Issuu on Google+

Libyan

diplomats

apply for possesion

order on Consulate

Squatters May Libyan diplomats have started High Court proceedings to have the squatters evicted from the former Libyan Consulate in Princes Gate. A n application for a possession order on the building was adjourned by Mr Justice Allot after a brief private hearing on Tuesday. FELIX contacted the Libyan interest s e c t i o n of t h e S a u d i A r a b i a n E m b a s s y w h o have d e a l t w i t h L i b y a n i n t e r e s t s in L o n d o n s i n c e B r i t a i n b r o k e off diplomatic relations with L i b y a . A Libyan diplomat claimed to k n o w nothing about the court c a s e a n d s a i d that h e d i d n ' t s p e a k to t h e p r e s s . A F o r e i g n O f f i c e o f f i c i a l t o l d F E L I X that t h e y w e r e u n a w a r e of t h e present position as the building was no longer a diplomatic p r e m i s e b e c a u s e it w a s n ' t u s e d for d i p l o m a t i c p u r p o s e s . H e did s a y t h o u g h , that t h e F o r e i g n Office had encourage d the S a u d i s to t a k e a c t i o n a s t h e y thought the squatters were a nuisance. A s p o k e s m a n for D e p a r t m e n t of t h e E n v i r o n m e n t , w h o o w n t h e b u i l d i n g s a i d that he k n e w a b o u t t h e s q u a t t e r s . F E L I X attempted to contact the residents o n W e d n e s d a y but they got no reply w h e n a ' e p o r t e r c a l l e d at t h e C o n s u l a t e .

• The Libyan

Consulate

P o l i c e s o u r c e s s a y that t h e S a u d i s have been e n c o u r a g e d to t a k e a c t i o n b y l o c a l r e s i d e n t s w h o have c o m p l a i n e d about the squatters. T h e y were particluarly upset about the p a r t y h e l d in t h e C o n s u l a t e last Friday. In a s e p a r a t e i n c i d e n t t h e fire

s U n i v e r s i t i e s wil l b e c i o s e d if t h e G o v e r n m e n t fails to p r o v i d e extra money, Sir Peter S w i n e r t o n - D y e r , C h a i r m a n of the U n i v e r s i t y G r a n t s Committee told Vice C h a n c e l l o r s last w e e k . Sir Peter told the c h a n c e l l o r s that n o m e m b e r of t h e U G C b e l i e v e d 'that t h e u n i v e r s i t y s y s t e m c a n b e p r e s e r v e d at its p r e s e n t s i z e a n d e x c e l l e n c e or. t h e a m o u n t of m o n e y w h i c h t h e G o v e r n m e n t h a s s a i d it wil l m a k e a v a i l a b l e ' , h e a d d e d that r e c e n t s u g g e s t i o n s of s l i g h t l y increased funding for u n i v e r s i t i e s w e r e ' t o o little a n d t o o late'.

Sir Peter made reference to t h e r e c e n t s t a t e m e n t that h e w o u l d b e w i l l i n g to c o n s i d e r increased funding for u n i v e r s i t i e s if t h e r e w a s real p r o g r e s s in s e l e c t i v e l y , r a t i o n a l i z a t i o n of s m a l l departments, better financial management and improved t e a c h i n g . H e s a i d ; that universities s h o u l d take the offer s e r i o u s l y a n d t h e qualifications s h o u l d not be regarded as rhetoric. Universities must be more s e l e c t i v e , T h e r e is h a r d l y a n institution w h i c h c a n plausibly s a y all o u r d e p a r t m e n t s a r e equally strong'.

R e c e n t h u g e i n c r e a s e s in rates a n d t h e p r o s p e c t of l a r g e p a y rises f o r u n i v e r s i t y staff m e a n t that t h e f i n a n c i a l prospects for universities had c h a n g e d f r o m ' d e p r e s s i n g to disastrous!' a c c o r d i n o to S i r Pete-

T o be strong departments m u s t b e of a r e a s o n a b l e s i z e , h e s a i d ' c l o s u r e of s m a l l d e p a r t m e n t s is n o t o n l y a m e a n s of e c o n o m y ; it is t h e w a y to p r e s e r v e s u b j e c t s , in p a r t i c u l a r s m a l l s u b j e c t s , in g o o d health.'

Free!

Friday 6 June

b r i d g a d e w e r e c a l l e d to t h e Consulate on Tuesday when a e m e r g e n c y g e n e r a t o r that t h e r e s i d e n t s h a d s t a r t e d in a attempt to provide electricity for the lights started to p r o d u c e s m o k e . N o b o d y w a s hurt a n d the i n c i d e n t w a s s o o n u n d e r control. S i r P e t e r s a i d that c o n s t a n t effort w a s n e e d e d t o k e e p u p t e a c h i n g s t a n d a r d s . H e s a i d all teachers c o u l d not be c h a r i s m a t i c but a l l h a d a d u t y to be competent.

n T wo hang gliders were stolen from outside the Biochemistry department. David Evans, a B i o c h e m i s t r y s t u d e n t , left t h e hang gliders, w h i c h belonged to the U n i o n H a n g G l i d i n g C l u b , outside the department while he went o n holiday for two w e e k s . When he returned the gliders had gone. C o l l e g e Security told F E L I X they were unaware w h o had removed the gliders w h i c h they said were worth a p p r o x i m a t e l y ÂŁ1000. T h e y s a i d they had advised M r Evans about improving his security a r r a n g e m e n t s in t h e f u t u r e . A n y o n e with information about who removed the gliders s h o u l d contact David Evans o n Internal 4118.

j i M B i M L M

pjj


[

o O

Libya It l o o k s a s t h o u g h t h e s q u a t t e r s a r e s o o n to b e evicted from the L i b y a n C o n s u l a t e . S t u d e n t s in L o n d o n have an almost i m p o s s i b l e task w h e n they start l o o k i n g f o r accommodation. A c c o m m o d a t i o n is e i t h e r massively over priced or disgusting or both. There a r e . t h o u g h , in L o n d o n , m a n y large empty buildings w h i c h c o u l d be u s e d to accommodate young people. T h e Libyan c o n s u l a t e is a p e r f e c t e x a m p l e . It c o u l d b e u s e d f o r a c c o m m o d a t i o n but t h e L i b y a n i n t e r e s t s e c t i o n of the S a u d i A r a b i a n E m b a s s y s e e m s d e t e r m i n e d to k e e p the building empty. T h e G o v e r n m e n t s h o u l d be encouraging young people to s q u a t r a t h e r t h a n encouraging foreign e m b a s s e y s to e v i c t t h e m . UGC The University Grants C o m m i t t e e has a difficult j o b . T h e y a r e t r y i n g to g u a r d s t a n d a r d s in the university sector while the Government makes savage c u t s to t h e i r f u n d i n g . S i r

Peter Swinnerton-Dyer's recent statements have b e e n a m a z i n g l y realistic a b o u t the p r o b l e m s f a c i n g the universities. H e has • a t t e m p t e d to d r a w a t t e n t i o n to the p r o b l e m s facing higher education. The Government, though, s e e m s p r e p a r e d to i g n o r e his w a r n i n g . T h e o n l y w a y that the governmen t c a n be m a d e to c h a n g e its p o l i c i e s is if t h e m i d d l e c l a s s e s w h o make up a significant p r o p o r t i o n of T o r y s u p p o r t realise the d a m a g e the G o v e r n m e n t is d o i n g . M a n y of t h e s e T o r y v o t e r s a r e p a r e n t s of u n i v e r s i t y students. T h e universities s h o u l d try a n d i n f o r m t h e s e parents about the p r o b l e m s they are f acing. V i c e C h a n c e l l o r s of s e v e r a l universities, including D u r h a m , h a v e w r i t t e n to p a r e n t s i n f o r m i n g t h e m of the p r o b l e m s c u t s are causing. Tory voting p a r e n t s t a k e n o t i c e of s u c h letters a n d w r i t e to t h e i r M P s . I don't understand w h y the R e c t o r d o e s n ' t w r i t e to p a r e n t s . It w o u l d n ' t cost m u c h and w o u l d be an e x c e l l e n t w a y of

p e r s u a d i n g the G o v e r n m e n t to c h a n g e its p o l i c i e s . R C M and R C A O n p a g e t e n of t h i s i s s u e you'll see a feature on the R C A a n d t h e R C M . B o t h of these c o l l e g e s have f a c i l i t i e s that a r e o p e n to I C s t u d e n t s . W h y not try a n d get i n v o l v e d w i t h t h e m ? It's r i d i c u l o u s that w e s h o u l d all b e s t u d e n t s in S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n yet w e h a r d l y m i x . It w o u l d b e g r e a t to get t h e o t h e r c o l l e g e s involved with IC s o that w e c a n c h a n g e t h e s o c i a l life s l i g h t l y b y m a k i n g it m o r e artistic. T h i s m a y s e e m s t u p i d but w h y not g o to one R C M or R C A event? Credits T h a n k s to C h r i s E d w a r d s , John Burgess, Simon Lewis, Judith Hackney, J i m Clayden, Dave Rowe, J Martin Taylor, Sunny Bains, Dave Jones, T o n y Churchill, Rosemary Hosking, Mark Cottle and e v e r y o n e I've f o r g o t t e n . W i l l all the staff p l e a s e c o m e to t h e O f f i c e at 1 2 . 4 5 p m o n M o n d a y s o that w e c a n t a k e t h e staff p h o t o a n d have a few d r i n k s .

FELIX is published by the Editor for and on behalf of Imperial College Union Publications Board and is printed by the Imperial College Union Print Unit, Prince Consort Road. London, SW7 2BB, (Tel 01-589 5111 ext 3515). The Editor of FELIX is Hugh Southey and the Business Manager is J Martin Taylor. Copyright FELIX 1986. ISSN 1040-0711.

Setting The Record Straight

Dear Hugh, I w a s most c o n c e r n e d that P r o f e s s o r B l o w (Letters, last w e e k ) s h o u l d h a v e i n t e r p r e t e d the r e m a r k s in my a n n u a l report as an attack o n the Undergraduate Studies C o m m i t t e e ( U S C ) . Let m e m a k e it c l e a r that I think t h e c o m m i t t e e is c o m p o s e d of a c a d e m i c s w h o d o c a r e a b o u t t e a c h i n g , a n d that t h e y h a v e all put a g r e a t 2

d e a l of effort i n t o its w o r k . I a p o l o g i s e if I g a v e a d i f f e r e n t i m p r e s s i o n in m y report. Perhaps I should explain m o r e f u l l y the p o i n t s I w a s m a k i n g in t h e s e c t i o n s r e f e r r e d to by P r o f B l o w . W h e n I s a i d that the report was being 'watered d o w n ' I d i d n ' t m e a n that unauthorized c h a n g e s were b e i n g m a d e , but that, consciously or u n c o n s c i o u s l y , the more radical ideas were being s o f t e n e d to i n c r e a s e t h e i r a c c e p t a b i l i t y to t h e B o a r d of S t u d i e s ( B O S ) t h i s is not t h e fault of t h e U S C , but a p r o d u c t of t h e i r r e a l i s t i c a s s e s s m e n t of t h e a p t i t u d e s of t h e w i d e r b o d y of t h e i r c o l l e a g u e s . It w a s to this w i d e r b o d y that m y s e c o n d paragraph referred, not to the U S C , w h o s e m e m b e r s I would specifically exclude from the c h a r g e . In t h e r e p o r t I a l s o expressed disappointment t h a t it d i d not p r o v e p o s s i b l e to p r o d u c e a r e p o r t e a r l i e r in t h e y e a r .

