that it must push its Imagineers to the limit, creating a park “like nothing else on earth” to compete for the Chinese audiences. There is a NEW audience emerging in China. The “sunshine” generation, as they are called, believes anything is possible and the world is full of possibility. This is the audience of our future and we must deliver experiences that inspire, entertain, educate, fascinate and appeal to them. For the Information and Communications Pavilion presented by China Mobile and China Telecom at the Expo 2010 Shanghai, BRC moved beyond looking at the generic statistics of the Chinese audience and the broad information supplied by the Expo Bureau. Instead we travelled throughout Shanghai and China meeting everyday people. We engaged them up close and personally. We went into their homes. We interviewed them, often over a cup of tea. We

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met young people, great-grandparents, and every generation in between. What we found was an audience that was profoundly shaped by technology, individual dreams and an overwhelming sense of optimism for the future. There is no looking back in China, although cultural traditions are still an important part of holidays and business. We saw a cultural shift that is bringing forth a new level of excitement. We saw a huge audience seeking new experiences, products and services. Younger people have more expendable income than their parents did growing up. They are more educated and they ask the question “How will we shape the World?” This is a society on the verge of greatness and they know it. It’s a mistake to treat them like one large mass market demographic. During our home visits, we were pleasantly surprised by their openness in sharing their daily lives with us. They were eager to share their ideas and dreams for the future. They wanted to convey how they used technology to stay in touch with family, friends and people around the world. There are over 800 million mobile phone sub-

©BRC Imagination Arts, INC.

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The Integrated Attraction

scribers in China and over 500 million people using the Internet and social media sites like qq.com everyday to stay in touch, watch media and play games. Everyone is engaged with technology, old and young. One of my favorite experiences came from a multi-generational family visit. As the family shared their personal stories and interests, Grandpaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mobile phone rang. Then his OTHER mobile phone rang. He was able to chat on one, text on the other and continue our conversation. Grandpa had to be in his mid-seventies. When he finished I asked him why he had two phones. Simple, he needed one for his friends and one for his family. He loved being in touch, and had no problem juggling the demands of two devices. We learned valuable lessons from our home visits, personal interviews and the dream workshops we conducted. They helped us define the goals of the project and identify what would connect with our target audience for the world expo. We realized that the emotional story must be delivered in their hands and in their hearts. Our deeper understanding of the dreams and desires of the Chinese audiences helped us design and produce a unique pavilion experience that was both inspiring and personal. We applied mass customization to experience design by combining state-of-the-art immersive digital media, environments and tactile effects, with a personal interactive mobile device and wireless network technologies. This created a shared full-immersion story with personal interaction and with a high hourly capacity:

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The result was a pavilion experience that emotionally connected with the Chinese audiences in a personal way. The Information and Communications Pavilion at Expo 2010 Shanghai was a smash hit with kids and families. The Pavilion created a unique emotional connection with this very important audience in China and inspired them to Dream Big. What remains true is that you must start with emotional storytelling and engagement. The NEW audience is seeking unique types of experiences and personal engagement. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be reminded of old traditions or symbols from Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past. They also donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want a Western only reference point. Their identity is a unique mash-up of personal experience and collective global influences. This is an exciting time to be working in China and the possibilities are limitless. Just ask the next generation of dreamers. The Chinese â&#x20AC;&#x153;sunshineâ&#x20AC;? generation is the rising star in the East.

Christian Lachel (clachel@brcweb.com), ICP Pavilion Creative Director and Vice President, BRC Imagination Arts, has worked extensively on BRC projects throughout China and has spent the last three years focused on Expo 2010 Shanghai, providing creative assistance for a variety of pavilions including the China National Pavilion, USA Pavilion and SAIC-GM Pavilion. Christian led the creative team for the Information and Communications Pavilion from tender through production. Christian is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council, a LEED accredited professional, and a past board member of the Society of Environmental & Graphic Design. He occasionally teaches courses in Experience and Environmental Design at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA, where he graduated with honors. His life and work have been further enriched by his training experience with the United States Navy and Special Warfare Leadership.

AudioVisual Consulting

KAHANER RESEARCH

Lighting for Architectural & Live Events

MARKET RESEARCH/COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS/RESEARCH ON DEMAND

Theatre & Facility Consulting

S P E C I A L I Z I N G I N T H E L E I S U R E T I M E I N D U S T RY

TRACY A. KANAHE R 922 14TH STREET STE. 20 9 SANTA MONICA, CA 9040 3 P 310.451.062 4 KanaherR@ aol.com

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858-456-6395 info@n-e-d.com n-e-d.com ENTERTAINMENT design inc

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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New Market Realities

The New Audiences AN New Generation of Support for Space Exploration & NASA By Matthew Solari “The audience is changing. Who are they? What do they want?” The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex had a challenge – how do they engage and win over a new, younger audience? These guests have almost no emotional connection to NASA. Most were born 2-3 decades after the first moon landing. To solve this riddle, the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex called upon long-time collaborator BRC Imagination Arts. The KSCVC wanted to produce an educational attraction that would inspire new generations of explorers to support and participate in the future of space exploration. The result is an innovative, immersive, breakthrough learning environment called “Exploration Space: Explorers Wanted.” BRC did an inventory of the attractions at the Visitor Complex, and discovered why young people weren’t drawn to the place. The KSCVC campus of exhibitions and attractions celebrates NASA’s iconic achievements from early space flight to the Shuttle era. These are awesome achievements to be sure, but they are all about the past. The younger audience walks away with the message, “The golden days of the space program have already happened…and you missed it.” That is hardly inspiring to a seventh grader. To make matters worse, the Space Shuttle era was ending in 2011, and no clear vision was emerging for humankind’s next steps into space.

©BRC Imagination Arts, INC.

©BRC Imagination Arts, INC.

©BRC Imagination Arts, INC.

The BRC team began researching this new generation of digital natives. Our breakthrough came from a surprising place…within NASA itself. We stumbled upon a presentation on the social networking site SlideShare. com. It was created by a small group of young NASA scientists and engineers. They were frustrated. They felt their insights were being ignored by the establishment. Their presentation was dazzling – a Rosetta Stone to help us translate our project goals into a dynamic, immersive, interactive, participatory experience that makes the visitor the hero of the journey: The concept of top-down, one-way communication is dead. Don’t tell us what you want us to hear or what you want us to do. Engage us in the FRQYHUVDWLRQ/HWXVEHDSDUWRIÀQGLQJWKHVROXWLRQ/HWXVGLVFRYHULWIRU ourselves. Make it fun. This is a generation that is: ‡ Attracted to large social movements ‡ Comfortable with diversity and globalization ‡ Connecting with people in new and distinctive ways ‡ Educated and entertained through interactive experiences ‡ Focused on personal success.

©BRC Imagination Arts, INC.

Every design decision for “Exploration Space” was measured against the expectations of this audience. Instead of telling them what to look at and where to go, we created a free-choice learning environment that guests could explore at their own pace. Immersed in light, color, sound and energy, “Exploration Space” transports you instantly to Mars, the moon or other worlds. The presentation uses largescale digital projections, multi-dimensional exhibits and dynamic interactive experiences that invite you to be a part of the future of space exploration.

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New Market Realities

CONSTRUCTION SERVICES C R EATI NG I NTER I OR A N D EX TER I OR ENV I R ONM EN T S

©BRC Imagination Arts, INC.

Content is delivered mainly through large-scale visual media that uses very little text. Visitors are drawn into the story. Rather than presenting facts and data, this presentation asks questions and presents possibilities. Where should we go? How will we get there? What are the dangers and risks of living in space? Every 30 minutes the entire gallery explodes into an immersive show environment with a live NASA presenter. This experience, called “Explorers Wanted,” sparks the visitors’ imagination from the very first moment with high-impact computer animation and a compelling message - that today’s young pioneers are working right this very moment to solve the difficult (and thrilling) challenges involved in sending us further into space. Then comes the invitation – “How would you like to be part of mankind’s next great adventure?” Response to “Exploration Space” has been heartening. We’ve clearly touched a chord -- not just with younger audiences, but with people of all ages. We’ve seen young kids turn to their parents and proclaim: “I’m going to be the first person on Mars!” or “I’m going to work on the moon!” Several parents have expressed their gratitude for inspiring their children. We often hear them say, “I’ve got to bring my daughter/son to see this.” One child came to see the exhibit on his birthday. Two hours later he came back in an orange flight suit. He told his parents that for his birthday he wanted to get an annual pass so he could come back every week till he becomes an astronaut. After he flies, he promised to come back to work with NASA in telling other kids about space. Best of all, it’s not just the guests who are inspired. One person who has been working with NASA for many years told us how proud he and his colleagues were to work at NASA after seeing “Exploration Space.” Matthew Solari (msolari@brcweb.com), Cultural Project Development for BRC Imagination Arts, is passionate about helping clients create experiences that connect profoundly with audiences and convey the great stories of history, science and culture. He was development director of Exploration Space: Explorers Wanted at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and Visitor Complex. Part real-time briefing center, part immersive experience center, part futuristic recruitment center, Exploration Space invites visitors to join NASA’s next epic quest into space. A small sampling of the many BRC projects that Matthew has contributed to include the American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar, NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Museum of Liverpool, Arizona Science Center, Louisiana’s Old State Capitol, National Health Museum, Tennessee State Museum and the Niagara Experience Center. Matthew is a graduate of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and is the recipient of several awards and honors for his work as a professional theater director, producer and performer.

SIGNS & GRAPHICS HAND-PAINTED MURALS L ARGE-FORMAT DIGITAL PRINTS FABRICATED SURFACES ( Vacuum-formed panels )

PL ASTER & FIBERGL ASS FABRICATION METAL FABRICATION ARCHITECTURAL ORNAMENTATION COLLECTION DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVICES Contact: Jim McGrory 818.954.7046 james.mcgrory@warnerbros.com www.wbsf.com ©

and ™ 2010 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All rights reserved.

