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V4.11

+ + + GLICK CORNELL UNIVERSITY +

RYAN_ M.ARCH +

CANIDATE + + 2012

UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO

B.ARCH ARCHITECTURE 2010

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RYAN THOMAS

GLICK

EDUCATION Cornell University

Master of Architecture Candidate Professional degree December 2012

University at Buffalo

Bachelor of Science in Architecture Pre professional degree Cum Laude Honors May 7th 2010

HONORS Mary Miller Lyons Graduate Fellowship

Cornell University 2010

Deans List

2009-2010

Invited Guest Critic

University at Buffalo_2010

Academic Excellence Celebration

Spring 2010 Selected to represent Buffalo's school of architecture at the university wide Academic Excellence Celebration. Selected students are chosen by the dean of their coinciding school within the university for a public display of research

Next Stop Design Competition

Summer 2009 Awarded 10th of 268 Entries

Hyatt Award

Spring 2007 Awarded to top five students per semester

Buffalo Scaled Exhibit

Anderson Gallery Fall 2006 Public display of semester work

Atelier 2007 & 2008

University at Buffalo Architectural Show (work displayed)

Regional Scholastic Silver Key Winner

Spring 2006 Northeast Regional Art Competition


10150 Dietrich Rd Breinigsvile, PA 18031 rtg53@cornell.edu (484)-515-60144

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Craig Nealy Architects

New York,NY Architectural Intern-Summer 2009- Current Responsibilities included maintaining correspondence with India clients on a daily basis, while working on design development, project proposals, and 3d rendering. I worked on concept design, rendering, material selection for Optx eyewear retail space. I also designed a Mรถbius strip to hang in Tulips retail store in Pune, India. I developed the exterior facade for the chartered hotel in Ahmedabad, India. I developed a presentation for a lecture at the Leela Palace in Bangalore, India.

W2A Design Group

Allentown, PA Architectural Intern-Summer and Winter 2008 Responsibilities included working on design proposals and physical models. I worked on a project proposal for the Performing Arts High School of the Lehigh valley and Wilson Area High School in Reading,PA. I completed physical models for Nazareth Slate Belt Church, and Parkland Community Library.

Independent Study

Buffalo, NY Design team member semina exposure to architectural design As a part of this seminar, competition as a serious form of design practice. Through the establishment of a hypothetical design office we have entered between 2-4 architectural design competitions per semester. This seminar performs much like a design studio/office with the professor acting as the design lead. Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009

PROFICIENCIES Computer Aided Design

Proficient in Auto CAD,Rhinoceros 4.0 Intermediate skills in Grasshopper, Vray

Physical Modeling

Basswood and Chipboard Concrete,Hydrocal, Rock-ite Wood & Metal working tools Laser Cutting CNC Router 3D printing

Adobe

Photoshop, Illustrator, In design, Premiere


SELECTED WORK

Interface Textile Projection Spheres Old Fort Niagara Luanda Evolutionary Systems Next Stop Union Station Craig Nealy Architects Den[city]

month

01

02

03

04

05


07 08 09 10 year

06

07

08

09 10

11

12


ICORNELL N T E R F A FALL C 2010E UNIVERSITY DESIGN STUDIO 3 BROOKLYN,NY RYAN GLICK & ELIZABETH KANG

STUDIO PROFESSOR

GISELA BAURMANN


Transfusing Redhook Fall 2010_ M. ARCH_Design Studio 3 Location: Redhook ,Brooklyn ,NY

This semester work was based around challenging traditional procedures and protocols through the development of and adaptable apparatus which inhibits a three dimensional aggregation of activity. This apparatus was derived from a series of diagrammatic investigations. The spatial articulation developed serves as a teen center adjacent to the existing Redhook Community Justice Center. Through our semesters work we have developed a unit of interface which evokes versatility while remaining constrained within itself as a singular object. Pulling the main circulation up and into the mixing chamber located in the heart of the site. This acts as the distribution interface which serves the community center. By utilizing the unit at drastically different scales we were able to create occupiable spatial articulations which serve as the four main hubs positioned on the site, which are then stitched together using a patterning of the units.

