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The Newspaper of Imperial College Union

Founded in 1949

No confidence in Morton? An emergency motion of no confidence in the executive overshadowed the husting speeches at yesterday's UGM.

Holding holding his own: M r R o b e r t H o l d i n g I C U P r e s i d e n t i a l candidate (left) and N i c k M o r t o n at yesterday's U G M .

Mary captured by RCS The Royal College of Science Union violated Mary, the mascot of Queen Mary College London, on Tuesday. A g r o u p o f a r o u n d 20 students met i n the R C S U Office at 6:30am a n d reached Q u e e n M a r y C o l l e g e a r o u n d 8:15am. T h e y found the y e l l o w a n d b r o w n l e o p a r d bolted to the iloor. but as the nuts were o n l y Finger tight the mascot was easily removed. T h e y also m a n a g e d to overcome the attention of a security g u a r d who put a neck-lock o n one o f the mascotry team before he was persuaded to accept a letter to the President of Q u e e n M a r y C o l l e g e .

T h e m e e t i n g opened at 1:07pm w i t h a large c r o w d present i n the G r e a t H a l l . M i k e , the U n i o n mascot, was also present. T h e m o t i o n was put f o r w a r d d u r i n g the President's business and the meeting d e c i d e d that it s h o u l d be h e a r d i m m e d i a t e l y . It was proposed by P h i l i p N a t h a n a n d after he h a d received several extensions, M r N i c k M o r t o n opposed the m o t i o n . M r M o r t o n then m o v e d to the centre o f the hall a n d nearly brought the h a l l d o w n w i t h a r o u s i n g speech. T h e m o t i o n o f n o confidence was heavily defeated. O t h e r reports were accepted w i t h o u t c o m p l i c a t i o n . M r R o n a n M c D o n a l d , R a g C h a i r m a n , e x p l a i n e d that there w o u l d be a R a g stunt today while H a n d b o o k E d i t o r M r Peter Rodgers asked for contributions before F r i d a y , A p r i l 30. T h e hustings themselves were uneventful w i t h a l o n g series o f i m p o r t a n t , yet uninteresting a n d repetitive questions b e i n g asked to a l l ten candidates. T h e q u o r u m was successfully c h a l l e n g e d at 3 : 1 5 p m after a n argument between President a n d D e p u t y President about w h e t h e r the meeting should be a d j o u r n e d o r was inquorate. T h i s meant that a m o t i o n o n S o u t h A f r i c a was not put a n d no one had the o p p o r t u n i t y to put the case for a b s t a i n i n g in the s a b b a t i c a l elections.

Bolt snapped! The new system of electronic bolts recently installed in the basement of the Southside Halls of Residence was vandalised on Wednesday evening, only half an hour after being used for the first time.

Mary on display at the RCS

UGM.

Photo: Ramzi

Shammas

A l t h o u g h the elections for next year's R C S U Officers were inquorate, it was ratified b y a Results U G M last T u e s d a y . T h e next R C S U President w i l l be M r K a r l S c h m i d t a n d the other executive members w i l l be M i s s F i o n a O w e n (Vice-President) a n d M r C h a r l e s F u l l e r ( H o n o r a r y Secretary). M i s s H a z e l Cheeseborough a n d M r Bruce B r i c k n e l l w i l l be A c a d e m i c Affairs Officer a n d H o n o r a r y J u n i o r T r e a s u r e r respectively. No. 608

Fhe bolts are part of an i m p r o v e d security system w h i c h is intended to isolate the bar area a n d prevent u n au th or is ed entry to Southside. Access to the bar w i l l in future be from the side d o o r directly above it only. T h i s means that the m a i n .Southside doors w i l l be kept shut a n d o n l y residents s h o u l d be able to g a i n access to the H a l l s t h r o u g h the entrance by the lifts. T h e e l e c t r o n i c b o l t s w e r e s h u t l o r the first t i m e at 7 : 0 0 p m W e d n e s d a y , b u t s o m e b o d y g a i n e d access to t h e R e a l A l e B a r , presumably v i a a back entrance w h i c h then s l a m m e d shut. F i n d i n g tliemsell(ves) locked i n , a handle was torn from one d o o r a n d another door charged (with considerable force) u n t i l the bolt housing snapped. R e p l a c i n g the bolt w i l l be very expensive a n d anyone w h o c a n offer i n f o r mati o n on the incident should contact the College Security Officer or the U n i o n President.

F r i d a y M a r c h 5,1982

Free!


c a m p a i g n to boycott Barclays. T h e r e are two reasons for not b a n k i n g with Barclays. T h e first is on p r i n c i p l e — I certainly w o u l d n ' t want any of m y money to be lent to .South A f r i c a . T h e second is to put economic pressure on Barclays to end its links w i t h racism a n d oppression. I hope any actual or potential holders of Barclays accounts w i l l bear this in m i n d . G l v n Garside EE2 Dear

Dear

Sir

In F E L I X 606 you printed a one page advert for Barclays B a n k . S u r e l y it is w r o n g , especially for a U n i o n p u b l i cation, to publicise or take money from a company w h i c h is so closely linked to the S o u t h A f r i c a n a p a r t h e i d system. B a r c l a y s benefits g r e a t l y from its S o u th A f r i c a n links, a n d forms a significant part oi that countries economy. Barclays is the largest bank i n S o u t h A f r i c a , w i t h over 1,000 branches i n S o u th A f r i c a a n d Namibia. T h e South African subsidiary, Barclays N a t i o n a l , is 60% owned by Barclays i n B r i t a i n , a n d has over _£500m invested i n government bonds and public securities — a direct investment in the state, supporting a n d pr ofiting from this evil regime. A m o n g s t Barclays c o n t r i butions to the country's w a r effort the most blatant was its purchase of £6.6m of " d e fence" bombs, h e l p i n g finance the a r m e d forces. Barclays also contravenes U N rulings by o p e r a t i n g i n N a m i b i a (illegally occupied by S o u t h A f r i c a ) . T h e S o u th A f r i c a n regime depends heavily o n foreign investment, both to oppress a n d e x p l o i t the 8 0 % n o n white section of its p o p u l a t i o n , a n d to finance its frequent invasions of n e i g h b o u r i n g countries. I n 1980, Barclays p a r t i c i p a t e d i n a $250m loan to S o u th A f r i c a . Barclays has already lost several m i l l i o n pounds w o r t h of accounts as a result of the Page 2

Sir

H a v e we got our priorities w r o n g ? T h e S u p p l i e s to P o l a n d scheme, while good in theory, seems pointless when all the factors are considered. 1. If the Poles were starving the rest of the socialist states would surely help them out, rather than r u n n i n g the risk of r e v o l u t i o n i n P o l a n d against the communist system. T h e S o v i e t s m u s t be i n hysterics over the way we are giving away food to prop up a decaying regime. If we want to help them, why not give them the means to grasp their freedom? A n airlift of a r m a ments to Gdansk for example. 2. W h a t about A f g h a n i s tan? H a v e we forgotten about the Russian invasion a n d the thousands of dead Afghans? Back i n 1979 we made a lot of noise a b o u t s a n c t i o n s a n d very nearly missed the great p r o p a g a n d a victory made by C o e a n d O v e t t at the 1980 O l y m p i c s (the most politically o r i e n t a t e d s i n c e 1936). A t least helicopter gunships a n d n a p a l m are not being used i n P o l a n d . T h e average Pole is h a v i n g it e a s y . T h e m o s t helpful t h i n g we c o u l d do for t h e A f g h a n s w o u l d be to supply them w i t h ground-toa i r missiles. T h i s w o u l d also relieve the pressure on P o l a n d , because the Soviets w o u l d h a v e to use m o r e o f t h e i r infantry i n A f g h a n i s t a n , once their helicopters became less effective. These proposals m a y seem extreme, but often the justification of the overthrow of a regime by arms is only accepted afterwards w h e n a l l the facts are k n o w n. W a s it w r o n g to overthrow P o l P o t , Idi A m i n and Hitler? Tours

sincerely

'The C a p e d Crusaders' (Names supplied.)