T h e f a c t t h e U S C ' s first report will be c o n s i d e r e d b y B O S in t h e s u m m e r vacation inevitably reduces its i m p a c t , o n s t u d e n t s at least. I t h i n k t h i s is u n f o r t u n a t e , s i n c e it d e s e r v e s the fullest possible debate, as Prof B l o w p o i n t s out in his letter. I d i d p r e s e n t a g l o o m y v i e w of t h e p r o s p e c t s of s i g n i f i c a n t " h a n g e s a s a r e s u l t of t h e U S C ' s first r e p o r t . T h i s I still s t a n d by after r e a d i n g t h e r e p o r t n o w it h a s b e e n p u b l i s h e d . I feel that e v e n if it is a c c e p t e d t h e w o r s t d e p a r t m e n t will s a f e l y b e a b l e to i g n o r e m a n y of its r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s , whilst the more e n l i g h t e n e d d e p a r t m e n t s are a l r e a d y p u t t i n g m a n y of t h e m i n t o effect. H o w e v e r , t h i s is not to s a y t h a t t h e p r o c e s s is no t v a l u a b l e . It is u n d o u b t e d l y a s t e p in t h e right d i r e c t i o n , a n d will h o p e f u l l y result in g r a d u a l improvements and i n c r e a s e d a w a r e n e s s of t h e p r o b l e m s , e v e n if

Friday 6 J u n e

i m m e d i a t e c h a n g e s are not forthcoming. M y f i n a l poteit is t h a t t h i s m u s t b e t h e b e g i n n i n g of a l o n g e r p r o c e s s , rather t h a n a once-and-for-all step, a fact w h i c h I am sure Prof B l o w is w e l l a w a r e of. Yours sincerely, J Martin Taylor ICU AAO

Eating Our Words

Dear Hugh, Y o u r f e a t u r e a r t i c l e last week about food and nutrition was most i n t e r e s t i n g but c o n t a i n e d many inaccuracies. F i r s t l y , it c o n c e n t r a t e d too m u c h on modern fads, s u c h as keeping y o u r s a t u r a t e d fat c o n t e n t l o w , a n d e a t i n g lots of f i b r e . A d e q u a t e fibre levels c a n be m a i n t a i n e d j u s t a s e a s i l y by eating a correct portion of v e g e t a b l e a n d f r u i t s a s by sprinkling everything w i t h B r a n . C h o l e s t e r o l is a s t e r o l a n d not a fat, b e i n g d e r i v e d in t h e b o d y f r o m Acetyl C o e n z y m e A, which is f o r m e d f r o m C a r b e h y d r a t e s as well as fats. T h e r e a r e s e v e r a l t y p e s of c h o l e s t e r o l , o n l y o n e of w h i c h is t h o u g h t t o b e a s s o c i a t e d w i t h heart d i e s e a s e . S a t u r a t e d fat l e v e l s a n d heart d i s e a s e are s t i l l o p e n t o d e b a t e , b u t at least t h e y a r e n a t u r a l l y produced, unlike margarines, which go through many chemical p r o c e s s e s , with the a d d i t i o n of v i t a m i n s to make them more like butter. B r e a d is a c t u a l l y a g o o d s o u r c e of p r o t e i n c o n t a i n i n g b e t w e e n 12 to 17% (even white bread!), s o Chris' H a m B a p gives him m o r e than the protein from the h a m . Howev er , b r e a d , flour a n d most other grains are q u i t e i m p o r t a n t l y d e f i c i e n t in L y s i n e , a n d t h e c o n t e n t of o n e o r t w o o t h e r e s s e n t i a l a m i n o a c i d s is a l s o s i g n i f i c a n t l y l o w e r . It is a pity that p r o t e i n w a s not m e n t i o n e d in a n y d e p t h in the article, particularly with t h e c u r r e n t p o p u l a r i t y of vegetarianism amongst s t u d e n t s . O n e of t h e b e s t w a y s of o v e r c o m i n g a m i n o a c i d d e f i c i e n c i e s is to eat a m i x t u r e of b o t h g r a i n s (wheat bein g most common) and sweetcorn, s i n c e the d e f i c i e n c i e s tend to l a r g e l y c a n c e l e a c h o t h e r o u t . T h i s is w h a t C e n t r a l and South A m er ic a n L

FELIX


Indians practice, but it is important to eat them at the same meal. Amino acids are not stored for long, and if they are not soon converted into protein, they are broken down and excreted. S o sweetcorn for lunch a n d wheat for dinner will not give the same nutritional requirement. It is obviously important to ensure that the correct amino acid balance is eaten for good health. T h e problem becomes even more critical for Vegans. Unfortunately, animal products have a better balance than plant products. With wise and informed eating however, the amino acid deficiences can be minimised. However, it is wise to note that women who are Vegans, are often advised to eat wider varieties of food when pregnant, in order to avoid severe deficiencies and foetal malformations, the advice usually being to include at least some dairy products during gestation. The comment about peanuts being a good source of protein is also slightly incorrect. Whilst the protein content of such nuts is high, it is bound in a complex way, such that it is largely indigestible once eaten so the gain is very much lower than would appear. This problem comes in part from the methods used to quantify the nutritional content of foods. These are all carried out chemically, usually under severe conditions whilst the content may be as analysed, the ease with which an individual's digestive system can recover these nutrients is widely variable, a fact often forgotten by nutritionalists. Although enzymes are wonderful things, they do not always produce the same results as extreme chemical modification. It is also well known that individuals often have an enzyme defiency through genetic reasons, and given the complexities of the digestion and metabolic processes, it is likely that we all differ from each other in at least a few enzymes. Finally, beer! This actually can be quite nutritional, since the alcohol provides energy, and it also appears to act as a solvent for fats and therefore (in moderation) could be likely to lead to a reduction in the risk of heart disease. It can also provide protein, but more FELIX

importantly, essential vitamins and minerals in surprisingly large amounts. It is important to note, however, that the nutritional value is largely lost with excessive filtering and pasteurisation, as occurs with lagers. S o the best thing is to drink Guinness or real ales, and cut out the lagers and keg bitters! Above all, eating must be 'carried out sensibly, but provide plenty of variety. The old adage, 'A little of what you fancy does you good' is certainly near the nub of the matter. Tony Spencer

Terror Protests

To: King Hussain Royal Palace Amman Jordan And The Jordanian Ambassador 6 Upper Phillimore Gardens London W 8

Amazing

Dear Sir, I wonder if any of your readers have noticed the amazing similarity between international Disco Queen Dave Kingston and our own DP and Freemason, Divine. Yours Chairman Real Ale Soc and Chairman Canoe club pp S Seward Chem Eng 3.

There is deep concern for their lives, gravely threatened by the conditions of detention and interrogation at the hands of your Security forces. We hold your Government fully responsible for the c o l d blooded murder of fellow students in Jordan, and demand:

The following letter is part of a campaign by Jordanian students in this country and has been given the support of the union by Carl Burgess.

We, the undersigned students and youth organisations in Britain, strongly condemn the recent massacre of students at al-Yarmouk University in Jordan by your Security forces. We also condemn the continuing campaign of arrests against the democractic forces in Jordan including prominent patriots, trade unionists and students.

ft

3

• T h e immediate halt of the campaign of arrests and repression and the release of all students and political detainees. • T h e immediate withdrawal from the Univeristy campus of all Security forces and agents. • T h e reinstatement of al! students expelled from alYarmouk University, and an end to all forms of harassemnt and persecution. • an immediate public inquiry into this horrendous crime and the punishments of its perpetrators, whose hands are stained with the blood of innocent students. College Imperial

e e Dave

o

Kingston

ULU Travel Imperial College, Sherfield Building, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 Tel: 01-581 8882

A Service of

STA \

«4

STA Travel the worlds leading organisation for independent youth and student travel

s

If you're crossing the finals frontier remember S T A Travel is for,

Divine

Graduates too! Friday 6 J u n e

PJT'fi 3


:

ANNOUNCEMENTS • N i n e Cleaners wanted f o r the w e e k e n d after term for £2 an h o u r . See Lesley Student Services. • T i r e d of paying s o m e r a n d o m E l e c t r i c a l E n g i n e e r lots of m o n e y for a d i s c o ? C o n t a c t P e t e M u r p h y in L i n s t e a d Hall ( R o o m 322) for a d i s c o you C A N Afford. •Part-time students r e q u i r e d t o w o r k at the S p o r t s C e n t r e . A p p l y to Cliff S p o o n e r at the S p o r t s C e n t r e . •Photos wanted of R C S events a n d p e o p l e for this y e a r ' s R C S H a n d b o o k . A l l p h o t o s will be returned if p e o p l e ' s n a m e s are i n c l u d e d . P e a s e leave t h e m in a n e n v e l o p e in the R C S p i g e o n h o l e in I C U or the R C S O f f i c e . • T h e Ladies six a side cricket T o u r n a m e n t is t a k i n g p l a c e at B i r m i n g h a m on Sat 1 4 " J u n e . P l a y e r s are W A N T E D . T h e r e will be p r a c t i s e before h a n d . P l e a s e c o n t a c t D a w n W i l l i a m s o n ( C h e m E n g 4) o r G a r e t h F i s h ( M e c h E n g P G int 6289) A S A P . No wonderful experience necessary l a d y h o c k e y p l a y e r s are u s u a l l y q u i t e good.

P r o f e s s o r E H B r o w n , R o o m 439, C i v i l E n g i n e e r i n g , to b e put o n the list of u s e r s . • Parking Notice—would all D e p a r t m e n t s i n f o r m the T r af f ic W a r d e n s if they have visit or s o r e n g i n e e r s c o m i n g into C o l l e g e . If possible, Departments concerned s h o u l d m a k e a v a i l a b l e a bay for t h e m . If this is not p o s s i b l e , the T r af f ic W a r d e n will be a b l e to let t h e D e p a r t m e n t k n o w if a s p a c e is a v a i l a b l e (preferably the day before). A s all D e p a r t m e n t s k n o w , there is o n l y a limited a m o u n t of s p a c e s free f o r visit or s or e n g i n e e r s . T h i s a l s o a v o i d s visitors or e n g i n e e r s u s i n g o t h e r p e o p l e ' s b a y s . IC Ttaffic Warden.

FOR S A L E •Frigidaire Freezer perfect c o n d i t i o n , ideal for s t u d e n t s for next year. 1.52 c u b i c feet c a p a c i t y . B a r g a i n at £60. C o n t a c t W a y n e M o r e l y C h e m 3 or p h o n e 385 8842. • 3 speed Ladies bike wit h basket on front in r o a d w o r t h y c o n d i t i o n . £35 o n o c o n t a c t M F o w k e s C h e m E n g IV or 229 8375 (Even) • G e n t s Racing Bicycle. V e r y g o o d c o n d i t i o n , 5 g e a r s , b a r g a i n at £50. M u s t be s o l d i m m e d i a t e l y ! ! C o n t a c t W a y n e M o r l e y C h e m 3 or p h o n e 385 8842.

c o m p l e t e with leather c a s e a n d H o y a S k y l i g h t . In E x c e l l e n t C o n d i t i o n . If interested c o n t a c t E H w a n g M e c h E n g 3 via P i g e o n h o l e • H o n d a CB100N X r e g , 8500 m i l e s , o n e y e a r tax a n d M O T . £200, c o n t a c t A d a m Cattle through G e o l o g y letterracks o r 879 3778 e v e n i n g s WANTED • W o u l d the person w h o stole the 2 hang-gliders from outside B i o c h e m i s t r y please leave t h e m w h e r e they c a n be f o u n d a n d i n f o r m the p o l i c e or D E v a n s ( a n o n y m o u s l y if n e e d be) on Int 4118. A n y b o d y w h o s a w them b e i n g m o v e d s o m e time last w e e k ( p r o b a b l y at night) c o u l d y o u please c o m e f o r w a r d , all i n f o r m a t i o n gratefully r e c e i v e d .

continued

;

department usually doesn't h a v e to s p e n d m u c h m o n e y o r t i m e g e t t i n g it d o n e . T h i s is w h y s o m a n y D e p R e p i candidates this year are I l o o k i n g to set s u c h I c o m m o n r o o m s up.