Abandoned Industrial Development

IKEA

Community Art & Culture

=

UNIT

PIER & MARKET

+

SKIN_FACADE

STRUCTURE


SECTION D-D

Conceptual Activity Diagram

+

+

APERTURE

COVERING_PROTECTION


Diagrammatic Models A series of models moving from conceptual diagrams into physical representations were constructed both digitally and physically. Each technique of modeling provides inherent constraints associated with the medium. Using these constraints as a tool for evolution was important to the development of the unit.

conceptual circulation diagram


Program Creating a fluid Interfaces between adjacent programs was integral to the function of the teen center. Programmatic interface diagram

FLEX CLASSROOM 1000

THERAPY 450

COUNCELING 450

675

ART THERAPY

KITCHEN 500

MIXING2100CHAMBER DINING 900

1100

Auditorium CAFE GALLERY 1500

ADMINISTRATION OFFICES 700

COMMUNITY PARK AND GARDEN 1700


A B

C

Existing unused building

Existing

E

E

D

D A Existing

Redhook Community Justice Center

B

C

site plan

SECTION C-C


EAST ELEVATION

SECTION A-A


Floor 1 plan

ntrance

cess NYPD Ac

Second ary E

Art Therapy Classroom

OďŹƒces

Auditorium

Cafe/Gallery

Community Garden/Park

up

down


Floor 2 plan

Flex Classroom

Kitchen

RR

Counceling

Counceling

RR

Dining Art Therapy Classroom

Auditorium

Mixing Chamber

oC nt

io

ct

ne

n Co JC

Garden Park

up

down


TEXTILE PROJECTION UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO FALL 2008 DESIGN STUDIO 5

PROJECT COORDINATOR

ARC_301

KENNETH MCKAY


Textile Projection

Fall 2008_ Design Studio 5 Location: Niagara, NY The ideology behind my project for this semester dealt with the projection from a chosen pattern, which created a structural framework which could be used for the suspension of programmatic volumes. After the initial framework was produced, an analysis of environmental performative criteria was done. Using these environmental performance ideas the main programmatic volumes were introduced. In this case these volumes were an aviary for birds (air) and an aquarium for fish (water). I used my developed framework as a device which could suspend these volumes, while having all necessary support systems within the structure. The site was located .25 miles north of Niagara Falls (American side).

orginal pattern

superimposed perforated volume

filtered pattern


Re-application of perforated panels Warping the perforated panels through the means of the original pattern provides reinvented perforations for environmental performance

original pattern

creation of 3-D height field

projection of grid

superimposed grid

isolated field pieces

flattened field pieces


Concept suspension models


southwest

northwest

pedestrian bridge view

exterior rear


section b-b


a

a

b

b

c

c

d

d

e

e

section d-d


plan a-a

plan b-b

plan c-c


plan d-d

plan e-e


S P H E R SPRING E 2008S UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO DESIGN STUDIO 4

ARC_202

COORDINATOR SERGIO LOPEZ-PINEIRO PROJECT PROFESSOR DENNIS MAHER


My project dealt

exclusively with shells. In my first set of precedents, each precedent used the shell in a different way, and exhibited a different relationship to ground. In each project, how the shells were located and developed was a driving force by which I set up rules which would allow me to make design decisions. These rules first dealt with three concentric shells, next, manipulating the shells along a center rotation point, and finally shifting the shells along an axis. Each sphere deals with these rules in different ways and has different relationships to ground

spheres Breif:Explore the investiga-

tion into the study of the sphere as a formal, programmatic,organizational, and symbolic archetype.The design methodology, identical for each project, is divided into two interrelated phases. First, an initial analysis of architectural precedents will be used as a way of uncovering architectural principles. In the second phase we used these principles and strategies to propose new architecture. This process was repeated three times, one for each project.