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New Market Realities

A

re In-Home and Out-of-Home Markets Converging? In-Home and Out-of-Home AV Systems are becoming Virtually Indisguishable. What does this mean for the entertainment industry? Edited by Judith Rubin

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hemed entertainment has always referred to an out-of-home experience. But increasingly, the same AV products and suppliers are furnishing both the in-home and out-of-home markets. Gary Kayye, CTS, wrote about it recently in his “Sight Lines” column in the August 2010 issue of Sound & Communications magazine (published by Testa Communications, www.soundandcommunications.com). Kayye was struck by how much InfoComm, a major tech show for the industry, and CEDIA, a major tech show for suppliers to consumer markets, have come to resemble each other. “I see a clear path to convergence of the home AV and commercial AV markets in both technology and applications,” Kayye noted after attending InfoComm this past June in Las Vegas. “They are looking more and more alike every year. [At InfoComm] I was struck with the number of traditionally home AV manufacturers with large presences on the show floor demonstrating either new commercial AV products or the use of home AV product lines in commercial AV applications.” Kayye, who is a member of the Sound & Communications Technical Council and on the adjunct faculty at UNC Chapel Hill, pointed out that it’s not just products that are moving in both directions. “This year there were also a lot of small- to mid-sized home AV integration firms… taking classes to learn how to integrate in the commercial AV world.” The processes of designing and building commercial AV and home AV systems, once very different, are now nearly identical, indicated Kayye. “And,” he writes, “as we move toward an IT-based AV world, they will be identical.”

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We asked several TEA members to comment:

Advancing technology

Content & story

Steve Birket, Birket Engineering

Chris Manson, Technical Director, Thinkwell

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“We are absolutely witnessing a convergence of in-house and out-of-house entertainment. Picture a finger-painting five-year-old blurring & smearing across the lines formally forming the boundaries between experiences available in the home, in retail, at restaurants, on your hand-held device, and at museums & theme parks.

“Whether or not the AV markets are becoming indistinguishable is philosophically inconsequential; at some point the public will perceive them to be. Forever will march the armies of technology. This in many ways is good for themed entertainment. Projects otherwise limited in their ability to provide a particular experience can now compete on a more even playing field. The real challenge for our industry is not technology differentiation, but content differentiation: How do we engage guests using the same systems they may have at home or be exposed to at the supermarket? The answer is in the continued practice of well-crafted stories and compelling environments.”

“Folks who make their living as systems integrators watch this closely. Whether it be for AV systems, the industrial systems controlling complex rides and shows, or your home laptop, the technology advances steadily, in many cases making the integration task simpler and simpler. No longer the secret domain of a wizard behind the curtain with a slide rule in his pocket, technology enables and economics require the gear to be friendly to the largest user-base possible. More and more complex systems are configurable by a low-tech or no-tech user.” 16

2011 TEA ANNUAL


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User experience

No competition for audiences

Christine Kerr, BaAM Productions

Brian Leonard, Dillon Works! Inc.

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“From my perspective, this boils down to the user experience. Increasingly we expect new technology to be intuitive -- it should “know” what we want to do next. At home, I expect the TV to behave like my laptop because (like many of us) when I am watching TV, I am also working on my laptop. Or ... maybe I am watching TV on my laptop. As part of true convergence, we expect our technology to be seamlessly intuitive. As experience designers and creators, we need to create something that is unique - big or immersive or engaging - and that allows guests to apply what they already know to a new context. Perhaps a context that knows what they are thinking?”

“As much as I’d like to say that the residential market is making a fundamental shift towards themed environments, unfortunately, I don’t feel this is the case. Why? In a high-end residence, there typically isn’t any “competition” for an audience – the homeowner, more or less, is the audience. And by God, if they have half a million to build a themed interior to compliment their high-end sound system, well…I’m their guy…

Maximum Impact Steve Thorburn, Thorburn Associates VMW#WDLQFFRP

“To compete with the various forms of in-home entertainment, out-of-home entertainment facilities have to offer activities which are - at the very least - as enticing as what the average consumer has at home. The multimedia aspects of entertainment facility activities are now being held up to stricter and more challenging audio and video standards than ever before. Just compare your home or car entertainment systems with what you find in the cinema, or local themed attraction, museum, retail or restaurant. Quite frankly, what you have at home is likely to be better. But to meet the growing demands being placed on them, many out-of-home entertainment facilities are revisiting audiovisual systems to provide the maximum impact to their guests.”

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2011 TEA ANNUAL

“There have always been wealthy homeowners, so the market has always existed for TEA members. But building a relationship with them is the hard part. Typically, they have more gatekeepers than any reasonable business development person wants to even think about. But if it’s important to you, peel back the layers of the onion, until you can get an audience with the real decision maker for the homeowner. (You will rarely, if ever, get an audience with the actual end-user.) Finding, and then collaborating with architects who specialize in residential ‘compounds’ is a good place to start. “I qualify residential clients by asking them how large their home is. If their residence is less than 10,000 square feet, odds are they can’t afford an immersive theater environment. I steer them to the Internet for plenty of off-the-shelf options to dress up the space.”


Set Design Motion Graphics Lighting Design Fabrication Installation

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www.fxgrouponline.com 407.877.9600

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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Leaner, Meaner, & Greener

he Leaner, Greener, & Meaner Experience Economy

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Notes from the Themed Entertainment Sustainability Summit (TESSÂŽ) By John Quiter, AIA, LEED AP

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elcome to 2010 - where Googling â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leaner, Greener, and Meanerâ&#x20AC;? returns 633,000 results.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leaner, Greener, and Meanerâ&#x20AC;? is not a particularly engaging phrase, and does not suggest an experience that we might want to market to our guests. But it does reflect the challenges of changing economic and environmental realities that led to establishing The Themed Entertainment Sustainability SummitSM (TESSÂŽ). TESSÂŽ exists because our industry needs to reconcile economic realities with the ideas behind the Experience Economy. TESSÂŽ was the brainchild of Jim Scheidel, a principal of Cuningham Group Architecture, P.A. As an informal gathering of entertainment industry colleagues, the group came together to discuss and explore the forces of change within our industry and the greatest challenges facing the entertainment industry relative to sustainability. We hope to craft a proactive approach to sustainability in entertainment development which can guide not only theme parks and attractions but extend to a wider range of entertainment environments including zoos, museums, performance venues and resorts.

What are we doing right? Two of the fundamentals of responsible, green development and land use are location (tied to transportation infrastructure) and intensity of land use. Many of our entertainment destinations are among the most intense leisure land uses in the world. And, most are located on major transportation routes close to urban centers. So the smart economic decision to locate an entertainment attraction within a well-populated area also gains an important sustainable component because of the land use intensity and infrastructure connection. What is the environmental impact of an average visitor to Disneyland/California Adventure/Anaheim Downtown Disney, where approximately 20,000,0001 annual visitors are entertained in a 490-acre2 development in the midst of a metropolitan urban area with 17,500,000 residents? When compared to the average visitor to Vail, where 1,400,0003 skiers annually are entertained on 5,290 acres4 carved out of a National Forest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we a better model of sustainability? When you add how these vacation experiences compare in affordability and value for a middle class

It has been 11 years since Joe Pine II and James H. Gilmore wrote The Experience Economy: Work as Theater & Every Business a Stage. That work was a sign to many of us in the themed entertainment industry that our time had come and that our business principles had come of age in society as a whole. In many circles, the book was widely praised as a predictor and descriptor of the fourth stage of economic evolution: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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However, the book was also criticized for its lack of basic economic realities. According to its critics, The Experience Economy ignored price sensitivity as a strong economic force; it did not address the scarcity of resources, including natural resources, and the limited supply of capital as economic factors. The TESSÂŽ discussions began with some big picture questions that we need to address, as an industry: What are we doing? We bring millions of people together through the creation of compelling places and experiences. In so doing, we are helping fulfill basic human needs of understanding, societal participation, leisure, creation, and identity. These are five of the ten basic human needs identified by Chilean environmentalist, economist and author Manfred Max-Neef. Yes, there is more to life than work and our needs go beyond food, shelter and clothing. We should feel good about our contributions and continue to embrace our role in society.

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family of four, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we represent a better choice for the guestsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pocketbook (meaner) and the environment (greener)? What are our challenges? As an industry, we do not have well-substantiated answers to the questions above. We should have a database of information in order to understand our value and our footprint. And, it would be prudent to develop best practices in sustainability including the return on investment for those best practices. We must be proactive, as an industry, in developing the best green/ sustainable practices in land use, energy, water use and waste management standards or others will do it for us. For instance, there are recent proposed changes in the California (Title 24) Energy Code as it relates to lighting in a themed entertainment environment. These environments were, until this $WWHQGDQFHĂ&#x20AC;JXUHVDUHIURP7KHPH,QGH[*OREDO$WWUDFWLRQV$WWHQGDQFH5HSRUWE\7($DQG $(&20DQGLQFOXGH'LVQH\ODQGDQG'LVQH\¡V&DOLIRUQLD$GYHQWXUHRQO\ 'LVQH\ODQG¡VFRQWUROOHGODQGDUHDLVIURPWKHDUWLFOH Urban Disney LQ UrbanLand1RY'HF 9DLO¡VDUHDLVIURP vailcascade.com 9DLO¡VYLVLWRULQIRUPDWLRQLVIURPDOOYDLOFRPDQGLQFOXGHVVNLHUVRQO\


proposed change, excluded from the lighting requirements of the California energy code. The proposed changes, as worded, were confusing and appear to be written by someone who does not understand our project type. As written, the changes could be construed to require (in some instances) added lighting (and energy use/cost) for a themed attraction. Working with the writers of this code change to craft language and requirements that are clear, fair, and achieve their goals is the type of challenge that TESSÂŽ members might take on. What is our greatest opportunity? While it is important to improve the operations and efficiencies of our existing parks and attractions and to build new facilities to a higher standard, the one area where we can make the biggest impact on society is in the stories that we tell in those parks and attractions. Referring back to â&#x20AC;&#x153;what are we doing,â&#x20AC;? we engage people with stories and experiences that educate and entertain; that keep alive old stories and traditions and that create new ones. As the issues that we face in the world change, we should do our part in educating the public. This can occur at multiple levels. We can tell the stories of what we are doing to be greener in our design and operations, and let our guests know how they can participate. We can modify existing stories that we are telling to add items of global awareness. And, new attractions can incorporate this to an even greater degree.

