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Memphis in May International Festival

Promise Ball

Symphony in the Gardens


2500 Johnson Rd.

4600 Maple Glen Ct.

379 Sweetbrier Road

Germantown, TN 38139

Lakeland, TN 38002

Memphis, TN 38120

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Elegant yet with the feeling of home. New Orleans ambiance is expressed from the 2 acres of professional landscaping with fountains, brick paths, a grand pool, lovely peaceful setting. 5 BR, 5.1 bath home, over 7500 sf,plus 4 car garage with gated entry. If a Chef's kitchen is your dream this one has it! Sub-zero Refrigerator, double oven by VIking & Wolf Gas cook top. Roof is 7 years old! A Special feature is the ELEVATOR! One of a kind glass art panels in the downstairs Master Retreat with a closet that is breathtaking! Master up has added suite as well. More than can be described here! A peaceful setting that has been truly loved! Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist ©

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CONTENTS August 2019

Features

Signature Memphis • 12 Steve Pike Director, Pink Palace Family of Museums

StreetSeen • 20 Carol Buchman Dual Identity as Artist and Teacher

StreetSeen • 22 Chef Cullen Kent Showcasing Modern French Cuisine

RSVPhillippi • 49 Talk About a Giant Leap It is mind boggling that it has been 50 years since the first moon landing.

Events

Jake Adams and Margarett Frisby

Memphis Moments • 24, 25, 30, 32, 34, 35, 40, 42, 43, 44 & 46

Valerie Scott and Belinda Anderson

Memphis in May International Festival • 14 Bicentennial Gala celebrated historic occasion

Raymond Clemmons and Johnathan Gales

Symphony in the Gardens • 26 Musical delights in an outdoor setting

Adam and Lorena MacEvoy

Promise Ball • 36 All about making dreams come true

Cover Photo: Jennifer Rich and Austin Baker at Memphis in May International Festival. Photo by Don Perry

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RSVP Staff Volume XXV • Number VIII

August 2019 Publisher Roy Haithcock

Chris Pugh

Account Executive Chris has been exercising his talent in the advertising world since 1999. He joined the RSVP team in 2009 and brought with him a love for laughter and creativity. Originally from New Albany, Mississippi, Chris has settled in Memphis and enjoys being active in the fashion community.

Editor Emily Adams Keplinger Copy Editor/Accounting Ruth Cassin Contributing Writers Bill Bannister Virginia M. Davis­­­ Dennis Phillippi Gaye Swan Art Director Kim Coleman Photographers Baxter Buck Don Perry Steve Roberts Account Executives Chris Pugh Carter Davis

Carter Davis

Account Executive

Carter is native Memphian and a veteran of the broadcast industry, and magazine publishing. He is also a freelance voiceover talent and can be heard on WKNO 91.1FM on Sundays. Carter is an avid animal lover and likes to work with aquariums as a hobby. He enjoys his East Memphis home with his wife and 2 dogs, and 6 cats.

RSVP Memphis is published monthly by Haithcock Communications, Inc. First class subscriptions are available for $55.00 per year. Send name and address with a check to:

Haithcock Communications, Inc. 2282 Central Avenue Memphis, TN 38104 For advertising information contact:

Roy Haithcock Phone: (901) 276-7787, ext. 101 Fax: (901) 276-7785 publisher@rsvpmagazine.com Visit us online at:

www.rsvpmagazine.com For editorial information or to request coverage of an event, please contact RSVP Magazine one month prior to the event:

Call: 901-276-7787, ext. 105 Fax: 901-276-7785 editor@rsvpmagazine.com Follow us on:

Kim Coleman Art Director

Kim oversees all visual aspects of the magazine — advertising and editorial. Her career encompasses working with both print and digital media for magazines, newspapers and e-publications. Kim and her husband are raising their two children in the Cooper-Young area where their family enjoys the artistic atmosphere and entrepreneurial spirit of Midtown.

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RSVP Memphis Magazine

Copyright 2019 Haithcock Communications, Inc.


The Rices wrote the book on divorce. Literally. The Complete Guide to Divorce Practice is published by the American Bar Association and is recognized as the standard reference for divorce lawyers across the nation for decades. For the 30th Anniversary Edition, the Rices co-author their book with over a thousand pages of insight, experience, and techniques. Lawyers seek out Larry’s expertise and he has lectured on divorce in most states and in some foreign countries. As the only Super Lawyer in the Mid-South certified as a Family Law Specialist, Larry Rice spends most of his time practicing law with the Rice Divorce Team. Thomson Reuters repeatedly ranks Mr. Rice as one of the top 100 lawyers in all fields of law in Tennessee. Larry received The National Academy of Family Attorneys Top Ten Attorney Client Satisfaction Award and is rated on AVVO as 10 out of 10. Nick Rice grew up with the law. After graduating from CBHS and UT-Knoxville, Nick clerked while attending The University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law. Nick has lectured on several occasions and was recognized as one of Super Lawyers’ Rising Stars. Nick is rated on AVVO as 10 out of 10. He is a Rule 31 Family Law Mediator. The Rice Divorce Team is a practice group within Rice, Amundsen & Caperton, PLLC. The Rice Divorce Team is exclusively committed to family law - from prenuptial agreements to final decrees, from parenting time to property division and everything in between, and it includes: Larry Rice; Nick Rice; Erin O’Dea; Jessica Farmer Ferrante; Chelsea Knox; Faith Sanford; Christopher Burt; Jennifer Goodin; Andrea Schultz, ACP; Susan New, ACP; Tyler Walker; Cyndy McAfee; Lisa Blackledge; Krista Burt; Ken Schultz; Linsey Boatner; C.J. Parrish; Irris Williams and Blake Alford. The team applies generations of legal experience, nationally recognized expertise, and up-to-date technology to lead their clients through negotiations, mediation, arbitration or litigation. The depth of The Rice Divorce Team’s personnel provides the ability to tailor representation to each client’s individual needs and goals. While the team is proud of courtroom success, their greatest satisfaction often comes from obtaining a quick and quiet settlement favorable to their client. Divorce is difficult. Divorce is made worse by misinformation people have about divorce. The Rices’ guide for clients, “About Divorce”, is available at aboutdivorce.com.

