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THE LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES Fro

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(

CATALOGUE

INDIAN COINS IN

THE

BRITISH MUSEUM.

THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.

LONDON PRINTED BY ORDER. OF THE TRUSTEES. 66,

Longmans & Co., Paternoster Row; B. M. Pickering, Haymarket; B. Quaritch, 15, Picc.vdilly A. Asher & Co. Garden, and at Berlin 13, Bedford Street, Covent TRUBNER & Co, 57 & 59 LUDGATE HiLL; Ai.LEN & Co., 13, Waterloo Place. ;

;

Paris:

MM.

C.

Rollin & Feuardent, 1884.

4,

Rue de

Louvois.

63,


:

LONDON ntiyXED BY GILBERT 8T.

John's squake,

&

RIVINGTON (LIMITED),

cleukenwell road.


:

THE COINS OF THE

SULTANS OF DEHLI IN

THE

BRITISH MUSEUM.

BY

STANLEY LANE-POOLE, B.A.,

OXON., M.R.A.S.

EDITED DY

REGINALD STUART POOLE,

LL.D.

CORRESPONDENT OF THE INSTITUTE OF FRANCE.

LONDOX PRLXTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES. 1884.


I7ACX

;

MHia

EDITORS PREFACE.

The Catalogue of Indiau is

the

Coins, of which the present volume

instalment, will consist primarily of five volumes,

first

of which two, those dealingcalled

(i

)

with the coins of the so-

Patau Sultans of Dehli, and

(2)

with the contempo-

rary issues of the Kings

of Bengal, Jaunpur, Gujarat,

and other Arabic coinages,

wall be the

of the Catalogue of Oriental Coins,

work of the author

Mr. Stanley Lane-

Poole, while the earlier series, Greek-Indian and Hindu, will be

and

comprised in two volumes by Prof. Percy Gardner

I shall

myself undertake the description of the currency

of the Emperors of Dehli of the House of Babar.

The general

principles

upon which the Catalogue of

Indian Coins will be arranged will be similar to those

which have been observed in the Greek and Oriental

series,

but the tabular or column-arrangement which was used in the eighth volume of the Oriental Catalogue will be retained

in

preference

volumes of

that

to

series,

open pages of

the

save

when

the

the length

earlier

the

of

inscriptions render the open page necessary.

The

coins included in the present

volume correspond

to

Fraehn's Class XYII.

The metal

of each specimen

inches and tenths of inches.

^

733532

is

stated,

The weight

and

its

size in

of the gold

and


EDITOirS PREFACE.

VI

silver

examples

is

given in English grains.

Tables for

converting grains into grammes^ and inches into

metres as well as into the measures of Mionnet's o-iven at the

A

milli-

scale, are

end of the volume.

comparative table of the years of the Hijrah and of

the Christian Era has been added with a view to facilitating reference to the standard

the European computation

works on Indian history where is

adopted.

Typical specimens are figured in the nine plates, which are executed

by the autotype mechanical process from

casts

in plaster.

The work has been written by Mr. Stanley Lane-Poole, and

I

have carefully revised

it

throughout, except in the

ease of the Nagari inscriptions, which have been collated by

Mr. Gardner.

REGINALD STUART POOLE.


INTRODUCTION. The present volume comprises the coinage of the Sultans commonly known as the " Patan" or " Pathan^^ King's of With some reluctance I have abandoned this Dehli. time-honoured designation,

Patau

is

synonymous

Sultans of Dehli were the line of Dehli,

for the

Muhammad

Sam,

ibn

of the

rest

the

of

The founder

not Afghans.

and his successors, the

Ticr'kj

reason that the word

with Afghan, and most

of

was a G/wri first

were his Turkish slaves and their offspring.

dynasty,

The second

dynasty, sprung from Jalal-ad-din Firoz Shah, was com-

posed of Khalji Turks.

The third dynasty, that of the

Taghlak-Shahis, was of the race of the

Jctis.

The fourth

claimed descent fi'om the Arab Husain, grandson of the

prophet

Muhammad, and

of Sayi/ids.

called itself

Indeed, only the

fifth

by the sacred

and the sixth

title

of the

dynasties into which the kings of Dehli are divided could

properly term themselves Patau or Afghan, inasmuch as

Buhlol belonged to the Lodi tribe of Afghans, and Slier

Shah

to the

Sur division of the Lodi

tribe.

Thus, out of

forty Sultans of Dehli, eight alone have any right to be called

Patans or Afghans.

If,

therefore, the iiame

is

to

be

retained at all in this misleading connection, it can only be in deference to long-established usage.

The gain

in con-

venience, however, in thus preserving the appellation, surely

more than counterbalanced by the

ethnological accuracy which

The

is

series of coins struck

restored

by

historical

is

and

its abolition.

by the Sultans of Dehli

offer

fewer points of interest and importance than do most of the currencies of

jMuhammadan

States.

As

a rule

we may


INTRODUCTION.

VI 11

Miihammadan

look upon

coins as the surest foundations

an exact history of the dynasties by which they were

for

issued.

The

coins of a

Muslim

ruler generally

go

far to

establish those outward data in regard to his reign which

The year

Oriental historians too often neglect or misstate.

of accession, the extent of his dominion, his relations with

the neighbouring powers and with the spiritual chief of his religion, are all facts for

dynasties

it

is

which we may look with

many of the too much to

In

dence to his coins.

hardly

smaller and less

confi-

known

say that the coins are

Unfortunately we cannot claim this

our chief informers.

The

importance for the issues of the Sultiins of Dehli.

history of this dynasty has been recorded in detail by

native writers,

but

little

coinage

that

may

to is

whose

new

suffice

can add

statements the coins

or valuable.

to establish

Now

and again the

the truth about a dis-

puted date, but such examples of usefulness are rare in the series.

Moreover, owing to the habit with weak

rulers,

whose tenure of power was unusually precarious, of protecting themselves behind the aegis of a renowned predecessor, and issuing their coins in the Sultcin, it is

name

not always easy to

of a deceased but revered feel

assured that the dates

on the coins represent precisely what they profess

;

and to

arrange the order and years of the succession by these dates,

without reference to the histories, would create no fusion.

little

con-

Almost the only piece of historical information which

has been thought to be derived from the coins alone

is

the

])resumed issue of the piece No. 85 in this volume, by Ntisir-

ad-din

Mahmud,

father's lifetime.

the eldest son of Altamsh, during his

This would doubtless be interesting

if it

were established, but the result of a careful examination of the

attribution.

me to reject, with all diffidence, Mr. Thomas's Two sons of Sultan Altamsh bore the title of

Niisir-ad-din

;

i'acts

to

has led

t)2r>,

the elder was governor of Bengal from 624

wliLU he died: the younger, born in the year of his


1^

INTRODUCTION.

became Sultan of Dehli after Mas'ud Mr. Thomas ascribes Shah, and reigned from 6U to 664. of Bengal by the government short the coin No. 85 to the

brother's

death,

elder Nasir-ad-din, on the it

of the

name

reigned from

ground of the occurrence upon

of the 'Aljbasi Khalifah Al-Mustansir,

623

to

governor-'s striking coins in his

acknowledgment of

his

who

improbability of the

The

640.

own name, without any Sultan Al-

father, the reigning

tamsh, together with the close resemblance between this coin and those which undoubtedly belong to the younger

Nasir-ad-din, led

me

No. 85 among the

to class

latter's

coinage, and to regard the anachronism of the Khalifah s name as merely an instance of the not un frequent posthumous

use of names on Dehli coins. cision, I notice that

Since coming to this de-

Dr. A. F. R. Hoernle* has arrived at

the same conclusion, and has supported his view by some

cogent arguments, the substance of which I here reproduce. In the first place, no Governor of Bengal, unless he had

thrown

name

off

the yoke of Dehli, ever substituted his

for that of his

own

The utmost a

master the Sultan.

governor might do was to add his name after his master's, as Yildiz did after

Muhammad

Secondly, coins

ibn Sam^s.

probably struck in Bengal, and clearly dated 624, do not bear Nasir-ad-din's name.

It

is

evident that

styles himself Sultan, and puts his

when the

own name

latter

exclusively on

the coin, he does not do so as a mere governor.

Moreover,

the publication by Dr. Hoernle in the same article of a coin of 'Ala-ad-din Mas'ud, with pi-ecisely the

cluding the peculiar

aJJ

same obverse,

and the omission of the

before Siiltcm, seems to put

it

beyond

in-

article

a doubt that Nasir-

ad-din copied his obverse from his immediate predecessor, at

first,

and that the coin No. 85 was his

earliest issue.

Neither the coin of Mas'ud nor No. 85 have any trace of

marginal inscriptions or dates. • Journal of

the Aniatic Society

of Bengal,

vol.

1.,

1881, pp. G2 fj

— 65.


INTRODUCTION.

A

certain historical value attaches to the joint issues of

the Firoz III. and his sons Fath and Zafar, as confirming Fath son his "invested Firoz notices of the historians. in with the insignia of royalty in 760, and placed his name, conjunction with his own, on the public currency," as FeAl-Mu'tadid ri^htah records; and the Egyptian Khalifah

sent a robe of investiture to the

young

All this

prince.

is

confirmed by the inscriptions on the coins, where we find the names of the Sultan and his son and the Khalifah con-

On

jointly on all specimens.

the other hand,

while the

to coins also corroborate the statements of the historians as Fath's III., to Firoz of son another Zafar, succession of

the

on the death of that prince, the value of the numismatic data is considerably diminished by the occurrence of one of those too common instances of posthumous issues

place,

which destroy

to

Dehli currency as date 791,

when

some extent the trustworthiness of the No. 387 bears the historical evidence.

pothesis of Mr. Rodgers Zafar,

The

who bore

and the hy-

Zafar was no longer alive: that

it

may

to a sou

refer

of

the same name, seems far-fetched.

coinage of the Sultans of Dehli

more valuable from

is

the point of view of political geography.

Mr. Thomas,

his classical account of the Chronicles of the

in

Pathdn Kings

of Dehli, thus describes the first foundation of the dynasty, and the beginning of the acquisition of that wide dominion

which

reached

Muhammad

its

greatest

extent

under

the

famous

ibn Taghlak.

" The later scions of the dynasty of Sabaktagin, driven out of Ghazni on its sack by 'Ala-ad-din Husain Jahansoz in

A.H. 550,

retired to

Labor, and had already, in

effect,

become domesticated Indian sovereigns so that, as Mu'izzad-din pressed down and around them, the occupation of ;

the more advanced provinces of Hindustan followed as a Mu'izz-ad-din Muhammad ibn Sara, or natural sequence. Shiiiab-ad-din

as he

was

called iu his

youth,

otherwise


il

IXTIIODVCTION.

known

Muhammad

as

dynasty of Dehli,

Ghoii, the founder of the Pathan noticed in history on the occasion

is first

of his nomination,

in conjunction with his elder hrother,

Ghiyas-ad-din, to the charge of a province of Ghor, hy his After

Husain Jahansoz.

uncle, the notorious 'Ala-ad-din

the accession of Ghiyas-ad-din to the throne of Ghor, in 558 A.H., Mu'izz-ad-din, acting as his general, suhdued portions of Khurasan

and, on the conquest of Ghazni in

;

569, he was nominated hy his suzerain brother to the government of that country. From this time his incur-

commenced

sions into India

:

in 571 he conquered

Multan;

in 574 he experienced a sanguinary defeat in an expedition against the prince of Nahrwala ; next, Khusru ]\Ialik, the last of the Ghazuavis, was assailed, and at length in 5S3

In 587, in a more extended ex-

captured by stratagem. pedition

into Hindiistan,

routed on the memorable leader, Prithvi

Muliammad Ghoii was

field

Thaueswar by the Chohan

of

After a year's repose, the

Raja of Ajmir.

disgrace of this defeat

still

self-same

battle-ground,

adversary,

now

rankling within him, he, on the

encountered

again

his

former

supported by the whole force of the country,

This time fortune

the confederated armies of 150 princes. favoured the Ghoris, and a hard-fought

field

the total discomfiture of the Indian host. victory the

totally

terminated in

By

this single

be said to have become the

Muhammadans may

The

virtual masters of Hindiistan.

ulterior

measures for

the subjugation of the country were of speedy accomplish-

ment, and most of the later additions to the Indian empire of

Muhammad

Ghori were perfected by his quondam

slave,

subsequent representative in Hindustan, and eventual successor on the throne of Dehli, Kutb-ad-din Aibek.

ad-din,

who had long

retained

little

beyond the

Ghiyastitle

of a

king, died in 599 A.H., and shortly afterwards Mu'izz-addin was installed in form.

conquest in the

An

north, in itself

unsuccessful attempt at

attended by most disastrous


:

INTRODUCTION.

Xll

results,

was succeeded by the revolt of the governors of this outbreak, however, was soon sup-

Ghazni and Multan pressed.

:

In the month of Sha'ban, A.H. 602,

Ghori was

Muhammad

own camp, Muslim empire of

slain in his tent, in the centre of his

by a band of Gakkars, At

his death, the

India extended generally over nearly the whole of Hindustan

The

and Bengal.

Sind,

proper,

sovereignty

was,

however, held by very exceptional tenures, and was most indeterminate in

its

inner geographical limits."*

This wide empire, although

it

underwent many tempo-

rary retrogressions, gradually advanced in extent up to the

time of

Muhammad

ibn Taghlak, when, according to the

account of Siraj-ad-din

^Umar

of

Oudh,f

it

included the fol-

lowing provinces Dehli.

Oudh.

Deogir.

Kanauj.

Multan.

Lakhnauti.

Kohram. Samanah.

Bihar.

Siwistan (Sehwan).

Malwah.

tJchh.

Labor. Kalanur.

KaiTah.

Hansi. Sirsuti.

Jajnagar.

Malabar.

Telingana.

Gujarat.

Dwara Samundra.

Badaon.

A

reference to the

map

of India, facing page xvi, will

show the vast extent of the dominion included in these provinces. But the elements of dissolution are always present in a

Muhammad

huge and disconnected congeries of states.

ibn Taghlak, in spite of his extraordinary perversity, was no ordinary ruler, and he, if any one, had the will and the power to hold his

stances

unwieldy empire together.

were * E.

too

strong

Thomas

:

even

Chronicles, pp.

f Notices et Extraits,

xiii.

for 10

170,

his

But the circumiron

resolution.

— 12.

cf.

Thomas,

p.

203.


INTRODUCTION.

" The dominion covering- twenty-three provinces, or indein the very

pendent nationalities, became,

number

of its

Local feudatories had of

sections, essentially incoherent.

been superseded by governors appointed by the head of the state, and the selection of fitting- and trustworthy representatives was attended by far g-reater rists than of old,

late

now

that the national bond, so effective among- the ruling-

under the dynasty of the Turks, had disappeared amid the dissensions of Turk and Khilji, both of whom had

classes

bow

henceforth to

Muhammadan

breed. In the all

to an alien

Sultan of curiously mixed

distrust of unconverted Hindus,

manner of foreign adventurers were

posts

:

installed in divisional

these men, having little or no interest in the stability

of the throne, were ever ready to aid any projected rising or to join with their combined forces any of the

in-

So that the annals of the period present a

fluential rebels.

— no sooner was one

mere succession of outbreaks, the empire brought back to division

more

would seek

its

allegiance than

section of

another

to assert its independence.

"The Sultan was often obliged to command his own armies and though he was usually victorious, the very fact ;

of his absence in distant parts encouraged the disaffected

The

elsewhere.

new

application

;

old proverb,

'Dehli

is

distant/ found a

the royal forces were often less near to the

threatened point than the inconveniently situated capital itself,

whose distance from the southern

suggested

its

supersession

parallel obstacle to the

by the more

states

had already

central Deogir.

A

permanent subjection of the provinces

was to be found in the state of the roads, and the general insecurity of the country at large, evils that extended to

such an extreme that the tribute of the south was allowed to accumulate at Deogir, merely because it was found impossible to transport

treasure

it

to Dehli,

and eventually the whole

was divided on the spot among some temporarily

successful insurgents.


IXTUODUCTION.

XIV

"The end

of such a state of things

might

easily be pre-

in coining

The Bengal mints occupied themselves

dicted.

money

for independent rulers

"Warangol, reverted to other masters;

its

;

the Sultan's early triumph,

name

ancient

in the

hands of

Deogir, his chosen capital^ submitted to

Hasan Gangu, the founder of a new race of Kings, the Bahmani Dynasty of Kulbarga, who were destined to play a prominent part in the destinies of the country

many kingdoms

finally, the owner of so

and

;

died miserably of

a fever, near Thata, on the lower Indus, with his army,

" like ants or locusts " around him cessor found

some

diflBculty in

cherished Dehli, which

;

and

his cousin

getting safe

Muhammad

and suc-

home

ibn Taghlak

the

to

had once

done so much to desolate and destroy/'* Less than

fifty

years afterwards, the reigning Sultan of

Mahmiid ibn Muhammad, was

Dehli,

capital itself,

from which

hemmed

by

in

Muhammad

confined

the

to

pretenders to the throne

rival

ibn Taghlak had dispensed

erratic notions of law to so immense an empire

:

and

his

after

Timur's invasion, 801 A.H., the kingdom of Dehli was distributed piecemeal, and Ikbal

Doab

Khan

held Dehli and the

Zafar Khan, Gujarat; Khizr Khan, Multan, Dai-

;

balpur,

and Sind;

Oudh,

Kanauj,

Khawajah-i-Jahan,

Karrah, Dalamau, Sandalah, Bahraich, Bihar, and Jaun-

Mahmiid Khan, Mahobah and Kalpi; Dilawar Khan, Dhar; Ghalib Khan, Samanah ; and Shams Khan, Biana. Sher Shah for a moment gathered together once more the fragments of the empire but it was reserved for Akbar to

pur;

;

rebuild the fabric in

The

coins are of

more than

some value

empire which thus rose and rapidity. in

the

With

its

ancient grandeur.

in tracing the variations in the fell

with such astonishing

a view to supplying the data they afford

manner most

convenient

for

Âť E. Thomas: Chivnicle?, pp.

reference,

203-

20G.

I

have


XV

INTRODUCTION.

arranged the table,

known mints

of each Sultan in the following

including not only the British

Museum

examples,

but those in Mr. Thomas's Chronicles, and in Mr. C. J. Rodgers' supplementary papers in the Journal of the

Bengal Asiatic Society,

vols. xlix.

and

li.

TABLE ILLUSTRATING THE EXTEXT OF THE EMPIRE BY THE MIXTS.* 589

— 602 Muhammad ibn Sam,

Ghazm, [Kanauj,] Pes/iavjar, Farwan. Ghazni.

Yildiz,

607—633 Altamsh,

Dehli, ]\Iultan,Narwar?

634—637 Riziyah, 637—639 Bahram Shah, 639—644 Mas'ud, 644—664 Mahmud I., 664—686 Balban, 686—689 Kai-Kubad, 689—695 Firoz II.,

Lakhnauti.

Lahor?

695

Ibrahim

Dehli.

Dehli. Dehli.

Dehli.

Dehli. Dehli. Dehli.

I.,

695—715 Muhammad Shah 716—720 Mubarak I.,

I.,

Dehli, DeSffir. Dehli,

Kutbdbdd

Dehli

720

725

Dehli.

Khusru,

720—725 Taghlak

(i.e.

?).

I.,

Dehli, Deogir, Talang.

— 752 Muhammad ibn Taghlak, Dehli, Satgaon, Sondrgdon, Agrah, Taghlakpur(i.e.Tirhut?),

Daulatabad and Yi^ogir,

Sultanpur,

Warangol,) nauti

(i.e.

(i.e.

Lakh-

Gaur).

* Mints in the National Collection are printed in roman letters; those from Mr. Thomas's ChroiiirUs, in italics; while those from Mr. Rodgers'.

papers are printed in small capitals.


xvi


XVU

INTRODUCTION.

ance of Jaunpur as the second mint of Bulilol

when

it is

recollected that

Jaunpur in 893

after

was

it

this Sultan

had

it

is

interesting-

who

re- annexed

independent for a

been

century. It

will

be noticed that the names of several of the

Sultans are absent from the preceding table. owing- to various causes; Aibek, for instance, to have struck

Ibrahim

any coins at

all

II., etc., issued coins

of the mints

This

not

Abu-Bakr, Sikaudar

;

is

known II.,

without stating the names

Khan Lodi and Khizr Khan,

while Daulat

;

in the general confusion

is

which accompanied the invasion of

India by Timur, preferred rather to trade upon the traditional credit of their predecessors than to

make any demands upon

the peojjle's trust in their personal solvency, and thus issued their coins in the

name

of Firoz III. or

mints of which issues cannot be held to

Muhammad III., the offer

veiy trustworthy

evidence of the extent of their strikers' dominion, which,

however, we

know from

other sources to have been limited

to a small district immediately surrounding Dehli.