Â&#x2021; 7KH XVH RI GD\OLJKWLQJ LQ RFFXSLHG RIĂ&#x20AC;FH DQG EDFNRIKRXVH VSDFHV LI GHVLJQHG SURSHUO\UHGXFHVQRWRQO\WKHFRVWRIHOHFWULFLW\IRUOLJKWLQJLWDOVRUHVXOWVLQVDYLQJVIRUFRROLQJ FRVWVDFKLHYHGE\HOLPLQDWLQJWKHOLJKWLQJKHDW ORDG7KRVHVDYLQJVFDQEHJUHDWHUWKDQWKHHQHUJ\VDYHGRQOLJKWLQJHOHFWULFLW\ Â&#x2021; ,Q PDQ\ DUHDV UHF\FOLQJ ZDVWH HVSHFLDOO\IRRGZDVWHFDQVDYHPRQH\RQRSHUDWLRQVDQGLWLVJRRGIRUWKHHQYLURQPHQW Â&#x2021; ,QORFDWLRQVZKHUHH[LVWLQJZDVWHZDWHU SURFHVVLQJLVQRWDGHTXDWHWRPHHWWKHQHHGV RIDQHZGHYHORSPHQWDQGWKHSURMHFWQHHGV WREHDUWKHFRVWRIVXFKWUHDWPHQWPLWLJDWLRQRI WKHDPRXQWRIZDVWHZDWHUWKDWPXVWEHWUHDWHGFDQEHDFKLHYHGWKURXJKDQDHURELFZDWHU WUHDWPHQWRQVLWH$WRXU'UDJRQ¡V*DWHSURMect in Hainan, China, we are saving our client PLOOLRQVRIGROODUVLQWUHDWPHQWFRVWVWKURXJKWKLV ORZWHFKVROXWLRQ,QDGGLWLRQZHDUHFDSWXULQJ UDLQZDWHU FRQGHQVDWH ZDWHU DQG JUH\ ZDWHU IRUUHXVHWRPLQLPL]HWKHFRQVXPSWLRQRI 





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As an industry, we need to understand our place in the world of sustainability and continue to make intelligent and informed choices in how we begin to address it and use what we are doing to our advantage in the marketplace. In so doing, we can be more responsible in our use of resources (greener), save on operational expenses (leaner) and better position our-r selves to compete for the entertainment dollar (meaner). More importantly, we can thrive while we continue to entertain millions of people around the world, in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Experience Economy.â&#x20AC;?

As designers, we need to be able to direct our clients to solutions that are both leaner and greener. These solutions will vary widely, depending on geographic location and the type of facility. Climatic conditions, utility prices, the market for recyclables, and utility and government incentives vary greatly from one location to the next. However we do know that: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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John Quiter (jquiter@cuningham.com) is Chairman of the Board for Cuningham Group Architecture, P.A., an international, award-winning firm with offices in Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Biloxi, Bakersfield and Seoul. As Chairman, he guides the organization and its Board of Directors in strategic long-range planning as the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus becomes increasingly sustainable and global..

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Leaner, Meaner, & Greener

Energy Management Systems Power Rangers: Energy Management for Visitor Attractions By Joe Bokelman an

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any commercial and residential buildings are required by local and state codes to implement basic energy-saving strategies. But so far, themed entertainment venues have not been included in any legislative action and therefore have had little incentive to save the planet. Why go through the expense and inconvenience of installing complicated energy saving systems, which temporary staff may or may not understand, when thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no order to do so? But times are changing; themed entertainment venues realise they wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be left alone for much longer. Increasingly, designers are asking what energy management features have been used in other, non-exempt venues, so that they can have it installed in advance of any legislation. Pressure is coming from above them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; managers who want to save money on energy and have something to say to the environmental auditors for the annual report â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and below them, with customers wanting to know how theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing their part in saving the planet. A modern energy management system can take one of three forms: occupancy sensors; time of day management; and daylight harvesting. Each can work well individually, but only together will they offer the best opportunities for efficient and effective power management. The challenge for themed-venue designers is finding a system that offers all three strategies, while still being a competent part of a dynamic environment. While a potentially expensive investment, they can provide a return on investment far beyond the original spend. Reducing power at the Palazzo An ETC Unison lighting control system was installed at the Palazzo Las Vegas as part of a project completed a little over two years ago, when green sentiment was coming to a peak. On older projects, lighting would be set by hotel staff and left on for when it was needed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; perhaps hours or even a day later. With no automatic control and little concern about energy usage, it would simply be left on, burning energy and money. Not so at Palazzo, where the main ballroom has occupancy sensors installed, so that when the space is not in use, the lighting will turn off. Similarly, daylight sensors are used in sky-lit areas, automatically dimming or even turning off entire circuits when not required. As itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not about interrupting the way people work - and equally, one doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want people thinking the lighting might shut off while people are using the room â&#x20AC;&#x201C; such a system should incorporate easy-to-use overrides and interrupts, so that everyone from the cleaners to the CEO can be in control of what the lights are doing. Two of the biggest obstacles to any energy management system working effectively are the staff failing to properly understand the system, or it being badly set up. Take daylight harvesting: It always seems like a great idea, using photosensors to read the incoming daylight, and then automatically lower the artificial light to a target level. But without proper calibration, a daylight harvesting system can become an annoyance instead of the nearly-invisible asset it is meant to be. You can have a situation where if it gets a little cloudy, the lights come straight on, and then switch back off again as soon as the sun comes out again. The frequent and sudden switching may prompt staff to disable the system. This problem can be solved (or avoided) by proper design and commissioning.

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Longer lasting lights One of the most popular abbreviations ati today is LED. People in entertainment use them because they offer a wide palette of deeper, saturated colours; they are small; and they are highly controllable – these days, LEDs can even be dimmed or controlled. And while they are not a new technology to themed entertainment, they are now being used with a focus on energy usage.

Leaner, Meaner, & Greener

Timee based energy management systems can be de designed to interact withh the exhibits themselves. For example, an energy management m system m could be configured to shut s down an exhibit or ride’s lighting each evening, saving on staff havin having to remember to turn off each and every light, while remembering to lea leave those required for security staff. Similarly, each morning, it could be set to run through a series of switch on and safety checks for each ride, saving on staff costs. They can even be connected to a central monitoring torin station, with each area’s management system reporting back on any unexpected une events such as circuit failures, which can then be individuallyy investigated. inv

In a themed environment, the lighting should be as long lasting as the rides or exhibits. Until recently, lighting designed for theme parks would last only days or weeks. Even a long life tungsten lamp might last only 2,000 hours. Now, with a life of 30,000-50,000 hours, LEDs offer an alternative – resulting in a cost saving not only in the replacement cost of the lamp itself, but also in maintenance costs - the environmental impact of driving a vehicle over to the ride, and having a number of high wattage work lights on while work is carried out. Thinking it through Occupancy sensors, time of day management and daylight harvesting are best used only when a space’s needs are carefully planned and thought through. Failure to carefully plan an energy management system will cause it to be seen as a hindrance rather than help by staff. Lighting designers, consultants and manufacturers are beginning to understand this and are working together to provide lighting and control products that allow facility owners to actually do well by doing good.

Joe Bokelman is architectural market manager at lighting manufacturer Electronic Theatre Controls (ETC, www.etcconnect.com).

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The Integrated Attraction

When Animatronics are part of the mix Modern Controls add Sophistication, Functionality & Appeal

By Bill Butler

W

hen Walt Disney first conceived of the mechanical devices to entertain and inform guests at his dream park, Disneyland, he could scarcely have imagined the technological and artistic heights to which animatronics would ascend. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re making these human figures,â&#x20AC;? Disney said in late 1963, during the development of the Mr. Lincoln Audio-Animatronic figure for the 1964 New York Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We make animals move, make anything move through the use of electronics. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just another dimension in the animation we have been doing all our life. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a new door, and we hope we can do some really exciting things in the future.â&#x20AC;? Now, fifty years after the birth of theme park animatronics (the term was first used in 1960 to promote the mechanical animals at Disneylandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wonderland Railroad), animatronics are often a central component of attraction design. Major theme parks, themed dining and retail locations and many theater shows, museums, and interpretive centers feature animatronics to amuse, inform, or direct guests. Garner Holt Productions (GHP) has built thousands of individual figures, more than one-fourth of which were for non-theme park use. Advances in control The basic technology behind animatronics has scarcely changed since their inception - hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders driving metal frames affixed to fiberglass or vacu-formed plastic shells covered with synthetic skins, and finished with wigs, fur, eyes, teeth, and costumes - although improved methods and materials for each have been developed over time. There have been major leaps forward in computer-based control of their motion. More sophisticated control has led to more complex motions, meaning greater realism, more precision, and, recently, great variability in animatronic routines. Animatronics are breaking away from the role of passive actors in pre-programmed shows to being active participants in their environments, including interaction with guests, and their future development seems to hinge on this. At GHP, the current focus of our research and development department is directed at the creation of a figure with the ability to see, react, communicate, and respond to an audience, in addition to utilizing actuation and control technologies unavailable even five years ago. Attraction operators and experience designers recognize the abilities of animatronics to engage guests, push storylines, add detail and life, educate and entertain, and create focus in an infinite variety of settings. They have great potential to interact with visitors and communicate a message. An example is Backyard Monsters: the World of Insects, a touring museum exhibit owned and operated by GHP. It features giant animatronic insects and one of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest insect specimen collections. The physical reality of a praying mantis as big as a car has a strong impact on the human standing next to it.

Engineering & maintenance The struggle to balance costs and benefits merits an animatronics producerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence at the early stages of design - and there is a point of equilibrium. Well-executed animatronics are good, solid pieces of engineering at completion, and, in order to stay in peak condition, need to have careful attention paid to their maintenance. A poorly executed animatronic is as detrimental to an attraction as the worst storyline, architecture, or rough track surface. A poorly maintained figure can be worse, meaning that an experience may not be consistent over time. Animatronics must be planned for as carefully as any other complex mechanical element. Early involvement with their creators is a tremendous benefit. As complex mechanical devices, they require special forethought for infrastructure, utilities, control, installation, staff training, and other areas of concern. It is advisable to include your animatronics provider in design meetings from the early conceptual stages of a project because the special considerations for animatronics often have great impact on an attraction, long before and forever after it opens. And in nearly every case, the design 24

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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intent of an attraction or experience just wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the same without the use of animatronics. When it comes to cost, there is a range depending on complexity of the product. Animatronics can be relatively inexpensive and have limited functions and details, or can be alloted a larger budget and emerge a true showstopper. At GHP we have created figures for a few thousand dollars, and othoth ers for several million.


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everyday and the extraordinary are all subjects for representation by animatronics. The presence of animatronics in so many venues today is no accident – they can be an essential part of a compelling guest experience. The same curiosity and fascination that filled our forebears reb at the sight of mechanical chess-players and clockwork songbirds ngb lives today for figures that ride unicycles, bears that sing, and cre creatures we know aren’t real, but we still look them in the eye.

Bill Butler is Manager, Creat Creative velopment, Garner Holt ProducPro Development, tions, Inc. www.garnerholt.com www.garnerho

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The Integrated Attraction

The Acoustics Acrostic By Steve Thorburn

I think that nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ever been found. As misunderstood as the field of sound. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Steve Thorburn

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o much is written on the visual arts, and so little about the world of acoustics. With that shortcoming in mind, I present to you my ACOUSTICS acrostic, created for builders, designers and developers and gleaned from my three decades of experience in the industry.