275 Jefferson Avenue Memphis, Tennessee 38103 901.526.6701 firm@ricelaw.com • aboutdivorce.com


From the Editor

August

L

ooking for some cool ways to enjoy these sultry days as summer makes its last stand? Then look no further as The Pink Palace Museum has quite a few things on tap to help you beat the heat. On August 16, the museum serves up their fifth annual Science of Wine event, giving guests (21 years of age and older) the opportunity to taste wines from around the world. This year will be better than ever thanks to the generosity of some of Memphis’ most popular restaurants and West Tennessee Crown Distributing Company. “People can kick back and enjoy wine and food pairings that bring out the best flavors in local cuisine,” said Luke Ramsey of the Pink Palace Education Department. “Science of Wine proceeds go to support the Pink Palace Museum’s educational programming for area students throughout the year.” More cool educational/entertainment options are available in the new and improved Pink Palace Mansion. Treat yourself to a tour of the new and refurbished exhibits including the Piggly Wiggly Store replica, the Country Store, and the popular Clyde Parke Miniature Circus (admission to the museum is free on Tuesdays, 1 - 5 p.m.). And added just for this summer is a new bicentennial exhibit called “Making Memphis: 200 Years of Community” that interprets events of the past 200 years that have, according to the Pink Palace’s website, “shaped Memphis’ past, present, and form the basis for our future.” Other Pink Palace Family of Museum properties including the Lichterman Nature Center and Mallory-Neely Historic House have special exhibits on display for the city’s bicentennial, too. Another new exhibit this summer, called “Sun, Earth, Universe,” pays tribute to the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission. With hands-on fun and interactive activities, this one is sure to be exciting as you follow the footsteps that were “one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” Tying into that celestial celebration, the AutoZone Dome Sharpe Planetarium is showing “Back to the Moon — For Good,” a program that explains the Google X-Prize. Its goal to inspire young engineers, in cooperation with private enterprises, to send a robotic mission to the moon. And for some of the coolest shows in town, kick off your weekends at The Pink Palace as the museum hosts Fab Fridays featuring laser lights shows Laser Beatles and Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon, in the planetarium, and the Star Wars trilogy on the big screen in the CTI 3D Giant Theater.

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Signature Memphis

August

Steve Pike Director, Pink Palace Family of Museums Hometown: Evansville, Indiana Favorite Song: “I Won’t Back Down” by Tom Petty Your Lucky Charm: The photo of my Dad, age 22, Commandant of Cadets, US Army Air Corps, Montgomery, Alabama. 130 lbs., straight as rebar, sword at his side

Your Best Quality: Humility. Seriously, a good question to ask others. What I am

WORKING on (I am certainly not there) is summed up in the Serenity Prayer - the real one, not the Seinfeld version. That one I am trying to unlearn.

A Nonliving Celebrity/Role Model You Would Invite to Dinner:

President and General Ulysses S. Grant--I’d expect grit and naiveté, soft-heartedness and unbreakable will.

Your Favorite Memphis “Thang”: Being with someone who’s not

from here when a “Made in Memphis” song plays and telling them where it came from.

Favorite Place to Travel: Israel. It’s like New York on speed.

Ferociously passionate people. Massive contradictions. And a real love of children.

Best Memphis Hangout: The library. And as a museum guy, I am soooo jealous they can be free.

Place You Go to Think: My back yard, especially pre-dawn. It looks out on 50 acres

of forest. I love how day happens.

Favorite Southern Idiom: All Y’all Best Advice You Ever Got: It’s all about love and trust. Proudest Moment of Your Life: Just now, seeing my oldest son, Joseph, in Army

Something You’ll Never Live Down: Introducing Henry Kissinger as a “Man who needs no introduction.” His first words were, “Yes, but he would have liked one.” I am 100% sure he does not remember this. But ouch! One Goal You’d Still Like

to

Accomplish: There is so much I want for the

Pink Palace, Lichterman, Mallory-Neely, Magevney, Coon Creek. If I had to pick just ONE thing, it would be to find a way to make it all free.

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Photo by Steve Roberts

Basic Training, Ft. Benning. He’s halfway through. On the parade ground he looked like a warrior, a man you would go a long way to avoid. Afterward, with the family, his sweet smile, his intelligence, and his shy charm showed through just like before.


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Memphis in May International Festival

August

Bicentennial Gala

T

Barry and Kathy Yoakum

Jerry and Bobbi Gillis

Memphis in May International Festival

he 2019 Memphis in May Bicentennial Gala lived up to its name, pausing its tradition of honoring a foreign country and focusing instead on its hometown. Held exactly 200 years to the day of the founding of Memphis, this year’s gala saluted the City of Memphis, as well as Shelby County. Leigh Shockey, Susan Arney and Pat Kerr Tigrett, the Gala Host Committee Chairmen, welcomed glamorously attired guests to the FedExForum for a spectacular night of celebrating 200 Years and a New Century of Soul. Local rapper Al Kapone served as the evening’s emcee and introduced Rabbi Micah Greenstein and The Reverent Dr. Kenneth Robinson who both shared in giving the Invocation. Rabbi Greenstein asked, “How many Memphians does it take to change the world?” and answered, “1,” saying that if each person in the room would focus on making one change, then the world would be a better place for all of us. And Rev. Robinson commented that it was just like the lyrics in the Memphis musical that played on Broadway, “Memphis lives in me.” The Honorable Jim Strickland, Mayor of Memphis and The Honorable Lee Harris, Mayor of Shelby County, took turns welcoming the evening’s guests and introducing the spectacular Memphis Musical Entertainment. See all the party photos at rsvpmagazine.com Password: RSVP

Savanna Buster, a Lakeland resident who sang on “The Voice,” Evie McKinnon, and The BarKays, along with Al Kapone, brought their talents to the stage, performing hit after hit to the delight of the crowd. And Governor Bill Lee sent his well wishes in a video message that was shared with the gala attendees, closing with “Grit and Grind Memphis!” Party-goers enjoyed a seated dinner that featured chargrilled Romaine Casear salad, with a dual entree of petite mignon and seared salmon served with asparagus and a risotto toe cake with three peppercorn sauce. Desserts included blueberry cobbler cheesecake and a flourless chocolate cake with raspberry sauce. San Simeon Cabernet Sauvignon and Stella Rosa Pearl Lux Sparking wines rounded out the meal. “We produced the gala on behalf of the city of Memphis and the proceeds supported the many bicentennial programs held throughout May, along with the free community event, Celebrate Memphis held on May 25,” said Jim Holt, President and CEO of Memphis in May. “The Memphis in May Festival began 42 years ago with a modest budget of $52,000 and has now grown to become an $11 million non-profit organization with an annual economic impact of over $137 million (in 2018).”

Michael Schmitt and Jutta Schneider

Martin and Crystal Hand

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Barbara and Lewis Williamson

Story by Emily Adams Keplinger Photos by Don Perry

Joel and Emily Thomas

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August 2019

Chelsea Lumpkin, Doug Browne and Beth Flanagan

Terrell and Angela Richards


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Memphis in May International Festival

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Memphis in May International Festival

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John and Angela Stevens with Elizabeth and Greg Smithers

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Story by Emily Adams Keplinger Photos by Steve Roberts

CAROL BUCHMAN Dual Identity as Artist and Teacher


August

StreetSeen

"... teaching really immersed me in creativity and was its own art form. My classroom was like being in a studio all day long, engaging every minute, making artistic decisions every day.”