.S'tV

T h e y ' r e at it a g a i n i n Canada! Baby seals are being killed for their pelts. Sometimes they are skinned while still conscious to save the time a n d effort of k i l l i n g them first. C a n you imagine t h e a g o n y t h e y m u s t go through? Between M a r c h 8 a n d 12 the E u r o p e a n P a r l i a m e n t is voting on whether to ban the import of a l l skins a n d products derived from cruelty. Please write to your E u r o M P asking h i m to vote in favour of the ban. T h e E u r o M P for o u r u n i v e r s i t y is: S i r D a v i d Nicholson ( E u r o M P L o n d o n C e n t r a l ) , 15 H i l l St., W 1 X 7FB. E v e r y letter helps stop the slaughter. A d r i a n Delemore Dept of M a t h e m a t i c s Dear

Mark

I was indeed p u z z l e d by-the l e t t e r f r o m " P u z z l e d of F a l m o u t h / K e o g h " . I read i n my N M E this week that E l t o n J o h n has rearranged for the coming autumn a London c o n c e r t he w a s f o r c e d to cancel last spring. W h e n one c o n s i d e r s that the C h e f s (just one of the bands featured at L i n k s C a r n i v a l ) h a v e played six L o n d o n gigs in the last three months, one can only assume that if the writer finds such music " u n f a m i l i a r " it is b e c a u s e he is a l a z y mindless cretin, too idle to get off his fat arse a n d go a n d see some of the excellent bands currently gigging i n L o n d o n . Tours "Annoyed" Weeks Dear

Hall

Mark

Last year, Barney M c C a b e was the person i n R C S i n charge of mascotry (see the article i n the last Broadsheet by P a u l Johnson). T h i s year, as a sabbatical officer of I C U , he is supposed to treat a l l sections of College equally. Y e t , only the other week, he was displayed on the front c o v e r of F E L I X ( w i t h M a r c o L e d w o l d , another I C U sabbatical) holding S p a n n e r a n d Bolt. Last week, he was responsible for leaving Reggie (the K i n g ' s College mascot) i n the G r a f f i t t i storeroom, whence G u i l d s

FELIX, March 5, 1982

later 'liberated' it. These mascots were stolen by R C S , not I C U , a n d should be of no concern to h i m , leastways not in p u b l i c a n d certainly not on the c o v e r o f F E L I X . T h e 'Reggie incident' also shows a blatant abuse of position, i n that he alone has the master keys to a l l the U n i o n rooms and as such has access to them all. C o m e on M c C a b e , play the w h i t e m a n . G e t on w i t h looking after the interests of I C U (a j o b you were elected to) a n d not the mascots of R C S (a j o b you do very badly i f last F r i d a y ' s d e b a c l e is a n y t h i n g to go by). A l u n Griffiths Chem Eng 3 • L i n n Sondek LP12 wit h B a s i k arm and cartridge, £250ono; N A D 3020 amplifier, offers? Both vgc. C a n demonstrate. Contact G . J . Smith, Civ E n g 2. •Minolta SRT101& c a s e & 5 0 m m F1.7 & T a m r o n 2 8 m m F2.8 & 2X a d a p t o r & s o m e extras + £99. R i n g 341-4010. • Cheap V o l k s w a g e n ! £275, K - r e g , 1600 fastback. C l e a n , s o l i d , reliable car, l o n g tax & M o T . C o n t a c t Keith K e r s h a w , M e c h E n g 3, tel 373-8399 (Flat 4). • 8 / " telescope, reflector, electric drive, etc., £250. F o r details see P. B e n h a m , M a t h s 1. • F o r sale: 6 pairs of slightly u s e d knitting needles. Contact Guilds Office. •Substantial reward for i n f o r m a t i o n l e a d i n g to return of bike—Carlton Sprint, light blue, 14 gear, t u b u l a r w h e e l s — s t o l e n W e d , F e b 24, f r om u n d e r E l e c E n g . C o n t a c t T. L a r c o m b e , EE1. • O K keep the scarf. I h o p e it c h o k e s y o u . T h a n k s for c o m i n g to Welfare Day. •Available now 3 r o o m s in flat in Hammersmith, 2 singles, 1 double, £17.65pp pw. C o n t a c t ' E r i c ' J a r v i s , 589-5111 ext 2146 or F r a n k y W i l l i a m s , M i c r o b i o l o g y 2. • G i r l needed to s h a r e a d o u b l e r o o m in 81 L e x h a m G a r d e n s f r om M a y 4 to the e n d of term. F o r details c o n t a c t F. J u d s o n , Life S c i p i g e o n h o l e s . • S k i Club T h e r e will be H i l l i n g d o n trips on the f o l l o w i n g dates: T u e s M a r c h 9; T u e s M a r c h 16; T u e s M a r c h 23. Meet 7:30pm at the s l o p e . • H . G . Wells Society A G M M o n d a y , M a r c h 22. 3

4

• T h e Underground Elger'—a b r e a t h s t o p p i n g film of the attempt o n the w o r l d u n d e r w a t e r dive length r e c o r d , M i n e s 303, T h u r s M a r c h 11, 12:30pm. • B U N A C : W a n t t o w o r k in N o r t h A m e r i c a this s u m m e r ? T h e n c o m e to the G r e e n C o m m i t t e e R o o m , this Friday, 12:30pm. • B a d g e s o c make badges! T a s t e n o o b j e c t e . g . " I n c e s t is R e l a t i v e " ; " O r g a s m — F a c t or Friction?", " N e c r o phili a is D e a d B o r i n g " . C o n t a c t C h r i s T a y l o r , c / o M e c h E n g letter-racks. • T h a n k you to t h o s e kind s o u l s w h o d e c i d e d to m o v e the M i n i Estate, by S o u t h s i d e o n S u n d a y night, I really love havin g to s p e n d £50 to get it fixed. Thanks. •If anyone is interested in a c t i n g / c r e w i n g at the E d i n b u r g h F r i n g e in A u g u s t / S e p t e m b e r . W e are h o p i n g to take a c o u p l e of p r o d u c t i o n s . C o n t a c t M i k e P i c k u p or C h r i s Barton c / o D r a m s o c , IC U n i o n . •Wanted: p e r s o n or p e r s o n s u n k n o w n to help with m a k e - u p / w a r d r o b e / p r o p s for 2 s h o r t plays to be p r o d u c e d for the C N D benefit do on A p r i l 30. C o n t a c t " E r i c " J a r v i s , c / o D r a m s o c or 589-5111 ext 1054.


Supplies to Poland Further details In the last week encouraging impetus has been gained by the 'Supplies to P o l a n d ' group's project w h i c h involves the transport a n d distribution in Poland, of 200 tonnes (ten lorries worth!) of food, clothing and medical supplies w h i c h s h o u l d ease the hardship of at least some of those that are suffering as a result of the shortages caused by the recent crisis. In particular, special baby foods a n d the supplies in many hospitals are dangerously low. T h e c r e w comprising of about fifteen Imperial College students is n o w virtually complete a n d will be meeting with any other helpers every T u e s d a y a n d Friday at 12:45pm in the U n i o n U p p e r Dining Hall.

Loughborough race home H y d e P a r k suffered a n i n v a s i o n on S a t u r d a y afternoon as 700 runners sought to complete their laps in I m p e r i a l College's 34th a n n u a l H y d e P a r k R e l a y . Sebastian Coe's failure to appear d i s a p p o i n t e d some, but the event was still graced by a n u m b e r of i n t e r n a t i o n a l stars a n d teams from as far a w a y as S w e d e n . Coe's absence d i d not stop L o u g h b o r o u g h U n i v e r s i t y r e t a i n i n g the title, w h i l e the L a d i e s ' R a c e a t t r a c t e d a r e c o r d n u m b e r o f entries. A t the p r i z e - g i v i n g , D r T o n y W a t t s recounted how the event h a d been started w i t h 9 teams i n 1949. T h e event was sponsored b y N a t i o n a l W e s t m i n s t e r B a n k w h o have now sponsored it for a n u m b e r of years. Results o n page 13.

T h e preferred plan for the project was originally conceived outside the College and is both ambitious a n d highly original. N o w the challenge is being met by a group made u p solely of Imperial College students and staff run by M a l c o l m C l a r k e , a n electrical engineering postgraduate. H o p i n g to go this c o m i n g vacation, it is planned to ship the supplies on the Elbe from H a m b u r g to Prague o n a single 200t barge whose owner can hopefully be persuaded to c o m e a n d pick u p the cargo in L o n d o n . N o r m a l l y barges travel empty in this direction and should therefore be available quite cheaply. In Prague where w e have contacts in the T e c h n i c a l U n i v e r s i ty the supplies will be divided into ten C z e c h lorries. E a c h lorry will be a c c o m p a n i e d by s o m e Imperial College students to the destinations for the supplies designated by the C h u r c h and the State in P o l a n d . A t present s u c h supplies are being distributed through either C h u r c h or State n e t w o r k s , but in this way we hope in some way to keep a check o n whether the supplies arriving from the W e s t are actually reaching those w h o really require the assistance. If successful such a venture will not only help the Polish people but also allay doubts in Britain The start of the men's race. about the final o u t c o m e of s u c h donations o n c e in Polish hands and hence possibly encourage m o r e aid in the future. W e are w o r k i n g o n t h e project with a n established charity, the O c k e n d e n V e n t u r e , w h i c h will be organising the collection of the supplies in Britain. H o w e v e r w e still need funds a n d donations of supplies and therefore we apnea! to a n y b o d y who has contacts with a firm or k n o w s of a firm who may be interested in our s c h e m e to contact M a l c o l m C l a r k e through the U n i o n Office letter-racks. Y o u could even contact them on our behalf. Similarly any helpful c o m m e n t s and ideas and any alternatives to the scheme will be gratefully appreciated.

Priest at IC Last week, C h r i s Priest, p r o b a b l y the best B r i t i s h science fiction w r i t e r a l i v e , c a m e to t a l k t o I C S F S . H i s wife, L i s a T u t t l e , an A m e r i c a n S Fwriter whose c o l l a b o r a t i o n Wmdhuven is n o w

170

a v a i l a b l e t h r o u g h N E L , also came. C h r i s talked about w h a t a n d why Science F i c t i o n is, postul a t i n g that we a r e t h e first century to consider l o n g - t e r m change, a n d that thus SF" was a pr odu c t o f o u r society.