Sphere 1_Temple for three beliefs. The obstructions for Sphere I are as follows: -Three different independent points of access -The most central interior space of the sphere should be left unoccupied. -The three different ‘sacred’ spaces should be located centrifugally around the unoccupied center.

concentric

rotate x

rotate y

ryan t glick

A-A

B-B


south elevation


Sphere 2_Recreation facility The obstructions for Sphere II are as follows: Sphere II should respond to the extended context defined by Sphere I. Context does not only refer to the physical site reconfigured by Sphere I but also to its circulation path, its skin’s materiality, its conceptual argument, its structural design, etc. Program Recreation: Resort to include a pool, a cinema, and a disco. Spatial Organization The three programs are to be treated as three independent but interrelated volumes contained by specific surfaces.

Process: Shift along axis

concentric

ryan t glick

C-C

shift

shift


west elevation


Sphere 3_Linked Neighbors

Obstructions:The third sphere deals with the neighboring sites. Create a element or elements on the site or within the site which link your site to others. These links can be physical or visual. Links between sites are to be created through the same principles which sphere 1 and 2 were created upon.

D-D


east elevation


Site Context

circulation

site

site plan collage

plan with neighboring sites and views from sphere 3

form


OLD FORT NIAGARA UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO FALL 2007 DESIGN STUDIO 3

PROJECT COORDINATOR STUDIO PROFESSOR

ARC_201

MERDAD HADIGHI JAMES LOWDER


Old Fort Niagara Fall 2007 Design Studio 2 Location: Youngstown, NY

Semester objective: Design a new visitors center based. on concepts derived from original precedent analysis. My project took on a different approach by taking existing structure and adapting it to meet the new programmatic require ments. This provided as little disruption to the 300 year old fort as possible. Precedent: Bunker Valintin is a World War two uboat assembly bunker located in Farge Germany. The assembly bunker consists of 11 assembly stations which tightly fit between the 12 meter thick concrete walls. The circulation is which is carved out of these thick walls which surrounds the program, was the driving concept for my semesters work.

solid_void studies

void solid


circulation circulation

assembly station

assembly stations (program)

Original Precedent Drawing Graphite on Stonehenge 36x42�


Circulation studies

circulation

volume/program

circulation

In these models, the conceptual developments from previous analyses push circulation to the exterior of the building. The circulation moves inside and outside, giving views of the fort at specific points which re quire a minimum elevation. Housing circulation within the depth of the exterior wall, allows views to be unveiled of the fort at specific moments section model

This cast model was an investigation into how circulation could begin to move up around programmatic volumes. The volume sizes were derived from existing perforations in the existing structure found on site

Presentation model


section_concept model_graphite on stonehenge 36x42�

Final unfolded elevation_graphite on stonehenge 36x42�


L

U

A

N

D

A

COMPETITION ENTRY SPRING 2010 WOVEN ENVIRONMENTS RESPONSIBILITIES:RENDERING,DIAGRAMS,TEXT PROJECT TEAM: RYAN GLICK,LAIA CELMA, CHRISTINA PARRENO,JEFF STEWART, IAN KAPLAN


Woven Environments Design Competition_Spring 2010 Location: Luanda, Angola

The aim of this competition was to design a single family dwelling aimed at severely deprived families in Luanda. The goal of the project is to provide units that provide poverty reduction and the provision of adequate housing, infrastructure , health, safety, and basic services. For that purpose, the house unit needs to comply to our four self prescribed credentials. 1-Radically economical in cost 2-Include the possibility of evolutionary systems 3- Suited to the cultural, economic and social circumstances of the area 4-Able to weave into the urban fabric of the city

Strategies:

This project consists of two main strategies that intend to respond to the questions raised above. Both strategies work together in the urban and in the unit scale and they will not only enable the project to meet the essentials needed but they will provide additional values.

Strategy 1:

FOOT PRINT ECOLOGIES-INFRUSTRUCTURAL WALLS Our first approach to the proposal of a new urbanized area in Luanda is to maintain the natural or agricultural landscape. The design of the infrastructural wall, allows for all electric, water and sewage systems to be incorporated within the wall. Avoiding the impact on the natural ground will act as a noninvasive adaptable system which can be implemented with a gradual growth. The five basic functions of the walls are: 1. Carrying all sanitations and mechanical systems 2. Elevate the slab of the units from the natural ground in order to protect the interior from humidity and seasonal flooding. 3. Provide a stable support for the structure of the house. 4. Act as dividers of the outdoor domestic space,allowing areas to be filled in with soil farming 5. In uneven topography, the infrustrucural walls can be used as retaining walls, which can create terraces.