G

rowing up in Roslyn, Long Island meant it was only a short train ride for Carol Buchman to access the art world of New York City. It was a trip she made numerous times and that exposure is what she credits as her earliest influences in art.

“I was a child artist,” recalled Buchman. “Even as early as nursery school and kindergarten I would make drawings for other children.” Buchman continued, ”My father was a psychologist, and also a potter. He loved art and often took me to places like the Guggenheim Museum. In the 1960s in SoHo there were ‘Art Happenings.’ To me it was absolutely magical — art you could interact with and touch. Seeing those installations created such awe in me and cemented my belief that art is fun and special.” After high school, Buchman attended Hamilton Kirkland School in upstate New York where her focus was on writing and art. After some soul searching, she said that she realized that she should do what had always been her love — art. She enrolled in the Massachusetts College of Art in Boston, the only purely art school in the country that was a state school. “We were not students of privilege,” said Buchman. “Rather we were a motley crew of commuters, people working their way through school.” After earning a BFA in painting, Buchman said she tried to make a living as an artist and

found out just how hard the path was that she had chosen. So, she went back to school at Boston University School for the Arts to get her MFA and a teacher’s certificate. Subsequently she worked in schools in the Boston area. “At the time there was a stigma about being an art teacher — sort of a ‘those who can do and those who can’t teach’ mentality,” said Buchman. “I always thought that was a lot of baloney. I found that working in arts administration was not my thing; however, teaching really immersed me in creativity and was its own art form. My classroom was like being in a studio all day long, engaging every minute, making artistic decisions every day.” In 1992, Buchman decided to leave the New England area and conducted a nation-wide job search. Through a professional connection she made at a national art educators conference, she was introduced to the head of the Memphis City School Art Department, Julia Russell. Buchman was interviewed and hired on the spot, and soon relocated to Memphis where she first taught at Manassas High School, then Rozelle Elementary. “It really opened my eyes to urban issues,”

recalled Buchman. “The experience also made me realize that if I was going to continue my own work as an artist, public school was too exhausting. I interviewed at Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School, got the job, and have been there for 22 years. I love being a part of the fabric of that community where I have known families for years.” Now after almost 28 years of teaching, Buchman has instructed over 7,500 students. Buchman continued, “Teaching in lower school has afforded me enormous financial stability and I’ve been able to keep up my own art, usually producing one body of work a year. I fully embrace this dual identity.” A self-described mixed media painter, Buchman said that she prefers oils and gouache, and sometimes incorporates fabrics. “My own art has been influenced by the children’s art,” explained Buchman. “My style is naturally sort of whimsical. It has some of the unedited and free quality of children’s work. As a teacher, my goal is to nurture creativity in young people.” Buchman continues her community outreach with recent talks/shows at Eclectic Eye and Beth Shalom, and a planned one-person exhibition this winter at the Shainberg Gallery at the Memphis Jewish Community Center. For more information about Carol Buchman and her art, visit www.carolbuchman.org.

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Story by Emily Adams Keplinger Photos by Steve Roberts

Chef Cullen Kent Showcasing Modern French Cuisine


August

O

StreetSeen

riginally from Beaumont, Texas, Cullen Kent first made his way to Memphis when he enrolled in Rhodes College in 1994 to major in Political Science. Prior to coming to the Bluff City, he thought he wanted to be a lawyer and practice as a litigator. After graduating from Rhodes, he stayed in Memphis for about a year, then moved to the Texas Hill Country and ultimately spent time in southern California. It was there that he first articulated a desire to work in the restaurant industry, and subsequently moved to Houston for his first restaurant job.

“I worked a salad station at an upscale restaurant called Brennan’s of Houston,” explained Kent. “I fell in love with being in a kitchen and realized that was what I wanted to do. So I packed up my stuff and moved to Paris, France to go to culinary school at Le Cordon Bleu Paris.” After completing the program, Kent spent another year working at Apicius, a Michelin two-star restaurant. “I began at the lowest staff level and rose to be the Commis I (assistant to the chef on one side of the kitchen),” recalled Kent. “Then I moved back to the States, to my hometown of Beaumont, and came to Memphis for a wedding. As the saying goes — I met a girl.” After making numerous trips from Beaumont to Memphis for the sake of romance, Kent starting looking for a job in Memphis. José Gutierrez, then chef of Chez Philippe, offered Kent a position. That was in the summer of 2001. The girl (Katharine) became his wife and Kent has been in Memphis ever since. Kent stayed at Chez Philippe for two and a half years, then accepted the head chef position at La Tourelle. After one year, Michel Leny contacted Kent about coming to Cafe Society to run the kitchen and take over general operations of the restaurant. Now Kent has been there almost 14 years. During that time

“There’s a whole generation of young foodies who have been raised to enjoy good food. They have moved past the fast food scene ...” he says he has seen tremendous changes in the Memphis restaurant scene. “I came to Cafe Society in 2005 and bought the restaurant from Leny in 2007,” said Kent. “The changes I’ve seen are inherent in both people and food. The number of people trying to enter the culinary field has increased exponentially, More people are going to culinary school and choosing a culinary profession. Also, I’ve noticed that the clientele who appreciate fine food has become younger and younger. There’s a whole generation of young foodies who have been raised to enjoy good food. They have moved past the fast food scene and now view foods like lamb lollipops, Caprese skewers and smaller versions of classic fine dining foods as the norm.” Kent described his preferred style of cooking

as very simple and straight forward. “I like to use minimal ingredients that get the point across,” said Kent. “A perfect example would be a beautifully oven-roasted chicken with roasted potatoes tossed with fresh herbs and a natural jus to go along with it.” Kent is adamant that all good cooking starts with quality ingredients and locally sources most of his ingredients, including meats, vegetables and herbs. Bacon-wrapped shrimp with horseradish sauce, seafood bisque, and classic crème brûlée are among the signature dishes of Cafe Society. When asked what’s in store for his future, Kent said that he would like to continue his culinary education by taking some refresher courses in pastry-making for his own “amazement and amusement.” Additionally, along with his dedication to the kitchen at Cafe Society, Kent is spreading his culinary talent around Midtown. He has partnered with Tony and Stephanie Westmoreland to reopen the original Zinnie’s, at the corner of Madison and Belvedere. Kent is developing the menu to reflect the authenticity of Zinnie’s and anticipates the bar will reopen sometime this month. Also, he has become involved in in the reopening of Mardi Gras, a Cajun cuisine eatery located across Cleveland from Crosstown Concourse.