134 CROMWELL ROAD (near to Sainsburys) KENSINGTON, SW7

14

S E I* Q U B N S C A T ! P l A C f SOUTH

Friendly

HfWV

KENMN6TON.

L O N O O N S W.7

T e l : 01-581 1589

ENDSLEIGH INSURANCE SERVICES LIMITED 71 O l d B r o m p t o n R o a d South Kensington London SW7 3JS T e l e p h o n e 01-589 6 7 8 3

J u s t h o w useful are U G Common Rooms though? They should arguably provide a 'centre for s o c i a l activity with the department', be a place for U G ' s to g a t h e r w h e n not in lectures, or m a y b e even act a s s t u d y r o o m s in t h e e v e n i n g s w h e n l i b r a r i e s are f u l l o r not a v a i l a b l e . B u t j u s t h o w m u c h are t h e current s c h e m e s merely p a y i n g lip s e r v i c e to t h e s e reasonable ambitions? I fear I must n o w lower m y c o v e r to a n e x t e n t a n d talk a b o u t t h e s c h e m e f o r a ' U G c o m m o n r o o m ' in P h y s i c s . A s it s t a n d s at t h e moment, this involves c a r p e t i n g 30 feet of d e s i g n a t e d fire e s c a p e c o r r i d o r , l i n i n g it w i t h s e a t s (not v e r y m a n y w i l l fit in the s p a c e — a b o u t 30 maybe) and adding such salubrious items as potted p l a n t s a n d , to k e e p o n e of the A c c R e p s happy, a m u r a l ! N o t a b a d little s c h e m e to s p e n d £2000 o n y o u might think. T h e n yo . realise that P h y s i c s has

O p e n 12-2.30pm; 6.30pm11.30pm dally service

of style

In and

comfort Fully Air

licensed conditioned

Seating

for

110

Private parties catered tor 10% discount and

of up

for IC

to

40

students

staff

Early reservations advisable

;

nearly 600 u n d e r g r a d u a t e s — a r e a l l of t h e s e m e a n t to fit in t h e Common Room—(You p r o b a b l y h a v e to s t i c k t h e m to t h e c e i l i n g ) . A s e m i n a r r o o m at least t h e s i z e of t h e M a t h s C o m m o n R o o m is really n e e d e d . A n d Carpeting? When you realise that a coffee m a c h i n e is p l u m b e d i n t o the s a m e corridor, a n d road workers and bus drivers are frequent viisitors, I think you'll r e a l i s e that t h e c a r p e t , a l a r g e p e r c e n t a g e of t h e c o s t , will not last l o n g . A n d w h a t w i l l b e c o m e of this ' C o m m o n R o o m ' ? If t h e c u r r e n t i n c a r n a t i o n of the P h y s i c s C o m m o n R o o m is a n y t h i n g to g o b y , ( a n o t h e r fire c o r r i d o r o n level 1, l a r g e r i n d e e d , t h a n the p l a n n e d replacement) t h e g r o u p of p e o p l e w h o s p e n d a lot of t i m e t h e r e will g r o w u p to be t e r m e d objectionable hacks by many and everyone else wil l a v o i d it. A s I've a l r e a d y d i s c u s s e d the p r o p o s e d new P h y s i c s C o m m o n R o o m will not be a s u s e f u l to m e m b e r s of that D e p a r t m e n t a s i t . s e e m s at first s i g h t . I n d e e d m a n y of t h e p r o b l e m s of t h e p r o p o s e d s c h e m e are o b v i o u s , s o w h y is t h e scheme going ahead? I

Friday 6 June

attentive

an atmosphere

I Pmrsonit jtrwce guarant—d )

A Sideways Look (Warning: the o p i n i o n s e x p r e s s e d h e r e i n are not n e c e s s a r i l y t h o s e of t h e F E L I X E d i t o r o r of t h e a u t h o r e v e n . T h i s d o e s not detract, however, f r o m the p o s s i b l e v e r a c i t y of t h e a r g u m e n t s put f o r w a r d ) . D e p a r t m e n t s s e e m to b e f o r e v e r t r y i n g to a p p e a s e t h e s e e t h i n g m a s s e s of discontented undergraduates by being s e e n to d o a lot b u t a c t u a l l y d o i n g v e r y little. W i t h E l e c E n g d o i n g it last year and Physics making m o v e s this y e a r , s e t t i n g u p Undergraduate C o m m o n R o o m s s e e m s to b e a f a s h i o n a b l e w a y of d o i n g this. A n d w h y not—the p r o c e s s p r o d u c e s a lot of g o o d wil l a m o n g t h e 'Student leaders' since they a r e s e e n to h a v e a c h i e v e d s o m e t h i n g , a n d the

on page

Brasserie

SERVICING & REPAIRS at

• F o r Ricon SLR Cameras—XR R i k e n o n 3 5 m m f2-8 L E N S (£30 o n o ) — X R R i k e n o n 7 0 - 1 5 0 m m f4 2 0 0 m (£55 o n o ) . B o t h l e n s e s

• T h e Great Hall O r g a n — T h a n k s to the g e n e r o s i t y of the Q u e e n s g a t e T r u s t Imperial C o l l e g e n o w possesses a sophisticated and powerful C o p e m a n - H a r t electronic o r g a n , u s i n g the latest digital technologyl. T h e instrument, situated in the G r e a t H a l l , is a v a i l a b l e to a n y m e m b e r of C o l l e g e w h o p l a y s the o r g a n , or w h o w i s h e s to d o s o a n d is fairly c o m p e t e n t o n the p i a n o . T h e r e are n o a u d i t i o n s for its u s e , a n d t h o s e w i s h i n g to play it s h o u l d s e e

NEWLY OPENED

01-370 7617 have already p r o p o s e d that the D e p a r t m e n t v i e w s t h i s a s a g o o d a w a y of b e i n g s e e n to b e l o o k i n g after t h e students' interests. F r o m the Departmental a n d other R e p s ' p o i n t of v i e w , t h e y t o o c a n be s e e n to b e achieving something, and £ 2 0 0 0 s q u e e z e d o u t of a departmental slush fund l o o k s i m p r e s s i v e e v e n if it is to be s p e n t u n w i s e l y . In t h i s p a r t i c u l a r c a s e it c a n be s e e n as very g o o d pre-election publicity for S i m o n S i n g h ' s further p o l i t i c a l i n t e r e s t s in R C S U ( h e l p i n g h i s e l e c t i o n to next years p r e s i d e n c y n o end) and b e y o n d . T h e end result is that t h e Department benefit from a p p e a s i n g the student reps a n d the reps benefit from b e i n g s e e n to h a v e s c r e w e d m o n e y out of t h e Department, so helping their future election c h a n c e s . A n d the students. In P h y s i c s at least t h e y ' l l b e left w i t h a m u c h - t o o - s m a l l c o m m o n r o o m with a carpet nobody wants decorated with an A c c Rep's amateur artwork and . n o n e of it w o r k i n g verywell.. Its e n o u g h to s h a k e y o u r faith in d e m o c r a c y isn't it? ( W h a t faith..). Anon of Ibid. FELIX


The Week In Time Out Meets Tomorrow's World

Thymus Key To AIDS Vaccine? Research published last week in Science shows a possible leap forward in the fight against acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). T he AIDS Virus attacks Tlymphocyte cells, special white block cells that are part of the immune system. There is unfortunate confusion about Tlymphocyte cells, even among the scientific population (Letters, 30

May). White blood cells are produced in the bone marrow: lymphocytes are also produced in the spleen, the lymph nodes and the thymus. (The thymus, as every O-level biologist knows, is a gland found in the root of the neck, mostly under the cover of the upper part of the sternum: it consists largely of developing lymphocytes.) Bone marrow derived

Clay-brained Hippo Scheme Students at California Institute of Technology don't seem to think much of SDI, the so-called Star Wars project. In April they held a competition to see who could propose the most 'destabilising, unworkable, or incredibly expensive' scheme to

than air. Under imminent enemy attack, the animals would be released from the cage to form an optically thick cascade of buoyant hippos. When the mean hippo density became equal to the atmospheric density (hyppopause), the hippos

achieve SDI's goals {Nature, 22 May). The winning entry came from student Greg Ojakangas, who suggests developing a genetically engineered strain of pygmy hippopotamus. T he animals would be fed on a diet rich in radioactive materials, and then placed in cages containing cathodes. A continuous stream of electrons would convert the alpha-particles radiated by the hippos' food into helium. T he hippos would gradually inflate with helium, becoming lighter

would provide Readily Operative Overhead Protection by Hippos ( R O O P H ) . T he hippos would slowly deflate, floating gently back to earth after two days, when they could be collected and, presumably, reprocessed.

FELIX

It is estimated that the scheme would cost $457 million: all enquiries to IC Research Contracts Office, Sherfield Building; any similar proposals to the FELIX Office by Wednesday 11 June. (ÂŁ5 prize for best entry).

lymphocytes are termed Bcell lymphocytes. T h y m u s derived lymphocytes are termed T-cell lymphocytes. T-cells attack antigens directly at close range only; B-cells attack antigens by secreting antibodies. A hormone of the thymus, called thymosin, helps to regulate T-cells. With most immunedeficiency diseases, levels of thymosin are depressed, but researchers at the George Washington University, U S , have found what appeared to be high levels of thymosin in more than half of the AIDS patients they examined. The explanation that the researchers put forward is that a protein of the AIDS virus closely resembles thymosin. This might explain why the immune system is unable to cope with AIDS; antibodies that attack the viral protein may also attack thymosin, a suggestion supported by the observation that AIDS

patients suffer considerable damage to the thymus. T he theory has been tested by injecting rabbits with a synthetic version of the hormone thymosin. T he rabbits' immune systems were found to produce antibodies against the hormone: the hope was that these antibodies would also act against the protein at the core of the AIDS virus in-humans. T he results are encouraging: the rabbit antibodies reduced viral replication in the infected human cells by more than one-half. When the antibody was mixed with an immunoglobulin, levels of viral proteins were significantly reduced, and production of reverse transcriptase (See FELIX, 16 May) was halted. T he catch is that thymosin itself might evoke a similiar response, and cause the body to attack the thymus, warn the researchers.

Nine cleaners wanted for the weekend after the end of term. The pay is ÂŁ2 an hour. See Lesley in Student Services for details. FELIX Motor Rally is on the 21st June at 10am. Entries of teams of four to the FELIX Office as soon as possible.

Friday 6 June

5


R A I L

T R A V E L

F O R

U N D E R

26's

LOW COST EURSPEAN RAIL TRAVEL r^S\^\ ^ *rV$ \ \ Wo^loss \

PLUS

DESTINATION IN 23 COUNTRIES

Ask for a Eurotrain brochure at your local student travel office. 52 G R O S V E N Q R G A R D E N S L O N D O N S W 1 W 0 A G TELEPHONE 01-730 3402


Whores. 'The real man wishes for two things: danger and recreation. Hence man wants woman as the most dangerous plaything. Man should be brought up for the purpose of war and woman for the relaxation of the soldier; everything else is foolish.' FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE

T he complicated and inconclusive turn of events in Troilus and Cressida make this one of Shakespeare's lesser known tragedies. This is a pity, for a more poignant view of sexuality such as this would be hard to find in early drama. Two great nations war for the affections of a tinselled Queen, as wives and daughters are bartered for soldiers in battle. By this token, common peasant girls become heroines and empresses are whores. Howard Davies' new production is set against the background of the Crimean War. A clever touch, for Shakespeare's study of honour-for a man, to protect Queen and country; for a woman, to honour her chastity-is well suited to the high moral etiquette of Victorian conduct. It is unfortunate that Shakespeare's conclusion to Troilus and Cressida is so underdeveloped. Davies has not entirely overcome the difficulties involved and some of the final scenes more closely resemble Bedroom Farce than Theatre of War. The joy of this

production undoubtedly lies in the flippant but elegant handling of Shakespeare's text. Occasionally the light hearted behaviour of the actors threatens to mar the more important aspects of the play, but these moments are rare. Clive Merrison provides a superb interpretation of Pandarus, Cressida's eccentric uncle, and his flamboyant style appears to draw much from Osbourne's Entertainer. Thersites, a deformed and scurrilous Greek, is brilliantly transformed by Alun Armstrong into a disaffected Northern bigot. His impertinent mimicry of the bone-headed Ajax is particularly memorable. T he high standard of acting is complemented by some fine production. Ralph Koltai has designed a.n elaborate palacial vestibule some thirty feet tall, which, coupled with Jeffrey Beecroft's versatile lighting comfortably serves war chambers, officer's mess, tavern and courtyard a l i k e

John Burgess

Troilus A n d Cressida continues at the Barbican on the 4, 5,6th and from the 11th to the 17th of June.