Strategy 2:

CUSTOMIZED ADAPTABILITY- THREE UNIT MODULES The basic layout of the 100sqm living unit consists of 3 modular units that are supported by the infrastructural walls. These modules are set up in the 250 sqm plot following a system where numerous variations and spatial configurations are possible. This allows the outdoor space to respond and perform to individual user needs.


plan


EvolutionarySystems UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO SPRING 2009 DESIGN STUDIO 6

PROJECT COORDINATOR STUDIO PROFESSOR

ARC_302

OMAR KHAN PETER STEC


Laboratory for Evolutionary Systems Design Studio 6_Spring 2009 Location: University at Bualo Medical Campus

The site for this project was located on the University at Buffalo’s downtown medical campus. The programmatic constraints for this project consisted of a research facility for the study of social, biological, and technological networking. The development of the programmatic swarm as and evolutionary system, was the driving force behind formal and conceptual design decisions. The conception of programmatic swarm though a generation based algorithm yields many benefits. Using this systems as a means for both formal and programmatic organiztions and allows for a diversified program in plan, while maintaining continuity in section. Having a diverse programmatic plan in a research facility promotes social networking between different types of research. The continuity in section allows for the large requirement of servicing for each type of research to be integrated from floor to floor. Social Networking System

Private

Semi - Private

Public

Evolutionary System (swarm)

Proposed Research Facility (program) Lobby Circulation Restrooms Lecture Halls conference rooms

Social Networking

Biological Networking

Technological Networking

Wet Laboratory Dry Laboratory Research Offices

Dry Laboratory Research Offices

Dry Laboratory Research Offices


Programmtic Evolution


6th floor wet laboratory

model evolution


Site context The advantage of using programmatic swarming as a driving organizational device for the research facility is attaining a diversersified program in plan, while keeping programmatic continuity in section. Having a diverse programmatic plan in a research facility, promotes social networking between different types of research. The continuity in section allows for the large requirement of servicing for each type of research to be integrated from floor to floor. Since the swarm was used to organize program, similar programs become closer in proximity to each other as floors are added


ground/public floor


2nd floor


3rd floor(connection to existing)


4th floor


section a-a


section b-b


N E X T - S TSUMMER O 2009 P DESIGN COMPETITION PLACED 10 OF 268

PROJECT TEAM

RYAN GLICK


Next Stop Design Competition Competition Entry_Summer 2009 Location Salt Lake City, UT

This competition is part of a research project called “Crowd sourcing Public Participation in Transit Planning. The concept of this bus stop is the use of a standardized kit of parts. This allows the station to be adapted in size for various locations. It is equipped with solar panels to make it fully sustainable. The front facade is positioned close to the curb to maximize safety for waiting passengers. The curved facade prevents pedestrians from waiting to close to the street while buses arrive and depart. The station is equipped with L.E.D information boards at both ends of the station, a ticket vending located in the middle of the structure, and serves as a LAN Wifi hotspot. There is a ledge for awaiting passengers to utilize. The structure extends to the rear which creates additional covered space for vending of food and beverages and relief from inclement weather for passing pedestrians.