A

is for Afterthought Far too often, the acoustical elements of a project are passed around like a hot potato. The designer assumes the architect will deal with it. The architect assumes the engineers will tackle it. The engineers assume the designer incorporated it in their plans. Once the project is finished, while it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too late to fix acoustical problems, it can often be challenging and cost-prohibitive to do so.

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C is for Consulting Every decision has a trade-off. In project planning, a blue-sky dream plan is continually whittled away by budget, engineering and space limitations. A good acoustical consultant understands that sacrifices have to be made, but they can advise the client on the effects of certain decisions and guide them toward optimal solutions.

O is for Obvious The â&#x20AC;&#x153;lookâ&#x20AC;? of a space is obvious to owners, developers and architectural design teams, and they spend a lot of money on it. It should be equally as obvious that sound is just as integral to a design, but... I think this disconnect stems partly from the design process relying on two-dimensional drawings. But once a project is built in three dimensions, bad acoustics are as obvious as a room without any lights.

U

is for Unique Every situation is unique, even if it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look like it on the outside. One of our clients was installing an MRI machine in a space similar to that in another of their facilities. Same machine, same room layout. One might think the process would be a simple copy-and-pasteâ&#x20AC;Ś. In this location, however, one of the main support beams near the machine also supported an HVAC unit. The unit was a few rooms away, but the vibration from it was enough to cause concern for vibrations affecting the MRI. Overlooking something like this can cause big problems later.

S is for Spaces When it comes to open space, an architect might utilize adjectives such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;light,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;openâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;airy.â&#x20AC;? An acoustical consultant hears one word, over and over: â&#x20AC;&#x153;echo.â&#x20AC;? Or, if the space is really light, open and airy, they think, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can you hear me now?â&#x20AC;? Whether it is a church, an atrium, a classroom or a board room, the sounds in each space need to be controlled. Sometimes bigger spaces need bigger sounds, but not always. An acoustical engineer has the know-how to make the space work to the clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s advantage.

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is for Totality While ile there are many individual components that al all have to be addressed by their eir respective specialists, a failure to examine the totality totalit – the big picture - can lead ad to a disastrous project ou outcome. All of the disciplines in project design and management affect one anoth another. To neglect any one area, including acoustics, weakens the overall project structure. str

I is for Intelligibility When was the last time youu said said, “Can you repeat that?” or, “Can you hear me?” during a team meeting or onn a phone p call? Were the acoustics in that room thought about? Was the room m rel relatively quiet? Did the room sound like a canyon or a dense forest? Perhaps aco acoustics design would be better called the Science of Intelligibility. If you can und understand what you are listening to then you have good acoustics.

C is for Cost Savings Including acoustics as part of the design, construction and fit out of a project means more up-front cost. But it is an investment well made, as those projects that don’t include acoustics up front inevitably falter and require more costly fixing later on.

S is for Solutions Every project and every challenge has a solution, and it is your acoustician’s job, as an expert, to help lead the client to that answer. Every project has the potential for success, and including smart acoustical design is one way to help get you there.

Steven J. Thorburn (SJT@TA-inc.com), PE, LEEDAP is co-founder of Thorburn Associates, an acoustical, technology, and lighting design firm. He just completed his second and final term as TEA’s President.

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The Integrated Attraction

Digital Cinema in Museums Immersive Digital Cinema abounds in the Science Museum Community

By Judith Rubin

W

hen it comes to exhibition, science museums have a track record for innovation and experimentation. Up-to-the-minute display technology seems to fit with the questing scientific mindset. It was, for instance, the science center community that adopted giant screen film exhibition starting in the 1970s, recognizing its technological novelty, potential mass appeal and its power to educate, as well as to generate revenue. Now, museums are embracing digital video formats. Digital Video Digital video boosts the ability of smaller venues to get into the cinema game, affordably. Typical of the development arc for these venues are a close working relationship between client and integrator, a modular approach that allows for later expansion, the building in of multiuse capability and control systems that deliver onebutton operation. Other hallmarks include in-house facilities for production/customization of content, the capability for the operator to modify and program the system in-house, and remote technical support provided by the integrator.

“Most of these sites used to think they needed a 20- or 40-minute show,” noted Baker. “But the moms are now saying, ‘Thank God it’s only 15 minutes!’ They don’t necessarily want to spend a whole day.” According to Baker, they’re also becoming more discerning about 3D quality. “It’s the ‘‘Avatarr effect’,” she said. “Hollywood has raised the bar on 3D.” Fulldome The immersive digital dome video format known as “fulldome” is also mushrooming rapidly in science-mission institutions. These systems have found their primary market in planetariums but are being adopted for entertainment venues and other settings. There are at least a dozen providers of fulldome systems, and there is a growing body of international festivals, seminars and conferences devoted to the medium and technology of fulldome. Associations active in the fulldome community include IMERSA (Immersive Education, Research, Science & Arts, www.imersa.org) and IPS (International Planetarium Society, www.ips-planetarium.org).

2011 TEA ANNUAL

Integrator as instigator The new 3D/4D theater at the National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium in Dubuque, Iowa exemplifies a larger, multipurpose cinema that helps diversify and refresh the venue in a big way. ETI, headed by President/CEO Brian Edwards, was contracted directly to the museum

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Short Programs The shows in these digital theaters generally run no longer than four- to 14 minutes, keyed to a family attention- span cycle and the needs of school group scheduling. The short program run time is welcomed by the family decision maker, according to Janine Baker, VP Distribution & Development of nWave Pictures, one of the most prolific producers and distributors of 3D shows for the museum and entertainment markets. Popular nWave shows for museums include Fly Me to the Moon, TurtleVision 3D and Jetpack Adventure.

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We looked at three new digital cinema installations in US museums. All were upgrades of existing, well-established institutions.

to supply the 134-seat theater, which was completed June 2010 and is part of a $40 million expansion that includes new galleries and a children’s educational play area. The timeframe was about 18 months from the start of ETI’s involvement to completion. Museum Executive Director Jerry Enzler and CFO Alan Stache took active roles in the project. “We try to always provide some amount of expandability,” said Edwards. “It is typical that these theaters include some special event capability, with technology to support additional programming.” ETI helped spark the trend of museums adopting 3D digital theaters, with some of the first installations in the early 2000s at locations including the Science Museum of Minnesota, the Aquarium of the Pacific and Discovery Science Center in Santa Ana, Calif. The company’s other markets for 3D digital theaters and other AV technology include theme parks, universities, casinos and nightclubs, corporate visitor centers and the military. The San Diego Air & Space Museum first opened its doors in 1963. Now, about a half century later, it has its first cinema: the 36-seat Zable Theater, open since July. Integrator MediaMation has completed about three dozen 3D theaters to date. The company’s entertainment clients include Merlin Entertainments (Legoland parks) and Ripley’s.


Vendors often find it in their best interests to step into a consulting consu role, making the most of their specialized knowledge to help elp a mu museum customer formulate a realistic business plan for a new theater. eater. “I will show them how to t look at their venue and put it in perspective, ective, to find meaningful comps in terms of m market and location and so forth,” said Janine Baker. “When it first opens, a site sho should average a 40% 0% to 50% capture rate. In the low season, it goes down to 15% to 25%. Those are good numbers. If they’re getting less thann 10% capture rat rate, there’s something wrong.” “When we offer the whole package, we can give them a bu business model,” said MediaMation Project Manager Chris Seide. “Smaller er pparks and institutions, and even small retailers looking to generate revenue, are out there purchasing these 4D theaters as a relatively cheap investment for substantial return. If your

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content is on average seven minutes long, you can have five to seven shows per hour. We will help clients look at their ticketing and throughput and what else is in their institutions, and advise them on theater size and make other recommendations, doing what amounts to a feasibility study.” Self-reliance of smaller venues In addition to consulting on the business model, part of working with an institution is respecting its interest in DIY, in terms of the theater gear, as well as the content. Museums and planetariums, especially the smaller ones, are accustomed to doing more with less. They have a culture of producing in-house content tailored to local needs and tend to embrace the learning curve, however sophisticated the equipment. Just as a 3D/4D theater provides an experience people can’t easily give themselves at home, savvy integrators work with the DIY trend by providing signature services and products at attractive price points. Outside the US, MediaMation supplies operators through reps in Asia, Korea, Japan, Russia and the Ukraine, and reports a healthy amount of 4D theater business over the past year, international as well as domestic.

Bruc Howland, Facilities Manager at the San Diego Air & Space Museum, Bruce has as pl plans for future theater programming that is more specifically tied to his museum’ um’s air and space theme. “In addition to the current selection of animated videos, I’d like to show historical documentaries utilizing 3D and even 4D effects. ects. We hope to either produce or locate additional content that will get people excitedd about flight while giving them an immersive experience. We’re still on the beginning edge of this journey.” Morehead: retrofit instead of rehab Richard McColman, Fulldome Theater Director for the Morehead Planeetarium & Science Center at the University of North Carolina, is in charge of thhe new 68-foot diameter, 229-seat GlaxoSmithKline FullDome Theater that oppened in February. Formerly the Star Theater, the planetarium dates back to

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1949 when the facility was only the sixth planetarium to open in the US. It received a $1.5 million gift from GlaxoSmithKline that enabled it to purchase and install the new Sky-Skan Definiti projection system.

Inside the Morehead Planetarium Digital 'RPH7KHDWHU *OD[R6PLWK.OLQH7KHDWHU

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The Integrated rate Attraction

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McColman, who has worked in the planetarium m sector for more than two decades - the past 18 years at the Morehead - recalled early ly automated planetarium systems in which â&#x20AC;&#x153;you were still controlling a whole pile of pieces of different equipment, including slide projectors and optomechanical projectors, all coordinated with a computer control system but with a kind of Rube Goldberg approach.â&#x20AC;? He cited the decision to go fulldome as â&#x20AC;&#x153;pretty much a given,â&#x20AC;? pointing out that two mainstays of planetariums - slide projectors and CRT projectors - have passed into obsolescence. What had been originally envisioned as a comprehensive theater overhaul was stymied by the economic downturn, so Morehead postponed the architectural rehab and focused on finding a way to integrate the new theater technology, while retaining existing components. Sometime around May 2011, Morehead expects to decommission the old technology. Longer term, there is a plan to install new, removable seats so the space can also open up for special events. Sky-Skan also set up a fulldome production facility for the Morehead, located elsewhere on the campus. Sky-Skanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest market is planetariums, but the company has also provided a variety of projection systems for museum exhibits, special events, environmental effects and other displays, including the Saudi Arabia pavilion at Shanghai Expo 2010, a special event for Cartier and the Millennium Falcon cockpit experience within the Star Wars traveling exhibition. Digital theater is an affordable way to refresh an established venue, whether large or small. But, as more and more venues get on board, content gaps appear. Like 70mm theaters were before them, digital multimedia theaters are an extension of a venueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibitions and are in service to its mission, although they also have the power to diversify the exhibitions and the audience and broaden the mission. But some things never change: Ultimately, content and not technology is the primary draw and differentiator of a visitor attraction.