W H E N I T HAI'PfcN'S

Disarmament 'Teach In' The Protest against the present phase of the nuclear arms escalation has made s u c h a n impact over the last few years that few people c a n have remained totally agnostic o n these matters. In the near future the controversy c a n only intensify as T r i d e n t b e c o m e s more expensive a n d as the government attempts to site C r u i s e missiles here. Unfortunately, all this has not u s u a l l y b e e n a c c o m p a n i e d by a n increase in knowledge a n d understanding of the underlying issues. M P s a r e themselves ignorant, as was demonstrated b y the l o w level of debate during the first parliamentary discussion of Nuclear Arms policy for 15 years in M a r c h 1980. ^ T h i s S a t u r d a y , M a r c h 6, t h e r e is a n opportunity for people t o discuss and learn more about the vitally important issues. In

The Ministry of Disinformation: various positions adopted by British government on the issue of nuclear war. cooperation with a local C N D and W o r l d Disarmament Campaign ( W D C ) group, I C C N D has organised an all-day ' T e a c h In'. In the m o r n i n g t h e r e w i l l be f o u r t a l k s b y distinguished speakers. T h e n , in the afternoon participants choose one of six w o r k s h o p s where they will discuss and analyse one area in depth. T h e role play w o r k s h o p w o u l d allow y o u to relive and analyse those arguments that you wish you had fared better in. For the last hour everyone meets together again for a talk about what has been resolved

NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT ' TEACH-IN' ' T e a c h In' S a t u r d a y March 6, H u x l e y R m 213 10:00am-5:00pm Morning Session 10:15-12:30 L o r d (Philip) N o e l - B a k e r — ' D e m o b i l i s a t i o n ' Eirwen H a r b o t t l e — ' P s y c h o l o gy and D i s a r m a m e n t ' G e r r y M c G l y n n — ' C h r i s t i a n Perspectives' D u n c a n Rees — ' T h e G r o w t h of the M o v e m e n t — T h e Russian Threat' Afternoon Session 2:00-4:00pm W o r k s h o p s : a n opportunity to discuss i n greater depth some of the

and what this means for the future. Things are moving fast. T h e W o m e n ' s P e a c e C a m p s outside the p r o p o s e d C r u i s e missile bases need support and publicity. T h e U N S e c o n d Session o n D i s a r m a m e n t in J u n e is becoming an important focus of attention as we discover that Reagan and T h a t c h e r do not intend to participate. T h e r e is a lot to be done and choices will have to be made. W e h o p e that the T e a c h - i n t o m o r r o w will p r e p a r e people to make them wisely. ICCND

issues involved in N u c l e a r D i s a r m a m e n t a n d D i s a r m a m e n t 1) Strategy 2) N u c l e a r arms proliferation and N u c l e a r power 3) Alternatives 4) G o v e r n m e n t secrecy in the media 5) T h e T h i r d W o r l d and the A r m s R a c e 6) Role plays 4:00-5:00pm S u m m i n g U p

FELIX, March 5, 1982

E n t r a n c e £2 waged; £1 unwaged (inc students)

Page 3


The truth about my other life by Barney

McCabe

H o w m u c h m o r e of this bullshit must we be subjected to? N o b o d y , least of all an election candidate, has yet hit u p o n what doing a sabbatical U n i o n job is about. It's not about boycotting this, opposing that, striking here or o c c u p y i n g there. It's not about m a k i n g U G M s interesting, or getting people involved in a n d to respect "their U n i o n " . A l l of these ideas are what a large group of egotistical ignorami imagine are the key functions of a "sabbatical". T h e y are wrong. T h e most important qualify needed in a sabbatical is a c o m m i t m e n t to helping other people; whether it be directing them to the nearest M a c D o n a l d s or opening the G y m c h a n g i n g r o o m s , t h e r e m u s t be t h a t c o m m i t m e n t to helping. 90% of the job I do is geared to helping students get o n with their business.

The case against Apartheid by Graeme

Shaw

1982 has been declared "International Y e a r of M o b i l i s a t i o n of S a n c t i o n s A g a i n s t S o u t h A f r i c a " by the U n i t e d N a t i o n s . T h e issue about sanctions is a n o l d one. It was first introduced in about 1957. H o w e v e r , the reason w h y it has h a d little effect is that there has been no solidarity in the sanctions campaign, there have always been countries that disobeyed U N policy, a n d unfortunately Britain is the worst culprit. A t the last U N A s s e m b l y , fourteen resolutions were passed on apartheid; only two countries did not vote for t h e m , one was the U S A and the other, Britain. T h e need for sanctions against S A f r i c a has c o m e about because of the " s t u b b o r n efforts of the regime to perpetuate racist domination by an ever increasing dependence o n violence a n d r e p r e s s i o n a n d t o c o n t i n u e its i l l e g a l o c c u p a t i o n of N a m i b i a , in defiance of repeated appeals by the international c o m m u n i t y and flagrant contravention of the U n i t e d N a t i o n s C h a r t e r , the Universal Declaration of H u m a n Rights a n d the D e c l a r a t i o n on G r a n t i n g of I n d e p e n d e n c e to C o l o n i a l C o u n t r i e s a n d P e o p l e s " this has " c r e a t e d an explosive situation in S o u t h e r n A f r i c a and constitutes no longer a threat to, but a manifest breach of international peace a n d s e c u r i t y j ' But why hasn't the U N Security C o u n c i l taken any action? S i m p l e , because Britain and t h e U S A a r e p e r m a n e n t m e m b e r s of t h e Council. T h e call for sanctions is total a n d complete, it includes an effective oil embargo, a cessation of c o l l a b o r a t i o n w i t h S o u t h A f r i c a i n the military a n d nuclear fields, a n d of investments in a n d loans to S o u t h A f r i c a , it also calls for the denial of certain supplies, s u c h as electronic

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T h e organisation of which I a m part and w h i c h exists generally to serve students has two distinct functions. T h e first is to provide administrative back-up for well over 100 active clubs a n d societies; r o o m s and equipment for s t u d e n t s ' use a n d a stable o r g a n i s a t i o n distributing public money fairly a m o n g those s o c i e t i e s . T h e s e c o n d f u n c t i o n of t h i s organisation is to ensure that all the other s e r v i c e s ( p r o v i d e d m o s t l y by College) for s t u d e n t s — f r o m " a n e d u c a t i o n " to refectories, residence to welfare—are provided as high a standard as possible. F o r the U n i o n to perform this second function there exists a complete network of accountable (i.e. elected) representatives or observers on all the College decision a n d policy m a k i n g committees (apart, that is, from the Rector's Policy C o m m i t t e e a n d the E x a m i n i n g Boards!). T h e representatives play an extremely valuable role in putting the students' case where it is relevant. In this w a y , the U n i o n plays a constructive part in the running of the College; a part which is fully i n t e g r a t e d w i t h t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of t h e College and w h i c h is respected by those who ultimately govern it. B y far the greatest d e m a n d o n a sabbatical's time (especially the D P s and H o n Sees) comes from the first of the two functions outlined above. T h e wrath of the few hundred people per day who visit the U n i o n Office would soon be d o w n o n a s a b b a t i c a l w h o , t h r o u g h campaigning in other directions, allowed his attentions to sway from the needs of the societies. F i n e he/she would make U G M s popular; fine he/she would make more news for F E L I X ; fine h e / s h e w o u l d achieve great political popularity; but at what expense? It

a n d c o m m u n i c a t i o n s equipment, machinery a n d chemicals, as well as technology. Y o u may argue that by i m p l e m e n t i n g sanctions Britain would be doing more h a r m to the b l a c k o p p r e s s e d people in S o u t h e r n A f r i c a . T h e U N recognizes this, but the people in S o u t h A f r i c a a n d the frontline states have already laid their heads on the line by making the plea for sanctions, have we the right to say they are wrong? Still, the U N affirms that the c o s t of sanctions is very small c o m p a r e d to the c o s t of t h e e x i s t i n g h u m a n s u f f e r i n g a n d degradation in S o u t h Africa a n d the threat to international peace. Alternatively, you may argue that sanctions w o u l d be detrimental to the British e c o n o m y , as we d e p e n d u p o n trade with S o u t h A f r i c a , e s p e c i a l l y for s o m e m i n e r a l s , s u c h as v a n a d i u m and tungsten. H o w e v e r , m u c h of this d e p e n d e n c e is false, unnecessary and foolish; D r D a v i d O w e n , w h e n he was British F o r e i g n Secretary stated that "we are in a position of depending on S o u t h Africa far more \ than is healthy if we are to pursue consistent a n d viable foreign and e c o n o m i c policies." People also argue that British companies w o u l d do more g o o d by operating in S o u t h A f r i c a than by pulling out, but what is the evidence to support this? T h e non-whites still have p o o r wages, about a tenth of those for white w o r k e r s , few amenities, poor education a n d housing a n d barely any political or civil rights. E v e n B a r c l a y s , w h i c h is better t h a n , most companies, gives fewer opportunities to its black employees, a n d although they pay wages that are higher t h a n the n a t i o n a l average, it is of little use when they are actively s u p p o r t i n g the g o v e r n m e n t , b? b u y i n g G o v e r n m e n t Defense B o n d s for example. S o u t h A f r i c a is a " d e m o c r a c y " (for whites) a n d not all of them support apartheid as fervently as the government, so it would take only a little more international pressure to m a k e a majority of the whites realise that the time had c o m e to dismantle the apartheid regime. It wouldn't take long if sanctions were applied, a n d Britain c o u l d manage without