Friday 6 June


? ,

Shakespeare

Thought by mdny to be a play within a play written as e n t e r t a i n m e n t f o r a g r e a t late-16th c e n t u r y w e d d i n g , Cheek by Jowl's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream r e t u r n s S h a k e s p e a r e to t h e ' c o m m o n ' p e r s o n . Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod the Director a n d Designer, deserve acclaim a n d p r a i s e for^their v i s i o n a n d imagination; co'uple this to an able a n d versatile cast, w h o s e e m e d to be doing much more than going through the motions, a n d t h e result is a n e v e n i n g to r e m e m b e r . After more than a year touring, from Rio to K a t h m a n d u , a h a n d f u l of p e r f o r m a n c e s r e m a i n ; it is a matter of u r g e n c y t h a t a n y theatre goer sees C h e e k by J o w l ' s A Midsummer Night's Dream. Set in A t h e n s a n d a f a i r y infested w o o d nearby, the action involves four groups of c h a r a c t e r s : T h e D u k e , a n d s o o n t o b e D u c h a t f e of Athens who's impending m a r r i a g e g i v e s rise t o t h e play; four c o n f u s e d y o u n g lovers w h o run a w a y to t h e w o o d in a n effort t o sort out their r o m a n t i c problems; T h e fairies w h o o c c u p y the w o o d a n d have p o w e r over all w h o enter, a n d a b a n d of ' a c t o r s ' w h o enter the w o o d t o rehearse

Theatre

The Nest by Franz Xaver Kroetz, T h e Bush Theatre until 21 June T h e t r a n s l a t i o n of t h i s contempary G e r m a n play attempts to recreate the r e a l i s m of t h e s e e m i n g l y ordinary relationship between a lorry driver, Kurt, a n d his pregnant tiem a k i n g wife, M a r t h a . Unfortunately, the B u s h T h e a t r e ' s p r o d u c t i o n of T h e Nest a c h i e v e s little in t e r m s of m a k i n g a n y real c o n t r i b u t i o n to t h e " u n d e r s t a n d i n g of t h e ' m a n o r w o m a n in t h e street', w h i c h is w h a t it s e e m s t o set o u t t o d o . O n entering the 'L' s h a p e d t h e a t r e , it is n o t at first o b v i o u s w h e r e t h e stage is. However, a s t h e p l a y b e g i n s it b e c o m e s a p p a r e n t that t h e w a l l of gauze-like material in-front of t h e s e a t i n g a r e a is t o b e

•Weird scenes at the Donmar Warehouse. A Midsummer Nights Dream until the 21st June.

• used as a screen through w h i c h t h e a c t i o n is viewed". Images o n the 'stage' behind the screen are only visible when illuminated. T h i s effect a l l o w s a l a r g e n u m b e r of s i m p l e s e t c h a n g e s to o c c u r since the a u d i e n c e is u n a b l e t o s e e through the gauze when the s t a g e is unlit. T h e plot r e v o l v e s a r o u n d the birth of a b a b y b o y a n d t h e effect this h a s o n t h e proud Kurt and Martha. K u r t is a w o r k e r , a ' g o o d ' father. H e w o r k s t o p r o v i d e for his family a n d to p a y for all t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s of a n e w b a b y . H o w e v e r , it is a l s o f airly o b v i o u s that h e w o r k s t o fill h i s t i m e , t o g i v e h i s life s o m e m e a n i n g . 'I e n j o y m y s e l f w h e n I c a n do something'. Essentially, due to an unlucky c o i n c i d e n c e , Kurt is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r t h e n e a r fatal i n j u r y of h i s s o n . T h i s

u n d e r m i n e s a l l that K u r t b e l i e v e s in a n d l e a v e s h i m w i t h t h e o p t i o n s of e n d i n g h i s life o r f a c i n g u p t o it's realities. H e c h o o s e s t o live, a n d t h e f e e l i n g s i m p a r t e d b y this a c t a r e of h o p e for the future. Kurt f i n a l l y o p e n s h i s e y e s . 'I c a n ' t live a n i l l u s i o n anymore'. H e leaves his 'Nest'. The Nest is h a m p e r e d b y d e s i g n , t h e u s e of a s c r e e n serves to alienate the a u d i e n c e in a w a y that is entirely inappropriate. R e l a t i o n s h i p s a r e all i m p o r t a n t in t h e a t r e a n d The Nest d o e s n o t g i v e t h e f e e l i n g that a n y e x i s t , e i t h e r between audience a n d actors, or actors. Perhaps The Nest w o u l d h a v e o f f e r e d g r e a t e r i n s i g h t if t h e a p p r o a c h t o it's production had allowed the actors s p a c e to breath.

Simon Lewis.

a play that they h o p e to p e r f o r m at t h e f o r t h c o m i n g w e d d i n g festivities. T h e c h a r a c t e r s ' a n d their situations introduced, the m a d n e s s of l o v e ' s t a n g l e d web takes over reeking h a v o c a n d d e s p a i r . T h i s is largely d u e to the servant of T h e F a i r y K i n g w h o unwittingly, althougth w i t h o u t initial r e m o r s e , u s e s t h e m a g i c a l p o w e r s at his d i s p o s a l t o m a k e a l l t h e w r o n g p e o p l e fall in l o v e . After m u c h upset, a n d u s e of f u r t h e r s l i g h t l y d i f f e r e n t magic, mortals and fairies' love-problems are solved. H o w e v e r , b e f o r e a l l live h a p p i l y e v e r after, t h e 'actors' perform their play to t h e a s s e m b l e d c o u p l e s . F i n a l l y a l l l e a v e t o live t h e i r c o n t e n t e d e x i s t a n c e s but p e r h a p s m o r e urgently to c o n s u m a t e their marriages. T h e u s e of d a n c e a n d movement, flowing and r e l e a s e d , in c o n j u n c t i o n with music and other 'vocal noise', compels the a u d i e n c e not to take their attention away from the action for a s e c o n d . T h e a t m o s p h e r i c l i g h t i n g of t h e s i m p l e s e t s e r v e s not t o d e t r a c t in a n y w a y f r o m t h e d i r e c t i o n / m o t i v a t i o n of t h e actors. Essentially the b a l a n c e of t h i s p r o d u c t i o n is p e r f e c t .

Simon Lewis.


Theatrel James Saunders is a most prolific playwright. Since Alas, Poor Fred was written in 1959, he has c o m p o s e d numerous scripts for theatre, radio and television, perhaps his most famous stage production being Next Time I'll Sing to You first performed in 1963. For the Umoja Theatre Company's new production, director Carmen Munroe has chosen Saunders' most cherished protagonists: the married couple. Saunders' play takes the form of a dialogue between Mr and Mrs Pringle, an e l d e r l y c o u p l e living in a ' small detached council house. They are an argumentative pair. Mr Pringle is aggressive and disagreeable; Mrs Pringle, calmly assertive as they malcontentedly piece

by John Burgess

Alas, Poor Fred together their relation to Fred, a mysterious shadowy character, lost in the back of their memories. For Mr Pringle, Fred might never have existed at all, for his recollections are a distracted montage of other

by Jim Clayden.

F i i m H H H B S H S H i Just when you may have considered car chases to be a boring cliche two films have come out recently which may put them on the road to a comeback, T h e Hitcher reviewed last week and T o Live and Die in L A . The latter has been compared to Miami Vice, but this is most unfair on the film which is far more sophisticated and impressive than the television programme, although it does have some similarities. Both Miami Vice and T o Live and Die in L A involve a crime busting partnership in parts of the world but where they differ is in the portrayal of their subjects, the former is often rather clumsy and unimaginative storytelling and frequently little more than an overly long pop video, whereas the latter has some very imaginative editing of both sound and vision. Further in the television programme, for all it's stylised violence, somehow people don't seem to get hurt; in the film you really can feel when someone gets beaten up. The partnership in the film initially consists of an older agent who wants one last big bust of a famous counterfeiter before retiring and a younger more ambitous man, William L Peterson. In trying to secure the arrest single handed the elder man is killed. His partner is then determined to catch the evil lawbreaker, played in a little too exaggerated manner by Willem Dafoe,

peoples faces and lives. Yet his wife's love of Fred, and her intimate knowledge of his habits and his appearance is an often spoken but soon forgotten secret between them. The play draws heavily from lonesco, Beckett and Pinter for its, effect, so closely, in fact, as to be almost rigid and lifeless. Some fine moments of humour help to alleviate the irritating repetitiveness of Mr Pringle, a laboured character well handled by Malcolm Frederick. Corinne Skinner Carter as his wife, is given far more scope and emotional depth, and handles her part well. Alas, Poor Fred is at the Battersea Arts Centre until the 8th June, and opens for two days at the North Peckham Civic Centre on the 12th.

using whatever means he can. T o assist him and replace his former partner he is reluctantly assigned a younger more moral agent, whose dilemmas and tears are very convincingly portrayed.

me

f

•Jim's had a hard week. Continuing the theme of action movie brings me to Biggies. Oh dear. In attempting to portray Biggies seriously and avoid making another spoof, Biggies has been relegated to a supporting role for a young modern American, yes, modern. The film makers believed, possibly with good reason that modern audiences would not be able to swallow a straight Biggies film so they had the wacky idea of making a fast food manufacturer Biggies' time twin, which seems to me to be an idea which is about as digestible as the T V Dinners the young hero sells. However in trying to appeal to a greater audience the film fails to hit it's target (in fact it doesn't even wing the blighter) and in spite of Neil Dickson, (who makes an excellent Biggies), the impressive stunt flying and the fact that an old .school friend of mine plays Ginger I can't really rate this film very

highly. Another somewhat disappointing film is Paul Matursky's Down and Out in Beverely Hills which starts off well as a satire on the lives of the rich folks in Beverely Hills but ultimately pulls it's punches and ends up as a vindication of the lifestyle the Great American Dream. The characters are the street person (tramp), a wealthy coat hanger manufacturer, his repressed wife who hires gurus to assist her enlightenment, their daughter 'a blur with a nice smell' and their son whose inability to communicate with his parents result in him leaving videos for them to watch which provides one of the better jokes. The best characters are the Mexican maid, the marvellous Magritte the dog and the brilliant dog psychiatrist whose skills enable him to diagnose nipple ancestry in Magritte and to suggest that he may have come from a nine dog litter, but his presence is al too short lived. The film concerns itself with the way the tramp's arrival into the family affects the lives of all it's members and how their neuroses are cured by the wisdom of this free man. Unfortunately it merely reaffirms the Great American way which once again seems to include the notion that foreigners are figures of fun. Pity, it coulc have been very good rathe thn just funny in parts.