August 2019 •

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Memphis Moment

August

American Heart Association Go Red for Women Luncheon

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o Red for Women strides ahead with a vigorous beat 15 years after its launch by the American Heart Association. The social initiative seeks to empower women to take charge of their heart health. It challenges women to learn their risks for heart disease and to take action to reduce their personal risks. It advocates for awareness of the issues of women and heart disease, and also action to save more lives. Go Red for Women supporters joined to recognize its mission during a luncheon at The Great Hall. Katina Rankin, co-anchor of Local 24 News, gave opening remarks. The program included remarks and introductions by co-chairs Denise Burnett-Stewart and Beth Washington. Personal stories of local heart disease and stroke survivors were shared with guests. A fashion show featuring survivors followed. CVS Health, a national sponsor of Go Red for Women, joined local organizations in sponsoring the event.

Kelly Bunch, Deborah Johnson, Jennifer Lammers and Barbara Patronis

Story and Photos byVirginia M. Davis

Rose McCahill, Ashley Burns, Mira Couch, Angela Stemmler and Diane Swan

Courtney Tucker and Lauren Phillips

Shanea McKinney, Rola Obaji and David McKinney

Roger McCollum and Nicholas Huey

Dr. Michelle Alexander and Alexandria Shelton

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August 2019

Charity Brannen, Torian Carwell, Paige Stubbs and Rachel Harrison

(Front row) Roz Donald, A’Ishah Williams and Gale Ware; (back row) Robyn Robinson, Stanley Tyler, Ronda Scurlock, Shenicia Richardson, Ruby McNeal and Pattie Robinson

Rob Heard with John and Leslie Daniel

Paula Peckham, Antoinette Wiseman and Heather Wood

Beth Washington, Michelle Harp and Denise Burnett-Stewart


August

Memphis Moment

GreekFest 2019 OPA!

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he annual Greek Festival, held at the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church on Highland, is a celebration without parallel. For the cost of a small admission fee, or three cans of food, festival-goers were transported to the Greek Isles. As the crowd consumed authentic, homemade Greek foods, the Athenian Dance Troupe performed traditional Greek dances. The purpose of this festival was to share Greek heritage and culture, as well as food and faith, with the community. Renee Graves, organizer of the church tours, dressed in an ensemble featuring the signature “Santorini blue” color, greeted guests and shared history about the stained glass windows and the newly installed, handcarved altar wall. “This festival is our best outreach to let people know who we are,” said Graves. “The event is also a money maker. Proceeds are designated for local charities and the collected canned food is donated to the Memphis Food Bank.” Story and Photos by Emily Adams Keplinger Renee Graves

Leah Apabdimas Horvath and Michael Horvath

Lindsey Price and Savanna Price

Kristen Kellum and Elizabeth Thompson

Nicholas and Erica Ploucha

Aislinn Towne, Mark Towne, Zachary Towne and Samantha Towne

Andrea Moore and Phyllis Gooch

Mary Katherine Wood, Ann Elizabeth Murphy and Madeline Michalopulos

Father Nicholas Vieron and Paul Vieron

Joy Touliatos and Ann Touliatos

Callie Hildebrand with Cole and Eleanor Hildebrand

August 2019

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Symphony in the Gardens •

August

Symphony in the Gardens

P Chuck and Mary Stewart

Amanda, Amelia and Bill Cline

Delightful Music Outdoors

icnic blankets and folding chairs dotted the South Lawn of The Dixon Gallery & Gardens as the Memphis Symphony Orchestra (MSO) took the stage at the far end of the lawn. The occasion was the annual Symphony in the Gardens event. To the delight of the crowd, the MSO performed Big Band music. The opening song was a tune with our city’s name in the title, “The Memphis Blues.” Standards like “Funny Valentine,” “String of Pearls,” “Stardust,” and “Begin the Beguine” followed. Other legendary songs from Memphis, like “Green Onions” and “Hound Dog” were also part of the program and proved to be true crowd pleasers. As over 1,450 concert-goers enjoyed food, wine, and beer during the evening’s performance, they were also supporting both the symphony and The Dixon. Originally the private residence of Margaret and Hugo Dixon, the site was opened to the public more than 40 years ago. Today the home is a museum with a series of galleries devoted to displaying The Dixon’s permanent collection, as well as hosting traveling exhibits. “The surrounding 17-acre wooded site, created in an American-style garden reminiscent of English landscape parks and French and Italian garden styles, contains a horticultural complex See all the party photos at rsvpmagazine.com Password: RSVP

that includes a library, meeting space, potting hub, greenhouses, and a glass conservatory,” explained Chantal Drake, Director of Communications for the Dixon Gallery and Gardens. “Our annual Symphony in the Gardens program is one way that we reach out to invite the community to visit our grounds. Although The Dixon is a public institution, we receive no city, state or federal funding. We are supported by the Hugo Dixon Foundation, Dixon Gallery and Gardens Endowment Fund and by individual and corporate donors.” This year’s Symphony in the Gardens marked the 34th year that the Memphis Symphony Orchestra has performed at The Dixon. “For Symphony in the Gardens, Big Band Leader Scott Moore, principal trumpet for MSO, led other musicians. In terms of community outreach, MSO performs three times more concerts for the public at venues like The Dixon than at the Cannon Center,” said Lindsey Stanfill, Development Manager at MSO. “Each year we reach over 15,000 students with our school performances and some of our musicians serve as coaches and mentors for students. Additionally, we have community performances at area libraries, community centers, and other public venues.”

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Raney and Hugh Bourland

Horace and Anne Tipton with Mary Shea and Steve Quach

August 2019

Marina and John Bogan

Story by Emily Adams Keplinger Photos by Don Perry

Mark and Ann Heuberger

Ann and Carl Shorter

Alison Smith and McClain Gordon

Kathy and Richard Peak


August

Angela and Scott Foster

Dennis and Sarah Norton

Gary and Marci Mosley

Ramona and John Seabold

Margaret Smith and Roylyn Parks

Aaron Van Alstine and Arushi Saxena

Symphony in the Gardens

Greg and Susan Morgan

Burk and Angie Forester

Allison Claire with Pete and Courtney Hicks

Joe Sullivan and Quinn Strother

Dawn Schroth and Ruthann Schroth

August 2019

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27


Symphony in the Gardens •

August

Rick and Lynne Robinson

Harper Pillow and Rebecca Longcrier

Ysabella and Joy Anderson

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August 2019

Anne Carver and Meghan Galtelli

Annie and Andy Christensen


August

Symphony in the Gardens

Stefanie, Isabella and Stephen Edwards

Irma Rivera with Luna, Ruby and Tony Fuentes

Eve and Lucy Pai with Karen Ullman

Hudson, Diana, Justin and Elaina Nicholas

August 2019

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Memphis Moment

August

Cooper-Young Garden Walk Flowers, Edibles, Natives and Herbs

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uaint, colorful shotgun houses, beautiful bungalows and grand homes from the late 19th century to the early 20th century, as well as area businesses, put out the green carpet for a two-day showand-tell intended to inspire creativity in others. Educational booths and Area Master Gardeners offered tips and information. There were front gardens, side gardens, and backyard gardens. There were gardens planted with fragrance in mind, gardens filled with herbs and edibles, and others that were for the birds (literally). Some spaces were designed to serve as outdoor living rooms or dining rooms. Some gardens showcased water features. There was even one garden with a treehouse for adults. But all of the gardens on the fourth annual Cooper-Young Garden Walk had one thing in common — they put a positive spotlight on eclectic styles that represent the best of this Midtown neighborhood.