FELIX, March 5, 1982

w o u l d be quite w r o n g to damage the clubs and societies merely in order to c o n f o rm to the misconceptions of a misguided few, after all how does one judge the success of a nation? Is it by the size and strength of its army, or, is it by the quality of life of its people? " B u t what about U G M s ? " I hear you ask. A s far as I a m c o n c e r n e d a U G M is where I go for a little self-indulgent fun. it is a forum for debate w h i c h leads to policy; it is a rubberstamp body but that is not all. N o ! It's a great o p p o r t u n i t y for e g o t i s t s t o f u r t h e r t h e i r interests. The hacks and would-be hacks a m o n g y o u will probably be c r y i n g out in d i s g u s t at m y l a c k of c o n c e r n f o r o u r democratic body. A U G M is not democratic, it has nothing to do with democracy, it merely serves to give the appearance to College of enormous student power when it mandates one of us to pursue a particular policy. That's about the only reason why we bother with them at all. In s u m m a r y , I have enjoyed most of the publicity I've personally had at I C , soT'm sure, have other U n i o n Officers. M u c h of it has been untrue, but it's all been fun. I wouldn't have let myself in for all those snotty jobs w h i c h are n e v e r i n d i v i d u a l l y i m p o r t a n t or i n t e r e s t i n g enough to mention in F E L I X if it wasn't for the opportunity of a bit of ego-tripping, nor would anyone else in their right m i n d . M a y I suggest that, should y o u want to vote, y o u vote for proven commitment to helping others, and vote for technical c o m p e t a n c e in every field, from C o m m i t t e e handling through to duplicator operating to pinball machine repairing! T h a n k - y o u for reading. trading with S o u t h A f r i c a , for a short while at least, whether by stockpiling beforehand or else using alternative suppliers. Even partial sanctions would have an effect, or cutting off diplomatic relations—but something must be done. Imperial College too is linked to S o u t h Africa. In 1965 S i r W i l l i a m P e n n e y , C h a i r m a n of U K A E A and Rector of I C , visited S o u t h Africa " w h e n the Pelindaba reactor went 'critical'". In 1979 there was an advert in the J o h a n n e s b u r g S u n d a y T i m e s inviting students to apply for a c o u r s e in n u c l e a r r e a c t o r s c i e n c e a n d engineering at Imperial College. T h e Royal S c h o o l of M i n e s has obvious examples of collaboration with S o u t h Africa; there are about half a d o z e n students sponsored by S o u t h A f r i c a n companies, students w o r k out there during the s u m m e r vacation a n d some even go out there to live a n d lecturers often visit to give seminars or advise. T h i s is all in contravention of U N policy. The College Careers Advisory Service invites s u c h companies as Rio T i n t o Z i n c , C h a r t e r e d C o n s o l i d a t e d Services L t d (part of Anglo A m e r i c a n ) and others to the College, f i e s e c o m p a n i e s c o m e to r e c r u i t white students to w o r k in S o u t h A f r i c a , to help boost the e c o n o m y and sustain the apartheid regime. It would d o no one any h a r m to end our hospitality to these companies; the C a r e e r s A d v i s o r y Service could still publicise their vacancies and graduates c o u l d simply treck a c r o s s L o n d o n for t h e i r i n t e r v i e w s . T h u s nobody's freedom would be impeded and we c o u l d s h o w o u r disapproval of the S o u t h A f r i c a n government. S o what else c a n we do? S t o p banking with Barclays is one answer, it is still the biggest bank in S o u t h Africa a n d supports the Pretoria regime, far more so than any other high street bank. Secondly, don't buy S o u t h A f r i c a n p r o d u c t s and thirdy, go on the National M a r c h o n M a r c h 14. H e l p e n d racisim in the world a n d help the coloured majority in S o u t h Africa by supporting the U N ' s year for sanctions.


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ELECTION SPECIAL


President: STEVE GOULDER proposed by Pallab Ghosh Residence It is clear that any new student a c c o m m o d a t i o n must be in the form of H e a d Tenancies or short life housing schemes. H o w e v e r , some conditions in Hamlet and C a m b r i d g e G a r d e n s are appalling. I do not expect students to live in such conditions, the U n i o n will support any action taken to improve this situation.

T h e Candidate S t e p h e n G o u l d e r is a third year undergraduate in the Biochemistry department. W h i l e at Imperial C o l l e g e has t a k e n a n ac ti v e a n d constructive role in the U n i o n . A s S o c i a l C l u b s C o m m i t t e e C h a i r m a n he has encouraged a s u b s t a n t i a l i n c r e a s e in c l u b a c t i v i t y . T h i s affects a wide range of students, not just h a c k s . Steve also spent eight months last year coordinating the R C S C e n t e n a r y celebrations. Steve has proved himself to be a n able candidate for President. H e has the experience and ability to bring about improvements for students next year.

External Affairs W e must have an active voice in the current reorganisation of L o n d o n University instigated b y S w i n n e r t o n - D y e r . B e c a u s e of i t s h i g h p r o p o r t i o n of overseas students it is important that I take a s p e c i a l i n t e r e s t in their increasingly difficult situation.

Pallab Ghosh

A c a d em i c Affairs It will be essential for me to take an active role in A c a d e m i c Affairs next session when the first part of the Rector's 20% cut in all departments is being made. W e must fight any cut in student numbers and in the quality of learning at this College.

T h e Policies Refectories Little has been d o n e to improve the quality of food available in College. T o achieve anything we must demonstrate widespread popular support for o u r policies. I intend to d o this by organising a refectory boycott for the first w e e k of N o v e m b e r . A s P r e s i d e n t I a l s o propose to bring the U n i o n Refectory under U n i o n control as a profit making c o n c e r n .

Stephen Goulder

President: ANDREW LYALL proposed by David Jago It is a l m o s t u n i v e r s a l l y a c c e p t e d a m o n g Imperial College students that in recent years their U n i o n has b e c o m e completely out of touch with the student body. T h e small group of students who traditionally s u r r o u n d the E x e c u t i v e are not typical of the IC student and s e r v e o n l y to i s o l a t e t h e m f r o m s t u d e n t o p i n i o n . T h e b e s t w a y to o v e r c o m e t h i s p r o b l e m w o u l d be for the President to hold a regular surgery o n , say M o n d a y lunchtime during w h i c h any student, not merely officers and ' h a c k s ' will be able to talk with the U n i o n President about anything that might c o n c e r n h i m / h e r , be it academic, personal or political. T h i s , y o u may think is very simple — it is, but I m u s t e m p h a s i z e , u n l i k e the g r a n d a n d exhorbitant claims presidential candidates normally make its simplicity means that it will b e c o m e a reality. In m y view implementation of s u c h simple ideas will b r i n g a b o u t the m u c h n e e d e d ,

i n c r e a s e d c o m m u n i c a t i o n w h i c h will itself bring great rewards in other directions: for a united student body lead by an informed and determined President will be hard to resist. A t first sight, through not having previously held high office in the U n i o n , it may seem that I a m underqualified for the job of President. H o w e v e r in my five years at IC (two on my legs, one in hospital and the last two in a wheel chair) I have always represented my year group o n the staff/student academic affairs c o m m i t t e e s , I h a v e t a k e n t w o d e g r e e s in widely differing s u b j e c t s , e x p e r i e n c e d two constituent colleges and their unions and met a great number of people. I would like to be the new type of U n i o n President Imperial College desperately needs in this c o m i n g year. T o d o it I need y o u r vote. T h e choice is yours.

A . Lyall

President: J.MARTIN TAYLOR proposed by Andrew Needham I decided at the outset of this campaign not to make unkeepable promises merely t o grab votes. But there's only space for a brief outline of my intentions, so very quickly. Grants I think it's time we stopped burying our head in the sand. N e x t year is going to be very difficult for many students, a n d we must campaign to prevent the year after being even worse. Education C u t s M a n y of you will have felt their first effects. W o r s e is to c o m e . H o w e v e r , we shouldn't just have blanket opposition to all changes caused by cuts. W e must play a full part in discussions s u r r o u n d i n g t h e m , whilst maintaining our opposition. Refectories T h e r e have been some i m p r o v e m e n t s this year at the U n i o n ' s instigation. W e must keep on pushing our ideas next year. I won't be calling for a boycott, because M o o n e y simply isn't capable of doing his job without o u r help.

Residence T h i s year we've accepted mid-session rent increases without protest. I'm determined to stop this h a p p e n i n g again. H a l l s are v e r y expensive already and steps must be t a k e n to hold costs d o w n next year. In general the President must take time to gauge opinion, not just rely o n the few people at U G M s . Socialising other than in the U n i o n Bar is essential. A l s o , he m u s t s t a n d u p f o r students i n t e r e s t s , not a l w a y s b e n d i n g to the convenience of the College authorities. Finally, beware. S o m u c h c r a p is talked in these e l e c t i o n s , even by c a n d i d a t e s w h o should k n o w better. If you want a President w h o is experienced (I've been Exte r n a l Affairs Officer for IV2 years), sees things f r o m a student (not a College) point of view, a n d isn't just out to inflate his o w n ego o r get a c u s h y job next year, then give me your vote. C u t the c r a p a n d let's go!