Judith Rubin (www.judithrubin.blogspot.com) is an editor, writer and publicist for the Experience Industry, and publications director for TEA.

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Jack Gillett Precision Prototype Design

G ILLETT D ESIGN 18434 Oxnard Street Unit A Tarzana, CA 91356 818-399-7149 gillettdsn@yahoo.com

Mailing Address: 4706 Lakeview Canyon Rd. #416 Westlake Village, CA 91361

Interpretation p for themed entertainment experiences                  michael mercadante president

www.mainstreetdesign.com michael@mainstreetdesign.com +1 617.876.9111 x13


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U.S.Participation at Shanghai and Beyond The USA Pavilion at Shanghai 2010 was a success, but its Backstory Reveals Steep Obstacles to U.S. Participation in World Expos

By Nick Winslow

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hanghai Expo 2010 (May 1-Oct 31) the largest World Expo in history, was a great success, having met its own very ambitious goals:

general public. Often, in discussing the subject of Expo with friends and colleagues, I was asked: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do they still have Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fairs?â&#x20AC;?

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World Expos are sanctioned by an international organization, the Bureau International des Expositions (BIE) in Paris. While an individual city may become the host of an Expo, applications are made by and awarded to member countries. Once an Expo has been awarded, the Host Country invites the world community to participate. Invitations are made by headof-state to head-of state. In most cases the invited nation then determines if it will participate and if so, begins a state-run program to design, build and operate a pavilion.

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Whereas the 2008 Olympics was primarily an international television experience, giving China the opportunity to showcase itself to the rest of the world, so Shanghai Expo 2010 allowed the nations of the world to showcase themselves to the

Chinese.1 The Chinese government made it clear to the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nations that participation was an important piece of Chinese diplomacy, and the world responded. It helps to be the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second largest and fastest growing economy with superpower status in making such participation requests. But the cost to China will be staggering, possibly exceeding $58 BILLION. It is highly unlikely that Shanghai Expo will recover its cost. But that was never the point. In this article we will explore the future of World Expositions and how US policies and procedures fit into this picture, based on my recent experience heading up the effort and the team that successfully produced the USA Pavilion at Shanghai 2010. Government support: The unique quandary of the US To our observation there is no interest at the highest levels of the US Government to use Federal funds to challenge the current interpretations or to support Expo participation by the US. In fact, support of the World Expo movement within the Federal Government is tepid at best. The same can be said of support from the 7KHLQWHUQDWLRQDODVSHFWRI:RUOG([SRVKDVPRVWO\WRGRZLWKH[KLELWRUVDQGQRWYLVLWRUV,Q6KDQJKDLIRU H[DPSOHRYHURIWKHJXHVWVDUH&KLQHVH

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2011 TEA ANNUAL

This process is not open to the US because the US is no longer a member of the BIE. As a result, the process for creating a USA Pavilion is different than most of the rest of the world, and complicated further because the US has on the books a statute that prevents the use of appropriated funds for participation in World Expos, resulting in the requirement that US pavilions be entirely funded by the private sector, states and NGOs. Message: diplomatic or commercial? World Expo pavilions generally offer three messages: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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Host countries, and many exhibitors, also look for new foreign investment. 2 In the US, responsibility for participation in World Expos resides at the State Department and, more specifically, the Education and Cultural Affairs (ECA). There is no bureaucracy in place to specifically address the 7KHH[WHQWWRZKLFKWKHVHPHVVDJHVJHWWKURXJKWRWKHLUWDUJHWDXGLHQFHVDQGLPSDFWWKHGLSORPDF\ DQGRUHFRQRPLHVRIKRVWDQGSDUWLFLSDQWQDWLRQLVXQIRUWXQDWHO\XQFOHDUDQGZRUWK\RIFRPSUHKHQVLYHVWXG\


issues attendant to participation in World Expos, which means there is little institutional memory regarding best procedures, dos and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ts, etc. As noted above, National Pavilions need to serve two masters, diplomacy and commerce. There is inherent tension between these goals. With participation resident in the State Department, diplomacy needs are given heavy emphasis, while commercial promotion is given low priority. This conflicts with the need for funding which requires a thorough understanding and sympathy for the commercial role. For recent Expos including Shanghai, the US State Dept. has sought a private entity, usually a 501(c)(3), to design, build and operate the US National Pavilion. Technically, the private entity â&#x20AC;&#x153;loansâ&#x20AC;? the pavilion to the US Government during the term of the Expo. The US Government appoints a Commissioner General who heads the government management entity during the Expo and is the official liaison between the pavilion and the Expo organizer. It is important that the Commissioner Generalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office and the private entity management team have clear lines of authority and common interests. The private entity is responsible for demolition or close-down of the pavilion at the end of the Expo. Making the USA Pavilion happen As of December 2007 the US was not going to be represented at Shanghai Expo 2010. The Chinese government had issued a formal invitation but the US had given only a conditional acceptance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the condition being that it could find an entity that would, at its own expense, design, build, operate and demolish the pavilion in accordance with US law. Think about that for a moment: The government pays nothing. Someone else forms a not-for-profit, raises all the money, takes all the risks and owns nothing in the end. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty good deal for the government. Small wonder that by November 2007, a year-long tender process had failed to produce any acceptable responses and the issue was foundering at ECA. Several weeks later, Ellen Eliasoph, a friend and associate of mine from Warner Bros., who had run the WB film operation in China, called me to see if I had any interest in trying to get a USA Pavilion effort going. After visits to Shanghai and Washington DC to determine the level of interest in the project, Ellen and I decided to mount an effort. The Expo Bureau in Shanghai was delighted that we were offering to fill the void, stating that â&#x20AC;&#x153;we will not consider Shanghai Expo to be a success unless the USA participates.â&#x20AC;? The US Consulate authorities, realizing the importance of the Expo to the Chinese, were also very encouraging. In the end, State agreed to accept a proposal from our team and we were able to secure some start-up money from a US sponsor. 3+2726,QVLGHDQGRXWVLGHWKH86$3DYLOLRQDW6KDQJKDL([SR All photos ŠEdward Denison, 2010

We next formed a 501(c)(3) and assembled a core team 3 including BRC Imagination Arts and Clive Grout Architect for design, Norm Elder and Jim Garber for sponsorships, and Cini-Little for food service, and we then conducted a concept charrette. From the beginning we wanted to depict America as a nation of immigrants living in a free society who can rise to the challenge of improving the world around us, whether it be the block we live on, our city, our state, our nation, or the entire world. We originally decided on a sports metaphor, thinking it would be uniquely American, but this concept did not gain traction with our potential sponsor base. In the end we decided on a four-part attraction-an overture and three acts-with each unit accepting 500+ guests on a 12-minute or shorter cycle. Given the Expo theme of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Better City/Better Lifeâ&#x20AC;? we decided on making the building itself a demonstration of best practices, incorporating the latest US technologies to conserve energy, water, etc. Guest experience Overture: Welcome from our Commissioner General, numerous celebrities and average Americans. Common thread: each trying to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Helloâ&#x20AC;? in Chinese. Four screens showing the same content. No seating. Sponsor Honor Wall in the Overture. Acts as the queue bunch.

Act 1: Three-screen presentation by notable Americans including Pres. Obama and Sec. Clinton emphasizing the importance of education, innovation and freedom to achieve a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Better City/Better Lifeâ&#x20AC;?, the theme of the Expo. 500-seat theater. Act 2: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gardenâ&#x20AC;? 4-D theater feature which shows the story of a young girl who enlists the support of her very diverse neighbors to transform an unsightly vacant lot into an urban garden. Five very tall screens, with numerous in-theater effects and 500 seats. Act 3: Walk-through with exhibits focusing on the technologies and innovations that will bring about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Better City/Better Life.â&#x20AC;? The pavilion also featured: Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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Money problems and solutions It was very challenging to get this project off the ground. We fifinally received tentative approval (not ot the final commitment) from the State St Department to move forward inn summer 2008. By that time, potential sponsors were holding back, sitting on the sidelines, waiting to see the outcome of the Beijing Olympic games. Next followed wed the economic slump, the US presidential elec elections, and administration transition. Progress on design, fundraising and cash flow slow slowed to a crawl. By October 2008, I was convinced there would be no USA Pavilion. In February 2009 09 Sec. Clinton made her first trip abroad, to China, where the authorities made clear that US participation at the Expo was one of their priorities. The Secretary immediately mediately formed an office for public/private partnerships and staffed it with reliable, ble, heavyweight talent. This group, gro together with a revitalized private entity board, rd, began an intense fund-raising eeffort that was ultimately successful in raising the $61 million in cash and VIK that w was required to complete the project. Although late in coming, the active participation cipa by the US Government at the highest level, indicating support for the USA Pavilion effort, was essential to raising the necessary funds. Even so, it was a photo finish. We were not able to officially confirm our participation to the Expo authorities until late August 2009, with just over eight months remaining. The final sponsorship money was not committed until March 2010. A successful conclusion Getting the pavilion built and the shows installed is a story in itself. Suffice it to say that the Expo Bureau was not always able to meet our needs, there were construction hangups, the weather was an issue, etc. Delays in cash flow prevented the media filming from starting until February 2010. Nevertheless, we opened the USA Pavilion on time and on budget. Our COO, Mark Germyn, had the facility operating at full capacity in about 10 days, and it has been humming ever since.