Neither

of these two puppets was a king in any real sense, and to such, "it mattered

little

whose superscription was placed

on the public money,

—

duty was confined to authorising

the legality of the as

new

his

issues

by

so

much

of his attestation

was implied in the annual date recorded on the reverse,

...

a

of their

system,

own

indeed,

free will,

which the East India Company,

much credit and name of Shah Dehli, whose money

imitated with

simplicity by striking their rupees in the

'Alam and other defunct monarchs of had of old obtained good repute

in the local bazars.

as the progressive annual dates,

which were needed

But to test

the good faith of Oriental princes, came in process of time to be a source of confusion

and an opportunity

for

money-

changers, the Government adopted the expedient of select-

ing the best current coin of the day, and based their standard upon

its intrinsic

value; and so the immutable c


INTRODUCTION.

Xviii

date of

'

upon our much-prized

Dehli

lies

before

Any

'

Sicca Rupees.'

to figure

"*

chief importance of the coinage of the Sultans of

The

is

Shah 'Alam ' came

the xix san (year) of

in

who

one

bearing upon the currencies of India.

its

It

things a series which attracts the metrologist.

all

has studied Mr. Thomas's elaborate examina-

tion of the relations between these issues

and the ancient

Indian metric system will understand the value of the I do not propose to re-

coinage of Dehli in this respect. capitulate

which are

the results

here

Mr. Thomas's researches^

of

but a sketch

easily accessible in his Chronicles ;

of the principal developments of the coinage is necessary to a due appreciation of the various pieces described in the

following pages.

In considering the general character of the Dehli

ibn of

Sam and

his lieutenant Yildiz,

very uncertain weights,

attempt to carry on the dirhams. the fact

Muhammad

set aside the introductory issues of

we must

series,

which are not only

but obviously indicate

Muhammadan

system

an

of large

The conqueror of Hindustan readily recognized that it was not to such issues that he must resort

in his dealings with his

new Indian

subjects.

From time

immemorial the staple of the currency in the northern provinces of India had consisted of small copper and hillon (silver

and copper)

pieces,

which

later

These, stamped with the

from the locality as Behl'mdls. traditional religious

on came to be known

emblems, the Bull of Siva and the Kabul

Chohan horseman, would inevitably form the models upon which an adapted coinage must be based, if it were to obtain

or

favour in the eyes of a conservative people.

Muhammad

ibn

Sam

Accordingly,

issued Dehliwals, with these

emblems

and his own name inscribed in Nngari or Hindi characters

* E.

'I'luiiiiJis

talhi, vol

i,

:

jiart 1,

r/()v;>/,V^(S,

pp. 329,

330

;

Iiiti'rnatluiial

Ancient Indian We'ujhts, p. 53

/".

Numismata

Orien-


INTRODUCTION.

So

of a rude type.

xix

he imitate the style of

closely did

the preceding local coinage, or so scrupulously did he avail

himself of the services of the old moneyers, that

many of his

found possible to attribute

names

are not recorded

upon

has been

it

coins to mints

whose by indications

their surfaces,

of style and treatment of the devices.

Similar reasons

induced him to preserve, though only for a short time, the peculiar gold issues of Kanauj, with a rude figure of the

goddess Lakhshmi, adding his name in Nagari. The billon Dehliwals, which for convenience are headed " Copper " in the present volume, retained their old important posi-

tion in the currency of Hindiistan through the

part of the duration of the dynasty founded

ibn Sam.

They underwent various

in the substitution of Arabic for

by

greater

Muhammad

modifications, especially

Nagari

inscriptions

;

and

there are minor differences in the form and position of the

Bull Nandi and the Horseman, which have been noted. But the main fact, that a billon currency formed the staple of

exchange in Hindustan, is undisturbed. Muhammad ibn Sam^s conquests " were always associated with an adapta^ tion,

more or

less

complete, of the local currency

we

find the peculiar type of the

its

own

locality

;

; hence Ghori Horseman retained in

Kurman

the distinctive

posture] of the Bull of Siva maintains

succeeding foreign dynasties ;

.

and Sind, each preserved, but

.

.

— the

Cavalier

with

the

outline

[upright

identity throuo-h

Ajmir, Dehll, Multan,

little

outline of the early device of the first

Kabul,

its

modified, a Tuo-hra

Brahman

reverse

of

Kino-s of

the

Sacred

new and

charac-

Bull/'*

Side by side with this native coinage, a teristic issue

was introduced by Altamsh

of the seventh century of the Flight.

* E. Thomas

:

in

the early part

This was the silver

Chronicles, p. 36.


INTRODUCTION.

XX Tankah, which held

its

place as the standard silver coin to the

end of the dynasty, and was so much approved that a gold Tankah, of equal weight, was added by Balban in the same century, which retained

its position,

with a brief interrup-

more than a century ,^-until,

tion, for

in fact, the precarious

Sultans of Dehll rendered any

tenure of power by

the

isยงue of gold

incompatible with

coins

The

treasury.

Tankah,

silver

the

gold,

or

state of the

should

weigh

175 grains, and the existing specimens bear out the esti-

mate with

tolerable accuracy.

in the British

weigh

to

Taghlak Shah I., 166 grains

collectively 12,550 grains, or a trifle over

apiece,

which, allowing for wear and sweating,

average.

two

Seventy-five silver Tankahs

Museum, from Altamsh

fall

None of these 75

is

a fair

pieces fall below 161 (indeed only

below 163 grains), and some reach the weight of 171.

The gold show an even the British

better average, for 21 specimens in

Museum, from Balban to Taghlak Shah

I.,

weigh

which gives 167Yy as the weight of 16S grs. One of these goes as high as each, or just under

collectively

8526

grs.,

below 164.

173, and only one

falls

ning of a regular

silver coinage

Thus from the begin-

under Altamsh, about the

Muhammad

year 632 of the Hijrah, to the time of

ibn

Taghlak, A.H. 725, the Tankah was the standard of currency in the empire of Dehli.

With Muhammad tions, which,

ibn Taghlak begins a series of innova-

although they were not destined to

introduced in their brief duration

many

features into the currency of Hindustan. is

stated to have had

last long,

curious and novel

Muhammad Shah

some such change

in contemplation

Muhammad ibn Taghlak He was anxious to strike a

with regard to the Tankah as eventually carried into

new Tankah

effect.

of 140 grains, in order to pay his Sijiahis, or

Sepoys, with as

little

expense as possible.

This was the

precise reduction which Ibn Taghlak effected.

His new


INTRODrCTION. 'AclUs, or

"

equItalDle

no very obvious

XXI

[coins]," as tliey were

called,*

for

140 grains, and from

reason, weig-lied

725 to 730 the new standard obtained throughout

A.H.

The

his empire.

British

Museum

specimens range from 137

to 151 grs., and give an average of 141 grs. ever,

Muhammad

In a, h. 730, how-

ibn Taghlak thought better of his reform,

and other coins of that year maintain the old weight of 169 (for

Simultaneously he had attempted an altera-

175) grs.

which he raised to

tion in the standard of the gold Tankahs,

200

grs., as

witness the pieces of 197, 19S, and 199 grs. in

But

this volume.

than that in the

this

silver;

change was even more short-lived it

began in

A.H. 726,

729 and 730 the old Tankah of 175

and already in

grs. is

again repre-

sented by gold pieces weighing 168, 169, and 171 grs.

But the most remarkable lak's

of

all

Muhammad

ibn Tagh-

monetary enterprises was the attempt to introduce a

forced currency of brass at the value of the Tankah.

attempts b}'

fiduciary coinage

a

at

Oriental sovereigns.

Such

had before been made

Khubilai Khan, the Mongol em-

peror of China, had succeeded in perfecting a very convenient

paper currency in the Celestial empire

and the Mongol

;

Ilkban of Persia, Gai-khatu, with very different motives,

had endeavoured subjects

;

but

made an end

Muhammad order.

It

to force a paper

strenuous

the

of the fraud

money upon

resistence

and of

his

his Persian,

he

encountered

own

sovereignty.

ibn Taghlak's forced currency was of a different

was

chiefly of brass,

and the state of the treasury

seems to havejustifiedanysystem of nominal values,inasmuch as

Ibn Taghlak could

at the nominal prices.

(730

— 732,)

the

trial

easily

have redeemed the whole issue

Indeed, when, after about three years,

proved unsuccessful, in consequence

of innumerable imitations, against which the Sultan had

organized no regal protective marks, Muhammad ibnTao-hlak

* The

name occurs on the coinage

itself.


XXU

INTEODUCTION.

took up

tlie

whole brass currency, g-enuine and forged

alike,

at the values for which they were intended to pass.

In

such circumstances there can be no question of dishonesty

on the part of the

That he anticipated some reluc-

ruler.

tance on the part of his subjects to accept the brass currency

Tankah may be seen from the character of the legends with which the new coins were in-

as equivalent to the silver

scribed:

,j-o«-^)t cllal J.AS

^UaJU.)! clJat

the Sultan obeys the Compassionate/'

Laxj ^^,ASu

^_^U)I J.£»

^UaA,-JI ^)^

*^)

^^ "Whoso \^a.^io\^

^,^:ij^ j.^*^\

obeys \^s^io\.

aii\

fJ$\^ ^J^J.l\

" Obey God and obey the Prophet, and those in authority

among you

:

sovereignty

is

of them (precede) others ;"

all men some At the same time, while thua

not conferred upon etc.

;

appealing to the Koran for the inculcation of obedience to the

powers that

be,

Muhammad

ibn Taghlak was careful to let

the people understand for exactly

was intended to ^^sJ

pass.

jL<.a»^ jtj j4.«1

Thus we

^J^ j^^J3j

j>

how much

;?-5lj

aCC>

r-J^

[ibn] Taghlak/'

and again ^<j^

" Sealed as a Tankah of

}^J3j )i

new

piece

j^ ^^

" Sealed as a Tan-

kah current in the reign of the slave hopeful

hammad

the

find the inscription

[of grace]

*'»"*i

Mu-

a^ jti^^."*.

fifty Kanis,^' or

Ganis,

or j^aj^l *->^ " Struck [as] the fourth ^jZJ\j^^ji\ " The legal dirham," j^^JI " The half-piece ;" c-^ Jj^

etc.

;

^\^

;

"Good

[for]

eight Kanis," or

of two Kanis/' and finally

equal to one sented

in

No. 201,

the

I read

In order

we must

Kani

to

:"

^A^ 33

^JUu ^JUI

JJUj.

"

but these varieties are not

National Collection, dS.-^

ajC^

"

Money

A

Chital

all

repre-

In Mr. Thomas's

not aCJ.

understand what these denominations mean,

consult Mr. Thomas's * table of the Currency

during the reign of Muhammad ibn Taghlak, here subjoined with some modifications in the arrangement. * Chronicles,

p. 219.


XXll

INTRODUCTION.

MUHAMMAD

IBX TAGHLAK'S CUREEKCY. Tankah.


;

INTRODUCTION.

XXiv

The an

piece

marked 8 Kanis weighs 53

eig-hth part of

grs.,

which

is

neither

136 nor a 6^ part, taking the two vakies

new Tankahs (64 and 50 Kanis) into conIf the 136 brass Tankah is meant to equal sideration. 50 Kanis, the 8 Kani piece should weigh about 21 grs. Or of the old and

Tankah

the brass

if

Tankah of 175

old

reduction

similar

is

grs., the 8

Kani

in weight,

and should hardly exceed

the 8 Kani piece to the Tankah, satisfactory account,

it is

bear any

ing no

less

than 74

tions.

Nor

is

it

impossible to give a

grs,, instead of 13, as it should if

relation to the 8

Kani

CMfal of copper, equal

a unique

is

it is

on the weight system, of the Du-kani

which weighs 25

to

piece should follow a

Again, on whatever principle we accommodate

17 grs.

piece,

intended to represent the

of 136 grs.

grs.,

easy,

Then

piece.

to 1

there

Kani, but weigh-

which must upset

all calcula-

on the principle of a uniform 112 and 55

of weights, to explain the pieces of

grs.,

scale

which

Mr. Thomas suggests may be 40 and 20 Kanis. Why should a 20 Kani piece weigh only 2 grs, more than an 8 Kani A remarkable Birham Sliar'i, " Legal dirham," piece ? also appears in the series,

no (as

legal

which comes up to 80

Mr. Thomas terms

it,)

weighs no

I do not quote these weights under

Thomas

grs.,

which

dirham ever did; while the Nisf^ or halt'-dirham, less

than 103 grs.

any impression that Mr.

has ever sought to prove that the brass coinage was

strictly adjusted to a regular scale of

weights corresponding

to those of the silver coins they were intended to supplant

indeed a remark of his (on p. 248) shows that he

is

per-

fectly alive to the discrepancies in the scale of weights;

but I

am

anxious to

from the weights

is

state

clearly

likely to be

that

any deduction

fallacious,

inasmuch as

the closest examination reveals no system or graduated scale whatever. The lower denominations were lighter than the higher, and that

is,

I believe, all that

about them on the subject.

can be formulated


XXV

INTRODUCTION.

Another carious feature issues

— of

in the currency

this " Prince of

Monejers "

name

gold and copper coins in the sole

— not

is

the forced

the striking of

of the contemporary

Khalifah of Egypt, the faineant representative of the once

The only

powerful house of 'Abba^!. the Dehli series

instance in

parallel

the remarkable coin of Altamsh^ No. 35,

is

where only the Khalifah Al-Mustansir's name appears in

From

the inscriptions.* of Dehli, the

Muhammad

neglected.

Khalifah

reigning

Baghdad upon W{

of

^

Sam

the

yet

may

al-uiu-iniiiin, as the

of the form

ibn

Muslims were never

put the name of the

^^^^j

dynasty

surviving

his silver coins, while the

Sri Ilainirah,

frfti;:,

Amir

the earliest issues of the Sultans lords of the

spiritual

perhaps stand

Nagari for

of

letters

^*.;^^1

j.A.«t

occurrence in the same position

Sri ShalipJia,

i.e.

Al-Khalifak, seems to

show; though Sri Haniirah might of course equally well

Muhammad ibn Sam Muhammad ibn Sam to that of

represent ^^-^/«iO' simply, and refer to himself.

From

Firoz

the

II.,

the time of

names

of the 'Abbasi Kiialifahs of

Baghdad

appear regularly on the gold and silver coins; and even so late as G95, forty years after

the

Baghdad Khalifate and

by Hiihigu, the name of Hindustan seem

to

the murder

last,

accession of

name

is

seen on

however, the Sultans of

have realized that there could be

spiritual benefit in retaining the

had been dead

of Al-Musta'sim

this ill-fated Pontiff

At

the coinage of Dehli.

the forcible destruction of

for forty years,

Ibrahim

I.

name

of a Khalifah

little

who

and accordingly from the

the coinage does not record the

of the Khalifah, but inscribes only a bare reference

to his existence, in the Sultan's title

mhiin, to which

Muhammad

I.

Ndsir Amir-al-mu-

added the

title

of

Yamin

al-Khilafah.

The next

alteration took place under

* E. TliOiuas, Chronicler,

p.

Mubarak Shah 4G.

I.,


INTRODUCTION.

XXVI

who,

of

with the stereotyped Ndsir Aniir-

alter beginning'

al-imi-minin

himself,

Khalif'ah

j^*«Jl»!l

wJ;

"Abode

of the Khalifate/'

AAAJla.,

styled himself

the

in

style

AijJii.

aJL)I

and

,JJI^)I

<xX)\j

improvements

terming Dehli

Dar al-Khilafah.

O-s*-*!-*^' >£•*'

dignity

the

j.^a\

adding such other

717,

in

y^*j.^^\,

assumed

predecessors,

his

of

Khusru Shah

^5^' ^^^ Taghlak

Shah

I. re-

Then

turned to the old form of Nasir Amir-al-mu-minin. his son

ment

Muhammad

introduced the crowning acknowledg-

of the Egyptian Khalifate

which he omitted

all

when he

''

time of the

Imam

Al-Mustakfi,"" the then reigning ^Abbasi

Khalif'ah of the restored line in Egypt. until this period,

hammad

was not apparently

Egypt under

the

after the revival

Mamluks, that the

Dehli became aware of this restoration

;

and Mu-

ibn Taghlak certainly spared no pains to empliasize

the discovery. lifati''^

It

more than eighty years

of the Khalifate in of

struck coins in

mention of himself, and substituted the

This Klialifati dinar was struck ... in the

inscription

Sultans

as

the

After his

coins, in gold

brief issue

and copper,

century of the Flight, the

name

Khalif'ah api^ears regularly

in the

of

purely

"Kha-

middle of the eighth

of the reigning

Egyptian

upon the Dehli mintings, in

conjunction with that of the Sultan, until A.H. 795; after

which year the monarchs of Dehli seem again to have

become uncertain lif'ahs,

and

as to

therefore

the names of the successive

contented themselves with

Kha-

simply

inscribing the fact that there was a Khalif'ah of some

name

or another, without seeking to indicate his precise titles.

The forms, " In the time of the Prince of the Faithful," ^j.Loj^lj-^1 ^x>j ^, or ^' The Khalifah [is] the Prince of the Faithful,''' retained their place on the coinage until the

time of Sher Shah, with the variation of

JSVi'id

Amir-al-mu-

minin. Sher Shah abolished the style of Khalifah altogether

from the coinage, with a due sense of historical accuracy, since the

Egyptian Khalifate had by then been absorbed by


XXVU

INTRODUCTION.

the Sultans of Turkey, and the Sultan of Dehli could not be

expected to understand that the spiritual power thus trans-

ought

ferred

Hindustan.

be recog-nised in so remote a region as

to

Slier

Shah^ however,

upheld the character

of the Dehli coinage for Sunni orthodoxy

names and

epithets of the

^Umar, 'Uthman, and

by

by inserting the

four Khalifuhs,

first

Abu-Bakr,

and the example was followed

'All,

his successors to the close of the dynasty.

After the reign of

Muhammad

ibn Taghlak the coinage

Only eight

of the Sultans of Dehli greatly deteriorates.

gold Tankahs are found in the British this

after

Museum

monarch, and of these but one

FIroz III.,

collection

than

later

The specimens

immediate successor.

his

is

silver also

becomes greatly diminished.

tion of a few

posthumous

silver

Khizr Khan in the name of

AVith the excep-

Tankahs, struck chiefly by

Muhammad

III.,

death of

Muhammad

ibn Taghlak and the accession of Slier

Sher Shah and his

Shah, an interval of nearly 200 years.

successors abolished the hlUon coinage, which

almost

all

Tankah

in its original

monotonous.

fall little

order,

and there are not many even of

peculiar forms

260-^263; \^\ ji^A^ \Js.su

JÂŁ9 ^UiuJI

may

be noticed

The

ajIAjj aJUI jljl,

titles of

pi

^^\ ^W^

^)^_ ^)

Jj^

y>'^)\

^S.ATLi (partly from Kur.

formulas

figure.

Mu-

Save in the phenomenal issues of

form of the Profession of Faith

^Ul

below this

on the coins of the Sultans are unusually

ibn Taghlak, the religious inscriptions are of the

commonest

A few

The

weight of about 175 grs.

Museum

inscriptions

hammad

had absorbed

the exchange of India, and restored the silver

specimens in the

The

about 817,

between the

silver coins occur in the British INIuseum

no

in

The

question are of the old weight of 167 to 170 grs.

njaJ^

iv.

^^\

:

aJDI

e.g., -n)!

these.

the complete

A)l^)

J^ ji^l on

(Kur. xxxv. 15); \^aJa\

^313

J>wjJI l^xJ*!^

aJUI

62); and the benedictory

and

dJ'iJ^j dJ^iU? aXII Jj^.

the sovereigns of Dehli are as monotonous as


XXVm

TNTRODIICTION.

They

their religious legends.

BMhram, ''Shahs"

also,

add to exidt the former of

Muhammad

Down

title is ^ia.£.^\.

to the

time

Taghlak, they hardly ever varied

ibn

Muhammad

although

this formula,

are all "Sultans," and, after

and the almost universal epithet they

Sam

ibn

himself,

when

under his brother's suzerainty, began with the variety of

^ka^l.

Original in his

hammad

which Taghlak substitution

began

titles,

as in everything else,

ibn Taghlak abandoned I.

the

had already shaken by

of the epithet

his gold coinage

jj;jUJI.

occasional

his

Muhammad

with a posthumous coin

This he followed by various

aAJI J.-s^w

Persian

^

»>.*,U^I,

^f^jJJ\ dJJt

new

son

his

in

memory

of his father, bearing the unprecedented series j.*yiJl

(jjUH.