President: ROBERT HOLDING proposed by J.Seymour Cole T h e Experience I C U Externa] Affairs Officer 1978/9* E d i t o r of S e n n e t ( n o w L o n d o n S t u d e n t ) 1979/80* C h a i r m a n of the O v e r s e a s Students C o m m i t tee 1980/1* R S M U Newsletter Editor 1979/80 I sat o n the Metallurgy dept staff/student committee for two years *I a m lying about these. T h e Bullshit Basically I a m standing for the job of I C U President because I fancy a year off from my studies. It must be great to get a grant a n d a free r o o m a n d do bugger all for it. It is obvious that most of y o u haven't the nous to w o r k this out so y o u might as well vote for me. It is Y O U R union so Y O U must decide whether y o u want one of the self-serving prats who are standing against me as y o u r President or self-

serving me — at least I'm honest about it and a m not a prat. T h e Policies I will fight t o m a k e sure that m y mates are alright as regards piss-ups, parking permits, etc. I feel that I w o u l d be able to w o r k well with the other sabbaticals; the people who are standing are fairly r a n d o m and so I s h o u l d be able to d u m p all m y w o r k o n t h e m leaving me to get o n with the real presidents job: getting pissed, gatecrashing parties a n d attending sundry other hoolies. F o r a long time we have had Presidents who have been elected on certain policies and then done piss all about them. If y o u look at all the candidates a n d all their promises I a m sure you will agree with me that there is only one choice: A B S T A I N .

Dep. President: PHILIP GREENSTREET proposed by Crispin Dobson This is a ridiculous attitude to take. I don't intend to be pu s h ed a r o u n d by College or the extremes of student o p i n i o n , but if a c t i o n is needed I will take it. I i n t e n d to t a k e ' M i k e ' t o e v e r y U n i o n M e e t i n g , a n d hopefully one or two other items as well. M o s t of all, I want to k n o w what the average student wants of the U n i o n , a n d I shall d o m y utmost to find out. If S i m o n Shaw's motion to m a k e D e p u t y President in charge of IC Ents is passed, thus making Ents Officer a sabbatical, I am confident that I c a n carry the post. I may not be the best m a n for the job, but I'm the best o n offer.

W h y do I think that I would make a g o o d D P ? W e l l , I feel that I could deal well with all the aspects of the post. I have a b r o a d experience of running a n d sitting on committees, for as V i c e President of R C S I have sat on F i n a n c e C o m m i t t e e , a n d handled estimates. I have a g o o d w o r k i n g k n o w l e d g e of t h e U n i o n Building, a n d a m well acquainted with the lock system employed within College. But there should be more to being D P than just going through the w o r k . Y o u s h o u l d be capable a n d confident enough to deputise for the President w h e n the need arises, able to raise interest in the U n i o n amongst students, and able to c o m m u n i c a t e with those a r o u n d you. In their campaigns, various people will tell y o u how wonderfully militant they intend to be.

Phil Greenstreet

Deputy President: JOHN WHITE proposed by Alan Edwards Firstly, if elected I would have to strive for a g o o d w o r k i n g relationship with those people a r o u n d me. especially the President, and H o n S e c . A n uncoordinated E x e c would be of little use to anyone. Together with this and from my experiences this year, I have found that one of the most important, and essential functions of the Deputy President is to be in the U n i o n areas for a large amount of time — not only during the daytime. T h u s he w o u l d be m o r e i n f o r m e d a b o u t the U n i o n f i x t u r e s a n d generally more likely to be able to deal q u i c k ly with any problem which may arise. I propose to d o this, having spent a lot of time in the U n i o n Building to date.

I also p r o p o s e to help the executives of each club a n d society with the promotion of their activities, as after all, this is the only contact most students have with the U n i o n . T h i s will involve taking a close interest in all the major s u b c o m m i t t e e s , and especially the financial affairs of clubs — through the subcommittees. T h e D e p u t y President is responsible for the security of the U n i o n areas, a n d the safety of those within it. I consider the security of the U n i o n Building especially, to be poor. A closer check will have to be kept o n the whereabouts of k e y s , and possibly restricting the areas in which people may move, especially nonstudents using the U n i o n facilities.

John White


Deputy President: GERARD LIVETT proposed by William Waterson W i t h respect to m y entertaining committments students ask me: " W h y doesn't the Ents C o m m i t t e e stage any big concerts?" The answer to this is quite simple. We (the Ents C o m m i t t e e ) do not receive a large enough grant from the U n i o n . T h i s is one thing I am campaigning for, a larger E n t s grant. I would also improve the facilities in the Union, such as the toilets, the kitchens, etc. Student welfare is a n o t h e r branch of my conce(a)rn. It would be my duty to encourage more students to b e c o m e aware of what is available to them. I would also vehemently oppose any infringement of student liberty and of their living standards, s u c h as mid-session rent increases. F o r more details see me at the hustings. Lots of love from, Gerard

O v e r the p a s t y e a r s , we h a v e s e e n a succession of sabbatical U n i o n Officers who seem barely capable of doing the job. P a r t of the p r o b l e m as I c a n see it is that the candidates w h o get themselves elected have b e c o m e so intwined with the U n i o n heirarchy that they lose t o u c h with the reality of life on campus. It will be m y intention as D e p u t y President to inject a n e w a n d youthful vitality to the Union. P e o p l e will ask me the most o b v i o u s question: " W h a t experience have y o u had in U n i o n affairs so far?" D u r i n g the course of last t e r m , 1 was elected a m e m b e r of the Entertainments C o m m i t t e e . M o s t of m y sparetime is n o w spent helping with events that the entertainments committee organise.

Hon."Secretary: NIGEL CRYER proposed by Karl Schmidt I've k n o w n Nigel since I've been at Imperial. H e ' s friendly, approachable and well organised — all the qualities necessary for I C U H o n S e c . H e ' s well acquainted with the committees and system of the U n i o n a n d thus k n o w s a lot about the job already. A s a c o n s e q u e n c e, he realises the responsibilities w h i c h y o u shall bestow u p o n h i m by voting for h i m as I C U H o n S e c . H e is the m a n to d o the job a n d d o it properly. S o , for a well organised U n i o n next year, vote Nigel C r y e r for I C U H o n S e c .

Karl Schmidt I see the job of H o n Sec in two ways; firstly as an a d m i n i s t r a t i v e post a n d s e c o n d l y as a representative of students. I will take the administrative responsibilities seriously since, if the U n i o n does not r u n smoothly, then it c a n n o t h o p e t o e f f e c t i v e l y r e p r e s e n t the students o n important issues.

I want to see a new role for the H o n Sec — it has been all too easy for h i m to remain in the b a c k g r o u n d but now, with education cuts, we are being exploited more than ever and the H o n S e c must c o m e out from the shadows and actively join in the opposition. Some cuts are u n a v o i d a b l e b u t w h e n t h e y are obviously unreasonable, we must unite to fight them. In addition to cuts, there are several other areas w h i c h I feel require improvement — attendance at U G M s needs to be increased to m a k e t h e m more representative and, with the possibility of a blind student in M a t h s next year, the facilities for s u c h cases in College needs to be investigated. I have the experience a n d e n t h u s i a s m t o do the job of H o n S e c well so use your vote wisely and vote for me — by doing so, y o u are voting for an influential and well r u n Union.

Hon. Secretary: MARY FREEMAN proposed by Frank Rowsell In m y three years at Imperial College I have w a t c h e d m y contemporaries b e c o m e more a n d m o r e remote and isolated from I C U , initial interest a n d enthusiasm b e c o m i n g d a m p e n e d down. I a m campaigning o n M a r y ' s behalf because I a m c o n v i n c e d her election will be a significant, as well as pleasant, change for the U n i o n . S he is a candidate w h o is a m p l y capable of inspiring and motivating other people; hard w o r k is no s t r a n g e r t o h e r a n d s h e is a n e f f e c t i v e o r g a n i s e r w h o is a b l e t o t a c k l e p r o b l e m s without fuss. M o r e importantly she is a good listener. I urge y o u to give her the chance to show y o u this too.

Frank Rowsell T o b e h o n e s t , m y ' h a c k ' c r e d i b i l i t y is absolutely zero. I have not sat on any of the following committees: C o u n c i l , External Affairs, Ents, T U C , C B I , National Front O v e r s e a s committee. S o , if y o u have never

been o n any of these either I a m the obvious candidate for y o u . H o w e v e r , I a m a serious candidate for this post, and as H o n Sec my priorities w o u l d be — t o c a r r y out all the administrative duties an H o n S e c is required to do. —to function as an active member of the E x e c in the political field. —to thoroughly organise all the paperwork and minimize the h u m p h (wherever possible). —to investigate methods of improving the refectories' service (e.g. requesting that large displays, giving the opening times and a price list, be set up; investigating the reasons for the extortionate food prices). 1 regard a sabbatical post as a full-time job, and not a 'year off, but I realise that it is not a straight 9 till 5 job, which means that I a m p r e p a r e d to d e v o t e as m u c h t i m e as is necessary to do the H o n See's job — and to do it well.