'Euroshima is Laurie Booth's poignant ballet about the power of nations. Taking the bombing of Hiroshima in 1945 as a reference point, Booth and his company, The Cargo Cult, set off to explore issues such as communication between countries, national defence and the constant fear of attack, using movement and motifs rooted in Oriental culture. Heavy? Not quite. Whilst the dancers are both expressive and versatile, their work is punctuated with informal and amusing gestures and expressions in a nonchalant attempt to talk to the audience through speech rather than movement. The show is complemented by an excellent set from John Newton, and runs at the I.C.A. until tomorrow.BJofm Burgess'

9


Students Imperial College students often seem to be isolated from the outside world. Life for many students appears to involve problem sheets, Union clubs and drinking. Few people make the effort to find out about other Colleges. There are two other Colleges with an International reputation in South Kensington, the Royal College of Art and the Royal College of Music, but most students show little interest in them. In an attempt to improve the situation FELIX went and investigated the R C M and the RCA.

Royal College Of Music T h e R o y a l C o l l e g e of M u s i c is that o d d V i c t o r i a n Building situated between the R S M b u i l d i n g a n d the Chemical Engineering d e p a r t m e n t . It h a s a b o u t 6 0 0 s t u d e n t s , 120 of w h o m are p o s t g r a d u a t e s , w h o a r e m a i n l y s t u d y i n g for t h e A R C M , a d i p l o m a with degree status although s o m e are s t u d y i n g for d e g r e e s . M o s t of t h e i r s t u d e n t s s t a y at t h e C o l l e g e i for three or four years

T h e R o y a l C o l l e g e of A r t is b a s e d in t h e m o d e r n o f f i c e b l o c k in J a y M e y s (that's b e i n d B e i t a n d n e x t to t h e Albert Hall). A l t h o u g h they h a v e b u i l d i n g s in o t h e r p a r t s of S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n . T h e c o l l e g e is e n t i r e l y p o s t g r a d u a t e . It h a s a b o u t 6 0 0 s t u d e n t s w h o are s t u d y i n g for M A s or P h D s . T h e y are m a i n l y f u n d e d by grants from the Department of E d u c a t i o n a n d S c i e n c e . The C o l l e g e has c h a n g e d r a d i c a l l y in t h e last t w o or three years. T h e R e c t o r J o c e y l n Stevens, the former b o s s of E x p r e s s N e w s p a p e r s , h a s set o u t to m a k e the C o l l e g e more commercially minded. He has introduced central f u n d i n g s o that d e p a r t m e n t s are no l o n g e r free to d e c i d e h o w t h e y

T h e R C S M A is a l s o r e s t r i c t e d to o r g a n i s i n g c h e a p events b e c a u s e R C M S t u d e n t s h a v e b e e n hit b a d l y by t h e c u t s . T h e

• S u e Gorton

Royal College

Of

a l t h o u g h s o m e stay for a considerably longer period. The R C M Students A s s o c i a t i o n is t h e o r g a n i s a t i o n that represents R C M students and organise social events. President Sue Gorton, a s i n g e r w h o h a s b e e n at t h e c o l l e g e for five y e a r s , s a i d that t h e R C M S A tries to concentrate on organising n o n - m u s i c a l e v e n t s s u c h as football, pool and drama. They had problems, though, because most R C M s t u d e n t s live a l o n g w a y from the C o l l e g e . R C M students have worse problems than most s t u d e n t s l i v i n g in L o n d o n w h e n t h e y start l o o k i n g for acommodation because m a n y l a n d l o r d s try to s t o p music students rehearsing. M i s s G o r t o n s a i d that t h e r e w e r e s t u d e n t s l i v i n g in Guildford because they couldn't find anywhere n e a r e r to live.

Art

s p e n d m o n e y they raise from outside sources. He h a s c u t f i n e art c o u r s e s a n d introduced courses d e s i g n e d to s a t i s f y i n d u s t r y . A s a result t h e D e p a r t m e n t of E d u c a t i o n and Science which funds the R C A directly has given t h e R C A level f u n d i n g in real t e r m s . R C A Union President Tim Foster, w h o was a s t u d e n t in I n d u s t r i a l D e s i g n , a c o u r s e run jointly by I C a n d t h e R C A b e f o r e becoming a sabbatical, said that t h e w a y t h e a p p r o a c h of t h e C o l l e g e to c o m m e r i c a l i s i n g itself w a s p r o b a b l y r i g h t in the l o n g t e r m . It w a s , t h o u g h , causing tremendous p r o b l e m s to s t u d e n t s in t h e short term. T h e R C A U n i o n is a

s m a l l o n e w i t h , at p r e s e n t , n o c l u b s or s o c i e t i e s . T h i s is m a i n l y b e c a u s e all t h e

• T i m Foster s t u d e n t s are a p a t h e t i c postgraduates and have to work hard. T h e U n i o n does, t h o u g h , r u n a bar a n d r e f e c t o r y . It a l s o p r o v i d e Ents with D i s c o s every Thursday.

r e m o v a l of t h e t ravel subsidy has made accommodation problems w o r s e . O n e h a s little m o n e y w h e n o n e h a s to t ravel from Guildford. The C o l l e g e has also been b a d l y hit b y c u t s . C u t s to C o l l e g e funding have m e a n t that e x t r a l e s s o n s that m a n y s t u d e n t s u s e d t o t a k e h a v e b e e n cut. L i k e IC s t u d e n t s , m o s t R C M students take very little n o t i c e of t h e i r neighbours. Musicians, a c c o r d i n g to M s G o r t o n , only think about other musicians. They only n o t i c e IC s t u d e n t s w h e n t h e R C M c a n t e e n is full of IC s t u d e n t s . T h i s d o e s n ' t m e a n , t h o u g h , that t h e U n i o n s d o n ' t get o n . M s Gorton said she had d i s c u s s i o n s with next year's ICU President Christine Taig about more joint s o c i a l events. T h e R C M will p r o b a b l y b e r e p r e s e n t e d at next y e a r ' s F r e s h e r ' s F a i r . S h e e n c o u r a g e d IC s t u d e n t s to f o r m l i n k s . 'IC S t u d e n t s a r e w e l c o m e to c o m e to a n y t h i n g w e d o ' . Most R C A students think that IC s t u d e n t s are ' d e a d b o r i n g ' . A s a result t h e y have very few links with IC. Even students on the joint c o u r s e s a r e g l a d to be at the R C A . T h e R C A U n i o n h a s v e r y little c o n t a c t w i t h IC U n i o n . M r F o r s t e r s a i d the o n l y time he'd met p e o p l e from IC u n i o n w a s w h e n F E L I X h a d b e e n to visit h i m . H e s a i d , t h o u g h , that h e w a s s u r p r i s e d that I C U w e r e still o u t s i d e N U S . H e s a i d he d i d n ' t s e e w h a t ICU gains from being outside. Mr Foster, though, e n c o u r a g e d IC s t u d n e t s to use the R C A ' s facilities. ' D o n ' t b e put off by t h e i d e a that w e m a y b e arty farty!' H e s a i d ' m a n y of o u r students are very m e r c e n a r y d o i n g j o b s for commerce'. He encouraged IC s t u d e n t s to g o to t h e Thursday disco.

Imperial College Union Life Membership

r n s e 10

Friday 6 June

FELIX


H a v i n g startec a m u s i c c o l u m n a m i o a b l a r e of pretentious credits and s u b - M e l o d y M a k e r ranting last t e r m o b l i g e s o n e to try a n d c o n t i n u e it, s o h e r e goes. C o l l e g e b a n d Duo s e e m l o n g o v e r d u e for a m e n t i o n in t h e s e p a g e s . T h e y a r e a f o u r p i e c e outfit w h o f o r m e d in t h e a u t u m n t e r m comprising John Noble (Drums) Colin Wooldridge (Guitar) a n d V o c a l s ) Richard Hanan (Bass) and Ian M o r r i s ( K e y b o a r d s a n d Voacals). They're from C h e m E n g 2 with the e x c e p t i o n of Ian w h o h a i l s f r o m C i v E n g 1. D u o play a d a n c e a b l e b r a n d of p o p r o c k w h i c h is d i f f i c u l t to c h a r a c t e r i s e , p e r h a p s t h e best i m p r e s s i o n of t h e i r s o u n d c a n b e g a i n e d by the f a c t that t h e y d o a c r e d i t a b l e c o v e r v e r s i o n of ' E v e r y b o d y W a n t s to R u l e t h e W o r l d ' . T h e y a r e k e e n to a v o i d t h e college band tag and although concentrating on t h e i r d e g r e e s at p r e s e n t they have well thought out plans for the future. T h e i r m o s t r e c e n t g i g w a s at t h e R a g F e t e party in t h e H o l l a n d c l u b a n d t h i s will b e t h e i r last f o r a w h i l e . O v e r the s u m m e r they have t h r e e d a y s b o o k e d in a s t u d i o to r e c o r d a d e m o for c i r c u l a t i o n to c l u b s a n d other potential venues, thereafter the lads are p l a y i n g it b y e a r . H o p e f u l l y a s t r i n g of g i g s o u t s i d e c o l l e g e will lead to greater things - one can only wish them luck. Significantly t h e y list a s o n e of t h e i r b e s t g i g s s o far a n o u t s i d e e v e n t at N u t f o r d H o u s e . O n t h i s o c c a s i o n D u o worked as 1

...AND ROLL College administrator, Michael Arthur looks at the problems caused by supermarket trolleys.

The ubiquitous s u p e r m a r k e t t r o l l e y is p r o b a b l y the most widely u s e d f o r m of t r a n s p o r t a r o u n d the C o l l e g e c a m p u s . U n d o u t e d l y , it is FELIX

part of a d o u b l e arrangement with Elec E n g student Hans Beier. Hans runs a professional

o u t a lot of h a s s l e w i t h P A hir e a n d it a l s o g i v e s t h e m an e d g e over a more c o n v e n t i o n a l d i s c o or b a n d .

COLLEGE

ROCK

s t a n d a r d d i s c o unit b y t h e n a m e of S o l a r W i n d s w h i c h he h a s built u p s i n c e 1976 w h e n h e s t a r t e d w i t h a hi-fi system. Hans gear now i n c l u d e s light p r o j e c t o r s and a 2 kW P A system w h i c h D u o are a b l e to u s e for their s o u n d . T h e c o m b i n a t i o n of D u o a n d S o l a r W i n d s s e e m to w o r k well as an entertainment p a c k a g e f o r p a r t i e s et c. T h e arrangement has cut

an extremely convenient v e c h i l e , i d e a l l y s u i t e d not o n l y to t r u n d l i n g t h e w e e k ' s fodder home from S a i n s b u r y s but a l s o to a m u l t i t u d e of o t h e r tasks—shifting equipment, m o v i n g to a n e w r o o m a n d d e l i v e r i n g F E L I X to n a m e but a few. Unfortunately, we have r a t h e r lost s i g h t of t h e f a c t supermarket trolleys belong in s u p e r m a r k e t s . S a i n s b u r y s don't even allow y o u to t a k e t r o l l e y s off t h e i r site a n d Waitrose o n l y d o s o o n the u n d e r s t a n d i n g that y o u are g o i n g to b r i n g t h e m b a c k . A c c o r d i n g to S a i n s b u r y ' s , a r o u n d 600 of their trolleys disappear for ever e a c h year from the Cromwell Road branch a l o n e . A t £50 a t i m e p l u s t h e c o s t of e m p l o y i n g s o m e o n e to s c o u r t h e s t r e e t s for a b a n d o n e d