The USA Pavilion was very well received by the Chinese audience, proving to be one of the most popular and most visited pavilions at the Expo with admissions of more than 40,000 per day. Exit surveys show positive gains in guest attitudes towards the United States and its people as a result of visiting the pavilion. Uncertain prognosis for future US participation in world expos The BIE currently allows two kinds of Expos: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worldâ&#x20AC;? expos, the big ones lasting 6 months, to occur every 5 years, and International (Specialized) expos, lasting 3 months. Only one Specialized expo may be staged between any two World expos. Two future Expos are currently sanctioned by the BIE. A third one is proposed. Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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US participation in these Expos will be a challenge under the current regulations and procedures. As I learned first-hand, it is incredibly difficult to attract financial support without:    

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funds which could be used to seek the best ideas and designs for a pavilion, which could then be judged in the context of US diplomatic and commercial interests. The current system of soliciting complete proposals absent full government support will, I am afraid, continue to result in projects with timelines and funding that are not optimal for the high standards expected of a USA Pavilion. The USA Pavilion Shanghai team did a remarkable job given the time and budget constraints we faced, and we are proud of our accomplishments, but we all could have done better with more time, a tighter relationship with the State Dept., and not necessarily more money but better access to our funding so cash flow was not a daily crisis. Commissioner General Villarreal and I will each submit reports to the State Department at the end of Shanghai Expo detailing our experience and how the US can improve its participation. I assume several others will weigh in as well. The very able group that staffed the USAP effort on behalf of Sec. Clinton seem open to improving the Expo pavilion process. Time will tell.

Nick Winslow of Nick Winslow Consulting (nick.scott@earthlink.net) is a specialist in large-scale entertainment project feasibility, management, construction and operations, advising developers of recreational destinations such as theme parks, resorts, museums, visitor centers, world expo pavilions and performing arts facilities. His background includes 7 years as president of Warner Bros. Recreation Enterprises and 11 years as president of Harrison Price Co.

34

2011 TEA ANNUAL


A W O R L D O F E N T E R T A I N M E N T®

CONNECT TO THE CLOUD

Meeting the Demand of a Digital World

PRODUCTION | DESIGN

GOTPRESS Judith Rubin Writing, Editing & Press Relations for the Experience Industry since 1987

C2C STUDIO INC 314.853.5210 RUBINJUDITH GMAILCOMsJUDITHRUBINBLOGSPOTCOM

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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S

o You Want to Have a Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair Excerpted from the original article in Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair Magazine, October 1994 By Harrison Price, with Comments by Steve Balgroski and Bob Rogers

E

xpositions are celebrations br of the first magnitude. Those that I have worked on were started by community leaders from the private or public sector who were striving to bring a new energy and image to a region and to produce a legacy of permanent facilities and renewal, commonly called residuals.

$1 billion in public money, mostly from the provincial and federal governments, while the 1984 New Orleans worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair was drastically undercapitalized with a miserly $5 million from the US government toward the costs of the US Pavilion.

For the most part fairs have had tremendous economic and aesthetic impacts on their host communities because of the millions spent for site improvements and new facilities. Funds put into these developments, added to income from visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; expenditures, generally add up to a total direct and indirect benefit two to three times the cost of implementing the event. This is a seductive idea for prospective expo hosts, but they should nevertheless keep in mind that worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fairs are difficult monsters to promote, finance, execute, manage and control. No city that has had a worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair has ever been the same again. It is a nervous-breakdown kind of business.

So, you want to have a worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair in your city. You know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great idea, but how do you get it off the ground? The first requirement is, clearly, to assemble an effective partnership among the local power structure and all sectors of public support (local, state or provincial, and the federal government). Otherwise, punt! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as

Seattleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1962 Century 21 Exposition, an event registered by the International Bureau of Expositions (BIE) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and my first worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair involvement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was primarily the brainchild of an irrepressible auto dealer named Joe Gandy. Gandy asked Walt Disney to help the Seattle organizers, but Disney did not want to get involved because he was specifically more interested in the impending 1964 New York Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fair and its large industrial pavilions. He referred the opportunity to me. Designer Herb Rosenthal, researcher Robert Lorimer and I prepared an economic and physical master plan for the 70-acre site in the middle of the city. Highlights of the Seattle fair were the Space Needle; the first US intra-urban monorail (by contrast, the 1964/65 New York fair would rely on old-fashioned double-deck buses to connect its separate areas); and the successful creation of a permanent cultural, sports, public-performance and celebration center connected to the central business district by monorail. Thanks to excellent management by Ewen Dingwall and his team, the fair drew a 9.6-million paid attendance in a total resident and visitor market of 7.8 million, a market penetration of 122 percent. It more-or-less broke even in net operating revenue versus development cost. We had projected a 7-million attendance goal, which was exceeded by 37 percent. In many ways, including residuals, Seattle showed up its rival, the more extensive New York fair, which was not BIE-registered and as a result lacked strong international participation. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like sometime to do a study for the US government on the importance of expositions in international relationships, and the potential payback of putting on a fair in terms of economic impact and development. Vancouver Expo 86 was criticized for being expensive, but its primary economic impact (total resident and visitor onsite and off-site expenditures) was more than twice its cost, without even taking into account the intangible returns. Expositions are one-shot projects with a short time-frame in which to make or break. Some have drawn massive attendances out of their market areas, and have remodeled and repositioned their communities. But fairs vary greatly in their ability to generate response in terms of strong participation and attendance. Higher-ranked market penetrations tend to be generated by cities that have major commitments of public money and adequate capitalization. Vancouver Expo 86 benefited from more than 36

2011 TEA ANNUAL

3DLQWLQJRIWKH1HZ<RUN:RUOG¡V)DLUE\/HRQDUG/HYLWDQ DYDLODEOHDVDSRVWHUIURPleonardlevitan@gmail.com

they say in football. The leaders of the Planet of Man, a proposed 1967 exposition in Long Beach, California, aborted after determining that the Los Angeles power structure was not behind the effort. With your strong domestic network in place, you next apply to the BIE in Paris, six to nine years ahead of the event date. The BIE needs to see a preliminary master plan spelling out the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feasibility from economic and financial perspectives. It should make the case for the city involved in strong terms of commitment and potential performance. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re successful, the next phase is an intensive marketing effort to inspire commitments of participation by foreign countries, national industries, corporations, international organizations and governmental entities (city, state and national) and domestic entities. This is a program that continues almost to opening day. At the same time, site-specific master planning is launched.


ditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note

E

in n the wake of Shanghai Expo 2010 and the recent passing of Harrison Price, we are revisiting Priceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitive article about H the planning and hosting of international expos t

The first step in economic master planning is to finalize target attendance parameters. Next, convert the attendance targets and per-capita expenditure data into size and capacity requirements for various services, concessions and entertainment activities. Then your planning team should evaluate the economics and feasibility of the fair: Estimate revenues, expenses and cash flow for all areas of activity.

Â&#x2021;

Prepare and present planning and budgetary material to companies and institutions interested in particular programs. This is critical for the marketing effort. Estimate development cost of needed facilities and programs. Estimate the probable flow of revenues, expenses and capital costs beginning two years in advance of the fair date and continuing through the shut-down phase. Identify potential means of funding the exposition. Based on the experience of other fairs and the plans of the organizers, sources of public and private capital are identified and evaluated. These sources, including private industry contributions and sponsorships, bond issues, conventional loans, government subsidies and special grants or gifts, are analyzed relative to the following major requirement categories: site acquisition; pre-fair planning, promotion and organizational efforts; and construction of facilities, along with staffing and servicing them during and after the event. An economic impact assessment will determine the principal direct and indirect benefits of staging the exposition. This analysis addresses three major time periods: before, during and after the exposition.

Â&#x2021;

Holding a worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair requires an immense mobilization of diverse constituencies. Most fair committees have risen to the challenge and have prepared their battle plans with dedication and skill. If the fair is well-executed, the host city benefits from image enhancement and economic infusion, even if the fair was not itself a financial success, and can gain immeasurably from the physical improvements. The cleanup of Spokaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown and its polluted river was a fine demonstration of the 1976 fairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s environmental theme and a great achievement for a smaller fair. The developers of Sevilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1992 expo practically rebuilt the infrastructure of the city. Fairs are fun. They can also be historic, heroic, educational, artistic and memorable. To its organizers, the good moments of a fair bring euphoria, while the bad moments produce something like a hangover. The reason to carry on is that the turmoil can lead to urban rebirth. The benefits, in terms of investment, development, image building and community pride, are worth the effort. Preliminary Master Plan Items Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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Questions to Ask about Your Target Attendance Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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Addendum: Comments from two practicing specialists in world expos Steve Balgroski, AECOM Buzzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s methodology remains sound. On the expo front, most things are not fundamentally changed since the time of this article - except that it has become harder and harder to raise capital to get the level of attraction you want to provide. Milanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2015 expo nothwithstanding, today the less developed countries generally have more to gain from hosting a worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair than the more developed nations. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expo hosts must keep in mind the four Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: Image enhancement, Infrastructure, economic Impact and International legacy (post use of the site). Bob Rogers, CEO, BRC Imagination Arts Harrison â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buzzâ&#x20AC;? Price and the mathematical formulas he helped create are what assured that your theme park or worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair experience would be the right size, in the right location and right in so many other ways that benefit the visitor and the operator. His work is the mathematical glue holding everything together in the Experience industry. Hiding in plain sight was one of his best techniques: Simplicity. This strength is apparent here as he summarizes complex ideas and methodologies in a few words. Buzz could glance at an absolute avalanche of discordant data â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or just a pinch of it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and pounce on the actionable meaning to deliver simple, clear, understandable conclusions that would tell an every-day practitioner what was key and what was just noise.

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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7KH)XWXUHRI:RUOG([SRV

by Fountain People, Inc.

In today’s world, you really have to stand out to get noticed.

Themed Entertainment Just got Brighter!

Upcoming & Proposed World Expos By Gordon Linden

The success of Shanghai Expo 2010 has elevated international interest in world expos to an all time high, and many a city has been spurred to look at the possi possibilities of hosting an expo. At this writing, the BIE had given itits sanction to two cities for upcoming events: Yeosu, Korea (2012) and Milan, Italy (2015). Yeosu 2012 As a Recognized Expo, Yeosu Expo 2012 will run 90 days. Its theme is “The Living Ocean and Coast.” The population of Yeosu is relatively small for an Expo city with about 300,000 people but nearby Busan, about an hour to the east, has 3.6 million people. Busan is also bidding for the 2020 Summer Olympic Games. High speed train service to Seoul, the country’s capital with a population of 12 million, will be in place in time for the Expo. Despite the short duration and fairly remote location, organizers are planning for the participation of over 100 countries.