Mu-

cherished epithet,

j^^si-JI

titles,

such as

a^^efcj ^_5«^I;.M,

and the

6^^, representing the Arabic ^ef.\^\ a*aJl.

jlj^.-jt

After his time, the old formula returns once or twice, on posthumous issues in the name of Muham-

chiefly

mad

III.;

were

satisfied

Firoz of

but

^LkJ-^,

also

Sidfani

unfrequently added. called

Sultans of

Dehli

by

inaugurated

himself ^Jhji

styled

J^^j

Jj'>^')

with " Lieutenant

or As-SuUdni,

Prince of the

of the

the later

rule

with the simple epithet,

(who

II.

a

as

Faithful," ^i:^y^)\ j.^\ y.^5U, not

The Lodis abolished

themselves ^-o^jJ

'

J^>V

1^5^^

and Islam Shah adopted the

I

;

this

title

and

and Sher Shah

style of

J^Ult ^IkJLJt; or, on the copper issues, the very peculiar formula ,^laJI ^i^^)! jLJjJS o-i^^ (or ,^«£3la^)l). Added to the first title are generally a

which

is

kunyah

lakab,

such as Nasir-ad-din, and a

hivj/aJi,

universally Ahu-l-Miizaffar, whenever there

at

all,

except in two cases

Nasir Amir-al-mu-minin addition to these

titles,

is,

(j.*-u>3-oJt

it \s

I.

is

a

Jhi-l-Miijd/tid.

as has been said, a

from Altamsh to

and on the coins of Taghlak the Faithful,''

when

common

Muhammad

I.,

" Sword of the Prince of

j^^\ \Ji^, occurs on the coinage of


XXIX

INTRODUCTION. c

Fir6z

IT.,

,j-^^l j^\

form

the

as does

Queen of the form

^J..;^^\\

the British

Riziyah ibnat

line,

j^\ oj^.

Museum

So

reads,

at

The one

Altamsh,

used the

this

specimen in

the

least

and

w-5U, which IT.

remains in use to the time of ]\rubarak

confirmed by a

is

specimen described and eng-raved by Dr. Hoernle in the

Mr. Thomas

Journal of the Beng-al Asiatic Society (1881). has read yj.J^^^] j^\ 5j^^ from

only other titles of importance occurring' on

Muhammad

under i-eview are those of <li^l^;JI;

Mubarak

of

^UjJI

I.,

The

another example.

^*<fj ^^^l' jJJSL,\

T.,

jj.xii^\,

the coins

ii'^UJI ^a<>j, soon

changing" to ,j-mU^I J.A.45I dJJb Jj\^\ .^la.s.^)l>aU'^)l, and Khusrii Shah's ,^j.fJ^^\ j^\ ^J^ ^.<,A.ji\ j,<aXj (JjI^I, where .

Mr. Thomas has read

.

.

.

j.Asi~i

ipt^ll,

firmed by any specimen in the British

.

which

The orthog-raphy of the name "Altamsh I have followed

few words.

most usual spelling

not con-

is

Museum.

Mr. Thomas

demands a

''

in retaining the

but there can be no doubt that

:

it is

not the most accurate representation of the original Turki,

may have

whatever the meaning of that original There

infrequently another before the

form would seem to be transcript

f^ffffiTf^f^

witb this restoration

'Hand-grasper/ propriate.

'

tl-tutmish.

Lititimisi

agrees

The Nagari tolerably

well

and the meaning of Il-tutmish,

Supporter,'

^

Upholder/

is

sufficiently ap-

also be

ot

Pasha, suggests an alternative reading in ^l<^lLil,

kidnapped,^ or slave

might

so that the complete

:

(^-frlibl

Mr. Redhouse, however, on the authority

Ahmad Wafik ^.(^A, from it

;

J

been.

O, and not

generally a single stroke after the

is

'

to convey,-* 'carry

who was

off,'

?.e.,

'the

'carried off:' and adds that

taken in the active sense, as meaning the

'carrier off^ or ravisher (of the heart).

There are

many

points that might here be raised with

regard to the origin and localization of the Brahmanical

emblems and symbols, and the

peculiarities

palaeography as exhibited on the coins

:

of

Nagari

but these will


^XX

INTRODUCTION.

more appropriately be considered

volume of the

ia the

Indian Catalog-ue which will treat exclusively of the Hindu coinages. I have already indicated two or three small matters in which I have been compelled reluctantly to differ from the opinion of Mr. Thomas, and it is necessary to enumerate a

few more such minor

legible,

I

of eyes

and microscopes.

there

is

merely a

of an undisputed inscription

not here discuss

shall

sent volume of

When

differences.

how much

question as to

The

what

rejection from

Mr. Thomas's No.

7

is

only an affair

is

requires,

the

pre-

however,

some explanation, inasmuch

as the coin exists in the British

Museum.

am convinced that it is not Sam at all, but of one of the

I reject

a coin of

because I

it,

Muhammad

ibn

Ghaznawis, probably Khusru Malik. think, shows

Sam, and the

inscription, as I read

No. 120 of the

The

no fellow to the issues of

it is

Clironicles,

which

is

it,

fabric alone, I

Muhammad

the same coin as No. 138

of the ])resent volume, bears, according to Mr.

date 6S0, which he adds

is

ibn

confirms the rejection.

Thomas, the

" clearly an error," with which

I must concur, since I can only make it 695. Mr. Thomas's No. 121 presents a slight displacement of the inscriptions in i\\e

Chronicles, for the

word j.*.ÂŤl should be

in the

middle

line.

In his No. 146, Mr. Thomas reads Dar-al-Khilafah, where I

Dar-al-Mulk, but the two

find

same

On

issue.

Thomas,Ican find nodistinct

On

p.

not be of precisely the

trace of the

mint-name he

gives.

51 of this catalogue will be found a foot-note in which

I venture to dissent from

mous

may

the coins described under No. 297 by Mr.

coin of

Taghlak

I.

Mr. Thomas's reading of

The

rejection of the

a posthu-

presumed date

on the reverse at once removes Mr. Thomas's No. 158 to the side of his

No. 178,

as a

posthumous, and not as he supposed a

contemporary, issue of that Sultan.

The

ixiXQ

Ash-Shahid

think, enough to prove that Taghlak was dead

alone

is,

when

the coin was struck, for I cannot recall an instance of

I

so very significant a title being

assumed by

a living king.


XXXI

ll.TUODUCTrOX. I

may

add, in referonce to No. 73 in this volume, that I

can find no trace of the

aJJL>

and

j^e>.

Dr. Hoernle refers to

Bengal Asiatic Society (1881).

in the Journal of the

In the arrang-ement of posthumous coins, as well as in

some other minor pattern which

is

details of order, I set,

generally with excellent judgment, in

I class the

the Chronicles.

have departed from the

posthumous coins under the king

they bear, and give a cross-reference in the place

whose name

where they should come

The matter

is

if

the order were strictly chronological.

merely a question of convenience; and I fonnd

that the coins were more clearly described and more easily

compared in

this order

demanded.

their dates

than

if

they had been placed where

Instances of this arrangement will

be frequently met with in this volume, and the student must

not be deceived by the classification into the belief that the Sultans enjoyed preternaturally long reigns. principle to that

410

coins, Nos.

hammad

which prompted the

By

issue of

a contrary

posthumous

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 412 in this catalogue were struck by Mu-

III. before he actually

became Sultan, when he was

associated with his father Firoz III. in the government. It would have been better

had indicated

if I

this circum-

stance in the heading.

As

coins,

without reference to their historical or geogra-

phical or other relations, those of the Sultans of Dehli are

singularly issues of ficies

But

fine.

Especially beautiful are the clear-cut gold

Muhammad

enabled a better impression to be struck with the the chief test of a coinage

in the calligraphy,

upon

ibn Taghlak, where the smaller su])er-

though the

Muhammadan

coins,

is

die.

rather in the assay than

latter is

where the

not to be despised

finer

departments of

Mr.

the engraver^s art could not be allowed free

s'cope.

Thomas has given some

experiments

details of assaying

with the coins of Dehli, and the result in the higher metals shows great regularity.

Muhammad

example, had a fineness of 94"2, and Firoz

More

interesting are the assays which

I.'s

gold, for

II.^s of 94'5.

Mr. Thomas had


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; XXXll

made

INTRODUCTION. in India of the billon

coinage,

by the usual native The following

process of blowing- off the copper with lead. are

some

of his results

:

Twelve of Nasir-ad-din Mahmud's dehUwdls, with a tive

weight of 584

produced 149

grs.,

collec-

grs. of silver,

or 12"14 (nearly jth) apiece.

Various specimens of Firoz III., [Chronicles, No. 228), weigh-

ing from 131'5 to 141 grs. each, contained irregular proportions of silver, ranging from 12 to 24 grs. apiece.

Four

weighing about 140

coins of Buhlol LoJi, gr., 15'3 grs.,

gave

The average

silver

The

gvs.,

and

grs. each,

6*7 grs., silver.

the coins of Sikandar ibn Buhlol,

in

from an assay of piece, of

14

over

thirty,

was

5*64

in

each

an average weight of about 140 grs. each.

subjoined

tables

of

of the various princes whose

volume, together with the

map

the

genealogical

money

is

relations

described in this

of mediaeval India, will be

useful to the student of this dynasty in its connection with

the history of India at large.

In conclusion, I expressing

my

am

glad to have this opportunity of

thanks to Mr. Edward Thomas, not only

for

the assistance which eveiy student of the coins of the Sultans of Dehli must derive from his learned and exhaustive Chronicles, but also for the kindness with

mitted

me

to

which he has per-

examine his own annotated copy of that work,

and has read the proof-sheets of this Introduction. much indebted to Professor Percy Gardner for vision of the to

Nagari

Mr. Redhouse, Dr.

I

am also

his super-

inscriptions included in this volume, Stickel,

and

Sauvaire, for various suggestions

;

MM.

Tiesenhausen and

while to the Keeper of

Coins, in his minute and scrupulous revision of every line of

the work, I owe

many

valuable corrections and improve-

ments.

STANLEY LANE-POOLE. Richmond, Nov. 24, LSC4.


M^^r

7i^^^


(

xxxiii

)

i-S

_J

"c


(

xxxiv

)

rfl

a

•-6

P O


(

XXXV

)

T3

a


(

IV.

xxxvi

FOUETH DYNASTY.

28. Khizr

29.

Mubarak Shah

)

Khan Sayyid

Farid

ii.

30.

Muhammad Shah

31.

V.

'Alim Shah

FIFTH DYNASTY. 32.

Buhldl

L6M

33. Sikandar

ii.

Ibrahim

ii.

34.

iv.


(

xxxvii

-:3

02

"S

Q w

)


(

xxxix

)

TABLE OF THE

METHOD OF TRANSLITERATION ADOPTED THIS CATALOGUE.

1

IN


CONTENTS.


CONTENTS.

xlii

PAGE

Thied Dynasty

50

Ghiyas-ad-din Taghlak Shah

Muhammad

.

Taghlak

II. ibn

.

.

name of

the

in

.50

.

...

Forced Cui-rency Coins struck

I.

.

56

.

.

63

.

the 'Abbasi

Khalifa hs of Egypt

.

.69

.

69

Al-Mustakfi II

Al-Hakim Mahmiid Shah

71

Muhammad

ibn

lak, pretender

.

Firoz Shah III

With Path Khan

.

ibn Tagh-

.72

.

.

73

......

79

With Zafer

80

Ghiyas-ad-din Taghlak Shah II.

.

81

.

.

Abu-Bakr Shah

82

Muhammad Shah

III. ibn Fiiuz

Posthumous Coins

.

.

.

.84

.

.

.

.

Sikandar Shah 1

Mahmud Shah

86 87

88

II

Nasrat Shah {Interregmnn)

Posthumous Coin

.

.

.

.

.

.90

.

.

.

......

Fourth Dynasty Mubarak Shah II

Muhammad Shah

90 91 91

IV. ibn Farid

.

.

.93 96

'Alim Shah

Fifth Dynasty

97 97

Buhlol Lodi

.......

Sikandar II. Lodi

101

Ibrahim Lodi

104

Sixth Dynasty

105

105

Sher Shdb Islam Shah

Muhammad

118 'Adil

Sikandar Shah III

Shah

125 127


CONTENTS.

xliii

PAGE

Indexes

129

.

.

.

131

.

.

.

147

.

.

167

.

109

.

.

......

â&#x20AC;˘

YIII. ^Miscellaneous Table for

and

converting English into the

into

grammes

.

.

....... .......

weights

of

174 1'5

177

millimetres

measures of Mionnet's scale

Table of the relative French,

inches

139

.

English grains

180

and 183

Comparative Table of the years of the Hijrah and of the Christian Era

185


— (

xliv

)

EKRATA. 18, for

p.

u^«^t

read (jLo^JI

.

P. 33, no. 135 delate Pl. III.

P. 47, no. 226, delete Pl. IY. P. 93,

omitt'^d

j^^

read J^jfi

Ill, for j.Mt read ^*w

P.

The following

fcjv

.

references to the Plates have been accidentally

:

Kos. 268, 274, 276, 284, 309, 323, are figured in Plate V.;

and

nos.

518 and 530 in Plate VIII.


THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.


(

3

)

THE SULTANS OF DEHLI. FIRST DYNASTY.— TURKS. I.

II.

Mu'izz-ad-din

Muhammad

Kutb-ad-din Aibak

.

III.

Aram

IV.

Shams-ad-dia Altamsh

V.

Rukn-ad-din Ffrdz Shah

VI.

Sam

ibn

XI.

589

1193

.602

1205

607

1210

.607

1210

.

Shtih .

.

.

...

I.

633

1235

634

1236

637

1239

.639

1241

644

1246

.664

1265

686

1287

689

1290

.

G9o

1295

.

695

1295

.715

1315

716

1316

.720

1320

Riziyah .

VIII. 'Ala-ad-dm Mas'ud Shah

X.

A,D.

.

.

VII. Mu'izz-ad-din Bahram Shah

IX.

.

A.H.

Nasir-ad-din

Mu'izz-ad-din

.

.

Mahmiid Shah

Ghiyas-ad-din Balban

.

I.

.

.

.

.

.

Kai-Kubad

.

.

.

.

.

SECOND DYNASTY.— KHALJIS. XII.

Jalal-ad-din Fiioz

Shah

II.

XIII. Rukn-ad-din Ibrahim Shah

XIV.

XV. XVI.

XVII.

'Ala-ad-din

I.

Muhammad Shah

.

I.

Shihab-ad-din 'Umar Shah

Kutb-ad-din Mubarak Shah Nasir-ad-din

Khusru Shah

.

.

.

.

.

I.

.

.

.

.

.

.


-

4

(

)

THIRD DYNASTY.— TAGHLAK SHAHIS. A.H.

XVIII.

XIX.

Ghiyas-ad-diii Taghlak Shah

Muhammad

Taghlak

IT. ibu

I.

.

.

.

.

A.D.

720

1320

725

1324

XX.

Firoz Shah III

752

1351

XXI.

Taghlak Shah II

790

1388

XXII.

Abu-Bakr Shah

XXIII.

Muhammad Shah

XXIV.

Slkaudar Shah 1

XXV.

MahmudShahll

III.

.

XXVI.

Nasrat Shah (Interregnum)

XXVII.

Daulat

Mahmud

restored

.

.

.

Khan Lodi

.

791

1388

.792

1389

795

1392

.

1392 1394

.802

1399

815

1412

817

1414

.

.

.

.

.

795

797

.

FOURTH DYNASTY.— SEYYIDS. XXVIII. KhizrKhan

XXIX. XXX. XXXI.

Mu'izz-ad-din

Mubarak Shah

Muhammad Shah

IV.

II. .

.

.

824

1421

.

837

1433

847

1443

855

1451

'Allm Shuh

FIFTH DYNASTY.— AFGHANS. XXXII.

Buhlol Lodi

XXXIII.

Sikandar II. ibn Buhlol

XXXIV.

Ibrahim

.

894

1488

.

923

1517

930

152G

Farid-ad-din Sher Shah

946

]

XXXVI. Islam Shah XXXVII. Muhammad 'Adil Shdh XXXVIII. Ibrahim Sur XXXIX. Sikandar Siuih III.

952

1545

900

1552

Mughals

II. :

Babar and

.

.

:

Humayun,

.

AFGHANS.

.

Mughals

.

.

Humajim

SIXTH DYNASTY. XXXV.

.

ibn Sikandar

etc.

539

9G1

1553

962

1554

962

1554


I

I.-M U H

AMM AD A.H.

A.-IN

IBN SAM.

589—602.

CONJUNCTION WITH GHIYAS-AD-DIN GHURI.

SILVEE.

M

Inscriptions arrancjed in concentric circles. Hint: Date.

No.

1

,

Ghazni 596

,

Obv., 1st

circle,

^^.aJI

^^jJ;^! 2nd

circle,

3rd

circle,

CH^b

t>jJ=>

[^Jj aJ.^

^liCNJI J^iaX^S

nm^\

^j'

aJDI

ChjJ'j

Centre,

\i>i\'^^

J^j

W'*'^'

^^

j.<.a^<

3A

*/v-'*!^'

<iJJI -n)!

aJI ^)

*^^

'f*''^''

ijji "iS^i ^^s ^jjk3t tj* w>-i

circle,

iu*

2nd

circle,

J^< ^^«oJ' ^Usd-JI

3rd

circle,

Rev., 1st

J-wjI (<jJI

L^-^'v'W a'>«o

jaIsloJI ^jI

O^J^^'j

aJJI O-:!*^

^^^Ut

WJ^'

Centre,

PL.

I.

(Th.

3).

5l]-25, Wt. 73


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

M No.

Mint: Date.

2

Gliazni

Obv. and Eev., 1st

circles

for 5>Aj

and centres as on 1; but oJj

596 Obv., 2nd

circle,

3rd

circle,

Rev., 2nd

circle,

jsua

3rd

circle,

jaIa^I

^^

0"i«^ >-»^-^'

aJUI

[o^JftJL«]JI

^^'

^j1 O-tl-'^'b

j^'a^S ^Ua^JI

^t O^JJ'i

**J'

'^

^-'^s^

aXJI

J^^j

t>«ia>»e

^[*^«>J']

Pierced.

CO

'^'

B. MS, Wt. 48

Obv., within double square,

[59]8

A

l]-JI

aJJI J3

^)l

^x-c-

»j

^)

)l

^^

^

-**

^jjkJIj L-JjJl vtjL*_c

In segments, outside square.

Rev., within double square, 4JJI

^jJ ^^Ut

In segments, outside square, I

J

O^

^^-^

I

I

Pl,

I.

Al

"^-'"^

1-1, VVt.

82


MUHAMMAD

IBN sAm.

COPPER.* (Dehliwals.)

M No.

Eev.

Obv. Mint; Date.

Horseman

4

to

left,

OUaJU[M

with lance

at charge.

Inscription illegible.

JE

[Labor

-55

?

Th.]

PL.

I.

(Th. 7.)t

X. -65

Patan * Small coins of the size and character of 4 and 5 abound in the of a mixture of usually but copper, pure of seldom very are They series. Thomas's the proportions stated in various places in Mr. and copper, The general designaChronicles, and in the Introduction to this volume. ' ' however, been adhered to throughout, inasmuch as

m

silver

tion of

has,

copper

that metal always predominates.

t The Ueutenant

title

i'u^l

of his

seems

brother

^.J^\

to

indicate

ÂŤU

;

after

Muhammad was still the whose death, he adopts the form that


THE SULtAnS of DKHLI.

B.-ALONE.

N No.

G

GOLD.

Mint: Date.

Ghazni 602

|

Obv., within double square,

In segments, outside square,

3

1

^^b

a)>-,j 1

J^jl i^^l

>ÂŤ>

Rev., within double square,

In segments outside square,

Pl.

7

Ghazni 603

Same but :

rev.

margin ends a<>U

and obv. margin

is

ww^ >i^ ^^

iV

I.

I

1-35,

j>v--'

Wt. 322

l5^

'^^

nearly complete to <*J.^ (Th. 20.)

N

105, Wt. 89


.

MUHAMMAD No.

Mint Date,

8

Ghazni 604

IBN SAM.

:

Same

:

but

margin,

rev.

and obv. margin differently distributed. iV

The

two coins were probably issued by

last

Muhammad

ibn

Sam

died in 602.

1-35,

Wt. 146

as

Yildiz,

Cf. no. 20.

COPPER.

JE

Rev.

Obv. [Sind.

Chohan Horseman

to right;

Th.]

on

hf.rse's

around,

quarter

v

^^ '^ntrt Hammirah.

Sri

Horseman

10,

11

to

left

Pi.

I.

(Th.

5.)

M

-6

(Th.

6.)

M

-6

Same.

with lance

Pr,.

at charge.

I.

JS. -6

12â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 16

[Dehli.

Th.l

Chohan Horseman inscription,

as 9,

same

but characters

of quite a different style.

The Bull Nandi cumbent side

:

to

re-

left,

on Jhul 1^

on

;

(

Sri

Mahamad PL.

I.

Same.

(Th. 10.)

vE

M (no sign on side)

M M M

-6

6 'oo -6

'&o


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

10

Obv. No.

JRev.

Mint; Date.

17—

Similar: but horseman debased,

Similar

19

and inscription

:

but

bull

inscription in

scarcely

above, traceable.

debased

^ ^^^^^ ^ Pl.

I.

;

straight line .

(Th.

.

11.)

M

-6

JE, -65

M

-65

ISSUES OF TAJ-AD-DIN YILDIZ.