A previous article m e n t i o n e d that Schrodingers Cat w e r e recording a d e m o tape on a h i r e d 16 t r a c k s e t u p in I C R a d i o ' s s t u d i o . T h i s is n o w c o m p l e t e a n d is a v a i l a b l e f r o m J o h n L a m b e r t of P h y s i c 2 f o r the s u m of £ 3 - 5 0 (on c h r o m e tape!) Titled "Where The City Don't G o " , which was also t h e title of t h e i r p r e v i o u s t a p e , it c o n t a i n s s o m e of the s a m e t r a c k s w i t h t h e a d d i t i o n of " W a r A i n ' t a G a m e " a n d a very silly v e r s i o n of " J o h n n y B. G o o d e " . S o u n d q u a l i t y is a vast i m p r o v e m e n t o n t h e p r e v i o u s effort a l t h o u g h I felt t h e p r o d u c t i o n w a s a little u n b a l a n c e d at p o i n t s ,

trolleys, they r e c k o n they h a v e to s e l l o v e r £ 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 w o r t h of g r o c e r i e s b e f o r e t h e y r e c o v e r t h e c o s t of trolley abuse. This e x p e n s e is r e f l e c t e d in h i g h e r p r i c e s at t h e tills. In C o l l e g e t e r m s , t r o l l e y s are a n u i s a n c e . A lot of m a n p o w e r g o e s into r o u n d i n g up trolleys and g e t t i n g t h e m b a c k to t h e s u p e r m a r k e t s . T h i s is p a r t i c u l a r l y s o in P r i n c e s Gardens and Evelyn G a r d e n s . I n c i d e n t a l l y , if t h e residence handymen spent less t i m e c h a s i n g t r o l l e y s , they c o u l d spend more time improving residences. The most serious c o n s e q u e n c e , h o w e v e r , is the effect o n o u r r e l a t i o n s with neighbours and visitors. N e i g h b o u r s are i m p o r t a n t . L i v i n g c l o s e to a student communit y r e q u i r e s a f a i r level of

Friday 6 June

e s p e c i a l l y for the b a c k i n g vocals w h i c h I had trouble p i c k i n g out (you must bear in m i n d h e r e t h a t I'm slightly deaf - too many Zodiac Mindwarp gigs you know!). H a v i n g said this i also thought " N o H o p e " b e n e f i t e d f r o m a bit of creative production and "Apple B l o s s o m " from a p i a n o a r r a n g e m e n t . If a n y o n e is i n t e r e s t e d in g i g s d u r i n g the s u m m e r break I'm t o l d that S c h r o d i n g e r ' s C a t are l o o k i n g f o r a d a t e in o r d e r to i m p r e s s a n i c e man from a record company. W e l l I've still g o t a c o u p l e of e * a * s to fail s o this isn't g o i n g to b e a v e r y m e g a a r t i c l e . I m u s t a p o l o g i s e to a n y o n e who was expecting to get m e n t i o n e d e a r l i e r in t h e t e r m , this a r t i c l e h a s been h a s h e d up from o n e that d i d n ' t get p r i n t e d h o p e it's O K b o y s . T h a n k s to J o h n , Izzy & C o for t h e credit I was d e a d chuffed, I h o p e t h i s isn't t o o sycophantic. Finally, have y o u noticed t h e n u m b e r of F u p p i e s (Funky Y u p p i e s - geddit) a r o u n d lately. Y o u c a n s p o t these p e o p l e by the way t h e y rant o n in their free moments about "well c r u c i a l s o u l " a n d the profound social s i g n i f i c a n c e of " g e t t i n g o n d o w n like a s e x m a c h i n e " o n l y to r e t u r n to b e i n g boring Felix hacks during t h e w e e k . Y o u c a n bet that w h e n t h e s e p e o p l e talk about oppressive Police B i l l s t h e y ' r e t h i n k i n g of b e c o m i n g ten g r a n d a w e e k contract lawyers L o v e a n d D h a r m a et c. M a r k 'I a m not a h i p p y ' Cottle.

> *

t o l e r a n c e at t h e b e s t of times a n d we w o u l d do well no t to try t h e i r p a t i e n c e b y cluttering up the place with trolleys. T h e C o l l e g e has m a n y v i s i t o r s a n d it d o e s o u r i m a g e n o g o o d at all w h e n t h e y s e e t h a t t h e best a r e n o w n e d c e n t r e of Science and Technology c a n d o f o r t r a n s p o r t is to steal trolleys from supermarkets. U n d e r the C o l l e g e Discipline code misconduct ' l i k e l y to affect t h e g o o d n a m e a n d s t a n d i n g of t h e C o l l e g e ' is a d i s c i p l i n a r y offence. A l t h o u g h no one has ever b e e n 'done' for stealing supermarket t r o l l e y s , it c l e a r l y c o m e s u n d e r t h i s h e a d i n g a n d it m a y o n l y b e a m a t t e r of time before the C o l l e g e f e e l s that it h a s to t ake a c t i o n to b r i n g t h e t r o l l e y problem under control. 11


Opinion

§ I Law And Order: S Has It Eroded Your Civil Liberties? I Over the last few years the Conservative government have I started to pass considerable changes in the criminal law. These changes will significantly affected our rights as British residents. The Conservatives claim that these new laws significantly improve the police's chances of keeping law and order but how serious are the effects on our civil rights? in this opinion article H u g h Southey looks at the effect of these new laws All the major political h a v e o n c i v i l l i b i t i e s is v e r y p a r t i e s a g r e e that c r i m e is serious. g r o w i n g at a n a l a r m i n g T h e P u b l i c O r d e r B i l l is rate. S i n c e 1979, w h e n the a n a t t e m p t to c o n t r o l m a s s C o n s e r v a t i v e p a r t y c a m e to lawlessness. T he eighties p o w e r , riots h a v e b e c o m e a has seen n u m o r o u s large f e a t u r e of i n n e r c i t y life, t h e s c a l e battles b e t w e e n t h e n u m b e r of o f f e n c e s p o l i c e a n d the p u b l i c . r e c o r d e d by the police has B a t t l e s at B r i x t o n , g o n e u p by 4 1 % , v i o l e n t Orgreave, Stonehenge and c r i m e h a s g o n e u p by 4 0 % football grounds, city e t c , e t c . T h i s isn't m e a n t to c e n t r e s a n d p i c k e t l i n e s all b e a c r i t i c i s m of t h e over the c o u n t r y have been Conservative government, a f e a t u r e of law a n d o r d e r c r i m e w a s r i s i n g at a n since the present a l a r m i n g rate w h e n L a b o u r g o v e r n m e n t h a v e c o m e to w e r e in p o w e r , its m e a n t to power. Most people would i l l u s t r a t e the p r o b l e m s a g r e e that s i t u a t i o n s like f a c i n g the G o v e r n m e n t . All t h e s e h a v e got to b e the political parties agree prevented. Whether you t h e n e e d for c h a n g e s in t h e b e l i e v e t h e p i c k e t s o r the law to c o p e w i t h i n c r e a s e d p o l i c e c a u s e d t h e t r o u b l e at c r i m i n a l activity. T h e y don't W a p p i n g , m a s s riots, s u c h a g r e e h o w this c h a n g e as the o n e o u t s i d e the s h o u l d be a c h i e v e d . N e w s I n t e r n a t i o n a l plant , h a v e got to b e p r e v e n t e d . W h e n the C o n s e r v a t i v e s S o c i e t y c a n not t o l e r a t e t h e c a m e to p o w e r in 1979, n u m b e r of i n j u r i e s t h a t t h e y d e c i d e d to b o o s t t h e occur on such occasions. p o l i c e in a n a t t e m p t to T h e C o n s e r v a t i v e s h a v e set c o n t r o l the law a n d o r d e r o u t to b a n e v e n t s that problem. The Conservatives m i g h t e n d in a riot. T h e y have increased expenditure have given the p o l i c e the o n t h e p o l i c e by m o r e t h a n r i g h t to c o n t r o l t h e s i z e , a t h i r d in real t e r m s , p o l i c e l o c a t i o n a n d d u r a t i o n of manpowe r has increased static d e m o n s t r a t i o n s a n d b y o v e r 13,000 a n d p o l i c e meetings. T h e y have given pay has increase d by t h e p o l i c e t h e right to 111.1%. T h i s , t h o u g h , h a s impose restrictions on really f a i l e d to c o n t r o l m a r c h e s if t h e y f e a r crime. The figures ' s e r i o u s d i s r u p t i o n to t h e m e n t i o n e d e a r l i e r s h o w that l o c a l c o m m u n i t y ' o r 'the l a w a n d o r d e r is still a c o e r c i o n of t h e i n d i v i d u a l ' . major problem. T h e annual T h e y require the o r g a n i s e r s p r o m i s e s that a r e m a d e at of m a r c h e s to g i v e t h e C o n s e r v a t i v e party p o l i c e s e v e n d a y s n o t i c e of c o n f e r e n c e s to i m p r o v e law any march. T h e y have a n d o r d e r s h o w that t h e t i g h t e n e d t h e law o n C o n s e r v a t i v e s are w o r r i e d . i n c i t e m e n t of r a c i a l h a t r e d . In a n a t t e m p t to s u p p o r t T h e y have created a new t h e p o l i c e in t h e i r efforts, o f f e n c e of d i s o r d e r l y t h e C o n s e r v a t i v e s s t a r t e d to conduct. Finally they have pass new laws. B y the time given the p o l i c e the p o w e r y o u r e t u r n to C o l l e g e in to b a n s p e c i f i c m a r c h e s . O c t o b e r the P u b l i c O r d e r B i l l is l i k e l y to h a v e Many groups, including b e c o m e l a w . T h i s a n d the the L a b o u r Party a n d the Police and Criminal A l l i a n c e , have o p p o s e d E v i d e n c e A c t are the p a r t s of this B i l l . G r o u p s C o n s e r v a t i v e ' s a t t e m p t s at are a l r e a d y t h r e a t e n i n g to l e g i s l a t i o n . T h e effect t h e y organise m a s s illegal w i l l h a v e o n t h e c r i m e rates d e m o n s t r a t i o n s to p r o t e s t is, at p r e s e n t , d i f f i c u l t to a g a i n s t this l e g i s l a t i o n . O n e g a u g e . T h e effect t h e y w i l l group has already 12

a d v e r t i s e d f o r p e o p l e to a g r e e to a c t a s o r g a n i s e r s of a n i l l e g a l d e m o n s t r a t i o n . T h e i d e a of t h i s is that a l a r g e n u m b e r of p e o p l e w i l l r e p l y a n d a g r e e to act a s o r g a n i s e r s s o that t h e p o l i c e h a v e to a r r e s t m i l l i o n s of o r g a n i s e r s . T r a d e U n i o n s are protesting because they fear that t h e y w i l l l o s e t h e i r right to o r g a n i s e l a r g e d e m o n s t r a t i o n s that s h o w the labour m o v e m e n t s solidarity with strikers. Pressure g r o u p s are also w o r r i e d that t h e y w i l l l o s e t h e i r right to p r o t e s t b e c a u s e the police will d e c i d e that t h e demonstration disrupts the l o c a l c o m u n i t y (even though a significant p r o p o r t i o n of t h e l o c a l c o m u n i t y m a y w a n t to protest). O r d i n a r y m e m b e r s of t h e public, though, remain