June Taylor and Joyce Boggs

Story and Photos by Emily Adams Keplinger

Haynes Knight

Jimmy McCown with Sharron and Rex Johnson

Kevin Gallagher and Stacy Smith

Jane and Harry Liaw with Angie Wallick

Brian and Demetrius Sykes

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August 2019

Bill Branch

Laura Boone and Laura Patteson

Debby Harden, Pamela McCoy and Harriette Jenkins

Jamie Johnson and Robin Salant

Kalki Winter and Wendy Sumner-Winter


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August 2019

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Memphis Moment

August

Memphis Mercantile Antique Market Preview Party

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he front lawn of Howard Hall on Madison Avenue became the temporary home of a treasure trove of collectibles and antiques as the inaugural Memphis Mercantile Antique Market set-up for a two-day event. This market, featuring 11 vendors, was co-hosted by Memphis Heritage and Abandoned Treasures, an antiques warehouse in Southaven. Along with antique furniture and furnishings, shoppers had a wide range of collectibles to choose from, such as French oyster plates, antique tea caddies and boxes, as well as hand-crafted items like stationery, pottery, and tea towels with transfer-printed images. Tickets to the Preview Party included VIP shopping, hors d’oeuvres and wine, and a one-year membership to Memphis Heritage, a nonprofit educational and charitable organization dedicated to the preservation of the Memphis area’s architectural heritage. Proceeds benefit the ongoing preservation projects of Memphis Heritage, Inc. Story and Photos by Emily Adams Keplinger Lisa Finley and Doris Lawrence

Dick and Judy Daniels with Linda and Richard Tolland

Jeff and Beth Elzemeyer

Lisa Babb Van Frank and Louise Mercuro

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August 2019

Judy and Morgan Brookfield

Dana Gabrion, June West and Preston Battle

Roy and Donna Cohen

Sandy Goodbody with Larry Stewart and Adrienne Goodbody

Debi Vincent and Melissa Bridgman

Stephanie Jones and Carrie Floyd


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August 2019

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33


Memphis Moment

August

Cocktails for a Cause Benefitting Girls Inc.

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osted by Kathy and Kelly Fish, Cocktails for a Cause raises awareness and funds for local non-profits on the first Friday of the month, six times a year. The charming Midtown backyard is the perfect spot for guests to nibble, chat, sip and donate. Recently guests gathered poolside to support Girls Inc., an organization that inspires all girls to be strong, smart and bold, through direct service and advocacy. The happy hour featured signature drinks GINder Equity and GALperol Spritz, wine, beer and light appetizers. Behind the outdoor bar were celebrity bartenders Sharon Posman, Senior Vice President, Lipscomb & Pitts Insurance; Beverly Robertson, President and CEO, Greater Memphis Chamber; and Gina Sweat, Director, City of Memphis Fire Department. “Kelly and Kathy are amazing to offer us this opportunity to share our story with the community in their beautiful home,” said Lisa Moore, CEO of Girls Inc. Story and Photos by Gaye Swan Allison Prescott and Katie Brezina

Kathy Gibson, Beth Flanagan and Tim Maxwell

Amanda Ibrahim and Shannon McCranie

Daryl Leven, Laurita Jackson and Lisa Moore

Alicia Smith-Steele and Chara Stewart Abrams

Alex Willis, Nick Chamoun and Amelia Thompson

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August 2019

Kathy Fish, Marilyn Koester, Drew Koester and Michael Paul Vine

Chooch Pickard and Marie Santucci

Sharon Posman, Beverly Robertson and Gina Sweat

Becky Frost and Jerred Price

Sarah Morse, Shawn Hayden and Melissa Whitby


August

Memphis Moment

Café du Memphis Great Food, Fine Service, Rotary Style

R Paige Nielsen, Nina Kumar, Caroline Landaiche, Ausbon Rougeou, Olivia Nielsen and Zeke Smith

otary Club of Memphis has a motto that overlays its many community projects: “Service Above Self.” Its members prepared and served huge helpings of hope during the fifth annual Café du Memphis. Joe Birch of WMC Action News 5 emceed the event, which featured New Orleans jazz performed by Jeremy Shrader and his band. Grits were boiled by the gallon, shrimp steamed by the pound and beignets fried up galore. As each batch of beignets turned to golden puffs, the head cook yelled, “Serve ‘em up!” Blue-aproned Rotary volunteers would then deliver plates of the delicious brunch to guests. The outdoor event was situated next to the fountain just west of Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. Proceeds from Café du Memphis benefit The Dorothy Day House, a residence that allows entire families to live together as they transition out of homelessness. Story and Photos by Virginia M. Davis

Britani, Scarlett and Jared Cavaness

Chad and Laura Burgess

Art Richey

Buddy Adams and Sarah Petschonek

David Cocke and Joe Birch

Carma Furr and Wyki Jeter Danyel Swims and Jack Charbonnet

Heather and Phillip McGuire

Steve Pulliam and Emily LaRue

Pierre and Gay Landaiche

Jerry Draine Jr. and April Draine

Neysa Rhoads with Brenna and Mara Stratton

August 2019

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Promise Ball

August

Promise Ball 2019 One Night to Make Dreams Come True

A Horace and Annette Cunningham

Hayden and Laura Simons

s guests arrived for the 19th annual Promise Ball benefiting the West Tennessee chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), they were greeted with a cocktail reception and JDRF Youth Ambassadors, a group of young people living with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) who were the definite “stars” of the night. Hayden and Laura Simons were the 2019 Event Chairmen. The theme for this year’s gala was “One Night to Make Dreams Come True.” And that’s just what the evening was all about — making dreams come true, like finding a cure for Type I Diabetes in our lifetime. Along with cocktails, guests enjoyed perusing items in the silent auction, many which promoted local events and attractions. Passes to STAX Museum, VIP tickets to Graceland, field box tickets to the Memphis Redbirds, tickets to see “Hamilton” at The Orpheum, a Grizz Luxury Box for 12, a dog portrait sitting by Jack Kenner, the opportunity to host a private event at Annesdale Mansion, a year’s membership to The Dixon Gallery & Gardens, a Girls Night Out Party at Betty Hays Boutique, and more. And, for a $50 donation, a Kendra Scott jewelry pull offered guests a blind box drawing for items valued between $50 - $295, with the proceeds going to JDRF. Welcoming remarks were made by news anchor WHBQ-TV, Fox 13 Darrell Greene, who served as the evening’s See all the party photos at rsvpmagazine.com Password: RSVP