Concept Sketch

Tempered glass panels Solar photo voltaic panels Ticket Vending

Structural steel rib 1� Tempered Glass Seating Food & Beverage Vending

Tempered glass panels Structural steel ribs Glass surface L.E.D. Information board


U N I O N - S T A TSPRING I O2009 N INDEPENDENT DESIGN COMPETITON

PROJECT TEAM RYAN GLICK, KYLE RENYOLDS, JAMES LOWDER


union station 2020 Project Team:, Kyle Renyolds, RyanGlick(section,renderings), James Lowder

We approached the rationalization of movement as an

opportunity to incorporate the urban design principles evident in burnhams 1909 plan for Chicago into our union station 2020. To accomplish this, we internalized urban planning principles to the interior of the architectural object through the conception of a super lobby. Burnhams promenades and boulevards, essentially civic spaces that were not privatized, inspired the super-lobby model of linking public programs located outside the context of the commercial institutions while simutaniously supporting commerce. To that end, the super-lobby is bound to the object in the service of commercial institutions, but also serves a civic purpose. The super lobby also allows us to embrace the programmatic complexity of the project. We abandoned the complex linear systems in favor of creating spaces that interweave civic,commercial, and utilitarian functions. Belong transcending plinths and towers in the design, the resulting overlap will support new social space in much the same way the burnham sought to do so a century ago.Innovative mixeduse design must be adaptable and sustainable in order to be relevant. The best way in which to support a livable, sustainable metropolis is to design a livable and sustainable infrastructure. We accomplished this by supporting current programmatic requirements, anticipating obsolescence, and designing a space that will adapt to future programmatic conditions. Rather than burying parking underground, we incorporated it into the design through complex program juxtapositions. One can imagine a future in which the ubiquity of the automobile is no more. Particularly in the context of a densely populated urban center. rather than allow fifty percent of the interior space of union station 2020 to be rendered obsolete, the open floor slabs are flexible in order to accommodate evolving programmatic requirements


Programmatic Development


C R A I G - N 05.2009 E A - 8.2009 LY CRAIG NEALY ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTURAL INTERN RESPONSIBILITES:

NEW YORK, NY

PROJECT PROPOSALS,DESIGN DEVELOPMENT,CORRESPONDANCE MATERIAL SELECTION, RENDERING


Mobius Strip: Tulips Retail Objective:

Design a dynamic mobius strip to hang in a double height space in Tulips Fabric store in Pune, India. The strip should have depth from each view. The strip utilizes sweeping rails with eyelets every 15cm by which steel cable is strung between. The mobius strip adds dynamism while attracting attention to the interior of the store.

perspective

left elevation

right elevation

front elevation


Ryan Glick for CNA- Mobius strip


Location :Johnston, RI Optx eyewear is a new divison of Diamante Optical. The project consisted of turning the existing waiting room into a high end retail space for eyewear. The new space will house appoximetly 450 pairs of luxury eyewear, selling tables and lounge furniture for waiting.


Ryan Glick for CNA-Project Proposal


D E N [ C I T Y ] UNIVERSITY AT BUFFALO COMPREHENSIVE STUDIO

FALL 2009 ARC_401

PROJECT COORDINATOR STUDIO PROFESSOR

ANNETTE LECUYER HIRO HATA


Den[city] Design Studio 6_Fall 2009 Location: Buffalo, NY The focus of this semester is comprehensive architectural design. The synthesis of concept and making. For this project my goal was to bring private outdoor space to a high density urban condition. Along with the 24 residential units required, a mixed-use program of our choice was also required. I created an urban topography which becomes a mediator between public(theatre & galleries) and private space(housing) along with drawing in the public from Chippewa avenue. This mediator not only separates two different programs via a spatial buffer in section, but also allows for usable green space which separates the residential lobbies in plan. The for the mixed-use public space, I chose an exterior amphitheater which has covered and uncovered space along with interior gallery spaces bordering it at the north and south end. Creating a level of transparency between these public spaces both in plan and section was a design decision which was pointed at maintaining fluid public circulation.

high privacy + density

green urban + scape transparency + public

section model


site analysis diagram

civic

-

nightlife

-

n su

-

social -

ir

/a

nightlife

+

Public Program Site Development 1

Site Section (Existing)

2

Cut site

Theatre Upper Gallery

3 Adapted

performance space

(exposed)

(covered) Lower Gallery

view view

Upper Gallery

Lower Gallery

Party Wall

Apt. Circulation

Apt. Circulation

Party Wall

Lower Gallery


[existing]

N Parking floor 30’ 10’

50’


[existing]