Friday 6 June

i g n o r a n t of t h e w o r r y i n g i m p l i c a t i o n s of t h i s a c t . T h e press (particularly the tabloid press) haven't c o n s i d e r e d the important c i v i l l i b e r t i e s q u e s t i o n s that t h e B i l l p o s e s . Is it m o r e i m p o r t a n t that y o u h a v e a r i g h t to d e m o n s t r a t e a b o u t t h i n g s that w o r r y y o u o r that t h e o d d e v e n t l i k e l y to c a u s e t r o u b l e is b a n n e d ? Is it i m p o r t a n t that y o u h a v e t h e r i g h t to d e m o n s t r a t e a b o u t a n i s s u e of i m m e d i a t e c o n c e r n (the n e w law w o u l d p r e v e n t spontaneous demonstrations when mass r e d u n d a n c i e s are a n n o u n c e d for e x a m p l e ) ? Is t h e b a n r e a l l y g o i n g to h a v e a n y effect w h e n t h e s o r t of p e o p l e w h o g o to d e m o n s t r a t i o n s that m a y e n d in t r o u b l e a r e u n l i k e l y to t a k e a n y n o t i c e of a ' r e p r e s s i v e ' p o l i c e b a n (the t r o u b l e s in N o r t h e r n Ireland h a v e s h o w n that b a n s o n m a r c h e s h a v e v e r y little effect w h e n p e o p l e a r e o u t to c a u s e t r o u b l e ) ? C o u l d the p o l i c e ban events w h i c h are on the political fringes but u n l i k e l y to e n d in t r o u b l e ? C o u l d the p o l i c e b a n e v e n t s like S t o n e h e n g e w h i c h have had a bad • p r e s s ? Last year the p o l i c e s m a s h e d up the P e a c e c o n v o y w h i l e it w a s o n its w a y to S t o n e h e n g e . T h e s e p e o p l e w e r e n ' t out f o r trouble. Everyone knows that h i p p y s a r e p e a c e f u l p e o p l e . M a n y of t h e h i p p y s had their families. T h e y w a n t e d to g o to a p e a c e f u l rock concert. T h e police, t h o u g h , attacked the hippys b e c a u s e , in m y v i e w , t h e tabloid media had created a m y t h of d r u g c r a z e d v i o l e n t hippys rampaging through t h e S o u t h W e s t of E n g l a n d . W h y shouldn't these people hold a pop concert providing they don't break a n y l a w s like t r e s p a s s ? A t p r e s e n t the P o l i c e c a n o n l y have the hippies evicted f r o m a p a r t i c u l a r site if t h e landlord obtains a court o r d e r . If t h e P u b l i c O r d e r B i l l is p a s s e d t h e P o l i c e w i l l be a b l e to b a n t h e S t o n e h e n g e festival. The Police And Criminal A c t is v e r y d i f f e r e n t to t h e Public Order Bill. A c c o r d i n g to a Conservative Party press r e l e a s e it s e e k s to modernise and clarify police powers and safeguard the citizens p o w e r s . T h e law is a v e r y complicated and long piece of l e g i s l a t i o n . M a n y of t h e s e c t i o n s of t h e a c t a r e o n l y a t t e m p t s to c l e a r u p t h e very c o m p l i c a t e d and c o n f u s i n g c a s e law that governs police procedure. FELIX


These do attempt to, in the words of the Conservative press release, safeguard citizens rights. S o m e of the sections of the Act, though, severely erode the citizens rights. The police are now able to get a warrant to search the house or office of someone who isn't" suspected of a crime (there are certain limited exceptions to this clause that exempt members of the caring professions who keep records as part of their work eg doctors and priests). T h e police are able to stop and search people in the street, set up roadblocks, arrest suspects and take fingerprints. T h e police are able to detain someone suspected of a serious offence for four days (six if over a weekend) with no right to see a solicitor for thirty six hours. Finally the police have the right to authorise intimate body searches (including the anus and the vagina) of certain suspects. Again the Labour party and the Alliance oppose certain,aspects of the Act. The Labour party describe the Act as an attempt to replace policing by consent with policing by coercion. The Labour party is commited to repeal the Act. The S D P , though, believes that such drastic action would be damaging to the issue of police powers. It believes that sections of the act should be amended. Again the majority of the general public have failed to realise how parts of this act will affect their rights. When the Act was passed a few journalists complained because they were worried that the police would get the right to search their records to find evidence. Most of the other sections of the Act have been ignored by the media. Most people haven't thought about what happens if the police decide to hassle someone FELIX

they don't like by using the powers for stop and search etc repeatedly? What's to stop the police removing (by accident of course) innocent documents about police brutality while they search the home of someone who they suspect has evidence relating to another case? What's to say that suspects won't make confessions because they have been held without seeing their solicitor for thirty six hours? Thirty six hours is a long time to be held in a hostile environment without any friendly advice. T h e recent case of two Manchester students who appear to have been hassled by certain police officers for over a year because they gave evidence about police brutality shows that the police can be very vindictive when they want to. T h e problem with all these pieces of legislation is they assume that the police are a sort of superhuman body who are always decent, honest and truthful. The unfortunate fact is they aren't. T he police force is made up of ordinary people. Nobody should expect it to be perfect. Policemen, like any human, will react badly in certain situations. They may well try to gain revenge. Recent cases of police brutality show that policemen may well react violently to people who have 'annoyed' them. In the eighties there are numerous occasions when the police are likely to be 'annoyed'. Who can blame policemen who have been pelted by stones from pickets for hours for becoming 'annoyed'? They may well have a grudge against the labour movement for a long time. All this is unfortunate but human nature. The law, though, should attempt to

minimise the opportunities for the Police to abuse their powers to gain revenge. It should also minimise the police's opportunities to use the law for political reasons. Again the police are only human. People who feel strongly about politics will do a lot to get their views adopted. Who can blame a policeman who uses his powers for political gain? He shouldn't be put in a position where he has the opportunity to use his powers for political gain. In any non-anarchic society the Police will have certain powers which they can abuse or use. A democratic society should decide whether the possible loss of civil libities is worth the associated reduction in crime (assuming there is any). T he new powers have eroded civil liberties to a significant extent but haven't improved the law and order situation. In my view law and order will only improve significantly when societies problems are reduced. William Whitelaw M P summed it up in 1978 when he was Shadow Home Secretary. He said 'if boys and girls do not obtain jobs when they leave school, they feel that society has no need of them. If they feel that, they do not see any reason why they should take part in that society and comply with its rules'. Society must attempt to persuade the young unemployed, who

are almost outside society, that law and order needs to be obeyed before our civil libities are eroded further. That can't be done with more repressive laws, it has to be done by showing that society cares about all its members, not just the people with money and jobs. T he present laws are an attempt to reduce crime by making it more difficult to commit the crime. Will such tactics may work in the sort term, in the long term society will have to solve the problems that create crime. I'm not going to discuss how society can show that it cares, that's a political argument about economics and this is an article about civil liberties, I just want to end by saying that this article is aimed at getting you to think about whether your civil liberties have been eroded. I believe that we need a strong police force. I also, though, believe that police can 'only work effectively if they have the confidence and c o operation of the public' (quote from a Conservative policy document). This means that police can't be seen to repressive. They can't be seen to have powers that limit our civil liberties. The police must be seen to be as faultless as possible. This I believe can not come about if they are having to work with laws, such as the Criminal Evidence Act and the Public Order Bill, which are ' open to abuse.

Release are an organisation who provide an unbiased source of information for those arrested. If you get in trouble with the Police you can contact them on 603 8654 if its an emergency, alternatively you can ring them for an appointment on 837 5602. Release also have very useful cards giving a simple guide to what to do if you get arrested. These can be obtained by ringing Release on 837 5602 and talking to them nicely.

Friday 6 June

13


Gliding

Pimlico

New Members Flying This Summer Needed

V

Pimlico Connection S o c i e t y is recruiting tutors for next year 1986-7 to help in classrooms at local comprehensive schools. Our tutors help the teachers in their practical lessons on Wednesday afternoons during the autumn term and for the first four weeks of the spring term. This year about eighty students went into classrooms to help in science, mathematics and computing with pupils of most ages If you are interested then please contact Richard Bleasdale E E 3, Keith Bell C h e m Eng 3 or David Berry, Dept of Humanities. Leaflets and recruitment forms can also be picked up from outside rm 510 Electrical Eng. For people interested in any aspect of the society we shall be having a small, free introductory lunch, cheese and biscuits etc, in Elec Eng 6 0 6 at 1pm on 10th June 1986. During the last weeks of term we are also arranging visits to the schools involved.

Now that exams are nearly I over, we can get back to the serious things in life like flying. The annual barbecue will be held at Lasham on Saturday 14th June, which also marks the start of our fly-in week. T o arrange transport and fir;'! out details turn up at Thursday's night's meeting. A course is being run for pre-solo pilots and the casual list will also be running for people who can't get on the course. For the m o r e advanced pilots it is hoped to stage a repeat of the very successful race to Yoster Airfield. This time

however Burdett is barred from taking part due to his totally incompetent navigation last time—fetching up at Brize Norton heading in totally the wrong direction. From the end of term Thursday night meetings will cease, but the club continues functioning at Lasham. It is usually very quiet mid-week, so turn up and get lots of hours soaring in. Even at 'weekends during the summer you should be able o get all the flying you .. ant due to the revised IC ballot rules. For those not

Cycling

l

The 'famous three' were again in action last weekend, whilst everybody else was busy sweating over textbooks in preparation for exams (haven't they finished yet?). Anyway, Scott Heyhoe and Peter Hartigan were racing at Eastway last Sunday, and Peter excelled in

Half Colours Jonathan Davy Rick Weaver Paul Claydon Nigel Currie

Hockey Ian Parker Nick Collie Paul Smith Nick Hope

Jon Stonham Phil Choudhury Tim Carsider Justin Brooking Paul Chandler

Cycling Club Katherine Hunter Rugby Club Steve Parker Ian Hutchinson Paul Secombe Phil Clark Simon RoueM Rob Hargrove

Michael Anderson Neil Folland Thomas Goetz Chris Dancer Andrew Souchon Jason Jenkins Roland Smith John Gilkes Owen Miles

Ladies Hockey Alice Banks Elaine Harper Sandra Rofe Sarah Hodgson Table Tennis Andrew Lewry Richard Homan David Gallagher Ski Club Martin Steiber Mark Schmidt Mike Johnston

gaining fifth place in the 3rd and vets event, scoring 2 points on his licence and winning £2 for his efforts. Wayne Morley performed well also last Saturday, in a 30 mile T T at Witham, Essex. His time of 1-19-05 was achieved in apalling conditions, and represents his first ride at the distance

Dina Wright Kerstin Meyer Louise Duffy Anne Kynakas Irena Poskora Erica Larnbrianas

n b l f e

5mal

Swimming and Water Polo D Wall R Eastman N Ireland S Davie A Langham D Brockleband Sailing Club Phii Bevan Tony Lowe Pete Robson Richard Brimelow Helen Udy Rifle and Pistol Club S Brooker K MacDonald S Stewart Karate Club Stephen Bradley Jeremy Hague Paul Potter Orienteering Club Sally Mclean Tom Forster Badminton Club Helen Gregory Swan Yates Sarah Therengold Robin Martin S L Tan Golf Jonathan Gamblin Mark Cox Wu Shu Kwan Kung Fu Nic Brummel

Volleyball

14

d r s

Famous Three In Action

Athletic Colours '85-'86 A C C Colours Full Colours Fencing

going on the tour to Italy remember that the Libelle and A S W - 1 9 will be away from Lasham during July, (though the Ka-8 is being left behind so there will be one glider to fly). Finally congratulations to Jon Towill for making a 70km flight to complete his silver C , to Pete Placard for learning how to soar and to all those who have gone solo this year. Those who haven't soloed yet pull your fingers out during the summer. See you in the air. Bodge

ftfe N Williams G Johnston J Crowder N Mayall P Jackson N Rothwell I Ruddle Apostolos Leonidhopolous Andrea Burrows Jane Mc Clean Samantha Page Mai Hunter I Dixon P Deeks E Blance Paul Urbonas Paul Griffith Steve Taylor Scott Anderson Russel Norton Mike Palmer Bruce Ainsworth Dave Heaps Sean Mulshan Gary Chapman Ava Marthrossian Bharat Popat Dave Tierney James Arnold John Dixon Muhammid Mahmood

Bowling Club Paul Stewart Richard Ingram Nick Brigham Andrew Tress

Friday 6 June

continued

from page 4

ACCOMMODATION • T w o people r e q u i r e d to s h a r e s p a c i o u s , m o d e r n flat with t w o f e m a l e u n d e r g r a d u a t e s . Rent £ 3 0 p w f r o m S e p t 86 to J u n e 87. Five mins from Gunnersbury Tube. Contact J B o w i e C h e m 2 P i g e o n h o l e s or ring (Eve) 748 3309 Ext 217. •Accommodation available: o w n large r o o m in family h o u s e in W a n d s w o r t h s h a r e with o n e student a n d G e r m a n A u Pair! A l l m o d c o n s . H i g h l y r e c o m m e n d e d p r i c e £155 inc. C o n t a c t M i k e J o n e s int 5590 avail 5th J u l y to N o v . • F u l l y furniture flat for 4 in P u t n e y . Two double rooms includes spacious l o u n g e a n d a c c e s s to g a r d e n . A v a i l a b l e for S u m m e r o r year lease f r o m J u l y , £ 3 0 p w e a c h . P h o n e 789 0495

PERSONAL • J o h n y o u ' r e s u p p o s e d to use h e a d e r s in f o o t b a l l . • J o h n , first a G r e e k , than C h i n a , H o n g K o n g and now a Samurai •Sunley if y o u think y o u ' r e hard e n o u g h are y o u c o m i n g to the barbeque? • T h e only thing that Matthew's had his leg over is his c r o s s - b a r . •What a bell, it's Martin S m e l l e !