Hon. Secretary: ROBYN MORGAN proposed by Ray Goundry T h e job of H o n o r a r y Secretary has two sides: administrative duties a n d , to quote from the job description " . . . . a political function as a member of the Executive committee". T h e administrative duties range from taking, reproducing and circulating minutes of the numerous committees on which he sits to allocating parking permits a n d being Returning Officer for U n i o n elections. H o w e v e r , it is the political function as a member of the Executive that makes the H o n o r a r y Secretary more than just a nine-to-five administrator. Whilst it is the President's job to actually represent the views of students to College, to other students and to o t h e r e x t e r n a l b o d i e s , d e t e r m i n i n g the views a n d s u g g e s t i n g s o l u t i o n s to any problems must be initiated by all members of the e x e c u t i v e , i n c l u d i n g the H o n o r a r y Secretary. I believe that I have the enthusiasm to perform the administrative duties required and

the desire to take a full part in the initiation and execution of ideas as part of the Exe c u ti ve . I will not be afraid to propose radical changes in the U n i o n if this is needed but only if it is likely that s u c h a course of action will serve the interests of students and has the support of students. I also believe that experience of the workings of the U n i o n is, at least, desirable and, through being a member last year and chairman this year of the Permanent W o r k i n g Party and thus having a seat on C o u n c i l , I have the knowledge to perform m y duties efficiently. T o conclude, I ask y o u first to use your vote. This does not of itself guarantee a U n i o n that reflects its m e m b e r s ' views but it is a step in the right direction. Secondly, I ask y o u to vote for me, for an H o n o r a r y Secretary who does more than his job is w o r t h .

Robyn Morgan

indicate that y o u have voted. Y o u must cast your vote immediately and not take ballot papers away. T h e v o t i n g s y s t e m u s e d is t h e Single Transferable Vote (STV), by which y o u express your preference by putting numbers 1, 2, 3 etc. by the candidates' names o n the ballot paper. H o w e v e r , if y o u only have one preference put a 1 by that candidates name and leave the other spaces blank.

The Guff By now you will no doubt have gathered that on M o n d a y a n d T u e s d a y ( M a r c h 8 and 9) next year's sabbatical officers will be elected. O n l y M a r t i n S. Taylor has stood for F E L I X Editor (so there will be elections for the posts of President, D e p u t y President a n d H o n o r a r y Secretary). H i s statement of intent will appear in next week's issue. H o p e f u l l y y o u will have w i t n e s s e d the candidates' antics at yesterday's U G M , a n d will have seen the bumpf they have pr odu c ed. In this special F E L I X supplement you can read t h e i r i n d i v i d u a l m a n i f e s t o s , all p o s i t i v e l y bulging with wonderful promises and extensive qualifications. Before giving s o m e advice on how to c h o o se a candidate, I will explain the voting system used.

STV Firstly to vote at all you will need a valid IC U n i o n c a r d . B y showing this y o u can collect a ballot paper at any of the ballot boxes , which w i l l be s i t u a t e d i n all d e p a r t m e n t s f r o m

9:00am to 5:00pm on Monday Tuesday.

T h e c a r d w i l l be p u n c h e d

and to

T h e purpose of this system is that if there are three or more candidates for a post, your vote is not " l o s t " if your first choice candidate is not elected, but can help your s ec ond choice win over a third or fourth candidate. T o vote against a candidate, leave the space blank rather than putting a 2 or 3 against the name. If y o u are unable to decide between the candidates for a post or k n o w nothing about any of them, then I urge you to abstain by writing A B S T E N T I O N across the boxes for that post. F o r a v a l i d e l e c t i o n 2 5 % of t h e U n i o n membership must register a vote. Abstentions count as votes cast but spoilt papers (i.e. defaced, blank or with crosses) are not. T h e election for a post will be re-run if someone registers a valid complaint on procedure with the Elections C o m m i t t e e , if less than 25% of the membership vote, or if all fail to pass quota due to abstentions.

Advice It is important that we elect four sabbaticals who will perform their duties well. After all, these people influence the activity of the U n i o n to such an extent, that y o u should mak e an effort to ensure an informed decision. Firstly, by reading election handouts and posters you will be able to find out w h o is standing and why.

Hustings are usually a surprisingly good way of d e c i d i n g — y o u ' d be a m a z e d at h o w people's real qualities are revealed during s p e e c h e s a n d e s p e c i a l l y q u e s t i o n s . If y o u didn't attend yesterday's U G M then ask a friend how the candidates fared. B u t a w o r d of warning: N E V E R be influenced too m u c h by a p r o p o s e r . Y o u m u s t r e m e m b e r t h a t the proposer will not be doing the job a n d will normally have been chosen to say the few things that a candidate's modesty may prevent him from revealing personally. A s for the various promises made in the m a n i f e s t o s ( a n d e l s e w h e r e ) , y o u m u s t be c r i t i c a l ; d e c i d e what y o u think that the sabbatical should do and then find the best candidate. S o m e people w a r p the truth or lie outright, but you must try to c h o o se people who intend to do something and not just keep the U n i o n ticking over. Y o u s h o u l d not be influenced by sex, race o r other asides but c h o o se the best person w h o has the ability to perform the duties required. A l s o do not pay too m u c h attention to strings of qualifications, but concentrate on why one person's ideas might be better than another. O f course y o u can always abstain if y o u think all the candidates are poor. I intend to do this in the H o n o r a r y Secretary election for i n s t a n c e , b e c a u s e none of the c a n d i d a t e s c o u l d possibly convince me that they are suitable. I will abstain in the hope that the H o n Sec election will be re-run and s o m e b o d y who I c o n s i d e r is s u i t e d for the p o s t w i l l s t a n d (perhaps a defeated candidate from one of the other elections?). S o r e m e m b e r to v o t e o n M o n d a y a n d Tuesday, even if y o u k n o w nothing about the candidates and merely wish to abstain. E v e r y vote cast is important in that it gives a measure of popularity, interest and satisfaction with the candidates and U n i o n .

oOOfvrll


Voting Monday, March 8 Tuesday, March 9

Li

Results UGM 1:00pm March 11 Great Hall


Grants Cut Action Week D o n ' t forget the m a r c h today from the University of L o n d o n U n i o n to Hyde Park.

Fares Fair O n S u n d a y , M a r c h 21, the cost of travelling o n L o n d o n T r a n s p o r t will double because of the H o u s e of L o r d s ruling the G L C ' F a r e s Fair' subsidy illegal. L o n d o n will then have the most expensive urban transport system i n the world. M o s t rational people c a n see the necessity of subsidising public transport E v e n under the F a r e s Fair scheme the public subsidy that L o n d o n T r a n s p o r t received was lower than in many other E u r o p e a n a n d A m e r i c a n cities. T h e only solution is to persuade the government to change the law. That's where you make your views k n o w n as someone w h o lives or w o r k s in L o n d o n . W r i t e now to your M P urging h i m / h e r to s u p p o r t the e x i s t i n g low fares policy. Secondly, join the lobby of M P s o n T h u r s d a y , M a r c h 11 (meet at C e n t r a l H a l l , W e s t m i n ster between 2:00 a n d 9:00pm) and support the m a r c h o n S a t u r day, M a r c h 13, starting at C o u n t y H a l l , S E 1 , at 2:30pm.

Bookshop News

SF Soc

Socialist Soc

O n T u e s d a y of next week the S F S o c will show the film that this bulletin reported as being s h o w n last week. T h i s is not m y fault, I only obey orders. It is due to excessive thionite intake combined with a recent reading of Slaughterhouse 5 o n the part of the secretary. A l l those of y o u w h o keep b a c k c o p i e s of F E L I X c a n read m y c o m m e n t s of last week for information o n The Big Bus.

Scout & Guide N e x t T h u r s d a y ( M a r c h 11) at 12:30pm we are showing a film entitled " T h e U n d e r g r o u n d E i g e r " in M i n e s 303 in conjunction with C a v i n g C l u b . T h i s film was first s h o w n o n I T V in 1976 a n d is about a world r e c o r d breaking attempt on the longest underwater dive in Keld H e a d cave, Yorkshire. This is a superb film a n d gives a very g o o d i n s i g h t i n t o o n e of t h e world's most dangerous sports. N o t to be missed. T h e r e are also still places left for the S c o t l a n d trip at Easter ( M a r c h 27 to A p r i l 3). F o r further information contact A . Griffiths, C h e m Eng 3.

Micro-club Lectures O n T u e s d a y , M a r c h 9, at 7:00pm i n Huxley 145 D a v i d Buckley of M i c r o m o u s e fame will be telling us of the trials and tribulations involved in getting a n electronic m o u s e to explore a n d find the centre of a large maze in the shortest possible time. Hopefully his o w n mouse Q u e s t e r will be demonstrated. S o all y o u hardware people out there, this is for y o u . T u e s d a y , M a r c h 16, at 7:00pm in H u x l e y 145; this is a lecture you've all been waiting for. After m u c h arm-twisting I N M O S will be giving us a presentation o n different aspects of V L S I a n d will be talking amongst other things about H D L — t h e i r chip design language a n d how Britain's m i c r o c h i p industry c a n c o m p e t e with the Japan es e . Hopefully we m a y also get a n insight into their future productions.

News A s y o u m a y already k n o w the U n i o n have granted us the money to buy a B B C model B m i c r o which will m a k e a welcome addition to the club's equipment. W h e n this new c o m p u t e r will materialise depends o n the efficiency of A c o r n , but hopefully it will be before the end of the current academic year. A l s o i n the pipeline is a donation of an A c o r n A t o m by a generous benefactor together with, hopefully, a n e w wire wrap gun. W e also have a line printer i n need of interfacing, a n d a line to the College's mainframe. F o r further details o n joining the M i c r o C l u b drop a letter to J o n Davies of D o C 2 via internal mail.

The 1982 R A G R A C E STARTS SEE A t last — a R a g Stunt! This weekend is the annual 1982 Rag R a c e , so get y o u r t e a m together quick! T e a m s of about 3 or 4 leave College between 3:00 a n d 7:00pm T O D A Y to travel to an area of the c o u n t r y . H e r e they visit universities, solve clues, sell magazines

TODAY!