SILVEE.* 20

Ghazni [60]3or6

Obv. Area, within double square, similar to

6.

Margin, in segments outside,

^

3

I

L5^

^>

IJjk

1

Rev. Area, within double square, similar to

Margin,

in

wJj^

6.

segments outside, L]j jJI «.U

o'^yc^ ejufi I

M 21

Ghazni 610

?

Obv. Area, as

r2, Wt. 103

6.

Margin, in segments, Aj\^,XmI^

yiS-

. I

.

.

.

^^

i jo^

I

I

Rev. Area, within double square,

>—*-^t Margin,

in segments.

Pl.

Cf. nos.

7 and

ft.

I.

(Th. 23.)

M 115, Wt.

101


TAJ-AD-DiN TILDIZ.

11

COPPER. Rev.

Obv.

Mint: Date

Bull Nandi to

Above,

left,

debased

standing.

Hindi

cha-

racters.

Chohan Horseman Beneath horse, a

to right.*

star.


THE SULTInS of DEHLJ.

12

KANAUJ ISSUE.

GOLD. Mint Date.

Olv.

:

[Ivaiiauj]

The Goddess Lakshmi

Rev.

^

seated

*t[^

Maha.

Sri

facing.

T^ ^«T mad Sam.

'^\^

iV

[Kanauj]

^ ^^^

Similar.

^

^"^

Similar.

-85,

Wt. 66

Sri Mahamad

^"R

Pl.

[Kanauj]

vene

^

I.

Scirn.

J7

-6,

Wt. 65

Sri Ba.

W\X Hf[»? miraMahama-

.A?"

-6,

Wt. 65

Jf

G,

Wt. 66

lll.-ARAM SHAH. A.H. 607.

COPPER. Ohv.

Rev.

Cholian Horseman, degraded.

Pl. II

JE. -6


ALTAMSH.

13

IV.-SHAMS-AD-DIN ALTAMSH. A.H.

Mint

:

607—633.

SILVER.

Date.

Obv., within double square enclosed in

circle,

In each segment, three

Rev. (as obv.)

^

ju^

ji\-A*^\

dots.

In each segment, three

The

first

I

dots.

of ^eU^lt written very small and joined to the

Traces of marginal inscription outside

Obv. Area, within

dJUb

Margin,

a)

I

and

a

"n)!

j.'H

alif

'

)1

Tu.Q

)\

of aJUI connected 'I

Rev. Area, within double square,

Margin,

in

Wt.l63

•^)

a^IoJ:«j

^

.51 l"],

circle,

aJUI

(The lam of the

.

circle.

(Th. xxviii.)

6xa;

J

W

g^jl

O'

^

^

by an arch.) I«iA

w>o

''

segments, illegible (or ornaments, Th.). PL. II.

(Th. ixs.)

A 115, Wt. 164


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

14

M No.

37

Mint: Date.

63a;

Obv. Area, within double square, enclosed in

circle,

In each segment, three dots.

Margin,

i-iiJl

Rev. Area as 36, but omitting

^J^^\

\Stt>

j^\

w>«3

j«eli

In each segments, three dots.

Margin,

ajU^w^

^>{wUj

*-->^

Pl.

II.

(Th. 31.)

JR

1-15,

Wt. 169


15

ALTA.MSH.

M

COPPER.

No.

Mint: Date.

38â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

[Dehli Th.]

42

Rev.

Obv.

Chohan Horseman. Around,

W^ Sri

"^WtX.:

Hamirah

Bull Naudi.

Around,

^fT:'cTT!I

^ ^H^^^TU

Suritan Sri Samasadin 38, Jhvl


THE STJLTAnS of DEHLT.

16

Mint

:

Obv.

Date.

48â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Rev.

Chohan Horseman.

50 Around,

^ Sri

Pl.

M -6

(Th. 48.)

II.

Sri IIa{niiraJi)

Pl. II.

M -55

^ Multtin.

Within

square,

enclosed

in

circle,

Within hexagram, enclosed

in

circle,

laJLJt

J^

Pr,

Dehli.

-6

Within octagram, enclosed

in

II.

(Th.

49.)

.V. -65

Within octagram, enclosed

in

circle,

circle,

Same.

(Th. 53.)

Dehli.

Within

circle,

Within

circle,

OLk_JUI J_A^

L5'

^ -55


1

FfR6z No.

Mint: Date.

17

I.

Bev.

Obv.

Within hexagram,

Within hexagram, jj^^*^'

Jj^ft

^

(Th. 52.)

oS

iE-55

Within

circle,

Within

J^xc

circle,

^,^^0^

Above, ornament.

^

(Th. 55.)

Within zigzag border, Traces of

Hindi

Within zigzag border. Same.

inscription. JE

(Th. 51.)

60

A.H.

C Choiian Horseman

;

I.

633—631.

PPE

traces of

usual Hindi inscription

-5

Within hexagram, u^>»*^><

Within hexagram, ^IJaXw

V.-RUKN-AD-DIN FIROZ SHAH

01

"5

{'%).

E.

Bull Nandi

:

on JInd J)

,

on side

Above,

i

1

^opTji ^"tlU

Rukana Vh. n.

(Th. 89.)

D

din

M

-6


THE SULTAks of DEHLI.

VI.- R izTyah. A.H.

No.

634—637.


JE


20

THE eULTANS OF DEHLI.

M No.

C O P P E K. Mint: Date.

Ohv.

68

Bev.

Chohau Horseman. Above, (^UaXw

Within

^

square,

enclosed

in

circle,

In segments, loops. Pt.

69

Chohan Horseman.

(Tb. 93-)

II.

72

Pl.

II.

M

Bull Nandi.

Chohan Horseman. Around, ^^ f j^^x

-6

Same.

Illegible inscription.

70â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

M

:

Sri Samirah

Around,

^T^TO

^^'STiT^^*

Suritdn Sri Muajadim on Jhul

-\-

,

on side E (Th.

9Jl.)

Pt.

II.

iE

-6

iE -6

JE

-55


mas'Cd.

VIM.

-'ALA-AD-DIN MAS'UD SHAH. A.H.

M

S

No.

Mint: Date

73

Dehli [639-40*;

2]

639— 6M.

ILVER.

Obv. Area, within double square enclosed in

>*<' J

In segments,

Margin

.

(traces of)

itft'i

.

III

qI

circle,

I

.

i<^^i '^j

Rev. Area (as obv.),

In segments,

Margin

obliterated. Pl. III.

*

The

(Th. 97.)

Klialifah Al-Mustaneir died in a.b. 640.

^ 10, Wt. 168


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

22

M No.

74

Mint: Date.

641

Same

as

73

Obv, and

:

but on obv. area ^„yOJu....ioJ

rev.

I

instead of j»cuJi~^l

margins,

*r^/'^ (Th. 98.)

75

[6]i2

Same

as

74

:

but obv. margin

^^

O-si^ij'

.51 1-05.

Wt. 169

Lx*^'

Rev. margin obliterated.

M

76,

77

105, wt. 167

Similar to 74.

Mint and date

obliterated. Wt. 163 M M 105, Wt. 168 1-05,


No.

84

Mint: Date.


24

THB SULtAnS of

IX.

-NASIR-AD-DIN

No.

85

MAHMUD SHAH

644—664.

A.H.

M

DEIILI.

SILVER. Mint: Date.

Obv. Area, witliin double square enclosed in

j^.^

>l-«*s)l

^

circle,

9

Rev. Area (as obv.),

^

la

&^\ o^-^-J-J'

Apparently no margins.

Pl. Iir.

* See the Chronicles of the for ascribing this coin to

am

Pathan

(Th. 60.*)

kings of Dehli for Mr.

an older brother

of

/H 1-1, Wt. 161

Thomas's reasons

Mahmood, who

died in G26.

rather inclined to believe that the occurrence of Al-Mustansir's

merely another instance could be quoted.

of the

nse of an old obverse, of which

See Tntrodnction.

name

I is

many examples


:

MAHMtrD

M No.

86

25

I.

Mint: Date

Dehli

Obv. Area (as 85),

654

In top and bottom segments, an annulet. Margin,

iiw

ajjl

^

,^^i 0>-aa,o

i-oiJI

ojjk

w>>-^

Rev. Area same as 85; but omitting oli, and substituting yjj\ for ^_jJ.

In top and bottom segments, annulet

Margin

;

in right

and

left, ...

as obv. margin, but partly obliterated.

M

(Th. 106.)

Same

Delill

as

1C5, Wt. 165

86

655 but date

<ul<,i->_5

^J^*,».^^

l,,^-fr«^

on both margins.

PL. III.

Dehll

Same

:

but date a.>Io-^^

M

(Th. 106.)

C>-****<^

1-1,

wt. 166

/*"^^

657 (Th.l06.)

-51 1-05,

M Dehll

Same

:

but date

ajIo--«'3

Ot--^'^

658

O^

(Th. 106.)

DehJi

Same

:

Wt. 166

105, Wt. 168

M

1-05,

Wt. iro

but date 2j[.^2^^

660 (Th. 106.)

E

.51

10,

Wt

169


:

THE SULtAnS of DEHLf.

26

!Mlnt: Date

Same

Dehli

but date itl^Iw^ O'**-'^ lX*^'

:

662 (j>j vice ^JJ\)

M

(Th. 106.)

Dehli

Same: but date itL^Iw^ (J-jwj

1-05,

Wt. 167

ÂŤ.jjl

664

(^^ wee ^1)

M

(Th.106.)

1-05,

Wt. 167

Similar

Mint and date

obliterated. .ai 1-15,

M

1-1,

wt. 167 Wt. 169

COPPER. Mev.

Obv.

Chohan Horseman

:

Above, [ij^a*-* In

front,

^^

^jft[T:

Sri IIami[_rah]

Same.

(Th. 107.)

iE

-6

Pl. ni.

M

-6

M

-6

Same, but arranged

O'

ia~JU[t

PL.

m.

^


BALBAX.

No.

Mint

:

27

Date

X.-GH lYAS-AD-DIN BALBAN. A.H.

664—686.

GOLD. 100

Dehli

Obv. Area, within

circle,

672

Margin,

^>*J|

Rev. Area, within

iiw

^^

^^Xa^

O^-aa^ aJUI

«Jjk

^^

circle,

OUaJLJI

Margin same

as obv., partly obliterated. PL. III.

101

Same

Dehli

:

(Cf.

Th. 111.)

but date ajL^wj ^j-jtw^j

115, Wt. 169

.A^

sj>>.i^

675 Kev. margin

nearly' illegible.

N

102

Dehli

678

Same

:

11, Wt. 168

but date ajLo.Iw3 O-ta-.^^ ^1^5 on both margins. iV

1-05,

Wt. 169


THE SULTAnS of DEHLf.

28

Mint

:

Date

SILVER. Dehli

Obv. Area, within double square, enclosed

in circle,

664

Annulet Margin,

ajjl

Eev. Area (as

<Uw

in top

-i

and bottom segments.

is^^

Oj«cia»-^

^ju3

djjk

2uAai\

obv.),

In segments above and beneath, annulet

;

at right

and

left,

,

.

Margin, traces similar to obv. Pl. ni.

Similar: but dSLJ\ vice

Dehli

2usJii\,

(Th. 112.)

and no

.

.

M VI, Wt. M 11, wt.

165

164

at sides.

664 (Badly engraved, and blundered.)

M

Debli (iQ6

Same

as

103

:

1-15,

wt. 167

but date ibl«^j v>i*-^3 u-o-*- o" both margins. (Th. lU'.)

Ji

1

15,

wt. 109


29

BALBAN. Mint: Date.

Same

Dehli

without

:

,

.

;

667 date

3^1^^

0^3

^'J-^

^^^- ^^J"?'"-

<^"

Kev. margin obliterated. (Th. 112.)

Dehli

Same

as

103

:

date \_3u\^']^^

v>^3 ^*^

M

1-1,

Wt. 167

o^ ^o^^ margins.

669 (Th. 112.)

.51 1-1,

M

Dehli

Same

:

without

,

.

Wt. 167

115, Wt- 166

;

673

^'^

date A; 1.0^3 0^*tÂŤ^3

on both margins. (Th. 112.)

Dehli

Same

:

without

,

,

M

115, Wt. 168

;

674 date i)loJLw3

O'i*^^

^^'j'

^'^

^^^- "^^^gi"-

Kev. margin obliterated. (Th. 112.)

Dehh'

Similar to 103

:

M

1-15,

Wt. 165

dates illegible.

M M M

1-1,

Wt. 165

1-1,

wt. 169

1-1,

Wt

167


THE SULTAKS of DEHLI.

30

M No.

Mint; Date

C

P P E

Bev.

Obv.

In centre, within

115 118

Around, ^^:

E.

circle,

^fTT

^j^^

Within double square,

Trmjcf*^"

Srih Suit dm Gydsudim.

PL. III.

(Th. 113.)

M ^

-65 -65

JE, -65 .iE

\

119,

120

L

1L-.H

^-N)! PL. lU.

121,

122

'65

Dehli

(Th. lU.)

^ M

-65 -5

J.

JU (Th. 115.) Pl.

m.

/E lE.

-5

-55


31

KAI-KUBAD.

XI.-MU'IZZ-AD-DIN KAI-KUBAD. A.H.

686—689.

GOLD. No.

123

Mint: Date.

Dehli

Obv. Area, within

circle,

687

Margin,

«--

[iUw

Rev. Area, within

^

^.j^ji

C^j-asw-j

iS^-JI

«^

w>i>

circle,

Margin,

traces, as obv. PL. III.

iV

1-1,

Wt. 169


THE SULtAnS of DEHLI.

32

SILVER.

JR No.

Mint: Date.

124,

Dehli

125

686

Same: but areas enclosed and obv. margin

C>m>»

in double square within circle,

2j^

^

"

i^^i

**»-*

V>«^

Rev. margin obliterated.

M .51

126

Dehli

Same

:

date Sui^^^^

0^^3

^'•^

1-2,

Wt. 167

125, wt. 166

^^ both margins, but

687 traces on rev. only.

(Th. 116.)

127

Dehli

Same

:

date 5jlcl«rf^

C>^^3

O^

°^^

M

1-2,

Wt. 168

1-2,

Wt. 162

°^^* iiiargin.

688 Rev. margin obliterated. (Th. 116.)

128

Dehli

Similar, but d-oaJt

:

M

date obliterated on both sides.

M

1-2,

Wt. 165


kai-kubAd.

C

No.

Mint: Date.

Obv.

33

P P E E. Rev.

Within border, 129,

130

Sri Sultdm

Muijudim.

Pl. ni.

(Th. 117.)

M

-75

.^

-65

M ^ ^

-65

iE

-6

M

-65

OUftJUl

131133

Pl. in.

(Th. 118.)

-7

-65

Within ornamented borders,

134,

135

LJjJI Pl.

136

Dehli

J.

(Th.

137

III.

Jj^

[c5]

9.)

.^

â&#x20AC;˘55


34

(

)

SECOND DYNASTY. XII.-JALAL-AD-DIN FIROZ A.H.

M.

689—695.

i

N No.

138

,

Mint

:

GOLD.

Date

Dehli

Obv. Area, within

circle,

695

^UNll

Margin,

^;-»<^

<U->

^

»^'^>

oj^olo^

ibC-JI

djjb

>^j^

Rev.

OUaJU[t] Pl. IV.

(Th. 120.)

iV 10, Wt. 166


;

FIE(5Z

35

II.

SILVER.

M Mint

No.

:

Date,

[Dehli]

139

68 [9]

Obv. Area, within double square enclosed

in circle (annulets in

top and bottom segments),

Mai'gin,

5jL»I-»3

C>i'^3

Rev. Area as 138, but within double square

:

margin

obliterated. (Th.im.)

140.

141

'

Dehli

iw ^9 ^A>i ^j^as^

Same: but o^a-5

Dehli

Same

:

but date

aj^L/j

691

;

rev.

Wt. 1G7

6J> *->-»

[i-aA]JI

O-s^uJ^

margin

Dehli 693

obliterated.

(Th. 121.)

M

1-15,

(Hinged.)

IB.

115

jj.^o.1

Wt. 165

on obv. margin

traces on rev. margin. Ft. IV.

143

1-15,

690 i>lo^j on obv. margin

142

m.

Same

:

but >-w«l ajLoI-/_3

in

last

line

^>*a—Jj

of obv.

w^

(Th. 121.)

(as

138)

.51 1-15,

:

Wt. 16S

and date

on obv. margin.

Rev. margin obliterated, and S^-i*. with (Th. 121.)

Generally so spelt henceforward.

5.*

S.

1-15,

wt. 1P9


36

THE SULTAns op

DEULi'.

M No.

14i

Mint

:

Date.

Dehll

Same

as

143

:

but date

<ul<JL»>3

jJ^aju^jj

«jjI

on obv. margin.

694 Rev. margin obliterated. (Th. 121.)

145

Dehli

Same

:

but date aj[^Z,^^ ^j.**^Jj

ijto-o-^

M

1-2,

Wt. 1G9

on obv. margin.

695 Rev. margin obliterated. (Th. 121.)

COPPER. 14G148

149151

152,

152a

Dehll

M

1-1.

wt. 169


IBEAniM

37

I.

XIII.-RUKN-AD-DIN IBRAHIM

SHAH

I.

A.H. 695.

M No.

153

SILVER. Mint: Date.

Dehli

Obv. Area, within double square,

695 ^oJic^'N)!

O'

Margin

Rev. Area, within

Margin,

,.,-ÂŤ^

^

^'

obliterated.

circle,

a^ ^9 ^^^

'^J^^=>^

PL. rV.

*^

^-^'

(Th. 126.)

ai

1-25,

^J-^

Wt. 1C6


8S

THE

SULTANS OF DEHLI.

COPPER. Mint: Date

Dehli

698


MUHAMMAD No.

158

39

I.

Mint: Date.

Dehli

Same

:

date iil^juw^

*jjI

704 (Th. 130.)

159

Ddr-al-

Same

:

N

rO, Wt. 170

iV

1-0,

but margin

Islain. [Dehli]

708

IGO

Dehli

Same

:

but ajIoAw^

ii-*

j-i.c

^

\,^>

S^-osw.,!

710

161

7X5

iV 1-05, Wt. 167

Same

:

date SjIoJlwj iV

Same

162,

Wt. 169

168

area

-95,

Wt. 164

but both enclosed in double squares

inscriptions,

within circles

;

annulet in each segment.

Margins

obliterated. jr (Th. 131.)

^

-9,

Wt. 169

"So,

Wt. 165

SILVER. 164,

Dehli

165

695

Same

area inscriptions, both enclosed in double squares within circles

;

annulet in each segment.

Rev. margin, t^«a. 3j^

^

^J^^

S^-o^tI i-iiJI

PL. IV.

(Th. 132.)

e^ w>« M

M

11, Wt. 169 11, Wt. 171


.

THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

40

JR No.

16G

Mint: Date.

697*

Same

:

but ajL^Iw^

ij>****^i

^^

**

M 167

168

169

699

703

Dehli

Same

Same

Same

^^a-^Jj a-J 5-w

but

:

:

:

but djLoJUwj .^^jU

but 4jV«aaw3

^s

.

710

Same

:

(Th. 132.)

m, V\, Wt. 166

(Th. 132.)

M

1-0,

Wt. 169

(Th. 132.)

M

I'O,

Wt. 171

(Th. 132.)

M

1-0,

Wt. 166

m.

1-0,

Wt. 168

aX..

(,,/*«^

but a,i\^su^^ j^fr

\^ \^^^

**->'

ii«<

171

172

Dehll

Same: but ajIoJuw^

j-ift

t^J^^I

a^

711

*

^_^ i_5^^

M

(Th. 132.)

173

Dcir-al-

Same

:

but ajlo**-'^

>^

Wt. 169

.

705

170,

l-]5,

(^J^*-'

^^

i_5^

>e*iU»'^)l

Isldm. (Dehli)

105, Wt. 167

^\j^

M

I'O,

wt. 170

711 174

Dehli

Same

:

but iUloJu-*^

ji^ (^^1 Aiw ^9 t^^-*

*>*=^**^

712 (Th. 132.)

175,

Dehli

176

713

Same

:

but

^L^xwj y!^

S^

1-1,

Wt. 170

^*^ (Th. 132.)

.41

105, Wt. 163

M r05, Wt. 167 * Although tho these coins (noa.

namo

of tho

IGG— U;8,

mint

is

oblitoratod.

170, 171) to Dehli.

we

arc

.safe

in a.scribing


MUHAMMAD

M No.

177

178,

179

I.

41


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

42

M No.

188

Mint: Date.

Same

705

as

182; but

Same

y90^

as 182. (Th. 136.)

189

706

M

^01^

P

M 190

710

v9«|o Pt. IV.

191

(Th. 136.)

M

-65

S^^

711

(Th. 136.)

192194

-7

Same

:

M

7

years obscure.

M M M

-6 -7 -7

B.