Water | Light | Motion

Introducing the LIQUID COLOR ™ LC3. A Bright Solution for Themed Entertainment & Attractions. 512.392.1155 | www.fountainpeople.com

Milan 2015 Milan Expo 2015 is themed “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life” and is a BIE Registered event wherein many countries are expected to develop their own pavilions, as occurred in Shanghai. Organizers plan to accommodate the Expo adjacent to the relatively new and spacious FieraMilano facilities. Milan won the BIE nod for 2015 in a hotly contested competition with Izmir, Turkey. During the Shanghai Expo, there were reports that Italy’s Minister of Finance had announced the government did not have the financial resources to host the Expo. However, a subsequent organizers’ progress report assured the BIE that the event will go forward as planned. Bids for 2017 and 2020 Cities conducting studies for 2017 include Edmonton, Canada and Liege, Belgium while another five are mulling possible bids. Following two years of community consultations and technical studies for an expo bid, Edmonton received municipal and provincial approvals and is currently awaiting approval by the national government to proceed with its bid to the BIE. A tie-in for hosting the event is that 2017 will mark the 150th anniversary of Canada’s founding. As a frequent and major presenter at prior Expos with a serious legacy plan to transform the post-Expo grounds into a campus of the University of Alberta, Edmonton would appear, at the present time, to have an edge over the competition. 2017 will be a Recognized Expo with a duration of 90 days. No fewer than 16 cities, including San Francisco which has hosted two world’s fairs in the past, are reported by various sources to be considering a bid for Expo 2020, a Registered Expo of six months’ duration. Nearly one-third of the cities are in the U.S., which is not a member of the BIE. For one of these cities to move forward with a bid, there would need to be several initiatives undertaken to restore membership and revitalize the process for hosting an Expo on U.S. soil, a procedure which has been dormant for 22 years, ever since Chicago withdrew its successful bid for Expo ’92 in 1988.

Gordon Linden AIA, AICP (www.gordonlinden.com) is coauthor of The Expo Book: A Guide to Planning , Organizing and Hosting World Expositions. (www.theexpobook.com)

38

2011 TEA ANNUAL


Create with Modern Masters

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Your Source for Theme Inspired Paints and Coatings ,_[LYPVY0U[LYPVYt;OLTL7HYRZ ,U[LY[HPUTLU[=LU\LZt*HZPUVZ 5PNO[*S\IZt/VZWP[HSP[`t4\YHSZt*VTTLYJPHS9L[HPS

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heme Parks & Amusement Parks: Who Owns What Who owns the parks, and who owns the chains that own the parks? By Tracy Kahaner

This is the third annual ua study I have conducted for the TEA Annual regarding ownership of major theme parks, amusement parks and park chains. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s was expanded to include smaller branded attractions.

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TEA already compiles, jointly with AECOM, an industry-wide annual study regarding attendance at the various parks (the TEA/AECOM â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theme Indexâ&#x20AC;?). As in previous reports, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Top 10 Theme Park Chainsâ&#x20AC;? from that report was a foundation for this study.

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Retail districts, overnight accommodations and residential communities, including cruise ships and campsites, are excluded from this report. Each listed attraction is an amusement or theme park, unless otherwise noted. In several cases the descriptive term used to define an attraction can vary from one chain to the next. For example, attractions defined as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;midway siteâ&#x20AC;? by Merlin might be defined as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;family entertainment centerâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;themed attractionâ&#x20AC;? by another.

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With the exception of some Merlin properties, as in previous versions of this study, only those parks with separate gates are included.

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1) Walt Disney Parks and Resorts Worldwide

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2) Merlin Entertainments Group Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

40

2011 TEA ANNUAL

Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\¡V$QLPDO.LQJGRP/DNH%XHQD9LVWD  Florida Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\¡V%OL]]DUG%HDFK ZDWHUSDUN /DNH%XHQD Vista, Florida Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\&DOLIRUQLD$GYHQWXUH$QDKHLP&DOLI Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\¡V+ROO\ZRRG6WXGLRV/DNH%XHQD9LVWD  Florida Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\¡V7\SKRRQ/DJRRQ ZDWHUSDUN /DNH  Buena Vista, Florida Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\ODQG$QDKHLP&DOLI Â&#x2021; 'LVQH\ODQG3DULV0DUQH/D9DOOpH)UDQFH Â&#x2021; Epcot, Lake Buena Vista, Florida Â&#x2021; +RQJ.RQJ'LVQH\ODQG/DQWDX,VODQG+RQJ  Kong Â&#x2021; Magic Kingdom, Lake Buena Vista, Florida Â&#x2021; 7RN\R'LVQH\ODQG8UD\DVX&KLED-DSDQ Â&#x2021; 7RN\R'LVQH\6HD8UD\DVX&KLED-DSDQ Â&#x2021; :DOW'LVQH\6WXGLRV3DUN0DUQH/D9DOOpH  France

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ditor’s Note

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The Publishers believe the information in this article to have been well-researched and T a accurate at press time (late October 2010). We apologize for any inadvertent omissions or errors. We are indebted to the owner/operators who took the time to review this o information for its accuracy.

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3) Parques Reunidos ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

$TXDOXG ZDWHUSDUN /H7RXTXHW)UDQFH $TXDULXPRIWKH/DNHV ]RR QDWXUHSDUN &XPEULD8. $TXySROLV ZDWHUSDUN VHYHQFHQWHUVLQ6SDLQ %HQDOPiGHQD&DEOH&DU$QGDOXFLD6SDLQ %LJ.DKXQD·V ZDWHUSDUN 'HVWLQ)ORULGD Blackpool Zoo, Lancashire UK %R6RPPDUODQG ZDWHUSDUN %¡1RUZD\ %REEHMDDQODQG/LFKWDDUW%HOJLXP %RRPHUV IDPLO\HQWHUWDLQPHQWFHQWHUV /RFDWLRQVWKURXJKRXW&DOLIRUQLD)ORULGD1HZ<RUN86$ %RQERQ/DQG+ROPH2OVWUXS'HQPDUN Bournemouth Oceanarium, Bournemouth UK &DVWOH3DUN5LYHUVLGH&DOLI 'HOÀQDULR&RVWD'DXUDGD ]RR QDWXUHSDUN 6SDLQ )DXQLD ]RR QDWXUHSDUN 0DGULG ,GOHZLOG(DVW/LJRQLHU3HQQV\OYDQLD .HQQ\ZRRG(DVW/LJRQLHU3HQQV\OYDQLD /·2FHDQRJUjÀF ]RR QDWXUHSDUN 9DOHQFLD6SDLQ Lake Compounce, Bristol, Connecticut 0DGULG&DEOH&DU6SDLQ 0DOLEX IDPLO\HQWHUWDLQPHQWFHQWHU 1RUFURVV*HRUJLD5HGZRRG &LW\&DOLIDQG+RXVWRQ86$ $TXDULXP0DUGHO3ODWD$UJHQWLQD 0DULQHODQG$QWLEHV)UDQFH 0LUDELODQGLD5DYHQQD,WDO\ 0RXQWDLQ&UHHN ZDWHUSDUN 9HUQRQ1HZ-HUVH\ 0RXQWDVLD IDPLO\ HQWHUWDLQPHQW FHQWHU  0DULHWWD *HRUJLD DQG Dallas, USA 0RYLH3DUN%RWWURS.LUFKKHOOHQ*HUPDQ\ 3DUTXHGH$WUDFFLRQHV0DGULG 3DUTXH:DUQHU0DGULG 5DJLQJ:DWHUV ZDWHUSDUN 6DFUDPHQWR6DQ-RVHDQG6DQ'LPDV &DOLI 6DQGFDVWOH ZDWHUSDUN :HVW+RPHVWHDG3HQQV\OYDQLD 6HD/LIH3DUN+DZDLL ]RR QDWXUHSDUN 2DKX+DZDLL 6HOZR$YHQWXUD ]RR QDWXUHSDUN (VWHSRQD6SDLQ 6HOZR0DULQD ]RR QDWXUHSDUN (VWHSRQD6SDLQ 6LOYHU6SULQJV ]RR QDWXUHSDUN )ORULGD86$ 6SHHG=RQH IDPLO\HQWHUWDLQPHQWFHQWHU /RV$QJHOHVDQG'DOODV 6SOLVK6SODVK ZDWHUSDUN 5LYHUKHDG1HZ<RUN

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2011 TEA ANNUAL

41


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Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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4) Six Flags Entertainment Corporation

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Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

La Ronde, Montreal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²WKURXJKVDIDUL -DFNVRQ1HZ-HUVH\ 6L[ )ODJV :KLWHZDWHU ZDWHU SDUN  0DULHWWD Georgia

5) SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment 6L[)ODJV

Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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6) Universal Studios Parks and Resorts Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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7) Cedar Fair Entertainment Co. Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

42

2011 TEA ANNUAL

&DOLIRUQLD·V*UHDW$PHULFD6DQWD&ODUD Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wonderland, Toronto Carowinds, Charlotte, North Carolina &HGDU3RLQW6DQGXVN\2KLR 'RUQH\ 3DUN  :LOGZDWHU .LQJGRP $OOHQWRZQ 3HQQV\OYDQLD Geauga Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wildwater Kingdom, Cleveland, Ohio *LOUR\*DUGHQV)DPLO\7KHPH3DUN*LOUR\&DOLI PDQDJHPHQWRIWKLVSDUN

Kings Dominion, Richmond, Virginia

Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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8) OCT Parks Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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9) Compagnie des Alpes Family Recreation Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

$TXDSDUN ZDWHUSDUN /H%RXYHUHW6ZLW]HUODQG $TXDULXPGXYDOGHORLUH)UDQFL Avonturenpark Hellendoorn, Netherlands Parc Bagatelle, Merlimont, France Bellewaerde Park, Ypres, Belgium Bioscope, Ungersheim, France 'ROSKLQDULXP+DUGHUZLMN1/ )RUW)XQ1RUWK5KLQH:HVWSKDOLD*HUPDQ\ France Miniature, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France *UDQG$TXDULXP6DLQW0DORFHGH[)UDQFH *UHYLQ ZD[PXVHXP 3DULV /D0HUGH6DEOH(UPHQRQYLOOH)UDQFH 0LQL&KDWHDX[$PERLVH)UDQFH 3DUF$VWHUL[3ODLOO\)5 3ODQHWH6DXYDJH VDIDULSDUN 3RUW6DLQW3HUH)UDQFH 3OHDVXUHZRRG+LOOV6XIIRON$QJOHWHUUH8. :DOLEL$TXLWDLQH5RFTXHIRUW)UDQFH :DOLEL%HOJLXP:DYUH :DOLEL5KRQH$OSHV/HV$YHQLHUHV)UDQFH :DOLEL:RUOG3D\V%DV1HWKHUODQGV

10) Aspro Group Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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ÂŽ

ETC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; providing the most innovative products to lighting professionals for 35 years.