SOCREPS

NOW

and have fun. P r i z e s a r c g i v e n for o r i g i n a l forms of transport a n d mascots, clues solved a n d money raised for Rag charities. S o get your team together a n d sign o n in the U n i o n L o w e r L o u n g e between 3:00 a n d 7:00pm today.

W e are still getting a s k ed for past e x a m papers. A l l our supply was handed over to the various departments a year ago, to be given to whom needed them free.

New Titles Managing Job Satis/action-Barclay H a n k i n , £3 T h e author has a n honours degree in C o m m u n i c a t i o n Engineering from Imperial College a n d as a member of the British C i v i l S e r v i ce Job Satisfaction T e a m , he applied his experience for over six years to pioneering experiments i n change. T h e examples are d r a w n from this period. Fortran 7 7 - D o n a l d M . Q . M o n r o , E . A r n o l d , £9.50 T h e author, a resident one, my description. " T h e m a n y o u love to hate", his description. H i s latest b o o k Fortran 77 provides a comprehensive introduction for students with a b a c k g r o u n d in p r o g r a m m i n g a s wefl a s those learning F o r t r a n as their first language. E n d e r b y - A n t h o n y Burgess, Penguin, £2.95 R a g f / m e - E . L . D o c t o r o w , P a n , £1.50 Solomons S e a / - H a m m o n d Innes, F o n t a n a , £1.75 Loosely E n g a g e d - C h r i s t o p h e r e M a t t h e w , A r r o w , £1.25 Nancy A s f o r - D e r e k M a r l o w e , Penguin, £1.75 G e t t i n g E u e n - W o o d y A l l e n , Star, £1.25 Dancing Wu Li Masters-Gary Z u k a v , F o n t a n a , £2.95 1982 Michelin Guide to Great Britain and Ireland, £4.85 Debrett's Correct Form, F u t u r a , £1.95

IC Radio Tonight at 8:00pm in Southside B a r I C R a d i o presents a Viewpoint Election Special. A l l the candidates for the sabbatical elections have been invited. A n y b o d y w h o c o m e s to the bar c a n ask a question, without all the fuss and bother of yesterday's H u s t i n gs U G M , a n d i n a m u c h more relaxed a n d informal atmosphere. If y o u can't make it to Southside B a r (which I'm sure y o u k n o w is n o w called H a r r y ' s Bar) at 8:00pm tonight, y o u c a n listen in the Halls r o u n d Prince's G a r d e n s o n 301m m e d i u m wave, o r o n gallery level i n s o m e of them. P S : Y o u may have expected this article to contain biting c y n i c i s m about S T O I C , but they simply aren't w o r t h the trouble.

Anti-apartheid A motion has alredy been submitted for a U n i o n G e n e r a l M e e t i n g c a l l i n g for a n e n d t o Imperial College contacts with South Africa and on Tuesday, M a r c h 9, the Liberal Peer, L o r d Beau mon t and C o s m a s D e s m o n d , a former political prisoner in S o u t h A f r i c a will be addressing a meeting o n " A p a r t h e i d a n d the need for S a n c t i o n s " . T h i s will be a g o o d o p p o r t u n i t y t o h e a r first hand about S o u t h Africa.

D o n ' t forget the R u g b y Sevens o n M a r c h 14. T h e M i n e s / I F D i s c o is o n M a r c h 11. T i c k e t s £1 from R S M U a n d social reps. Election papers are u p , s o start thinking about next year's officers. Gaynor

Ents In Ents we like to play a game. It's called ' S i m o n Says'. Basically it goes like this: If S i m o n says d o something we immediately j u m p to a n d do it! A n d of course if Simon says don't d o it we are more than happy to oblige — " S h a w thing b o s s ! " Well apart from that we are honoured to present a n 'Alternative Entertainments E v e n i n g ' with topical c o m e d y revue ' T h e C h i p S h o p S h o w ' , four hours of r o c k promotional videos a n d a live band. T h r o w in a swinging 'alternative' disco, cartoons a n d the usual liquid refreshments gives you a fun filled evening. Y o u ' r e not doing anything else tonight so bring a p o u n d note a n d enjoy! N e x t week's film is none other than The China Syndrome. Usual place, time a n d p r i c e — b e there!

FELIX, March 5, 1982

Y o u voted for t h e m , don't say P h i l didn't warn y o u . H e r e is the A n n u a l D i n n e r bit. In a daring bid to set us free f r o m M o o n e y , the D i n n e r will be a n extravagant four course affair held at the K e n s i n g t o n C l o s e H o t e l o n Friday, M a r c h 19. T i c k e t s (heavily susidised) are £9:50 available from dep reps a n d the R C S U Office. W i t h the money saved o n this dinner subsidy, y o u c a n afford a delightful w e e k e n d i n P a r i s (with R C S ? ) £25 inclusive of o n e night and breakfast in a " c l a s s y " hotel. Depart M a r c h 26 — last d a y of term. P u t your name o n the list of the R C S U Office. Page 11


ft Hockey Seconds

W e d n e s d a y , F e b r u a r y 24 Football IC I vs IC III vs IC V vs IC V I vs

Roval Hollovvav I Kings II London Hospital II Guvs III

i-2(H) 4-1 (Hj 4-2(A, 5-l.(A)

R u g b y (Gutteridge C u p Semi-Final) 9-7(A) IC I London Hospitals S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y 27 Football IC I vs Kings I IC II vs Kings II IC I V vs Kings III ic: V I vs Kings I V Hockey ic: I vs E T E S S A IC II vs E T E S S A Badminton ( U L U K O C u p Final) IC vs Guys

2-3(Hj O-l(H) (i-O'A) li-0(A) 3-3(H) 4-0(Aj 5-f.(H)

S u n d a y , F e b r u a r y 28 R u g b y (Gutteridge C u p Final) IC vs Q M C

fi-3i'Ai

(^Swimming S t i l l s m a r t i n g from last week's defeat at the hands of Bristol, I C took o n O x f o r d U n i v e r s i t y in o u r o w n p o o l . W i t h the V a r s i t y S w i m m i n g & W a t e r P o l o m a t c h d u e next weekend, they were keen to d o " s p i l l i n g l y w e l l , w h a t - h o r " ' C o n s e q u e n t l y we were u p against it a g a i n . W e destroyed their women's team, i.e. they were too af r ai d of o u r w o m e n (Francoise, etc.) to t u r n u p . T h e m e n d i d n ' t d o q u i t e so w e l l . O r g a n i s a t i o n a n d p r e p a r a t i o n ol the I C team were ol the usual h i g h s t a n d a r d a n d r u m o u r s that some o f the team were d r u n k a n d / o r got up late a r e totally w i t h o u t f o u n d a t i o n . O x f o r d were faster a n d litter (not difficult!) t h a n w e were, a n d o u r o n l y w i n n e r was J i m B o u c h e r i n the breastroke, alter a closely fought race w i t h one of the O x f o r d machines. T e a m : J. Campbell, 1. Wilier, A. Kenrick, II'. Moore', F. Lye, M. fuck, . V. Last, R. Leach, J. Boucher, (',. Gttrlon, B. Ashwin, l.indsey X.

Judo The London University Team Judo T o u r n a m e n t was h e l d for the first time for three years, we w o n last time. In the first r o u n d w e d r e w B r u n e i , a very strong t e a m a n d also the ref was g o i n g senile so a l t h o u g h we put u p a very good fight we were u n a b l e to w i n m o r e t h a n two contests therefore w e were k n o c k e d out. T h e r e was also a repercharge o p e r a t i n g so B r u n e i c a r r i e d us t h r o u g h ( i n the e n d they w o n the gold) a n d w e fought M u l t i c o l l e g e s a n d showed t h e m a t h i n g o r two. W e w o n 3-1 w i t h a bye m a k i n g it 4-1. T h i s took us into the r u n n e r s u p r o u n d a n d meant w e were f i g h t i n g Q M C for a m e d a l . T h i s looked as i f it was g o i n g to be a task because o u r heaviest p l a y e r was l i g h t e r t h a n their lightest but we m u d d l e d t h r o u g h a n d so came away with a medal. Page 12

O u t o f the l a n d o f the N o r t h came the I C S e c o n d cohort u n d e r c e n t u r i o n Stroomus. T h e y m a r c h e d reinforced b y a group o f senators F o r b u s , L i l u s a n d E l d r i g i a n to clear the colony C h i s w i c k o f the Etessan natives. T h e power a n d tactics o f the w e l l - d r i l l e d b a t t a l i o n showed i m m e d i a t e l y despite the sticky, recently c u l t i v a t e d battlefield. M a n y p o w e r f u l thrusts o n the right flank eventuallyled to a gaol b y F o r b u s , assisted w e l l b y E l d r i g i a n w h o p l a y e d t h r o u g h o u t w i t h the speed o f a seige engine a n d the skill o f a b a t t e r i n g r a m . T h e second goal followed good w o r k o n the right flank by F a r m u s a n d was scored by W y l i a n , a w i l d t r i b e s m a n from the f r o z e n l a n d f a r N o r t h . I n d i v i d u a l skirmishes broke out between the armies, involving Sharpus and Forbus. M e a n w h i l e W y l i a n h a d a d d e d to his second goal a n d F'armus scored just o n f u l l - t i m e . T h e defense of B u t l e r u s , Roessinkus, P i t h k e t l u s a n d S h a r p u s p l a y e d very w e l l but u n d o u b t e d l y the full praise o f the e m p i r e goes to J o n u s who shall be toasted by the legions t h r o u g h o u t the w o r l d for his performance that day. T e a m : Butlerus, Roessinkus, Jonus, Sharpus, Stroomus, Forbus, Lilus, Birdus. Wylian, Eldrigian,