195

701

•Nil]

jJI

^JhX^\

^U

j^ (sic)

V

\

cJ^^^ Pl. IV.

196

702

^

-66

vr o (Th. 136.)

197

703

M

-6

M

-6

vr o (Th. 135.)

198

712

VI

r

(Th. 135.)

M

-65


43

'UMAU.

M No.

199

Mint

:

Date.

713

Same

as 195.

Same

as

195

;

but

v

I

(Th. 135.)

200

714 iTh. 135.)

201

715

202,

203

204

Dehli

205

715

p-*

S.

-65


44

No.

THE SULtAnS of

DEllLr.

Mint: Date-

XVI.-KUTB-AD-DIN MUBARAK SHAH A.H.

I

716—720.

SQUARE. GOLD. 200

Ddr-alKhildfah (Dehli)

^

Obv.

h

fr'N)!

^l

6N)I

718

Rev. Area, within square,

Margin, ^LoJ

iw ,^

|

4i*i)oJt jb 5j-aa»j

Pl. IV.

207

Dlr-al-

Same

:

|

ajC«JI dJiA

(Th. 142.)

.A^ -9,

w)j^

Wt. 167

but

Khildfnli

(Th. 142.)

A^IO, Wt.

169

(Dehli)

719

M 208

SILVE Ddr-alKhildfah. (Dehli)

718

Same

as

R.

20G. -K

-95,

Wt. 168


mubAeak shAh

45

I.

Mint: Date.

ROUND. SILVER Debli

716

dLt^jL«

OUsJUt Rev. Area, within

ft

JftpM

^

^1

^jlkJUJ

circle,

^L«jJI

Margin, j-^

J,

si-.«(

Aiw

^

j.i>

C

:

\^j^i

,1)1

Sj^a^ a^aJI

Pl. IV.

Dehli

(Th.

^j^

M

rOo, Wt. 169

M

r05, Wt. 169

M

1-05,

Same: but

717

Ddr-al-

im.

djjb

(Th. 143.)

Obv.

JA

f.'s)!

Wt. 170

.NJI

Midk. (Debli)

717 Rev. Area, within

Margin,

j-i^c

circle,

»-•«»

4.w

^s

^LoJI jl^ g^^,a» j

4^cuJI

(Th. 146.)

^

«Jjh

w>^

lOo, Wt. 16S

iK, 1-1,

Wt. 169


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

46 Mint: Date.

71G


mubAeak shah No.

47

I.

Mint: Date.

D. Ohv. 221,

Sev.

717

222

V

1

V

J'ft-t^o^l >:•'

(Th. 150.)

^ ^

7 -7

223,

224

omittinor last line and date.

.«;

-7

iE

-7


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

48

M No.

Mint: Date

Rev.

Olv, 229,

719

4jiJt

V .

ft

AjuXi

^JUxLJI

jJjI JE-6

230232

720 (Th. 152.)

M

-6

M-7

H.

232a

.*':^i

^^)\ (Th. 153.)

233,

Ddr-al-

234

KJiildfaTi

M

-55

(Dehli) (Th. 154.)

^

-45

M

'46


49

KHUSEt^'.

Nc.

Mint: Date

XVII.-NASIR-AD-DIN KHUSRU SHAH. A.n. 720.

GOLD. Dehli

720

Obv., within double square,

A

Ii<JI

i-w j-s

j^-*^^

1

Rev. Area, within

Margin

^jjj-i.^

>^—

.1

circle,

5j,rfi a».^

Pl. IV.

(C/.

iiC—JI

Th.

15o.)

dJkA

v>*^

A'-QS, Wt. 161

COPPER. 720

•^1

pl,

LJjJt vr]' o

h LJI

^^U

In centre, within

circle,

>oJ^

o-i^-Jij

Around,

Pl. IV.

(Th. 156.) JE 6

H


.w

(

)

THIRD DYNASTY.

Mint: Date,

XVI M.-GHfYAS-AD-DTN

SHAH

TAGHLAK

I.

720—725.

A.n.

GOLD. Obv. Area, within double square,

J

°

^

^^

^t

Rev. Area, an old obv. area of Muhammad's, same as 161.

Margin

illegible. (Th. 157.)

Dehli

iV

1"0,

Wt. 173

Obv. Area, within double square,

720

Rev. Area, within

Margin,

^j^c

circle.

4.w

j^J

;„5^> [^]>^*-:f aC^^I a^A

.i\"

^-i/-^

10, Wt. 169


TAGHLAK

No.

51

I.

Mint: Date.

239

Dehli 722

Same

240

Dehli

Same

but

:

O^/^^^J

5j1-oJJ-j.«(5

^J*^'

but %jj\

:

(Th. 159.)

J^

-Oo,

Wt. 170

iV

-95,

TIN' t.

168

724 241

Dehli

Obv. Area

726 Posthumous.

Rev. Area, within

circle,

*(S)

Margin,

Oir^3

*--*~'

O'^^l

^--«'

oli.AJLiw

•••> [5]j-a».

Pl. V.

242

Uj

Obv. Area,

Rev. Area, within

)l

01

^s

a^LJI

(Th. 158.)

oJa wj^^

^

jc

illegible. -So,

.A''

from

Thomas has read

the letters foUowing

sl^Ulii

as a date,

upon a gold coin of date (72G) occurs in the marginal

the improbability of a date in ciphers

and the

Wt. 170

circle,

Margin

* Mr.

-9,

fact that a different

v

r

r.

Wt. 161

Apart

this period, inscription,

The supposed supposition. the letters themselves do not favour the a, and I believe the whole word is a badly written ^ylU.:'. ^

v

is


52

THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.

M No.

243

SILVER. Mint: Date.

Areas as 238.

De6gir 721 Obv. margin, ^jt».t

d^ _9 j^^i

SudS-f

Pi. V.

244

721

Same

^«J)

(Th. 160.)

ojjb y^j*i

.51 1-15,

Wt. 170

but mint (between dJC^l and <Uw) obliterated and 3

:

inserted. .51 I'l,

245

Dehli

Same

:

but SjIoJuwj

CHj^^

15^3

1

3j^

^J ic^i

Wt. 169

a

oj <\ m f

722 (Th. 161.)

246

Dehli

Same

:

but

Dehli

Same

:

but

Dehli

Same

:

but

jR

1-1,

Wt. 170

(Th. 101.)

M

1-1,

Wt. 169

1-05,

Wt. 168

M

725

248a

(Th. 161.)

s.j;,?

724

248

Wt. 169

^*^

723

247

.51 1-05.

Similar to 241

:

margins cut

off.

ill

-6


TAOnLAK

No.

COPPER.

Mint: Date.

Ohv. 249,

I.

Rev.

721

2oO

(Th. 164.)

251

722

„ Pl.V.

252

(Th. IM.)

^

-65

723

724

.a;

-65

v-irp (Th. 164.)

254

-6

"65

vrr

(Th. 164.)

253

M M

^E

-6

725 (Th. 164.)

M

-6


w

TUE SULtAnS of

54

DElII.i.

M No.

Mint

:

Date.

Bev.

Obv.

255

721

Same as 249

:

but at foot

VT

In centre,

I

Around,

oli

-zfi:

^^T

^'TPJ^^*

Srih Sultdm Gydsudim

V 256

725

(Th. 163.)

JE.

-6

Pl. V.

^

-6

6 r

c. In centre,

257

dlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Around, Arabic

inscr. oblite-

rated. JE,

'65

.(E

'55

D. 258,

llJmX^mmSui

259 (Th. 1G5.)


MUHAMMAD

lEN TAGHLAK.

N No.

Mint: Date.

XIX.-MUHAMMAD A.n.

TAGHLAK.

IBN

II.

725—752.

A.*

GOLD. 260262

Dehli

Obv.

726

A-JL—Jl

-*

Rev. Area, within

Margin,

^^

-

^j\

-j^

A

!l

g

6j>i

circle,

CH/^3

^^-^

^-->'

j^^i

ojJas>^

Pt. V.

j^!^'

(Th. 171.)

'-^A

N'

-95,

w^-^

Wt.

199

Wt. 197 Wt. 198

Jf

-95,

^

-95,

M

10, Wt, 151

SILVER. Same 263

:

but ^J>»)' instead of jl^^l

Dehli

;

and

(Th. 180.)

725

See no. 241, a posthumous coin

of

preceding Sultan.


56-

THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

B. No.

264

Mint

:

Date.

Dehli

GOLD. Obv. Area, within

circle,

727 ^)l

a

N)

)l

J

Margin, o-iJ^3 ^f^

*^

^

)l

^^>

Sj-aa^ j^iJJI

'-Wk

Eev. Area,

Pl. v.

265

(Th, 173.)

^

-7,

Wt. 197

729

Oi Rev. Area, Ju^.^1 > &«wj

£Uw

_

OW

«

^'

^^^JjU

(C/.

Th.

179.)

^^

-75,

Wt. 168


MUUAMMAD No.

2G6,

Mint

:

1B>'

57

TAOnLAK.

Date.

733

Sae as 265

but date

:

267 and

^

in line

with jt^o^*^

^

728

Same

:

but «uC»»*wj

^j«i^^ jJWj

(Th. 182.)

729

Same

:

272

729

730

Same

75, Wt. 139

51

-75,

Wt, 140

-7,

Wt. 140

M

-75,

Wt. 110

Same

:

M

-75,

Wt.

M

but

:

but

,J-^ (Th. 182.)

M 273

M

but (Th. 182.)

271

Wt. 169

ii-j

269

270

Wt. 169

-8,

SILVER.

M 268,

-75,

Jf

137

COPPER. Same

as

266: year uncertain.

M 'lo


THE SULTAnS of DELHI.

Mint: Date.

D.

SILVER. Satgaon

Obv. Area, within

circle,

730

Margin,

<L>L»ft?">3 C>i*J-'

Rev. Area,

^^

jjC^

^^^

^^lki«^ aX«JI

^t

(Th. 184.)

Same

:

but obv. margin

«jjb w>>«0

illegible,

and

jLo>a^'«

M

-95,

Wt. 169

removed

to

middle line of rev.

M

-95,

Wt. 1G9


MUHAMMAD

Mint

:

IBN TAOHLAK.

59

E.

Date.

GOLD. DehU

Obv. Area,

aJJI^

736

Rev. Area, within

Margin,

circle,

SjLoJtw^

^^J.JXi^

w>««i

a^

^_5^^ oj ^s^j [Th. 176.)

iV -7, Wt. 171 iV -75, Wt. 168

SMALL COPPER. F.

Obi'.

Bev.

vrco (Tb. ion.)

M

'B

-E

-6


60

No.

THE SULTAnS of DELHI.

Mint: Date.

Q. Obv.

2S0

Rev.

726

--*

ol,>t.«.Uj

(Peculiar ligature in oLi) (Th. 189.)

281

-6

727

Pl. V.

282,

^

727

)Ua~JI

283 O-J

o-*j

(Th. 189.)

^

'55

^

*X<-s^^ Ji''»JI ^.•V^JIam/o

(Th. 192.)

^ .E

I.

284-

286

732

i^r^ijJi

a*c

-5

-55


MrnAMMAD

Rev.

Obv. No.

61

IBS TAGHLAK.

Mint: Date.

287

732

Same

Same

as 284.

as

284

but date reversed,

:

v**n

M

288

733 but vrr

M

(Th. 193.)

289

290

•&

734 (Th. 193.)

M

-6

(Th. 193.)

M

-65

735

K. 291-

733

294

(Th.

19J,.)

PL. V.

295,

296

-E

-C

^

-6

M M

-6

-6

734 but

JUjI (Th. 194.)

^ M

-6 -6


62

THE STJLTAnS of DEHLI.

M No.

297,

Mint: Date,

735

Obv.

Bev.

Same,

Same:

297a but (Th. 194.)

298

M M

-6

-6

737 but (Th. 194.)

M

-55

L.

299

734?

Same.

In centre, within double

circle,

JUu Margin, (^) ..[j]^^^^-

M

-56


MUnAMMAD

No.

ilint

:

Date,

IBN TAGHLAK.

63

FORCED CURRENCY.

COPPER

A2fD

BRASS.

M. 300-

303

Dehli

Obv. Area, within

circle,

731

L

UJt

u>—»-

.^1

s\

Margin,*

^iki

^yi

OA tbjj JL»

jkt

,^jXAi

d^ C^aJ ji

Rev. Area,

Pl. V.

^ ^

(Blundered.)

M

(Th. 195.)

304,

Same

:

omitting

«l^

c

305

M ^ 76 -8

* The

cj of

Juuat

is

unifoiiuly omitted.


THE SULtAnS of DEHLI.

64

JE No.

Mint: Date,

305a Dar alIslam (Dehli)

Same

as 304.

Margin,

....

jk«aiA ^j

JL»

ji'^^*^\ jt> j^

^ 305

^*

Agrah,

-8

Same.

730? Margin,

(^)

^^

jl-oaa jJ

JL> j^v^

*>^' j3

75

.a;

305 c Taghlak

Same.

pur

730

305(Z Satgaon

Margin,

^^i Jlciaa

^

JL;

•••

jy,J^><rt^' (^

^

-8

^

-8

Same.

731 Margin,

JC^ ^*j

jk...

JL; jj^jlxiw C>/«a^ ji

N.

50-Kdm 306

Daulat-

Piece.

Obv. Area as on 300.

abad

732?

Margin, (S)

_5i ^y-»

j„a»A> j.i

Rev. Area as 300, but second

JI-j >^lcJ_5i «o

wo.J

line,

instead of

(Th. 190.)

307,

308

Same

:

date

Brass.

"8

illegible. Brass.

JE

75 -as


^

,

MUHAMMAD

65

IBN TAGHLAK.

JE No.

Mint: Date.

Rev.

Obv.

309,

730

t

310

AMUtaJI

J

vTo

i. (Th. 197.)

311,

730

y*,L<JI

312

JE.

75

M

-75

J—

.^}\

vro (Th. 198.)

7.5

.iE

^

313

730

omitting

1

but arranged in

after second ^»*i9i

and putting

j^

-7

tliree lines.

M

in line with

"65

Q. Quarter- Adit.

314

O^

730

-^M^-*

vro (lb. 199.)

315

732 \^rr

K

M

-6

^

-6


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

Mint: Date.

Rev.

Obv.

730

e5

vro

L5-0

Pt. V.

M

(Th. 200.)

-55

V>^

no

ciphers.

^ yE

^

s.

Within double

JJ

circle,

Around,

)S>'?A

Mohamad

PL. V.

*

Whore iXl

i.s

erroneously read

S-Ci

(Th. 201.*)

^

-6

-55

7


MUHAMMAD

67

IBN TAGIILAK.

JE No.

Mint: Date.

Rev.

Obv.

319

Ddr-al-

yr^J^

It

w>-^

ji^}

»'^)t

jtju-j

Isldm (Dehli)

730 (Th. 202.)

320,

Dehli

321

730

M

-eo

ditFerently divided.

Pl. V.

(Th. 203.)

^

"Oo

.a: "OS

322

Dehli

730 but JULoJt

and

j'-XJ t'*ce S^'a*"^.

differently d.vided. (Th. 202.)

M

V.

-Kdni Piece. 323

(Th. 205.)

£•

55


68

THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

M No.

Mint: Date.

Obv.

324

Rev.

Dehli (sic)

*•

*

^

325,

732

Within

-6

circle,

326

Around, 33

^^

PL. V.

jucmA jj JL» (Th. 208.)

M M

-6 -6

z.

327

aJUI

JJi (Th. 209.)

.(E -6


MUHAMMAD

No.

Mint

:

IBN TAGHLAK.

69

Date.

COINS STRUCK

IN

THE NAME OF THE 'ABBAST

KHAUFAHS OF EGYPT.

i.-al-mustakfT A.H.

Dehli

701—740.

Obv. Area, within quatrefoil,

741 j\

;

jjc^l

^U'n)I

Rev. Area,

tJu.A

^^jUjJI

^ PL. VI.

329

I.

GOLD.

N 328

I

Dehli

Same: but

^jtoj,

and

(Th. 212.)

Dehli

Same

as

328

:

Dehli

743

Same

:

but

Wt. 170

jr

-95,

Wt. 171

AT

-9,

Wt. 166

unit of date obscured by ornament.

74a;

331

-9,

Aij^lL^

741

330

iV

O^ (Th. 212.)

J/

-9,

Wt. 170


THE SULTAnS of DEHLf.

70

M No.

Mint: Date.

COP PEE. Rev.

Ohv.

Within

332

circle,

Margin

illegible.

(Th. 215a.)

333

^

-75

743 C5

'

a)l

Pl. VI.

(Th. 311.)

M

-6


MUHAMMAD

71

IBN TAGHLAK.

II.-AL-H AKI M Mint: Date.

741—753.

A.H.

GOLD. Rev.

Obv.

Within

Within

cinquefoil,

cinquefoil,

^\

('ni.213.)

(No cinquefoOs.)

Pl. VI. Jf

-So.

4_Jl

It

(I.O.C.) Pierced.

Jf S.Vft. 170

Wt. 169

COPPER. Within

Within

quatrefoil,

quatrefoil, dJUt

Tl. VI.

^ ^

-7

7 -66

748

<

at left,

"5

.]

^. f-'

^

7

^

-5

^

-5

Small.

748 aJUI

Same

as 33G.

Same

^^Lf

as 336.


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

72

No.

Mint: Date.

MAHMUD IBN

MUHAMMAD

SHAH. IBN TAGHLAK.

{Pretender.) A.H.

GOLD.

N 342

752.

Obv. Area,

Rev. Area,

Pl. VI.

iV

-75,

Wt. 169


Ffndz in.

73

Mint: Date.

XX.-FIROZ SHAH A.H.

III,

752—790.

GOLD. Obv. Area,*

Rev. Area,

Pl. VI.

^

(Th. 223.)

-8,

Wt. 1G9

Obv. Area,t

Rev. Area,

<iuCLo>«

OjJLs.

^jUxLJ Pt. VI.

*

The name

of the khalifah

(Th. 225.)

^

Al-Hakim Abu-l-'Abbas Ahmad, combined

with Firoz Shah's, probably hmits the date of this coin to 752-3. t Al-Mo'tadid

&, Wt. leo

was khalifah from 753 to 7G3.


74

No.

3i5

THE STJLTAns or DEHLf.

Mint: Date

Dehli

Obv. Area, within

circle,

vole's)!

Margin,

C>i—^»-S

Rev. as 344, but

<iIJCJLo-«

^J^j

•••

beneath

^

**-»

^UaX^JI {Cf.

Same

31G

:

but margin

^J^i

Th.

224.)

I.

O. C.

iV

-85

Wt. 167

-9,

Wt. 166

illegible. J^

(Dehli)

347

7xx

Obv. Area, within

Margin,

circle,

aj1.o*«-'3

O-**

->«*>; 4^«JI

dJA C-*^^

Kev. as 345. (Cy.

348

788

Obv. Area,

Rev. Area,

L5-

Th. 224.)

iV

-9,

Wt. 170


rfnoz

M No.

Mint

:

75

III.

COPPER.

Date,

Ohv.

Bev.

Dehli

319

767

(Th. 228.)

Dehli

350

770

Dehli 771

351

772

-7

.E

vv

(Th. 228.)

M

vvT

(Th. 228.)

M

-1

(Th. 228.)

,E

-7

-7

Dehli

353

773

vvT

PL. VI.

Dehli I

776

vvT

355

(Tb. 228.)

VVo

Dehli

352

351

-75

-E

Dehli 777

(Th. 228.)

(Th. 228.)

VVV

M

-75

&


76

THE SDLtAnS of DEHlI

M No.

356

Mint: Date.

Dehli

Obv.

Same

349

as

Eev.

Same

as 349.

778 (Th. 228.)

VVA

857

-7

Dehli

780

VAo

358,

Dehli

'SoSa

783

(Th. 228.)

(Th. 228.)

vAr

859

M

^

75

JE

-7

M

-7

Dehli

784

(Th. 228.)

JE

-75

VA<}>

360

Dehli

Same

as

349

786

(Th. 228.)

but VA*1

361

Dehli

Same

as

-7

M

'7

359

787 but

M

VAV

* I.e. Al-Mutawakkil, a.h. 7(i3— 785.

(Cf.

Th.

230.)


FfROZ

77

III.

M No.

3G2

Dehli

Same

788

363

Bev.

Obv.

Mint: Date.

359

as

Same

:

as 349.

M

VAA

"7

Dehli

789

(POSTHUMOUS.) 364

Dehli

816

365

Same

as

349

but

A

n

JE

7

(Th.238.)

M

-7

Dehli

817

A(V

SMALL 366368

(Th. 238.)

Within

sixfoil,

SIZE. Within

sixfoil,

\* ^fli\

^'

PL. VI.

(Th. 235.)

^ M M

-55

6 5

dLi J3>*^

369,

^ UaJLw

370

<x5CJLo

Pl. VI.

* Al-Hakim: 740—753.

t

jJ^ (Th. 229.)

M M

Al-Mutadid: 753—763.

-55 -55


78

No.