master of ceremonies. Raj Midha, President of the JDRF Board of Directors, presented the “Living and Giving Award” to the Godman family (Cecil, Summer and Becca). The award recognizes those who have taken a leadership role in supporting JDRF. Additionally, Ryan McClatchey was in attendance, surprising his parents, Barbara and Gene McClathcy, as he presented them with the Oscar “Bo” Carr Award in recognition of their volunteer endeavors on behalf of JDRF. The evening’s Fund-A-Cure appeal was presented by Becca Clark. Auctioneer Mark Drilling led the crowd through a live auction, with guests bidding on ta bourbon whiskey tasting experiencex, travel packages, jewelry from Mednikow, a barbecue party for 50, commissioner artwork by Ken Lecco, and dinner for 8 in your home prepared by Chef Andreas Kisler. The heart-stealer of the evening was a beautiful, 12-week old British Labrador puppy from Robert Minor’s Duckhill Kennels. When the bidding wars were over, it was announced that the gala had garnered over $455,000 for the organization. JDRF is the largest charitable supporter of T1D research, and 85 percent of the proceeds from the 2016 Promise Ball will be used to fund T1D research and research-related education. The night was wrapped up by the band, Bonfire Orchestra, which brought people to their feet to dance the night away.

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Dr. Kevin and Cassie Scott

Lizzie Christensen, Ally Johns, Cheyanne Hall and Cooper Patrick

August 2019

Adrienne and Chris LeBlanc

Story by Emily Adams Keplinger Photos by Baxter Buck

Summer and Cecil Godman

Tammy and Darin Drake

Michelle and Raj Midna

Jesse and Michelle Jenkins


August

Vicki and Keith Allen

Tony and Anita DiLucente

Jackie Perkins and Terry Wright

Bill and Cookie Boring

Nathan and Stephanie Coleman

KK Gross, Andy Wagner and Ann Wagner

Promise Ball

Madelyn Clayton and Aleasheia Stanford

Tamara and Tripp Turner

Cynthia and Gary Simons

Josh Parker and Sharon Wright

Jill Dyles, Ike Sloas and Sarah Larke

August 2019

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37


Promise Ball

August

Doug and Jamie Granito

Anne and Dr. Darryl Quarles

Matt and Wesley Wade

Rudy and Sarah Laucirica

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Don and Anita Harrison

Mary Katherine and Adam Stewart

Gwendolyn and JW Wilson

Stacy Wegner and Betty Lamar

Phil and Brooke Berryman

Allison and Ted Butterfield

Cassidy Sheppard, Susan Morris and Rachel Ryan

Jason and Kelly Shifflett

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August 2019


August

Bill and Rene Platten

Franklin and Katherine Godoy

Doug and Tricia Snead

Promise Ball

Darin and Kristen Clark

Dr. Chad and Dr. Julie Kate Webster

Doug Windham and Karen Carlisle

Tori and Nate Falk

Hayden, Laura, Haley,Trey and Avery Simons

Dr. Shazia Hussain, Dr. Kashif Latif and Shafiqua Hussain

Emily and Stace Doonan

Jen Lamont, Christy Foster and Jayme Wasson

August 2019

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39


Memphis Moment

August

WMC Reunion Remembering and Reminiscing

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ecently the stars really did come out at night as Joe and Robyn Birch hosted a WMC 1960 (re)Union at their Hein Park home. Radio and TV personalities, past and present, from WMC gathered together for a walk down Memory Lane. Guests enjoyed reliving stories from their careers as they jockeyed for position in group photos with former colleagues. “The party was inspired by former WMC reporter Basil Hero who was in town for a signing event for his book, ‘Mission of a Lifetime,’ about the astronauts who walked on the moon,” explained Birch. “It was a family reunion of colleagues who have worked at WMC in every decade from the 1960s to the present.” Although many in the group had moved on or moved away, it was clear that this was a cadre of friends with a special bond and a shared experience worth keeping alive.

Earle and Cathy Farrell with Steve and Jeanie Conley

Story and Photos by Emily Adams Keplinger

Joe and Robyn Birch with Marianne Summerville and Basil Hero

Dennis Fuller, Karen Perrin, Darryl Evans, Ron Olson and Cindy Debardelaben

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George Brown with Diane and Richard Copley

Miles and Jill Dunagan

Donna Davis and Kym Clark with Chip Washington

George Larrimore and Judy Card

Brenda Wood and Mearl Purvis

Joe Lackie, Julie Meadows and Joe Cooper

Ursula Madden and Kim Hindrew

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August 2019


Memphis Moment

August

National Football Foundation 47th Annual Scholar-Athlete Dinner

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hodes College hosted the 47th annual Black Tie Dinner presented by the Memphis Chapter of the National Football Foundation (NFF) and College Hall of Fame. Eleven high school and two college scholar-athletes from the Memphis area accepted scholarship awards during the event. Germantown High School Head Coach Chris Smith accepted the 2019 Rex Award, given in memory of the late Rex Dockery, head coach of the Memphis State University Tigers football team. Mark Fisher, assistant football coach at Millington Central High School, received the 2019 Mario Reed Courage Award. The award honors a former Millington player who sustained a catastrophic injury during his sophomore year in 1997. Reed heads the nonprofit organization, Mario Reed Foundation, http://marioreedfoundation.org/. NFF has 120 chapters nationwide. It operates programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in young people. The Memphis chapter was established in 1963.

Renee Couch, Nick Anewalt and Keff Couch

Story and Photos by Virginia M. Davis Mike Clary, Jim Ryan and Bill Harper

(Back row, left to right) Sellers Shy of Memphis University School; P.J. Settles of Rhodes College; Caleb Waller of Manassas High School; Nick Anewalt of Houston High School; Gavin Olson of Harding Academy; Jackson Walker of Briarcrest Christian School; Yusef Thomas of Lausanne Collegiate School; Rahnmann Solcum II of Southwind High School; and Coach Chris Smith of Germantown High School (The Rex Award Honoree); (Seated, left to right) Addison Coleman of Trinity Christian School, Jackson, TN; Tyler Hunter of Whitehaven High School; and Marshall Ware of Germantown High School.