FELIX


Y E

OK, I got it wrong, the start of the World Cup has not been quite as exciting as I predicted last week. Yesterday's game between England and Portugal (I'm writing this at 8pm on Wednesday evening) was one of the worst games of football I've seen in a long time. The problem seems to be the heat. All the teams seem to be playing at half speed. I really wonder if they should have given thefinalsto Mexico when one looks at the poor T V coverage and the terrible heat. Don't worry, though, the iI

football will get better. This week we've got some excellent games coming up. Game of the week is probably Scotland v West Germany (Sunday, BBC 7pm). At the time of writing Scotland haven't played and West Germany have drawn with Uruguay 1-1. The West Germans, though, looked to me the best team I've seen so far in the competition. They managed to overcome the heat and look threateningforall of the game. England play twice but to be honestfollowinglast nights debacle I'm not sure that I'll be watching. I've got better things to do then watch a gme of football that's likely to be as exciting as paint drying. For those patriots who are interested England play Morocco (Friday, ITV 11pm) and Poland (Wednesday, BBC 11pm). One other game that will be worth watching is Uruguay v Denmark (Sunday, ITV 11pm). Before I get too depressed about the problems with the World Cup I'd better return to what's on in London. One of the features of the summer is the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. Amateur and professional artists get the chance to show their best new-

work. Hockney is there as are hundreds of less well known. There are several offers for IC students interested in going. The old students associations have organised a special showing, a buffet and music from the IC Orchestra string quintet. Tickets are ÂŁ12.50 which is excellent value for what should be a very special evening. The event is on July 11th so if you're interested contact the Old Students Association offices. If you can't afford the Old Students event, WH Smith have sponsored a series of concerts at the Royal twrti

Academy. For ÂŁ3 you get the opportunity to listen to some of the best classical music going and to view the exhibition. The concerts are on Thursdays between 26th June and 17th July. These concerts are highly recomended. You can find more details by ringing Youth and Music on 01-379 6722. Returning to more conventional Capital Ideas Saturday seems to be a good day for going to a gig. Desmond Dekker (you know the guy who did Isrealites) is playing the Sir George Robey. So if you fancy some good reggae/ska then get up to Islington for some crucial rhythms. On the subject of Ska, Bad Manners play the Lord Cecil on the same night. Bad Manners have got to be one of the all-time best dance bands. If you want something a little more relaxed, Mint Juleps play the Half Moon on Saturday. Mint Julips are one of the brilliant new vocal bands that seem to have sprung up. All in all if the feet are tapping the night away on Saturday you'll only have yourself to blame. To be honest there are virtually no other decent gigs

coming up in the near future. Never mind I suppose things must improve. When they do, though, I'll be out of London so I suppose I'm not going to benefit. Its typical really. Generally London seems a little dead at the moment. England are playing India in the test match at Lords and to be honest this is the only event that I fancy going to (other than the musical events lisited). England have got to win this match if David Gower is to remain as captain. To be honest I don't think he deserves to stay. His performance in the West Indies was a disgrace. Unlike Mike Gatting he seems to have no pride for England. He hardly seems to try when he leads an England team. One final Capital Idea. Why not go and see some opera? The English National Opera and the Royal Opera are two of the world's leading opera companies and its not that expensive to go and see them. Opera conjures up images of dinner jackets and funny singing. It is, though, amazingly powerful and romantic. Why don't you go once before you slag it off. Anyway I'd better stop writing. The more I write the worse my style becomes. I hope though I've given you some ideas about what to do when those exams are over.


e 41

Imperial C o l l e g e students John Craven (Chem Eng), Julian Wilson (Mech Eng) and Mark Masento ( B i o c h e m ) , have reached the F i n a l of a n a t i o n w i d e German Wine Tasting Competition sponsored by Decanter Magazine and T h e G e r m a n W i n e Institute. Julian, J o h n and Mark r e c e i v e d t o p m a r k s out of the 100 t a s t e r s in t h e s e m i f i n a l s that t o o k p l a c e at Imperial in M a r c h . T h e y n o w g o f o r w a r d , a g a i n s t 17 o t h e r t a s t e r s , to t h e F i n a l at

the V i n t n e r s H a l l in J u l y . T h e twenty finalists (students a n d general p u b l i c ) f r o m all o v e r G r e a t Britain will c o m p e t e for o n e of t h e f o u r p l a c e s in a t e a m to r e p r e s e n t E n g l a n d , S c o t l a n d a n d V a l e s in a n International G e r m a n W i n e Tasting Competition. The G r a n d F i n a l is in G e r m a n y in S e p t e m b e r a n d i n v o l v e s an a l l - e x p e n s e s - p a i d week attending tastings, dinners visiting estates and vineyards and competing against teams from France,

Germany, Holland, Spain, Belgium, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, Austria and possible U 3 A and Australia. Wine Tasting Chairman M a r k M a s e n t o s a i d 'It is s a d that a l t h o u g h IC W i n e Tasting S o c i e t y has Droved itself to b e o n e of t h e b e s t and most successful c l u b s in the c o u n t r y , a n d h a s a c h a n c e to m a k e t h e College known worldwide, the U n i o n d e e m us u n w o r t h y of t h e i r f u l l support.'

ULU VP Attacked

GUC

A n d y Ravenscroft, U n i v e r s i t y of L o n d o n U n i o n (ULU) Vice PresidentServices, narrowly avoided h a v i n g his r e p o r t to General University C o u n c i l ( G U C ) rejected on T u e s d a y Mr Ravenscrof; was criticised for c o m m e n t i n g in his r e p o r t that U L U w a s a politically ineffectual b o d y that s h o u l d concentrate on looking after s t u d e n t s ' i n t e r e s t s a n d services. There was also criticism, mainly from Vice President-elect (Finance and Administration) Nick W i l k i n s , of p l a n s to b u i l d a new bar on the fourth floor of t h e U L U B u i l d i n g . H e said other ideas s u c h as resiting the A c c o m m o d a t i o n Office, s h o u l d have priority.

A m o t i o n w e n t to G U C (General Union Council) on T u e s d a y to adopt the 'Student Charter' on experiments involving animals. T h e motion was n o : in t h e event d i s c u s s e d , b u t if p a s s e d at t h e nex t m e e t i n g of G U C , w i l l d e c l a r e e a c h s t u d e n t ' s right to c h o o s e w h e t h e r to p a r t i c i p a t e in e x p e r i m e n t s involving cruelty, without suffering any academic p e n a l t y f o r that c n o i c e .

Vandalism tAndy

Ravenscroft

Free Speech

Star Wars

A n a m e n d m e n t to t h e E d u c a t i o n A c t that w o u l d h a v e g i v e n u n i v e r s i t y staff a n d s t u d e n t s a l e g a l d u t y to u p h o l d f r e e d o m of s p e e c h has been withdrawn. A s p o k e s m a n f o r the D e p a r t m e n t of E d u c a t i o n and S c i e n c e told FELIX that t h e r e h a d b e e n problems with drafting. H e s a i d , t h o u g h , that t h e a m e n d m e n t w a g l i k e l y to be reintroduced.

U p to t w e l v e B r i t i s h universities have submitted p r o p o s a l s for 'Star W a r s ' r e s e a r c h , a c c o r d i n g to a n a r t i c l e in last F r i d a y ' s Times Higher Educational Supplement. Imperial C o l l e g e d e p a r t m e n t s are u n d e r s t o o d to h a v e s u b m i t t e d a p p l i c a t i o n s for the work despite o p p o s i t i o n f r o m g r o u p s within the C o l l e g e p a r t i c u l a r l y in t h e C o m p u t i n g department. O t h e r g r o u p s w h o are b e l i e v e d to h a v e s u b m i t t e d applications are HeriotWatt, U M I S T , B r u n e i , C r a n f i e l d Institute a n d T h e Science and Engineering Research Council's Rutherford Appleton Laborartory.

The amendment was i n t e n d e d to o u t l a w t h e ' n o p l a t f o r m ' p o l i c i e s that m a n y student u n i o n s have adopted. The amendment w o u l d not h a v e m a d e t h e s e p o l i c i e s i l l e g a l but it w o u l d h a v e b e e n o p e n to a n y o n e to t a k e out a n i n j u n c t i o n to p r e v e n t a b r e a c h of t h e law. 16

Big Spenders

Students vandalised severa! l a r g e f l o w e r p o t s in P r i n c e s G a r d e n s last w e e k e n d . T h e S t u d e n t s o v e r t u r n e c tne pots w h i c h are on the path o n t h e W e s t s i d e of t h e G a r d e n . Estates official, J o h n R e e s a p p e a l e d to s t u d e n t s not to v a n d a l i s e the g a r d e n s . H e said the v a n d a l i s m h a d u p s e t the g a r d e n e r a n d m ad e the G a r d e n s look less attractive. C o l l e g e S e c u r i t y have instructed the S o u t h s i d e g u a r d s to w a t c h f o r v a n d a l i s m in the Gardens. Anyone caught v a n d a l i s i n g the G a r d e n s will b e d i s c i p l i n e d .

University science d e p a r t m e n t s s p e n d m o r e of their University G r a n t s Committee ( U G C ) grant on research than other classes of d e p a r t m e n t . A c c o r d i n g to a s u r v e y b y a f o r m e r D e p u t y C h a i r m a n of t h e U G C , Professor Keith C l a y t o n of the U n i v e r s i t y of East A n g l i a , s c i e n c e d e p a r t m e n t s s p e n d 5 5 % of their U G C allocation on research. The survey was c o m m i s s i o n e d by the D e p a r t m e n t of E d u c a t i o n a n d S c i e n c e to ' p r o v i d e a c l e a r i d e a of t h e r e s o u r c e s b e i n g d e v o t e d to r e s e a r c h . a c r o s s a l l t h e s e c t o r s of higher education'.

Collection West L o n d o n C h a p l a i n c y raised over ÂŁ720 d u r i n g the recent Christian A i d Week collection by collecting r o u n d the halls a n d by c o l l e c t i n g outside the Albert Hall with a barrel organ. The Chaplaincy w o u l d like to t h a n k everyone who contributed.

Colours Recreational Clubs Committee (RCC) Chairman Tim Palmer has p r o p o s e d a motion for J o i n t C o u n c i l that A t h l e t i c s Half C o l o u r s s h o u l d be a w a r d e d to s t u d e n t s w h o c o m p e t e for Imperial as m e m b e r s of c l u b s that a r e outside Athletic C l u b s Committee. Mr Palmer b e l i e v e s that t h e s u c c e s s e s of c l u b s like W i n e T a s t i n g s h o u l d be rewarded with A t h l e t i c s Half C o l o u r s .

FELIX Notice Owing to the probabie move of the FELIX Office, printing work over the summer vacation is likely to be severely disrupted. The sooner jobs are booked in, the more chance there will be of completing them on time. All publicity for freshers fair should be delivered to FELIX by August 1, after which we will not be able to guarantee to print anything in time. Work booked in before the end of this term will be charged at this year's rates. For further information contact David Jones in the FELIX Office preferably after Wednesday June 11.

Friday 6 June

FELIX


http://www.felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1986/1986_0743_A