Contact the ETC professional serving you: Karl Haas, Western Region Sales Manager Bryan Yeager, Central Region Sales Manager Craig Fox, Northeast Region Sales Manager George Doukas, Southeast Region Sales Manager Bryan Palmer, Architectural Controls Product Manager Joe Bokelman, Market Manager

Americas Tel +1 608 831 4116



Europe Tel +44 (0)20 8896 1000



Asia Tel +852 2799 1220



www.etcconnect.com


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ENHANCING EXPERIENCE THROUGH INNOVATIVE AND REALISTIC SOLUTIONS SAN FRANCISCO

LOS ANGELES

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Magic is elemental animatronics show action systems special effects sets & scenery show control systems specialty actuators complete creative design

www.garnerholt.com www.ghpproducts.com

44

2011 TEA ANNUAL

Your show. Our business.®

RALEIGH-DURHAM


Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

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Additional Major Park Chains

Sea World

PARC Management / CNL Lifestyle Properties operti Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

&DPHORW3DUN IDPLO\HQWHUWDLQPHQW %DNHUVÃ&#x20AC;HOG&DOLI 'DULHQ/DNH%XIIDOR1HZ<RUN Elitch Gardens, Denver, Colorado Fiddlesticks Fun Center, Tempe, Arizona )URQWLHU&LW\2NODKRPD&LW\ Funtastics Fun Center, Tucson, Arizona 0DJLF6SULQJV &U\VWDO)DOOV+RW6SULQJV$UL]RQD 0RXQWDVLD)DPLO\)XQ&HQWHU1RUWK5LFKODQG7H[DV 0\UWOH:DYHV:DWHU3DUN0\UWOH%HDFK6RXWK&DUROLQD 1$6&$56SHHG3DUN6W/RXLV0LVVRXUL6HYLHUYLOOH7HQQHVVHH&RQFRUG1RUWK&DUROLQD0\UWOH%HDFK6RXWK&DUROLQD 3DYLOLRQ1RVWDOJLD3DUN0\UWOH%HDFK6RXWK&DUROLQD SplashTown, Houston :DWHUZRUOG&RQFRUG&DOLI :KLWH:DWHU%D\2NODKRPD&LW\ Wild Waves & Enchanted Village, Seattle, Washington =XPD)XQ&LW\LQ+RXVWRQ7H[DV.QR[YLOOH7HQQHVVHH&KDUORWWH North Carolina

Village Roadshow Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

$XVWUDOLDQ2XWEDFN6SHFWDFXODU¶+HURHVRIWKH/LJKW+RUVH· GLQQHUVKRZ *ROG&RDVW$XVWUDOLD .HOO\7DUOWRQ·V$QWDUFWLF(QFRXQWHU 8QGHUZDWHU:RUOG$XFNODQG New Zealand 2FHDQZRUOG0DQO\ DTXDULXP 6\GQH\ 3DUDGLVH&RXQWU\$XVVLH)DUP7RXU*ROG&RDVW$XVWUDOLD Sea World, Gold Coast, Australia 6\GQH\$TXDULXP$XVWUDOLD 6\GQH\7RZHU2EVHUYDWLRQ'HFN6N\ZDONDQG2]7UHN5LGH RSHQ DLUDWWUDFWLRQV

6\GQH\:LOGOLIH:RUOG LQWHUDFWLYHDWWUDFWLRQ $XVWUDOLD :DUQHU%URV0RYLH:RUOG*ROG&RDVW$XVWUDOLD Wetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n Wild Water World, Gold Coast, Australia Wetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n WIld Hawaii, Oahu5 :HW·Q:LOG3KRHQL[$UL]RQD

Universal Studios

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+)(RSHUDWHV&ODVVLF&DEOH&DU6LJKWLQJ +)(LVDQRSHUDWLQJSDUWQHUZLWK'ROO\3DUWRQLQWKH'ROO\ZRRG&RPSDQ\ZKLFKRZQVWKH'ROO\ZRRG 7KHPH3DUNDQG'ROO\ZRRG·V6SODVK&RXQWU\7KH'ROO\ZRRG&RPSDQ\LVWKHODUJHVWVKDUHKROGHULQWKH 'L[LH6WDPSHGHGLQQHUVKRZDWWUDFWLRQV +)(RSHUDWHV$WODQWD·V6WRQH0RXQWDLQ3DUNLQFRQMXFWLRQZLWKWKH6WDWHRI*HRUJLD 9LOODJH5RDGVKRZRSHUDWHVWKLV&1/LIHVW\OH3URSHUW\ OCT Parks

2011 TEA ANNUAL

45


,QGXVWU\6QDSVKRWV

CHAIN OWNERSHIP

Universal Studios Parks and Resorts

Walt Disney isney Parks and Resorts Worldwide The US theme parks are owned and operated by the Walt Disney Parks and Resorts div division of The Walt Disney ney Company. The Company manages and has 51 perce percent effective ownership interest in the operations of Disneyland Paris. The Compa Company also has a 47 per-r cent ownership interest rest in the operations of Hong Kong Disn Disneyland Resort, with the Govv ernment off the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region owning own the majority interest. A separate eparate Hong Kong subsidiary of the Company is responsible for managing this resort. Tokyo Disney Resort is owned and operated by an unrelated Japanese corporation, the Oriental Land Co., Ltd. of Japan. The Walt Disney Company earns royalties on o revenues generated by the resort, but has no equity interest. inte

Universa Parks and Resorts is a division of NBC Universal. Before September of Universal 2010, NBC Universal was 80 percent owned by General Electric and 20 percent owned by Vivendi. During the later part of September, Vivendi sold 7.66 percent stake to GE and is scheduled to sell the remaining 12.34 percent of its stake in NBC Universal to GE later in the year. NBC Universal wholly owns Universal Studios Hollywood and has significant interests in Universal Orlando Resort, Universal Studios Japan, Universal Studios Singapore, and their respective theme parks. Universal City Property Management and affiliates of the Blackstone Group equally own the Universal Orlando Resort. USJ Co Ltd. operates the theme park in Japan (Universal Studios Japan) under a license by Vivendi Universal Entertainment LLP and other Universal group companies regarding use of intellectual properties.

Merlin Entertainments ts Gro Group

Cedar Fair Entertainment Company

Merlin’s ownership structure ucture is now: KIRKBI 36 per cent, c Blackstone 34 per cent and CVC 28 per cent. Thee management of Merlin holds the rremaining shares.

Cedar Fair is a publicly traded partnership headquartered in Sandusky, Ohio. The Partnership is one of the largest regional amusement park operators in the world. All parks are owned and by Cedar Fair, LP.

Parques Reunidos

OCT Group

The company is currently owned by European private equity quity firm Candover Investments. However, in August of this year it was reported that Candover over had been reviewing options for Parques Reunidos and has received offers from various us pprivate equity firms. Movie Park Germany was acquired in 2010.

Shenzhen Overseas Chinese Town Co. Ltd., formerly Overseas Chinese Town Enterprises Company (OCT Group), is a China based enterprise that owns a series of enterprises and brands, including Splendid China, China Folk Culture Villages, Window of the World and Happy Valley. Compagnie des Alpes Family Recreation

SeaWorld Blue Horizons Show

Compagnie des Alpes is a public company that operates many amusement and leisure parks. During March 2009, Compaigne des Alpes adopted a single-tier management structure with a Board of Directors. Aspro Group Aspro Ocio, S.A. operates leisure parks and centers in Spain, France, Finland, Portugal, Switzerland, Belgium, and the United Kingdom.

Additional Park Chains: Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation Herschend Family Entertainment Corporation is a family-owned company that owns, operates or partners in themed attractions in the US. It is the largest familyowned theme park corporation in America. PARC Management /CNL Lifestyle Properties

Six Flags Entertainment Corporation Six Flags Entertainment Corporation owns or operates most of its theme, amusement, and water parks. The Six Flag properties that are less than wholly owned currently consist of Six Flags Over Georgia, Six Flags Over Texas and Six Flags White Water Atlanta. During February 2010, Six Flags Entertainment Corporation decided to reject the lease with the Kentucky State Fair Board and no longer operates the Louisville theme park. SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment In December 2009, Anheuser-Busch InBev and The Blackstone Group announced closing the transaction for Blackstone Capital Partners V L.P. to purchase Busch Entertainment Corporation from Anheuser-Busch InBev for up to USD $2.7 billion. The purchase price was declared to be comprised of a cash payment of USD $2.3 billion and a right to par-r ticipate in Blackstone’s return on its initial investment capped at USD $400 million. Busch Entertainment Corporation is now known as SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment.

46

2011 TEA ANNUAL

PARC management owns and operates entertainment facilities across North Amer-r ica. Its portfolio consists of theme parks, water parks, family entertainment centers and more. PARC Management is the largest attractions operator of CN Lifestyle Properties. Village Roadshow Village Roadshow is the largest theme park operator in Australia. Having acquired 100 percent of the theme parks in mid-2006, Village Roadshow remains Time Warner’s licensed partner for the Warner Bros. Movie World property in Australia. In February 2008 Village Roadshow acquired Sydney Attractions Group and now owns Sydney Aquarium, the Sydney Tower and other attractions.

Tracy Kahaner of Kahaner Research (www.kahanerresearch.blogspot.com) conducts studies for the attractions industry. Her expertise is in providing vital information to the concept phase of a leisure time attraction, to analyze the market potential and competitive environment. She is also the news editor of Blooloop.com.


2011 TEA Advertiser Index AECOM BAAM Birket BRC Imagination Arts Jonathan Casson Conceptual Innovative Artists Concept to Creation Digital Illusions Dillon Works! Electronic Theater Controls ETI Nick FARMER Fountain People FX Group Garner Holt Jack GILLET Global Scenic Services The HETTEMA Group Christian HOPE Design Tracy KAHANER

96 9 44 19 19 21 35 2 30 43 35 38 38 19 44 30 10 18 27 13

12 23 30 25 47 39 27 13 35 17 30 95 5 12 44 27 31 35 15 13

Mario KANBERG Design Lexington Main Street Design ernie MARJORAM Medailion Modern Masters Mousetrappe Nautilus Entertainment Design Judith RUBIN Sanderson Group Sywa Sung Taylor Studios TEA Association TEA Association Thorburn Associates TRANS FX UVFX VEE Warner Brothers Wildfire

2011 TEA ANNUAL

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aecom.com

The business of entertainment AECOM provides unrivaled expertise in the business of entertainment. We are in a collaborative community of multidisciplinary consultants enhancing and sustaining the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s built, natural and social environments. We are part of an integrated practice that brings together planning, design, architecture, and landscape architecture, in addition to the pioneering economics expertise that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve provided to developers, operators, and investors for the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading attractions.

2011 TEA Annual  

The 2011 edition of the annual publication from the Themed Entertainment Association, serving the global visitor attractions industry.

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