Gallery floor


re

delew a delew are

delew are

N

chipp

ewa


[existing]


outdoor theater

open to below

outdoor performance space

topo level


6th floor


north gallery


exterior theater

east elevation


Apartment Distribution

2 Bedroom unit 1100sq’ 10’

2.5’

1’

5’


Studio 600 sq’

3 Bedroom Unit 1260sq’ 10’ 5’

10’

2.5’

2.5’

1’

1’

5’


Life Safety : Means of egress

pressurized egress stairs

Egress Route 10’ 5’

Parking level 20’

40’

N

10’ 5’

Gallery level N 40’

20’


north-west (Delaware Ave) egress stair

10’ 5’

Ground level 20’

40’

N

10’ 5’

6th floor level

40’

20’

N


Building Services: HVAC & Plumbing

distribution ducts

return ducts

grey water radiant floor hot water

fresh air intake

intake fan

10’ 5’

Parking level 20’

40’

N

10’ 5’

Gallery level 20’

40’

N


heating

heating

heating

water

water

water

heating

heating

heating


Structure: Vierendeel truss & super columns concrete loadbearing wall

Veirendeel Truss

4’x4’ reinforced concrete “super” column 2x2 reinforced concrete column

loadbearing wall

open web joist 4’o.c


9. Green Roof Detail

1. 6” Site cast concrete slab with steel decking 2. vapor barrier 3. 4“ Rigid insulation 4. Separation Fabric 5. 2” Drainage, water and retention medium 6. Root barrier/ sediment filter 7. 6” Growing medium 8. Foliage

8.

7.

9.

Virendeel Wall 1. 48”x112“ triple pane argon windows 2. 3” flat plate steel vierendeel truss member 3. 2”x112” ventilation chamber

Detail Assembly A 1. 3” Welded steel angle iron 2. 18” steel wide flange beam with spray on insulation 3. 20“x14” steel C channel 4. 4“ rigid insulation 5. 3” anchor clips 6. 24“x48” poly carbonate panel

assembly 2 6. 1.Wall 1/2” Drywall

2. 2“x4” aluminum stud 3. 3” air space 4. 3” channel bolted to aluminum stud 5. 2” rigid insulation 6. vapor barrier 7. 2” anchor clips 8. 24”x48” poly carbonate panels

5. Typical Floor assembly

1. 14” open web joist @ 30” O.C 2. 6” site cast concrete slab with decking 3. 3” concrete topping with radiant floor tubing @ 12” O.C 4. 2”x4”x8’ wood sleeper bolted to concrete topping @ 16” O.C 5. 3/4” wood flooring 6. 1/2” drywall ( ceiling) 7. 7/8” metal furring channels @16” O.C 8. 1-1/2” cold rolled channels @ 4’ O.C 9. Steel hanger wire 10. Pre-action sprinkler system with 1” piping and recessed sprinkler heads

8.

7.

6. 5.

4. Exterior Floor at Grade

1. 1/2” Drywall (interior ceiling) 2. 7/8” metal furring channels @16” O.C 3. 1-1/2” cold rolled channels @ 4’ O.C 4. Steel hanger wire 5. Pre-action sprinkler system with 1” piping and recessed sprinkler heads 6. 6” site cast concrete slab with decking 7. 3” concrete topping 8. 2” steel drainage pipe 9. 1” sand topping 10. 8x8” concrete pavers 11. 8” steel drainage assembly

4.

3. Foundation Wall at ( Gallery Level ) 1. 18” Site cast foundation wall 2. 2”x4” aluminum stud 3. 3” rigid insulation 4. 1/2” drywall

3.

2. Foundation Wall at ( parking level)

1. 18” Site cast foundation wall 2. 46“ pile cap with 5/8” steel reinforcement @ 12“ O.C 3. 10” steel piles

1.

Parking Floor Assembly 1. 8” Crushed stone base 2. 8“ Site cast concrete slab with 5/8” steel reinforcement @ 12“ O.C 3. 12” Steel floor drain assembly

2.

1.


5.

9.

cking

4.

um

mber

3.


Glick_Ryan_Portfolio_V4.11