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Mario Reed

Bo and Rebecca Griffin

Tyler Hunter and Kyra Thornton

Mitzi, Marshall and John Ware

Caleb Walker and Sellers Shy

Bo Wright and Herb Smith

Rahnmann Slocum II and Rahnmann Slocum

Pat Caldwell, Janet Gatewood and Janice Bomar

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August 2019


August

Memphis Moment

Dishes for Wishes Serving Up Delicious Dreams

“W Becky and Bob Nieman with Lisa and Matt Kiser

hen you wish upon a star, makes no difference who you are. Anything your heart desires will come to you.” It’s true, just as promised in the song lyrics from Walt Disney’s 1940 classic Pinocchio. Make-A-Wish Mid-South granted 259 wishes last fiscal year to children undergoing life-threatening illnesses. Fund-raising events like the 14th annual Dishes for Wishes at Felicia Suzanne’s Restaurant make it possible for youngsters to have their fondest desires realized. Extraordinary dishes prepared by Memphis’ finest restaurants were served to guests. In addition to Felicia Suzanne’s, The Blue Monkey, Char, The Gray Canary, The Majestic Grille, McEwen’s on Monroe, Rendezvous, Rizzo’s Diner, Second Line, South of Beale and Sweet Grass participated. Presenting sponsor was Gossett Motor Cars. Chairing the event were Julie and Jake Farrell and Memphis radio personalities Steve Conley, Ron Olson and Karen Perrin emceed. Singer Josh Threlkeld provided musical entertainment. Story and Photos by Virginia M. Davis

Thomas and Stone Powell-McDavitt with Allie Allen and Melissa Kimbrough

Andy and Meredith Irwin

Dr. Kyle and Anna Fagala

Marcie Maxwell and Libba Nance

Abby Hall, Lindsay Bertsche and Shelby Norman

Misty and David May

Lauren Wellborn, Felicia Willett and Ava Goin

Carol Phelps, Steve Alford, Becky Davis and Michael Brennan

Kristen and Richard Vining

Al Gossett with Julie and Jake Farrell

Courtney Patterson, Jackie Gregory and Kelly Christiansen

August 2019

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Memphis Moment

August

The Arcade at St. George’s Vintage Finds for Modern Times

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he 2019 Arcade at St. George’s Episcopal Church kicked off with a Preview Party, with guests enjoying an early peek at a wide variety of items for home, garden and more. The Sunday Social, a four-piece combo, provided musical entertainment while attendees mixed and mingled throughout the various booths filled with garden accessories, art, antiques, home decor, antique/estate jewelry, silver and china, and floral designs. The preview was followed by a two-day market with area dealers joined by vendors from throughout the country. Local radio personality Ron Olson was one of show’s featured artists with several of his “guitar-themed” works of art for sale. In addition to shopping, The Arcade featured workshops and demonstrations by some of the vendors. This year’s show was co-chaired by Charlotte Albertson and Tracy Patterson. Proceeds benefit St. George’s local ministry partners; Church Health, Emmanuel Center, MIFA, and Room in the Inn - Memphis.

Ron and Vicki Olson with Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo

Story and Photos by Emily Adams Keplinger

Judy and Morgan Brookfield

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Mary and Steve Nelson

Pam Toppins and Pat Christopher

Dr. Cannon Doan and Scott Haight

Jenny Koltnow and Dorothy McClure

Nancy Ligon and Dale Chymiy

Charlotte Albertson and Tracy Patterson

Leslie and Bryan Darr

Sandra and Tom Hill

Stan and Dana Ellington

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August 2019


Smallfoot on DIRECTV CINEMA®

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Stream shows anytime on up to 5 screens simultaneously – no add’l equipment, no extra cost with the DIRECTV App.^ Content/channels/functionality varies. Data charges may apply.

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Memphis Moment

August

100 Women Who Care The Power of Giving

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or women who want to make an immediate, direct and positive impact on our community, there’s the Memphis chapter of the 100 Women Who Care organization. This member-run group relies on 100+ members to consistently participate to nominate, select and fund a variety of area nonprofits. Members meet once each quarter to listen to presentations by representatives from three local nonprofit organizations. Then each individual member votes on which nonprofit organization they would like to fund. The nonprofit agency receiving the most votes receives a check from each member for at least $100. In one hour, donors see the impact of their contribution multiplied by the en masse giving and a worthy nonprofit agency takes home a sizable contribution. To be considered as a potential recipient, an organization must by recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as a 501(c)(3) organization, be located in West Tennessee, North Mississippi, or West Memphis, Arkansas, be in operation for at least three years, and be willing to send a representative to the group’s meeting. At the most recent meeting, sponsored by United Capital, a check for over $13,000 was awarded to All 4’s Rescue League. Story and Photos by Emily Adams Keplinger Courtney Smith, Ginna Rauls, Jill Haag and Kaitlyn Everroad

Maureen Yarborough and Lynn Sewell

Sara Burnett and Brooke Shannon

Savannah Cantrell and Emily Van Epps

Lauren King and Chasati Woelfel

Michael Deutsch with Jeni Linkous and Jenny Roberston

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August 2019

Whitney Miller, Madelyn Gray, Lauren Yoakum and Jill Helen

Kembree Darakshani and Sonja Glaser

Jennifer Wallace and Susie Williams

Tracy Trotter and Casey Condra

Kristen Acuff, Amy Keys and Jennifer Powell


Beautiful and lasting memories are as simple as

rsvpmagazine.com More pictures than would ever fit in a magazine are online and available on our website. If you’re looking for a photo that one of our photographers took at a major social event featured in our magazine, that photo may be readily available online. Just go to our site, click on the event and remember the password: rsvp.

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August 2019

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Crossword

August

RSVP Crossword Edited By Ruth Cassin

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66 70

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73

54 60

69

48

53

RSVP

61

62 67

August 2019

Solution:

57

52

S T Y E

51

50

D E F Y

49

O B I

48

D I D O

46

D R A B

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B L E E P

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B E L T S

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A B C S

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K E Y

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E Y E S

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S A N D

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D E F R A U D E D

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E S S W C A Y S

26 29

35

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L Y R E

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A D A R

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T E E N

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S E R V E

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S E G A L

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A G E L O N G

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A X M A I X G I E O S A R H E P O D E A P R I D R T S R E E S E T

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H I T S

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A G A I N

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A A L P F R A M L A T F L O A W D E H U R U N M E G S I Z M O

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N O D

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1 Kindergarten basiccs 2 Sashes 3 Censor sound 4 Crop type 5 Spr.. month 6 Dull 7 Prank 8 Spanish ‘friend’ 9 Left or right on a graph 10 Kimono sash 11 Cheated 12 Resist 13 Eye infection 21 Bad (prefix) 23 Dog __ 26 Spire, e.r. 28 Islet (var.) 30 Computer Key 31 Influences 33 Beach make up 34 Potato sprouts 35 6th month (Jewish calendar) 36 Greek stringed instrument 37 Rhythm keeper 39 Cache 41 Sand hills 42 Spiritedness