371

TIIK

Mint

:

Date,

SULTAnS of DEHLf.

Obv.

Eev.

Dehli

(See above, 349.)

^ 372

-55

Dehli

759 Beneath,

373

Dehli

VOU^

JLdUl <i]JL_JI jk*c ^i\

No

date. {Cf. Th. 230.)

Dar-al-

Mulk. 374.-

379

oti

Dehli

378

JLâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A^

Dehli

825

380

Dehli

381

Dehli

.E

-6


FfBOZ

79

III.

WITH FATH KHAN.

COPPER. Rev.

Obv.

J3J^ O^-*-

dI]9^)La.

....

Pl. VI.

(Th. 240.)

JE

7

Sfnall.

last line?,

Pl. VI.

^

-55

Larger.

(Th. 242.)

^ M

7 7

Dehli

lower

lines,

J^c^ J^Up J[*

^

75


'

THE SULTAnS of DEHLf.

80

No.

Mint: Date,

WITH ZAFAR. COPPER.

M

i?eu

Ohv.

387

J3>

Dehli

791 Posthumous.

v^i

4JLit)^^.».

I

{Th. 247.)

^

388 {sic)

.

\

^

7

JS,

-7

•^^'

^

'"

M

Ju». <ii.^»Ji JUA.C

PL. VI.

Small.

389,

ait

390 ^r-t

djis*;^

c>jJ^

oU,

^3>^e PL. VI.

(Th. 248.)

M M

-6 -6

391,

392

(Th. 219.)

JR

-55

M

-5


TAGHLAK

No.

Mint

;

81

II.

Date,

XXI. -GH

I

YAS-AD-D

TAGHLAK SHAH A.H.

I

N

I.

I

790—791.

COPPER. Obv.

393

Dehli

^\

4.a «.,LTw.[Ji

790

V^

o

aJL

sM Pl. VII.

394,

(Th. 250.)

.a:

-7

AJUt

395 w)«xX^

Pl.

396,

397

Vn.

,

JUaXw

(Cf.

Th. 252.)

b

JLw

^

-65

Ddr-al'

Mulk Dehli

.<

>

*i

^1

(Th. 254.)

M

M ^

-5 -6


82

No.

THE SULTAnS op DEHLI.

Mint

:

Date

XXII.-ABU-BAKR SHAH. A.H.

791—792.

COPPER. JE 398

Eev.

Obv.

791

Pl. VII.

399,

(Th. 255.)

792

400

v^

401

(Th. 255.)

r

403

M

-75

.a;

-65

793 (Th. 255.)

402,

M7

792

M

7

iE

7 7

Within square,

^

w

51

i

Around,

Pl. VII.

(Th. 257.)

^


83

abO-bake.

.Bey.

Obv. No.

Mint: Date.

Same

404

Within

as 402.

circle,

Margin, dU;j3j.*9 (Th. 258.)

405

iE

-75

792

JUaJL; (Th. 259.)

-8

.<E

Small.

406,

X^

)l

407

j^UaJLw Pl.

VU.

olw j^^

408

(Th. 260.)

^ ^

-5 -55

^[}

^ 409

-6

aJUI

^t* <c:]9'^^ [ojkL>.

^

-6


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

84

No.

Mint

:

Date

XXIII.-MUHAMMAD SHAH A,H.

III.

IBN FIROZ.

792—798.

COPPER.

410

Rev.

Ohv.

JE Dehli

In centre,

790 aX

)l

PL. VII.

»i

(Th. 261.)

M

'85

Around,

yZ^yo cds'^^ OkXX^

411,

790

412

(Th. 265.)

v^

413,

^ ^

75 -75

9^)Ld»

793

414 v'^r

(^UftJL. for jJUaJlw) (Th. 265.)

yE 75

m 415

794

v]^l*

(^3UaX^.) (Th. 265.)

.E

7


MUHAMMAD

85

III.

Ohv. No.

Min

416

:

Date.

Within

Dehli

circle,

793

Around, Jjk^ ^JoCU^ PL. VII.

417

(Th. 266.)

M

-7

^

-7

794

v]^F

418

C^J^

Mint

obliterated.

Ddr-al-

MulTc Dehli

793

419

PL. VII.

(Th. 267.)

JE.

-55

(Th. 267.)

^

'55

Dehli

794

420,

420a (Th. 269?)

iE

-55

^

'55


86

THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

JR No.

POSTHUMOUS

Mint: Date

COINS.

SILVER. 421

817

Obv. Area,

(sic)

Rev. Area,

yo^*^[}'\

V V

O^

1

—^

Pl.

422

818

Same

:

but AJ

|

*--"

Vn.

(Th. 270.)

Same

:

-0,

Wt. 174

.21 'SS,

wt. 173

A (Th. 270.)

423

M

but date obliterated.

M

-9,

wt. 174


SIKANDAR

No.

87

I.

Mint: Date.

XXIV.-S

I

KANDAR SHAH

I

A.H. 795.

C JE 424

PPE

E.

Obv.

Rev.

795

(Th. 272.)

425,

Dehli

426

795

^

7

In centre,

]«x^,^

Around,

PL.

427,

Ddr-al-

428

Mulk

d

Dehli

795

429,

Vn.

^ ^

-65 -05

W jJk.tXw

Pl.

C5

(Th. 273.)

vn.

(Th. 274.)

^

-6

JE

-6

l__Jft-_JU

430 ^JJ

dl.^ jjk[.iC«»

^ ^

-55 -5


THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.

88

Mint

:

Date.

XXV.-MAHMUD SHAH A.H.

II,

795—815.

ao

L

D. Rev.

Obv.

Traces of date beneath. Pl. VII.

(Th. 276.)

A^

-8,

Wt. 171

SILVER. Traces of date beneath.

but jJt>U^I^1

M M

-9.

wt. 173

-9,

Wt. 173

COPPER. 795

Pl. VII.

(Th. 2/7.)

iE

7


maiimi!jd

89

II.

JE Mint

:

Small.

Dat«.

Rev.

Ohv. -

435

*

:

L.a^)»

Same

as

434. (Th. 279.)

^

'6

436- Ddr-aJMulk 438 Dehli

M

439

PL. VII.

(Th. 280.^

.E

-6

801 (Th. 280.)

441

-55

800

Aoo

440

-8

79x

-iE -66

815 .ac

AlOJ

«


)

THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

90

No.

Mint: Date.

XXVI.-NASRAT SHAH. (^Interregnum.

A.H.

M 442

443

Ddr-al~

Mulk Dehli

797

444

798

445

807

797 jff.


:

(

Mint

:

91

)

Date

FOURTH DYNASTY, XXIX. -MUBARAK A.H.

SHAH

II.

824—837.

COPPER. Rev.

Ohv.

446

(Dehli)

Within

835

circle,

ArtJ Around,

(Th. 288.)

Same 447

2S.

-8

centre

Dehli 83a;

/\rix

Around, ni

<^iy^ ^JUxLw Pl. Wi..

M


92

No.

THE STJLTInS of DEHLf.


MUHAMMAD No.

93

IV.

Mint: Date.

XXX.-MUHAMMAD SHAH A.H.

IV.

IBN FARID.

837—847.

COPPER. iE Ohv.

456

yjt 4.Q

Dehli

.

Rev,

L-w.[)l

843 ^Jj

dw

Mi o (Th. 293.)

457

.T;

„ [8]46 Pl. VII.

(Th. 293.)

.K

-Zo

(Th. 293.)

.*E

75

f1

458

„ [8]48

<pA

Small.

459 but

ous"^ line

;

OjJ^ and no

in

date.

last

bottom

line obliterated.


94

M No.

THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.


MUHAMMAD

95

IV.

JE Mint; Date.

466

Ddr-al-

Mulk

Rev.

Ohv.

Same

as

460

:

Same

as 460. £.

no date visible.

-55

(Dehli)

•467,

468 -^ -55

469

Dehli

"'J

-^ "^

2E

-oS

£.

-45

.'

Pl. VII.

(Th. 296.)


THE SULtAnS op DEHLI.

96

No.

Mint

:

Date,

XXXI.-'ALIM SHAH. A.H.

847—855.

COPPER.

M

Rev.

Obv.

470

Dehli [8]53

A.]

ft

i

y

U

^\

[.aji o\

^ L>

PL. VII.

Small.

471

Ddr-al-

472

[85]4

\

II)

}L-c i

(Th. 297.)

M

-7


(

No.

97

)

Mint: Date.

FIFTH DYNASTY. XXXII.-BUHLOL LODI. A.H.

473

Dehli

858

474

859

475

860

855-894.


98

No.

477

THE SULTAnS of DEHLf.

Mint: Date.

Dehli

Obv.

Same

Rev.

Same

as 473.

as 473.

884

M

478

Dehli

890 (Th. 311.)

APo

479

'7

Within

877

M

-65

circle,

Jj

Ki

A]VV ^UxUJI

Around,

(Th. 315.)

480

888

Margin

M

-7

JE,

7

illegible.

889

AA^

482

-7

ft

AAA

481

M

Margin

obliterated.

890

aV


BUHLOL

99

L6Dr.

Small. I

Mint: Date.

No. I

Eev.

Ohv.

Dar-al-

Mulk. 483

JUU3I

)\>

Dehli

855 Pl. VIII.

484

(Th. 313.)

M

-65

M

-5

857

v£v

485

863

Air

486

867

(Th. 313.)

873

Avr

490

(Th. 313.)

868

aIa

489

-6

M

-6

^

-6

(=Air?)

aIv

488

JE

863? A-ir

487

(Th. 313.)

M

-55

(Th. 313.)

M

-6

(Th. 313.)

JB

-5

877

AW


100

No.

491,

TUE sultAns of dehli.

Mint: Date.

Dehli

Ohv. 4_-i

Bev.

Same

U.a.-J[l

492

as 483.

Beneath, i<.^]a> ^jJAaÂť.j (Th. 312.)

M

-55

.a: -55

Large.

493

Jaunpiir

888*

^

AAA

-6

Small.

494

[8]93

A]^r

Two uncertain

letters beneath.

* Date of final re-annexation of Jaunpur.

^

'6


8IKA2TDAH

No.

II.

LdDI.

101


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

102

90G

Rev.

Ohv.

Mint: Date

Same

as

Same

495

as

495

(Th. 316.)

M

75

M

-7

(Th. 316.)

J&

-7

(Th. 316.)

M

-7

907

^v n

908

^OA

910 505, with star, and joined

^|o

(Th. 316.)

:

M 75 M 75

911

^11

No

star or joining. (Th. 316.)

M

75

914 i*p

\

n (Th. 316.)

J& yE

915 1

IE

(Th. 316.)

M -a;

7 7

'8

75


:

8IKANDAE

II.

Obv. No.

Mint: Date.

511

916

Same

as

512

513

JRev.

Same

495

n

^

103

L(5dI.

as

495

n

(Th. 316.)

^

(Th. 316.)

JE

-7

917 with star

7

918

^lA (Th. 316.)

514

M

-75

919 ^

n

Star over

J

of

J^^j

(Th. 316.)

^

-75

^

75

^

-65

515

No

Ciphers obscure.

star.

Small.

0-o^>

516,

517

No

ciphers.

Partly cut

off.

Pl. VII.

(Th. 317.)

&

â&#x20AC;˘65


THE SULTAnS of DEHLf.

104

No.

Mint Date. :

XXXIV.-IBRAHIM LODI. A.H.

923—937.

CO PPE E Obv.

518

JRev.

926

dv_—M>

ii_*

(Of.

^

Th.

I

320.)

nr

^

-55

519 date obliterated.

520 date obscure.

(Thinner.)

521-

523

926

in (The inscriptions ou the preceding

six coins are

fragmentary.)

M

-5

^

-6

extremely


.

SHER ShAh.

105

Mint: Date.

SIXTH DYNASTY. XXXV.-SHER SHAH. 946—952.

A.n.

SILVER. A. Single Square Borders.

a.

946

With

Obv. Area,

Margin,

o{

j^

dU*

4J.ll

j^c |

'^)t

O^^

arranged j^*—

a

I

^

!l

>«*

I

J^i ^i^

I.

Rev. Area,

^F1 4JLU

S>'{

aJJI

Ser Sdhi.

Margin, (Th. 351.)

946

Same

:

.51

11, W'l. 175

IB.

V\, Wt. 176

but without Hne above dli


THE SULTAnS of DEHLI.

106

M Same: No.

Mint: Date

526

Sharif-

Khalifahs' names run in a retrograde direction,

abad

>^

946

Rev. Area,

527

Sharif-

^M X^* OU^ I

I

L5^


107

SH^E SHAh.

M No.

532

Mint

:

Date.

Same: but mint obscure

:

[d'\j^[^]?

M

Sher-

garh

105

?

947

533

Same

948

as

530

On

but date

:

rev.,

^

fA

^ M

534

Same

Sher-

garh? 948

530

as

:

but date

]

Shergarli

Wt. 173

1-0,

Wt. 171

f/^

and rev. margin,

M

535

1-15,

Same

as

530

:

but mint oj^ja^ and date

^

^A

948 Obv. margin,

536

Same

Jahanpanah (Dehli)

O^-^ ijW*^

and

as

I

[>•»]*

J«**^

530: but date

I

\.J^ l5^1' ^**'*-

^f^

rev. margin,

949

On

rev.,

ffi .51 1-15,

Wt. 177


THE PAtAn SULtAnS OF DEHLI.

108

M B. No.

Mint: Date.

Within single Square Borders.

a.

537

As^rah

Obv. Area,

aJUI

4

*i)l

^)

)l

948 Margin,

Rev. Area,

.k

^

^TT

Sri Sdr

Margin,

I

Pl.

538

539,

540

Agrah 949

Gwalior 951

Same

:

but

'\f''\

sideways at

^^

Sd/ia.

left

Vni.

Th. 344.)

(Cf.

side of rev.

Same

:

but

^

sideways at j-"_ji

left side of rev.

*r>^ instead

Same

as 539,

but

',

£

£42,

Sber-

gadah

Areas similar to 537

:

Wt. 175

of 6j^\

M M 11

1-1,

Wt. 172

T

952

543

1-15,

;

(Th. 317.)

Gwalior

175

aJLLa

M

and

541

M M, Wt.

M

ri

JR

1-or,,

but witliout date.

Obv. margin,

liev. margin,

On

rev.,

* Al IM

(540, 541 and 542

nad

^T.)

Wt. 175


109

SH^R SHAh.

M Mint: Date.

Within double Square Borders.

b.

54-4

SheiI

Obv. same as 537, but jX.^.I, and Ch!j^< cii

O^^ (instead

6^ Rev. Area,

Margin,

'^

o/^ V>^

]f A

i

>ii-^' ^'

cH^'

I

3 VP^'

S, 105, Wt. 178

PL. VIII.

545,

Sher-

546

garh

Same: but

^>

^'^ and

On

rev. of 545,

On

obv. of 546, a sprig.

짜:

^

9]49 (Th. 3;6.)

M 11 M

1-1

547

KalfJi

Same

:

but beneath obv. area,

949

^^l^ V>^ Nagari beneath rev. Rev. margin

area,

illegible

^T ^ff

except jaJa^JI ^i^ (Th. 351.)

-51 1-05,

Wt. 176


THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.

110

M No.

Mint

C. With circular areas* :

Date.

Obv. Area,

548

aJUI

*^)S

a

W

^

948

J3UJI ^Uai-JI ^Js.

Margin,

^^

^ <j5a

^ ^Tf

/aJsloJI

On

obv.,

^j»

949

Same: but

^

^^

,

O^^J'i W^^' -^^

*

Pl. VIII.

549

oU-^ j-o^ j^ W

jjI^—JxLj ^aw

Rev. Area,

Margin,

(sic)

M

(Th. 348.)

V15, Wt. 174

^W*c

and

(Th. 348.)

550

949

Same as 549

:

jR

but jS^ ^\ and date ']*^] at right side of Nagari.

M

551

Jahanpaimh

Same

1-1

as 549: but date in

(Dehli)

']f'\

margin

in area

under aO.*, and

(Th. 349a.)

* The margins

of this

oUJl^

after jila«oi\

949

heart-shapo, or in the form

/r

1-2,

Wt. 176

type have generally one or two ornaments of

1-1

a whorl, etc.

of a


Ill

SHEB SHAH.

M I

No.

Mint

:

Date

552

950

553

950

Same

as

550

:

but

^

£o

at right of Nagari. (Th, 348.)

Same

as

548 (oW--c)

:

but

^

M

l-2o

at left of Nagari.

£

m,

554,

950

Same

:

but

O^^

;

and

1-25

at left of Nagari.

555

M

556

557

951

Sharif-

Same

:

but

^

£

I

at left of Nagari.

M

Same: but

^

£

I

at

right

abad

952

of

Nagari,

and

»\4\kiji.

1-1

beneath

rev. area.

951

558,

1-1

JR 11

Same

as

556: but

^

^

f

at left of Nagari.

^

559

1-2,

Wt. 175

M

1-16

SQUARE SILVER. 559«

Pl.

Vin.

Sqtiare.

M

•7b,

Wt. 179


THE

112

M No.

STILT AN8

OF DEHLf.

COPPER.* Mint

:

Date.

Large.

560

Rev.

Ohv.

949

PL. VIII.

561,

(Of.

355.)

M

-95

Th. 355.)

JR

-95

Th.

950

562

^e^

o63,

Cf.

951

564

(omitting <UJ1)

^s

(Cf.

565

Th.

355.)

M M

-95 -9

952

^

^Er

-95

566 in centre,

date obliterated.

*

On

^^Ul On

*

to is sometimes (566, 577, 579.) changed used. and on other coins an intermediate form ^>^\ seems to bo

the obv. the ^vord ^\J\ ;

the rev. of 561, 563, 677, 578,

^^lU., is

substituted for ^^'UJl.


siiEit

M No.

5G7

113

snAn.

Bev.

Ohv. Mint

:

Date

A grab

Witbin square,

Witliin square,

950 {sic) J

'^)

1

Outside,

Outside,

(Th. 356.)

508

950 or

S.

-95

1

^e-

or

^gl

but mint j^l

(?)

^

568r/

Sher-

garh

but

951

^

£

in

I

margin.

lint

dji ^-i* (Th. 358.)

569

-9

Hissar

?

,,

(?)

yE 1-05

in area;

951? marg. obscure. (Cf.

570

Th.

357.)

vE

-95

Gwalior

950

^£o marg. differently arranged. 35>(.)

^

-95

(Th. 358.)

.E

-95

(Th.

571

Gwalior 951

^€

^M^J


:

114

THE SULTANS OF DEHLi,

Ohv.

Hev.

Mint: Date.

Same

Grwalior

as

567

Same

as 571.

952 (Th. 358.)

date obliterated.

but mint

(9)

M

-96

M

-95

M

1-0

C^ci^

Within square,

951

no date but

^

£

in area

I

in

^l—iaJLw ;

margin. Outside, [<<i]3UaJLw3

Within square,

Within square,

(S) LfiJ^ JiAw>

Margin

varied.

Margin, •0 aJJI jJa.


115

SH^B SHAH.

M No.

Mint

:

Date.

Second Size. Rev.

Obv.

576

918

M

577

919

1^^

but ijUaJL;

;

and

<iSXo <UJI

jJa.

M

578

Same

950

as

576: but

579

75

^jlfcJL»

M

-75

M

-85

952

^er

580

-8

952 "izr

(O^laA-Jt)


THE SULTANS OF DEHLf.

116 JE No.

581

Sev.

Oiv. Mint

:

Date

Within square,

KalpI

Within square,

945

Ol

(sic)

Margin,

W

J.

,

^ .,>

Margin, >AiiiÂŤJt>jt Pl. VIII.

582

^

Kdlpi

M

-75

^3

'8

583 blundered.

584 Gwalior

mint

obliterated.

?

<x.X.X.><i

mX-a-4^


117

SllfR SlIAU.

Small. Mint

:

Date.

Rev.

Obv.

9i8

\\

iL

hJ>~)

JiL-OI At

side

and beneath,

[^]PA

PL. VIII.

^ ^

-5 -5

ciphers obUteiated.

M M

94.i

-55 -5

OUaJUl iPa?

J

^

-55

jE,

-i

5-

Pl. VIII.


118

No.

THE STJLtAnS of DEHLf.

Mint: Date.

XXXV

I.

-I

SLAM SHAH

A.H.

952—960.

SILVER. A.

952

Obv. Area, within square,

Margin,

in segments,

Rev. Area, within square,

^VJftLrf

r^

aCJU

iSr/

w JAM*

aJUI

jJLo.

Islam Sdhi

Margin, in segments, >iii«JI

^' [LH-^'3

^*^]-^'

J^

[J>^' O^J»^' .S,

952

Same

:

but

^

E

f

106, Wt. 168

beneath obv. area, instead of at side of rev. area. (Th. 360.)

M

11, wt. 173


No.

5U

119

ISLAM SHAH.

M I

Mint

:

Date.

Agrah 953

Same

but

:

£r

']

and mint, ojJ\

;

Ornament on

^

X

obv. area,

.51 1-15

595

59G

Same

Agrah 954

but lE^^-

:

On

Same

954

i

:

£1^

;

obv.

rev.

*

margin quite

On

597

Same

956

but

:

£

i

1

obv.

traces of

;

on rev. j^

,

On

956

^£l

Same:

On

.

obv.

Wt. 170

M

1-05,

Wt. 176

M

1-05

illegible.

in margin.

* Pl. IX.

598

1-05,

^

mint

obv.

JU

£).

M 599, Gwalior

GOO

601

?

Same: but

^£^

;

margins

957

Gwalior

Same

but

:

i

C'^

.

On

illegible,

On

obv.

On

obv. i

602

960

Same

:

but

^

*1

;

margins

Same

:

but

^

{Eutged.)

M

1*05

(Th. 360.)

M

ro, Wt. 175

C

M

•05

M

-9

illegible.

On

G03

except ...*^^^ •-iH'

obv. and rev.,

958

1-05

obv.

6

instead of ciphers.

(Barbarous.)


THE SULTAnS of

120

M No.

604

B. Mint

:

Date.

952

Same

as

592

:

but

^

£

(jJ^jI

006

607

608

953

Same

954

Same

955

Same

horizontal

T

:

:

:

;

and top segment

instead of

^^)

610

611

M

1-3,

Wt. 172

(Th. 359.)

M

1-3,

wt. 180

but

i

(Th. 359.)

M

1-25,

Wt. 16G

but

1

(Th.

3.59.)

M

1-25

(Th. 359.)

M

1-25,

(Th. 359.)

M

1-25

(Th. 359.)

M

1-3,

(Th.

M

1-25

£1

££

Same: but ^£v

957

Same

958

959

:

but

'^

Wt. 175

£ '^

Same: but ^£^

960

612 Gwalior 952

(Th. 359.)

lET

but

Pl. IX.

609

of

FVVX^

margin,

rev.

G05

DEHLi'.

Same

Same

areas as

:

but

592

Obv. margin, (S)j^*^^

Wt.

17t5

*1 1

but no date on

:

|

w>-i ^Xc^

]

3.59.)

rev. area.

0^-o^3 I>o^3>^W'

Rev. margin,

{^J^\ instead of

On

rev.

%

^j) (Th.

:j(!0.)

Ai

11.5,

wt. 177


121

islAm sHAir.

Mint: Date.

Satgaon

Obv. Area, within square,

955

Margin, in segments,

Rev. Area, within square, .•^)u-<t

o\

.1

Margin, in segments, retrograde,

,

j

Pl. IX.

955

Same

as

592

:

but

^££

on obv.

jjUa-Lj

Rev. Area,

9oG

Same

J

but

^

E

"1

Obv. margin of 616 as on 613

area.

*-

Ornament

onl}^ partly legible.

as preceding,

on obv. ;

rev.

Ornament on

Same

as

592:

rev.

margin

illegible >

.ai

1], Wt. 163

M

1-1,

Wt. 164

area.

margin

rev.

^

differently arranged.

^ {Clipped.)

956

M 115, Wt. 17G

ali ^'%-i\

)L

Margin

(Th. 360.)

no ornament.

jR

1-2

M

-9


122

THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.

Mint: Date,

957

Obv. Area, within double square, a]XJI

a

's)I

Margin, in segments (one only

^

)l

visible),

Rev. Area, within square,

"i]ev Margin, in segments,

a3UxL-3

illegible.

(Very peculiar

style.) Pl. IX.

M

-95,

Wt. 162

G.

954

Obv. Area, within

Margin,

circle,

J^Ia)!

Rev. Area, within

*>JI

o^^-J'

aJI

^

^jlo^j^tjSJ

Ul

dl__w

circle,

j^^j.

^^\

"n)

\^\,^

,1

0\

cOUaJLw^ <sS\a

til

4JUI

J-*y^

jJl^

(S)

Margin, |

ja)a^\ ^\ i^.J^^^ UJjJI J'i^.

(Barbarous.) Pl. IX.

AX.

13, Wt. 175


123

islAm shah.

M No.

Mint

:

Date.

C

P P E

E.

Thick and Large. Bev.

Obo.

621

95x i

ol

>6^>

rl

(Th. 363.)

622

-95

JE

-9

Partly effaced.

95i Beneath,

623

.<E

^£f

(Th. 363.)

960 Last

^jUsJ—

line,

^ 1 °

»

oU>

j-yit

yj-i

oi^D; Ornament,

^ ^

Second

624

Size.

Same

953

-95

as 621.

Date, in middle of last line,

M

.3


THE SULTANS OF DEHLI.

12 J.

M No.

Mint Date. :

Third

G25

Within square,

Size.

Within square,

^

-65

Thin and Small. 626-

029

U^-^J"-

JiU-a-Jt (Th. 361.)

^ ^

-5

-5

yE

-5

^

-5


w

MUHAMMAD

.11

No.

XXXVII.-MUHAMMAD Mint

:

126

'AdIL.

SHAH,

'ADIL

Date.

960—964.

A.H.

SILVER. G30,

961

Obv. Area, within square,

631

aJJI

a

^)\

^

)\

Margin, in segments.

Rev. Area, within square,

aS

to

J^J-a>

<lJDI

W^ «c4M T^ *[^ (in jiSr/

Margin,

in

margin)

Mahamad

Sultan

segments,

PL. IX.

.51 1-25,

Wt. 164

1-3,

Wt. 172

.51 1-0,

Wt. 177

.51 -95,

Wt. lot

.51

632

Narnol 961

Same

:

but rev. area,

4XJU

(SV«

Margin,

dl—

,jUstlw

aJI)I

jJl».

Mahamad Sah

Jyj^ ^-^^

j

• 1

PL. IX.

633

963

Same

:

but date

4

;

I

(Th. 365.)

and mint obscure. (Th. 365.)


TUE SULTANS OF

126

No.

Mint

:

DEIILI.

Date.

COPPEK. Obv.

Rev.

Large.

634,

961

^vft

^

635

d.$CJU

dJJt

JkJLa.

(Th. 300.)

2B

-9

Small.

636 no date

visible.

^

7

JE

'

637


Mint

:

Date.

962 963

639

M 610

or


— THE STTLTANS of DEHLI.

128

No.

Mint

:

SIKANDAR

III.

Date.

COPPER. Ret-

Ohv.

64^1

^^

PL. IX.

;

iL

(Cf.

Th.

370.)

JE. -5

Illegible.

G42 ;•* jlkJL.

M

-6


INDEXES.


i


I.

A.H.

INDEX OF YEARS.


132

A.H.

INDEX OF YEARS.


INDEX OF YEARS.

A.H.

138


134

A.H.

INDEX OF YEARS.


INDEX OF YEARS.

A.H.

135


136

A.H.

INDEX OF YEARS.


INDEX OF YEARS.

A.U.

137


(

II.

MIXT.

139

)

INDEX OF MINTS.


INDEX OF MINTS,

140

MINT.


INDEX OP MIKT3.

MINT.

141


IxVDEX OF MINTS.

142

MIKT.


INDEX OF MINTS.

MI>'T.

143


IXDEX OF MINTS.

144

MINT.


145

INDEX OF MINTS.

MINT.

Metal.

M Sharifabad

A.H.

PRINCE.

946 947

Sher Shah

Page.

526 527 557

951

M

Sher Shah

542, 543

Shergadah

JR Shergarh

947 948

532

Sher Shah

534,535,

544

Ghazni

(jJb)

M

[9]49 951

M

596

545, 546

568a

Muhammad

ibii

Sam

>)

N ))

M

602 603 604 601

Tildiz

610

See j-^yii Deogir

KaVah

Kalpi

[Kanauj]

M M

N

945 949

Sher Shah

X

Muhammad

ibn

Sam

1

106 106 111

108


INDEX OF MINTS.

146

MINT.


INDEX OF NAMES.

III.

I

^^^yU^-pJ

dli 154,

I

j.>>-»

I

j-a\J dli

153

155

523

^UsiJu

el^Ji>i9

CH>AJi o^ 6li>:j^t 398—401, 408

402, 403, 405

,^^^^\

>-6l

^^

9^ J3^

oU>:j ^1 404

^iUftJu>Js oU,^:^ ^1 406, 407, 409


INDEX OF NAMES.

148

^UjJI jjkJCwl

&ee J|;l--«

^>j dli ^'^jLwl

OUslL,

613, ^UaJl-j

^aJaJl^t >i^

oli;

UjJI J"^*- JiUJI ^UaJLJI

O^J^JIj

592—(312

616-618

olij^

dlwve'^L,;! jaJxoJI

^I O^jJIj ^S>\

S^

614,

615, 620

OUaJl^ 619

OUftJL, «li>i.^ o-^ 621, 622,

624

jjUaX-/ dU»^;-w ^>^ dl^'^)u»l ^>JJJI j^_j<^laJI

jjUpl aaJIs. J^laJI ^UftJLw dlij-ji ^,„lic'N)l

see

jUsJLJI

^^\jj\

,

,.;-»;lJL|I

jUaJLJI ^j^LwoUJbt

dli>6'i)u»l

JL,^U^\, 0-f^t''>*W»

o^j^JI^

U>)I

^ftJn^ll ^^1

j-wo'^)!

t,«H6^

623

626 — 629

«>^>3/— *'

^^^j>

48—50

^JjJtj ^J^'

i.^»«^ 51,

52


149

INDEX OF NAMES.

A oliaJU' 46, 47

oUoLJt

53, 54, 56, 57

^«cll pUftJUl 55

J^.rJ\

oUftJL-

^ ^^in

60

%firftTft» $>'i Sultd(7i) Lititimisi, 46,

^ ftlTTg wi ^f^^l^^ ^jf.N»;LJl

(c~ot)

jt^ju^t see

SH Snmasadin

38

— 42

see ^u.£>j

jL.»a.i^

^^^1 ^s^t ^-^•^jt

Sii7'itan

47

473—478, 495—523,

see

j^^a-l,

^a*-»,

^jU^,

see^ft'^l,^^

jjtuoJLJbt ^ee ,_^M»UJI

100—114 OtJ^ 0^*»Jb W'JJ' «t>U,Jifi^)t o^JaJ^I 115—118 0-»JJl3 tijJt

^J

^U^^N)!

IT^nri T^TTO^^' 'SiW'^

^U

121, 122

o^ftJLJI 119, 120

Sultdm Gydsudim 115

— 118


INOEX OF

150

N.VMF.S.

jljjkA^t ojJJ see jk^a^^

^5^^^)l jiA^I

j.,oU

^UslLJI 67

O.JjJt3 LJjJIj.a^^kc'N)!

J^iA^\ 69 Muajadim 70

^ftflT^ 5^ T^tT^^' Suritdn Sri

OUaX-

oU.

J^:>

OUftXJt oU.

0-»=vJ' t^J^ J^>:«)l

J^V. ^^^^)l^j^|

oUaJLw

dU J_^^ 483—492

OUaJLw

oUJ^V

>*WI oli

473—478

479-482

493, 494

^1 CH-^'i» W^-^'

JAaj jiJiJI ^jUaJLJt

^^li

— 72

^jl

^^ l5j^' O^JaJLJI 237 ^J^xJt^

iJjJI

OLc

j^gjliJI

249—254

^j^3«Jlj..^lj.^U 238—240,

dlw ,^Xstj jklA^\

242

243—248a

^UaJUlt


151

INDEX OF NAMES.

oli,

^:

JJLiu 255. 256, 258,

259

TRo^rTT TmiTir'^* S'-ih

jA^a*^'

Gydmdim

a^ O^-^^b WjJ' ^'^^ iJJ^I

OlM^I

255, 256

J^tV-^l jLja-Jt jjUiJ-JI

dliiUj 241

^UaJL«i dU. JJLi3

^jJt^

Suit dm

393—397

\iJji\ A)'i)L>. see

iu-tf'j

c

334, 335 j.«.a.l

^Lxll^l AJUt^b^^UJI 336—341

j.«».l

^l^l^tvoU*:^! 343

J^*.t ^l**)t ^1

366—368

0^«^'

\L>i'^^

(^.^^loJI see ji%^\ ,

^J\jJ^\

^jJt

^.claJI see^o'iLwIjjMjw

r ^Uii see ^Ui^ili

jfjti


INDEX OF NAMES.

152

j^\

^3

o^J*J^"

dU3>-^ cHJJb

UJJJ»>^U>fflie'^'

O^^^^l

^jj^^t 236 aJUI ^uJL». see

^jU«

^2>*^U3I w>j Aft-JL^ see i)jU«

^jUjJI ^uJl^ see y6*iL-l,j«w

^;^,5-u^l

456—459, 470, 491, 492, and

A.AJLsiJI

^^-^1

^UjJt ^ji\

^;>*«JUJl <^j see iujji\

^\

,Jh^jJI

see

ja*%^\,j^

JjUo

see ^-a^«««<fJ<

,^5^ J£>^ioJI

see O'^^o-jJ'

aJDI A^tt'j see J^«a».-e

^jJl3

L3jJI

A^j ^[

^jJI^ UjJt i^j ^jjjjl^ LijJi)

>

\j^i

see

see

]

o^J*J^I 63, 64

Af^j

j^\jj\

J (jUjJI see >e'^l

see


— 153

INDEX OF NAMES.

juJuJI see (^iJu, jL^jw^ ^J\ii\ jjjSLi fee jcoi»~«

jL«A^

^UaJL*

olw

^UaJL,

oU, ju»a*-«

ol^ J juiCw

^

424

dU»jJu5C«» (>s**>o^'>^'

^^ ^2^» ^^^

^^UftJLw 6U, jjJJL> 427,

428

OUaJU

430

dU, jJjSL, 429,

^5^ J^>i<^J 495—517

oli J>JLv^ oli jJUJL, O-^-^P'

(dU^ 505) (hi) uLijjkJw

w)Uc dlSr

^ILJL» 640

Jy^wL».wwt oUf jjjSL)

jjuJCw

o^^=^

yjUftXw see ^iA\jj\

^jlLJLJt

,

641, 642

ji%^\

JXij,

^j\^, .X»a»u

>

,

,_;1»IJJI,

dli-«|;l,

see ^.oiAtj-il,

J^XyJ,

,

J>iv^,j.*w,^U, «Voa»«

vftliLrf!,

jjL^UJt,

j-w, >»«, iSj^,

jtj-^a.,

ij-^j,

^<^.c,

^>a~-«, J^Xj

>

^UxL; (^j) see^l^, j,xXw, i^^^a^,

^UftUI

see

j^

^t, JJaj,

j>»Xj, voj/v:',

jj^iSL/,

i^Ai^.

^3A.~o

j.a1s>,

J^^, ^j^,

J»-o«»~«,


INDEX OF NAMES.

164 ^JlkJL.H

^IfrJ^

see

see

^^JMcy^\

J^^

jJ^i

,

fjS2^^\ «^AM* see j^j-t^

jfi<c\

*

olii

see ^f^\j.j\

,

j^jjl^ WJjJ' c'-*^

juy^)l see

^S

j:iij

^J^,

see

>e1jt,>B^Lj1,

,

^W>

J>V^> ti^>

^<,;lJI

J^-o^*^

WW— OUxL-Jt dl^ ^UflJL» dU»

oli

j^

^I

j-j^ ^aJsl<JI

^^ jaJs-oJI

^j\LX^

^;AJa-oJI

o-:i-^'3

^-J^J'

J^^ 524—536

—559

^1 CHJJ'i

^JJ^J' ->4)^

544

^\ o^jJlj

LJJ^JI

542, 543

-xjji

oU 537—541

OUJUI 560— 56G,

576, 579, 580

OUsJLw 577, 578

>JsmJI ^I dli oLi

j-^

OUaJUl

o^^*^ 567—574, 581—583

jj-jU o^JaJ^' ^5^^*J'

(^)

dli

oUaJLw dU,

^

j^

j^

jiL^\ ^\

xs'^'i"

575

Jil*)l o^J*J^'

584

JiUJI c>^hX^\ o^jJI AiJLo- 585—591


INDEX OF NAMES.

^

^ilJaJlw

oU jiJo

j_5^-i

J^U

^f yiH

j^

«6^

(v>v)

387, 388, 391, 392 389, 390

>j'

see

J^laJt see

^^,

>e'il.-jl,

J^.te^<«

ot^U — dlw J^^ai^ OliftJL-

o^ dUw»JU

oU^U.

^^Ls}l (^t) 5ee

^jUaJLw

470

471, 472 J^>»ll

^^^tjJI jLfC see

i-a.1^t jujJt see jua)I a/2^ 6j»k£.

see

see JJ>Xi

^^jjlj oLw

ju£

tjjjjt

^«&

"ilLft

see

jk^o-:^-*,

>3JL~-6

OliaJUl 205

e {Jj^

r

see

^*i

^^jIaJI see ^^iJo

jjjjJIj LJjJI

(.jLi

see

w'Lc

o^

see

v>*b,

j.^Aa5,

155


— INDEX OF NAMES.

156

(^t)

«JLa)I

Ota^

(i)

j^

iJjJt j^jji see olw

(Ch) oli

see

jt-oJ»*-«

jjj^ ChJJ' u>^J ^^TS

"^«FX!I

(ii) dU»

jj>h

382—386

(sic)

^jJlj *XJji

see j^^t^^, jk.cux^l,

Bukana

din 61

J3^ ^jJI J'iJ^—

OUaJUl 138—145 oli,j3j-s CHJ^Jb

OJJ^)b eUr

l!^jJJI

j3^

^^:

UJ^M

J'^^^'^t O^Ja^' 146—148

J^a-^^'liH O^J^' 149—151

152, 152a

^T^iTT

ifoST^^

'^''«'^

Sultdm Jaldludim 146

5ee also ^^\jj\

(hi)

ol5»

J3J-S

^UxU

dlw j^j-jj

j^bjj JuSW iPh 343

^UaJUl 344—347 0^><^'

^*<t s^lJ (^JlJaXw

^UiuL-, ol^ «Ur

j^^ 349—381

jj^ 382—392

dliw

j3j-i

348

— 148


— 157

INDEX OF NAMES.

jjjjJI^ IJjJt ^fJs3 see

^jL<

J)

^ji^\

see

iUc^

OUftJUl

0-:!JJ'i

Uj^M jjw

^o^'NjI

o^^*J^' 123-

128

iU.&

ChJJIj ^JJ»>a*.<riifi'^» O^^^^J^' 129, 130

^jJlj

UijJI jjw^«^'N)l o^J*J^"

^jjlj UjJI jA«

131—133

134, 135

J.SM 137 (jjjA«

136

st ^I^t

^jJlj

'

Miai<^^

'Sf^'*'

Sultdm Muijudlm 129, 130

UijJI jjV** see

(i) ol^w i)jl*c

0-j^>JI>**l 206—208

ji-^U AS'iJ^iJl ^>-*J ^J^>)I

O-s^^l

jt<^

209—211

jjUJwl ^jUaJLJI jJJ ^UaJLJt


INDEX OP NAMES.

158

O^^^

212, 213

oUaJUl 214

^OaJLJI

CH

O^J=^i' 215, 216

OUaJUl ^j\ o^^aJ^I 217—220

^>4i^^^l ^j<l dUUg JjI^JI jUftJl^l o^t o^^*J^'

221,

222

aJDW cP'^J' 0^^*J^'

^UaJLJi dLl£»jL^

oUaJUl

c>if»

OUftJUl

v>v1

^jJlj

v>:!-)^b

O-*"'

0^^»J^^I 223,

W*^'

s^is3 jAixoJt

224

^t

225—228

o^^aJ^»

LijJI ..fJaS

229—232

^f^l voU-N)!

232rt

oLi^ jL^ 233, 234

(11)

oil .i'j^-e—

j^UftJU dU.

^jt^ v>-^>«JI

^UsJu-

JjL^ 448—454

ali

oU> JjL<o

455

/i-*'

^U 446, 447

dJLit

AftJL^


INDEX OF NAMES.

0-;-i->»Jt

^

159

349 -358a, 371, 372, 408, 429, 430,

iajJla^ll

435 juc >^! AiJUJI 359—365, 373, 387, 388, 391—393,

aJUI

398—401, 406, 407, 411—415, 420, 420a, 424, 434

,>wU^t j^l>eU*s)l 421—423, 431—433 384—386

aJUI

juc ^\ j.^^^)\^t^\^lc^\

aJUI

juc ^t 389, 390, 394, 395, 409, 410

aJUI

^

J^^iftJI

OUaJl-JI dU. ^}XaJ

^

j^,a^ o-o*y

J^^

c^'^l

260—263

jc»A.^ 4jJt ^LoA.j ^^^|>il Ju«3l 264

oU, JJL*5 oU>

see JJLij

265—272

JAaj ^>y jLo^a^

aJDI J-j*w

j^

jjkla^^l 274, 275

^ J^.a^ j^ dLiLUj ^ J^UJI oUftJUl 280—283 oI^aUJ

aJUI

J---;

jJkla-^l 278,

279

jL,,*^

JJLiu j^^a^.« ^jo-iyi ju.t JJLiu

OJ

JJLiu

j.<^a^^yDt

>«=*-« ><r!>^

284—290

*J^I

I

dJJt

A<^j

L5^'>J'

A^».j ^^L>JI

299

Jii; J^>.a^ jljJ^I *J^ 300—308, 318 4>Xi3

^ >o^~«

djk-^

310

291—298


3

INDEX OF NAMES.