M E T R O N O M E

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DOWN

45 Buzz 47 Long lasting 50 Tax agency 52 Doodad 53 Once more 55 Actor George 56 Bring food 57 Strange-shaped fruit 58 Apex 60 Slugs 61 Birch, e.g. 63 Adolescent 65 Affirmative gesture 67 NYC Time A C M E

1 “Mama Mia” group 5 Large, whitish antelope 10 Chances of winning 14 Door ringer 15 Donna 16 Red vegetable 17 Musical notation

18 Number system base 19 Sketchey 20 Hot vapor 22 Golf term 24 Deli bread 25 What a dropped melon does 27 Japanese city 29 Ice sheets 32 Recycle 35 __ matter 10 11 12 13 38 Certain compass point 39 __ salad days 16 40 Tint 41 Ten-legged crustaceans 19 43 Certain vane direction 24 44 Medieval English king 46 Not nay 28 47 Totals 33 34 48 Old tv episode 49 Small bunch of flowers 51 Alpha’s opposite 43 54 Clothe 57 Wok, e.g. 47 59 Vision 62 Partly frozen rain 64 Collective course (abrv.) 55 56 66 Republic of the Congo, once 68 Shrek, e.g. 63 69 Bullets 68 70 Tiny insects 71 Church part 71 72 Swamp plant 73 Beginning 74 74 Dale

P E A R

ACROSS


By Dennis Phillippi

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TALK ABOUT A GIANT LEAP August

ike a lot of people in my generation, my first real memory of anything taking place that did not directly impact my daily life was Apollo 11 landing on the moon. I was five when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first people we know of to set foot on another celestial body and it made quite an impression on me. For a good month I wanted to be an astronaut. Then I went back to wanting to be Jim West because he wore cooler hats. It is mind boggling that it has been 50 years since the first moon landing. I’ve always been a space buff, and looking back at all of the footage that has been broadcast about Apollo 11 recently the technology looks like something from the Flintstones. You almost expect them to crack open a computer panel and see a bird inside reading punch cards with its beak. Metal toggle switches were everywhere. In fact, one of the things that you really notice about all of this ancient technology is how much metal was involved. Whatever pieces fell into the ocean have long since rusted out of existence. Incredibly Apollo crafts were basically disposable. Left to their own devices, and not kept in a climate-controlled environment, they would disintegrate. The most important pieces of machinery ever built had almost no plastic in them. Today you couldn’t find an artisanal pie shop that isn’t 40 percent plastic. Even the spacesuits, hand stitched by seamstresses, weren’t plastic. They were Teflon-coated glass microfibers, and neoprene and steel cables. Fun fact: the spacesuits for Apollo were manufactured by the fine folks at Playtex, the same people that brought the world the Cross Your Heart bra. Were a space agency to decide today to create new spacesuits, there is little chance someone would cook up the idea to contact an underwear company. For weeks now I’ve been constantly watching documentaries about the Apollo program, including the stunning IMAX film about the first moon landing being shown at the Pink Palace. It just amazes me that in the world we live in now, where everyone is carrying around a supercomputer in our pants pocket, we can identify our location anywhere on the planet with a simple push of a button, and can easily call someone in Tanzania, if we were to know someone in Tanzania, that we can’t come close to replicating what these people did with steel, aluminum,

It is mind boggling that it has been 50 years since the first moon landing. I’ve always been a space buff, and looking back at all of the footage that has been broadcast about Apollo 11 recently the technology looks like something from the Flintstones.

and computers that had less thinking power than an Atari 2600. Of course, the driving force for all of these people was John F. Kennedy’s 1961 speech in which he pledged to put a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth within the decade. Lots of presidents have made claims that this or that was going to happen within a certain period of time; Carter was going to put us on the Metric System, George H.W. Bush was going to put us on Mars. Those things, and many others, didn’t happen because none of those presidents were then assassinated. That’s a cruel oversimplification for an easy joke. There was plenty of motivation from the Soviet Union, which at the time of Kennedy’s speech was killing us in the Space Race worse than whichever team will be playing the

Cleveland Browns this season. I bet you thought I was going to go back to the Kennedy well for that joke. Cruel oversimplification jokes are one to a column. The truth is, we aren’t going back to the moon any time soon as a nation because we lack any clear reason to do so. There’s not a hero who proclaimed we were going to do so. Our own current president is unclear if he even completely grasps how our solar system is organized. We don’t have an enemy that seems to be preparing for an attempt to send a person to the moon. We’re not even certain who exactly are our enemies. Whoever they are, their rockets don’t carry people. At this moment neither do ours. We don’t, as a nation, even have a rocket that will carry a person to the Space Station, which is roughly the distance from Earth as we are from Nashville. We do have a few retired Space Shuttles, that will last for a billion years because they were made mostly of alloys, ceramics, and plastic. Instead we have to hitch rides with, ironically, the Russians. Yay us. This is where good old-fashioned, ego-based Capitalism comes into play. We are now so flush with billionaires with wildly inflated self-esteem and paperthin skin that they will get into a measuring contest that will crack this one for us. These rich kooks will get someone to the moon eventually. Whether they get them back is something of an open question. Another sticking point is that people seem to think that since we went to the moon so many times that people got bored with watching guys jumping around in Stay-Puft suits collecting rocks and hitting golf balls, then we should be thinking more about going to Mars. I know of at least two friends of mine that will be apoplectic when they read this, but why go to Mars? Because it’s there? So is Duluth, but there’s no compelling reason to go there either. If we’re going to go anywhere, and I’m not necessarily saying that we should, it ought to be the moon because the moon is a lot closer, a lot easier to reach, and a lot easier to get home from. If we as a people got bored with men going to the moon, imagine how we’ll all feel when a Mars mission takes off and instead of the three days or so it would take to get to the moon, we get to wait for a year. We get to wait for a year to watch people in Stay-Puft suits jump around collecting red rocks instead of grey ones. They’d better bring a whole set of golf clubs.

August 2019

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August

RSVPast The Memphis Sinfonietta

1952

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aestro Vincent de Frank, founder and conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra, stands at the helm of the Memphis Sinfonietta in the autumn of 1952. The Sinfonietta was a chamber orchestra of 21 musicians and evolved into the Memphis Symphony Orchestra in 1960. Photo from RSVP Archives If you have a past photo you would like to share with RSVP readers, please contact Emily Adams Keplinger at 276-7787 ext. 105 or e-mail the photo and caption to editor@rsvpmagazine.com All photos will be returned promptly.

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RSVP Memphis Magazine August 2019  

RSVP Memphis Magazine August 2019  

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