160

JJLij ^>. ju»a^(sic)

Li j^Jla3 ,jv

ol^ftXaS

^

JUj ^i

Jk o '^-

^ 324

«>"»a»»

*'

327

j.,,^ 276, 277, 314, 315, 317, 3176

JJLiu j^,*-«

^t

J^\ 319—322

*ft^^

^L;

1

>eL»

4

309—313, 318, 323, 325—326 '^^'^'^

Mohamad 318

1—3

6—8, 20 >L, (^)

c>:.

jL<,*-o^JifiN)l

JAoJI

o^^-J' 21

^jjl3 UjJI>Jw

^

^ ^

jf?»T?"

o^i*J^» 9—11, 27, 28

WW

22,

'S'/'i

23 12

— 19, 21

vene

Sam 30

Mahamad Same Mahamad

j^i^^ ^-^ ^JT

'§''»

jj^jj^ ^TJl

Mahamad Sam

(Ji'yi

31


INDEX OF NAME8,

^

H^T^

"^Wtx

^ ^^^:

jj-i*^l

<Sr«

^*-«l

^rnr

161

Sn Hamlra Mahamad Sam

Hammirah

9,

12

32,

—16

j-cU is^UJI O-co^

(^^' jju£w ^jUaLJI

157—181, 195-201

oU J^o^

CHJJ'i ^JJ'

^>jjJl3 LJjJI oU.

^J

0^^*J^<

182—194

^J^sXJS 202, 203

jL«a^ 204 ^cjirii

oUi juji

^UaJL*U»

•iU>ffJ^'i)l

*^j^^)\

^^5T^^* ^^^^ Sultdm Aldvadirn 182, 194

yj~i

dl^

dL>

jL^>a>..o

^UaJLi 456

— 459

j^^- 460—466

j^KS^ o^J«^ 467, 468

«l^ JU»ar^

^UaJL,

469

oU»

^jUaJL-; oli

j3^

^UaJU oU oUi j^«'»<.c

j3^

*lw jc»a>u>

410—412, 415

ol^ jL»a.^ 413, 414, 420,

ju^a^^ 418, 419

^f^^W j^\

33

w^l3 416, 417

420a


INDEX OF NAMES.

162

421—423

Jib

j^«a^ o^kJU

oUaJL- dU, «U,

J>U

jL»a».^

.

.

WjJ' JjW-ft 630, 631

j.<,a^ 632, 633

jc»s^ o^^*J^ jJbla^l

olw j^.oA>»«

«U>

jAJa«JI ^jt o-iJJ'i

.

.

i«Jt^j|

^jt 634,

635

636

^UaXw 637

jL«a^

Ji\t J^«A^

.

.

jJI (S)

jubUw^ 638 «XAla^ 639

,jUaJL>

0UaAw85

OUaJl-

86—91

OUaJL,

9^—95

5^<,a^ O^JJIj L^jJIz-dU^CN)!

^

^R^T;: ?>'^

Hamlrak

96,

99

o^JUl 96—99


INDEX OF NAMES.

1G3

j^lJaJL;431

^UaJL, 432, 433

^Uxlw

dU>

jk-fra,.^

^^UJL»

dli

i^..— 436—441

yj^^\^

dlw

^3^a.^ 434, 435

dJi\j^o^sCL^\jblc*:)\

0-ii*>«JI >wel^ff-a3u^l>oU'N)l

74—77

86—95, 100—114, 123—128,

138—145 4JJU

ft^im rM

328—331

,>«U>oJI 332 dJDW ,^«Cm.^H aJDI 3Ju)^ 333

0-w^>oJ«

j-w«»>'tfi'ii-«JI>6U'^l 35, 37, 62, 67, 73,

OUftJUt

73—77

85


INDEX OF NAMES.

164

i^SL^ V>i-^b

«l^

jjUftJL*

^

^^*«.,«

^t"^^ *:^^oi^*^^ O^J*J^'

.

.

.

78—81

83

"iJt

^cnf^Td Alddin 84

82

Wt Srz 4>*^X«-oJt see

jb%^\

(^1)

^ftjsufrll

5ee

dlw

voljt,

>rtA|/^',

^e'iV-'',

lA***''?

v>t^>

^b%^, ii^i^jJl/-*" >«•-'» ><^»J3>**' "^J^' •i^OO^, i>6*-«,

dJUV Juiu**)!

*Ift3l ^jt

^>-wU.^I^^I^U'^t 344, 382

^\^\ c>4io^l^>6UN)l 345—347, 383 -„Ia)1

^« AiJUJI

jAo)t see jjJL

«2lJU)t

2SX^

seejjlj

see SL^oj

4*^3^ seejjJu

369, 370


INDEX OF NAMES.

o-t^^^

J**' >-«^

*^^

>«j*W> tA»^i,

165

vftlKT*,

AJUIC>iJJ>^LJI 1,2,3

^>4i*^l^^1 \^ i*^^^\

aJUI

o^JJ>«^I

6, 7, 8, 20,

j<i^\ ojioj see <u«0}

^UaJU

olw

0/«£u

^UaJL.

«U-

0>Ai 443—445

^j-5-U^I ^-^t

^3

see

^^>y<o ^)i jiy^t j

^j""^

^^U 442

21

J^)

3>'*>»'>


— INDEX OF NAMES.

166

jJ^

Wj^" h-^ jjJLj djuft 22,

jJ^

iJ-JjJb

d*i)3<>3 ojk*c

23

WjJ» «-^ >«J»

ai'ilkoJt !>-«-» see

20

^jU-o,

-iJUUI

ojuc 27, 28, 29


IV.

INDEX OF NAGARI INSCRIPTIONS.

84.

^ToyTf^irr

^f(l^O

^"^

^»w^T^ ^^ 43—45.

^ it

or

^

46, 47.

^TiTTO Ft

^ITTO

JT^nr^'f

W\]

^^1^

H»W^

^T^RTT Ft

70—72.

^

61.

38—42.

^ ^F^TJT^f 613-618. ^ ^F^TH ^Tf^ 592—611, 620. ^ ^T^? ^ 43—45. ^ w^^^ T^ ^*T

30.

Ft ^'^p^ ^T^ 12—19.

^

^ ^:

*T1|»T^

H^»T^

FT»T

31.

^? 632, 633.

ift^«r^

318.


INDEX OF NAGAEI INSCEIPTIONS.

168

^ FT^ 537—543. ^ ^ ^ 648—559. ^ ^ ^T^ 524—536, 544—547. TTTT

^'t: ^"i:

^V.

#

^ni ^Toriw^f 182. ^HT JTxn^Tf 115—118, 255, ^in n^T^^' 146—148. ^V^

jcJPT

256.

630, 631.

wi w^wt ^^^"^ 129, 130. -saft

^

^in[ iif(T.:

f^yfrifiTfiTfti

9,

46, 47.

24—26.

^'t ^ifrc:

96—98.

^ V^x:

24—26, 38—42, 70—72.

^'^ ^*ft^

^^^^ Trm 32,

33.

51, 52,

63—66,


INDEX OF POINTS, ORNAMENTS,

V.

AND BORDERS. 62

.

.

103, 104, 106, 108, 109,

.

... 35, 37, 67, 73,

86—95

9

.-.

o

112—114

86—95, 103—114, 139—145, 162—181

*or *

6, 22, 23,

566,

24—26,

595—597

X

594

^

595, 623

^

612,

^

604—611,

SS

545

614—617 620, 630, 631

n

502, 507, 508, 511

y

598

c

599, 601, 602

i

600

O

544

=

603

Arch,

36

Sprig,

546

505, 514, 542, 543, 545, 547, 548,


INDEX OF ORNAMENTS, ETC.

170

On

Nandi

the side of the Bull

:

12—16, 43—45

(

38,

1

39

61

(II

On

:

1

e

70—72

«

40, 41

«^

42.

ihQJhul or flank of the Bull Nandi

^

;

12—16,43—45,61

M

38

F

39

n

42

+

70—72

Borders

Circle, 36,

55, 58,

100-102, 115-118,

123,

138, 153,

157—161, 182—194, 209—213, 235, 238— 248a, 260— 264,

274—277, 300—308, 325, 326,

410, 416, 425, 426, 446, 447,

Double

circle,

Square, 583,

332,

345—347, 404,

479—482, 548—559, 620

299, 318

206—208,

592—619,

Double square,

3,

402, 403,

625,

524—543, 567-575, 581—

630—633, 640

6—8,

20, 21, 36, 37,

115—118, 153^

237—240, 243— 248a, 544—547, 519 Square enclosed

in circle, 53,

68

253,-


171

INDEX OF ORNAMENTS, ETC.

Double square enclosed

in

circle,

35, 37, 62, 67,

73

85—95, 103—114, 124—128, 139—145, 162—181 Quatrefoil,

Cinquefoil, Sixfoil,

328—331, 336—338 334

366—368

Hexagon, 265—273

60

Hexagram,

56, 57,

Hexagram

enclosed in circle,

53

Octagram, 152, 152a

Octagram enclosed Zigzag,

in circle,

59

Ornament, 134, 135

54

—77,


VI.

INDEX OF DENOMINATIONS, MARKS

AND FORMULAS OF GENUINENESS, ETC.

^\£s

t\4i

306—308.

a£j 300—308. JUOoJ) 328—331 ^»AjjJI 1, 2,

319—322

^^1 ^jjJI 319—322 jtojci) 6, 7, 8, 21,

J:Ju)<6J\ jUjjJI

260—262, 264, 328—331

328—331

,^^^1 314, 315 lSiJ\

67,

235,

100—102, 105, 123, 138, 157—163, 206—208,

237—241, 243—248, 274,

275, 343, 344, 347

^>yi 319—322 ^judl263 i-oAll

62,

86—95,

103, 104,

106-114, 128, 139—145, 153,

164—181, 209—213 ,

Jl& cJJk 323

Jjs. 53—58, 121, 122, 136, 137, 152, 152a, 156, 204, 233, 234, 323

^U

JjLft 121,

122


174

INDEX OF DENOMINATIONS, ETC.

^J;Jx^

Jjs, 136

^\£s

c-mSa

Jj^ 323

j\^j^k\ ojJ^jj^j^jp

^\j

^\^j^\ 6JJJ

jl^jjij

^[£s

jl3»^*^l «jUj

J^ jij^^jj

j3

B.Cj

j^y^A 300— 305(?

dU^;j sSlj

3iSL)

318

j^

j^

306—308


INDEX OF FIGURES.

VII.

Bull Nandi to

left,

recumbent,

12—19,

22, 23,

38—45,

61,

70—72, 84 Chohdn Horseman

48-52 (?),

61,

to right, 9,

34,

63—66, 68—72, 78—84, 96—99

Goddess Lakshmi seated

Horseman

12—19, 24—26,

facing,

— 33

30

to left ^^ith lance at charge, 4, 10, 11

38—45,


MISCELLANEOUS INDEX.

VIII.

aJUI

J^j

jl»»-o

-n)!

AJJI

1—3, 6—8,

^)

a)!

21, 22, 35, 3G,

524— 559a, 592-620, 630—633, 640

264, 274, 275,

ai^j^ dju6 lji«.a^ ^1

J^v^l^ dJJI

N)! ai\ ^)

o' *H^' 260—263

yJ.J^\

^_^

«>vJaJ

JaJI O-d^i (^^V^W

A^i-'J

J>-o'

L5**^'

^

^^1

(^^

i>>iriaJ

JaJl Ori^3

^^^

ai^j

J-^jl i^->Jl

5*

4Jl£9 3,

Jjii))

^t^

^CLcj^-n)!

^;i)l aJDIj 276, 277

^3)5 Jj^^l

^fr 0^«^

>*

(sic)

aJI)I

l^aJsl

(W«) >vt 274, 275,

^U—t js».&

,^3 ^U^3

j-0^3

^^

^_^j-oJI

j^

t^aiJsl^

311-313

524—534, 536, 549—

554—559, 620

552, i^^Ac

6—8

jiu

ji;:^

IjI

^1

548, 553

612

^jU*Jl o^«i* (35J^' J-0^

Ji-f^^ j^i

(IjI) ^j'

537—541, 592—611, 614, 617, 618, 630—633.

c5^ CHJ3JI

^^i

oW^^

(3ij^*"

j'*^

Jd**-*''

^^

(WO ^1

j^j^l 544—547

^^^1

^

tr*^>* L5^

J^^\ J^e. w^UftsJI^^^

O^ OW^

wJlJai. j-o*

O^**^

w>lJa»,

J^ijuaJI^JCj gi 342,

Jjjbo

j^

bl 613,

^j| j.^

640

^Xc ^<^

OW^ ti^J

Xft J,Aaj

^^ ^j J Jk<c^l

535

343 616


MIS0ELLANB0TJ8 INDEX.

X78

^,j

^-^

3in.

316,

aU 85 .iJUUJI

aJD Sjai\3

aJD

325, 326

284—290

ajfiaJlj .iVJUJI

241

AJlfc^ aJJI jUI

G30, 631

0^1 C5^'

aJJI

d)^)LJi

d^'j^S

J.».

382—385

J^

J*

Aij^)L».

aJDI

j^JLo.

A;:^^)L*.

OjJLd. 329, 343—347, 349—365, 369-373,

J*^

328, 330, 331

382—

398—401, 405—415, 420—424, 429—435, 456—

395,

459, 470,

aO*

388

473-478, 495—523 524-529, 537—562, 567-573, 577, 584,

j^Xa.

aJL)1

592—612, 614-618, 632—635, 639 A^lc

j^Xa. 334,

<i;n<H> a3UsJu._5

,jr^]

J^ ^a^

^\

<d^JaJLw

^

563—566, 578—580

344, 394, 395 aJUI

jJl».

AiUftJL-3

C't^t^ 282,

^Uj (^ OUJt

335,

530—536, 574, 613, 619—624

aO^

aJJI

283

329, 334, 335, 343 328, 330, 331

jJU- 630, 631


MISOELLANEOOa INDEX.

^ 264—273,

0-«J

282,

283,

319—322, 344—347, 382—

386,

421—423, 431—433, 473—478, 495—523

^

35,

583,

621—625, 634—639

-XyP

.ffJil

37,

62, 67,

73—77, 85—95, 276, 277, 560—

(applied to Taghlakpur)

jX) and ojXt applied to Ghazni. olS

woiJ

(applied to Dehli and Daulatubad)

oj'A^ and ^j^cL^ (applied to Dehli)

^^^

J^>

aaL; (applied

to

Jaunpur)

istiS (applied to

De6gir)

Samvat Era,

47

46,

179


(

ISO

)

TABLE RELATIVE WEIGHTS OF

ENGLISH GRAINS and FRENCH GRAMMES. Grains


(

181

)

TABLE RELATIVE WEIGHTS OF

ENGLISH GRAINS and FRENCH GRAMMES. Grains.

Grammes.


(

183

)

TABLE VOB

CONVERTING ENGLISH INCHES INTO MILLIMJITRES

MEASURES OF MIONNET'S SCALE. English Inch


COMPARATIVE TABLE OE THE YEARS OF THE HIJRAH AND OE THE CHRISTIAN ERA. AH.


186

AH.

COMPARATIVE TABLE OF THE YEAES OF THE


niJUAH AND OF THE CIIHISTIAN

A.H.

EIIA.

187


188

A.H

CO.MPAUAriVE

TA.BLI':

OF TUE YEATIS OF THE


HIJRAll

A.H.

AND OF THE CHRISTIAN ERA.

189


190

A.H.

COMPAHATITE TABLE OF THE YEAUS OP TUB


HIJEAH AND OF THE CHRISTIAN EDA.

A.D.

601 602 603 604 605 606 607 608 609 610 611 612 613 614 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 626 627 628 629 630 631 632 633 634 635 636 637 638 639 640 641 642 643 644 645 646 647 648 649 650

1204 1205 1206 1207 1208 1209 1210 1211 1212 1213 1214 1215 1216 1217 1218 1219 1220

Aug. 29 18 8 July 28 16 „ 6 June 25 15 „ „

3

May ,,

2 „ April 20

10 ,, Mar. 30 19 „

Feb

1221

1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1226 1227 122S 1229 1230 1231 1232 1233 1234 1235 1236 1237 1238 1239 1240 1241 1242 1243 1244 1245 1246 1247 1248 1249 1250 1251 1252

23 13

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

191


192

A.H.

COMPARATIVE TAliLE OF THE TEAES OF THE


HIJBAH AND OF TUK CHUISTIAN ERA. A.H.

193


194

A.n.

COMPAEATIVE TABLE OF THE TEARS OF THE


nrJUAH AND OF THE ClIUISTIAN EKA. AH.

1135


196

A.H.

COMPABATITE TABLE OF THE TEAE3 OF THE


HIJRAU AND OF THE CHEISTIAN EEA.

A.H.

197


198 TABLE OF TEABS OF THE HIJRAH AND CHRISTIAN ERA.

A.H.


199

(

)

NOTE. The und

been compiled from

preceding table has

Wiistenfeld's

Vergleichungs-Tahellen

Christlichen

Leipzig,

Zeitrechnung,

identical with those given in

Professor

F.

der Muhammedanischen

Prinsep's

185J?,

which are

Useful Tables, except

that Prinsep adopts the English date of changing from the Old (Julian) to the

New

(Gregorian) style, and consequently omits

11 days on September

^,

1752

;

while Dr. Wiistenfeld makes

the alteration of 9 days on the day

when

all

Catholic Europe

adopted the decision of the Bull of Pope Gregory XIII., As this is obviously the most general viz. -^ October, 1582.

and proper date

for the

change of

style, I

have adopted Dr.

Wiistenfeld's principle, and have not deferred a chronological

change, which was adopted in 1582 by the chief nations of

Europe of the time, last

until the

been understood

necessity of the reform had at

England.

in

The second column gives the Christian day and month in which the Hijrah year begins. The Muhammadan year consists of 354 days, with an intercalary day added to the last

month eleven times

in thirty years

(on the 2nd, 5th, 7th, 10th, 13th, 15th, 18th, 21st, 24th, 28th,

and 29th years of every thirty years). To find whether the is to be added to any given year, divide the year by 30, and if any of the above numbers 2, 5, 7, 10, &c. remain over, the year is one of 355 days. E.g. 30 divides 1303 intercalary day

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

forty-three times, with 13 over

;

therefore the

Muhammadan

year 1303, corresponding to our 1885-6, will contain 355 days. To find the exact Christian day corresponding to any given

Muhammadan day due regard to the

is

a simple matter of calculation.

yesiv

being Leap-year or not, the

After

Muham-

equivalent is obtained by reckoning up the days of the month, allowing 30 for Muharram the first month, 29 for Safar the second, and so alternately 30 and 29 to the end, when the E.g. 21 November, intercalary day must be remembered. 1884, is 31 days over the beginning of the Muhammadan year

madan

1302, and would therefore be the 1st of Safar, 1302. fclLDEHT

AMD HIVINGTOX, IIMITBD,

52, bl

JOHN'S SQl'AEE, LONI'OX, B.C.


PL.

.

/

::.^?^fe:

viTT^

,.i^L^

MUHAMMAD

I

BN SAM, YlLDlZ.

I


PL. n.

ARAM_, ALTAMSH,

Fl

ROZ

L,

R Z YAH^ I

I

BA H RAM.


PL.IU.

^e

m

^f^lyi Mf^g^

/v,

f.:-^

MASUD, MAHMUD, BALBAM^ KAI-KUBAD.


PL.

fi'roz n,

ibrahi'mi,

MUBARAK

muhammadi, I,

KHUSRU.

^umar,

IV.

.


TAGHLAKI,

MUHAMMAD IBNTAGHLAK.


PL. VI.

^^\

^<<j^^|^'

J^^

A?r/>-

'^^m 74

/

MUHAMMAD

-•.

IBN TAGHLAK, MAHMUD, FIROZHI.


PL. VII.

TAGHLAK MAHMUD U,

11,

N

ABU-BAKR^ MUHAMMAD AS RAT^

MUBARAK

II,

EI

SIKANDARI,

MUHAMMAD

IX

'ALIM.


PL.VIU.

-^J

.S^'

J^f^

e^

Ft ^\^\-U

516

\\^

f'

<;

,2^

W.^^ BUHLOL, 51KANDAR, IBRAHIM

LODl,

SHER5HAH.


PL. IX.

ISLAM SHAH^

MUHAMMAD

AD

I

L^

S KA N DAR 1

IE.


^


'r-,


^rnf,


A

000 001 875

i


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