Pithketlus, Farmus,

Ladies T o o u r surprise at 1:00 we found we h a d a g r a n d t o t a l o f five players!!! Despite b e i n g confident o f success w i t h this n u m b e r w e agreed that h a v i n g seven w o u l d not give t h e S c h o o l o f P h a r m a c y players such a n in Ie r i ori ty complex, w h e n they lost. F o r t u n a t e l y we were able to d r a g a n o t h e r p l a y e r from b e d since the u m p i r e k n e w o f her whereabouts. C h r i s ( t i n a ) also r e a d i l y agreed to play i f we p r o v i d e d h i m w i t h a skirt. A f t e r o n l y five minutes o f play we were 1 -0 b e h i n d due to C h r i s ( t i n a ) b e i n g overcome by the o p p o s i t i o n . H a l f t i m e oranges (what d i d y o u p u t i n t h e m C a r o l i n e ? ) a n d o u r captain's usual i n s p i r i n g t e a m talk soon resulted i n three goals i n less t h a n five minutes to w h i c h a n o t h e r one w a s later a d d e d to b r i n g the t o t a l to four. C h r i s ( t i n a ) h a d a p a r t i c u l a r l y good game, the S O P t e a m member s seeming to enjoy his p h y s i c a l contact! C a r o l i n e ' s good h u m o u : ( w o n d e r w h y ? ) a n d C h r i s ( t i n a ) ' s legs c o n t r i b u t e d to a n enjoyable game. A l l goals were scored by A l i s o n , but A l i s o n d i d n ' t score a h a t t r i c k . T h a n k s to B a r r y for u m p i r i n g . T e a m : Alison, Alison, Alison, Caroline, Ruth, Karen, Chris.

Some members, n o tabl y Steve H a r r i s o n , were slightly unsettled b y the violent activities o f the drivers, w h o were a t t e m p t i n g to take the shortest route possible t h r o u g h ' S ' bends i n the c o u n t r y lanes. It is hoped that some 'elite' members (those who shoot for the Llniversity of L o n d o n ! ) w i l l be able to shoot i n the i n t e r - C C U c o m p e t i t i o n i n t w o weeks time, a g a i n at Bisley over a range o f 900 yards. W h i l s t not p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n the Bisley t r i p , the skills o f new members D e n k - a l - S a l a m were evident as he p u l l e d out a ' 9 6 ' after d r o p p i n g 3 o n the first shot.

Football Firsts D a t e : S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y 27, 1982 T i m e : 1600hrs P l a c e : D r e s s i n g r o o m 3, H a r l i n g t o n A t h e l t i c Grounds. Subject: I C A F C 1st X I Casualty Report: A team barely alive. Suffered an u n t i m e l y relapse at the m o m e n t of recovery (ref 1). W e have the o p p o r t u n i t y to b u i l d the w o r l d ' s first bionic team. W e have the technology, we c a n r e b u i l d t h e m . C h i e f S u r g e o n W a r d w i l l operate b e h i n d closed doors at M o t s p u r P a r k C l i n i c o n S a t u r d a y , M a r c h 6. T h e t e a m w i l l be put out for pasture l o r convalescence at 3:00pm. R e f 1: C f F A C u p F i n a l 1979 A r s e n a l v Man Utd. A f t e r a r u n of p o o r results I C Firsts have e l o p e d to a secret l o c a t i o n f o r a l t i t u d e t r a i n i n g to help t h e m cope w i t h the d i z z y heights o f the U L U C u p F i n a l . C e r t a i n players have developed S k t i t s o p h r e n i a as follows: A l l y — c u t t i n g d o w n o n the fags J o h n — a d v i s i n g T i m o t h y H u t t o n o n this weeks performance S t e v e — p l a y i n g for T w o t i n g K e v — h o p e s to lose h a l f a stone a n d take the b i g j u m p from B l a c k p o o l Beach to A i n t r e e S t e v e — l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to it: the game as well D o u g — s t i l l l o o k i n g y o u n g at 40, owes it a l l to O i l of* U lay. A n d y — in bed (with flu) after failing " p h y s i c s " test F i l l — ( w h o ) at the D o c t o r s (naughty boy) D e a n o — l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to the tube s t r i k e — a day i n T h e S t a t i o n M a i — h a v i n g nightmares about open goals G r a y — g o t a virus, w o n d e r if he caught it o i l Phil G o o d luck to the seconds a n d hope P l a n 069 works. P S : B e i n b e d w i t h ten. Songs for the F i r s t s : T h e F i n a l P r e v i e w Aled Williams: " Y o u Need H a n d s " Steve D u n h i l l : " W e D o n ' t T a l k A n y m o r e " J o h n L a y : " D o n ' t S t a n d S o Close T o M e " K e v Reeve: " W i t h o u t Y o u " ( D e di c a t e d to Steve W . ) Steve W a r d : " F a l l i n g A p a r t at the S e a m s " Phil Niccolls: "Message in a Bottle" A n d y Page; " T o o Y o u n g ' ' / " S t u c k i n the M i d d l e with y o u " D o u g E l s b y : " L i f e i n the Fast L a n e " D a v e D e a n : " I C a n ' t S t a n d u p for F a l l i n g Down" M a l c o l m C a r r : " W o n ' t get F o o l e d A g a i n " G r a h a m Rickard: " I ' m Getting Married in the M o r n i n g " F.B. Rolla: " P a r a n o i d "

Rifle & Pistol A s p r o m i s e d last week, the c l u b o u t i n g to Bisley took place o n S u n d a y , the a i m o f the t r i p was to i n t r o d u c e novices to the subtle art of full bore rifle shooting. D e n i s Sleath ( C l u b C a p t a i n , contact v i a t h e M e c h E n g letter-racks) took advantage o f this t r i p b y m a k i n g his presence felt b y a l l , but this d i d not i m p r o v e his s h o o t i n g however, w h i c h showed little o v e r a l l i m p r o v e m e n t . FELIX, March 5, 1982


Cross

Country

Hyde Park Relay

Rugby

a n d plastic c u p fetching by o u r noble leader, Ian Bull. T e a m : A. Mitchell, S. Ridd, B. Ions, L. Horrocks, H.K. Wong, G. Adamson, S. Willis, C. Hujflet.

Gutteridge Cup Final

T h o u g h far from a classic encounter, the I C Firsts came away from M o t s p u r Park g r o u n d w i t h a sound victory over their G u t t e r i d g e C u p F i n a l opponents, Queen M a r y C o l l e g e , last S u n d a y . Steve T h i s is the most i m p o r t a n t a n d prestigious T h o m p s o n ' s two penalty goals were sufficient event in the U K sailing c a l e n d a r , it is open to to p r o v i d e a 6 - 3 w i n i n a g a m e w h i c h any team from L o n d o n o r C i t y U n i v e r s i t y sometimes produced promising ball a n d this year eleven teams e n t e r e d , I C h a n d l i n g , but the thrust of D o w n s a n d M i l e s entered two teams. T h o m p s o n was often c u t out b y the keen O n Saturday the sailing was i n t w o Q M C b a c k - r o w a n d three-quarters. H a d the leagues, the t o p two teams from each going G u t t e r i d g e C u p not been at stake, F'azakerly t h r o u g h into a league o n S u n d a y to decide m i g h t have passed the b a l l to his threeResults the final placings. T h e " s t a r b o a r d " league on quarters more often, but sadly this was outside Fastest M e n ' s L a p s S a t u r d a y was w o n b y I C l w h o w o n four out the tactics of the game. A l l I C ' s points c a m e i n 13.27 Steve H a r r i s ( W L I H E ) of five races, w i t h U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e second. the first-half, w i t h the w i n d i n T h o m p s o n ' s 13.29 G e o f f W i g h t m a n (Bristol) St M a r y ' s H o s p i t a l s / K i n g s College w o n the favour. 13.39 I. A r c h i b a l d ( D u r h a m ) ' p o r t ' league w i t h I C A s e c o n d , s c r a p i n g Q M C lost t w o players d u r i n g the battle Fastest L a d i e s ' L a p s a n d perhaps the front-five o f I C ' s pack d i d t h r o u g h by b e a t i n g St. T h o m a s ' H o s p i t a l i n a 11.29 M a r i n a S a m y (Bath) race where b o t h teams retired by sailing one give their opposition too m u c h r o u g h stuff. 11.37 A n g e l a T o o b y ( U n i v e r s i t y o f Wales) lap too few a n d T h o m a s ' took one more A f t e r the game, A d a m W a r b y , I C ' s m u l t i 11.41 S u s a n T o o b y ( U n i v e r s i t y o f Wales) 'green' (penalty) t h a n I C A . talented skipper, was d i s a p p o i n t e d to hear O n S u n d a y t h e w i n d was excellent i b r Men's Teams that the E n g l a n d selectors d i d not consider team r a c i n g and further interest was 84.45 L o u g h b o r o u g h h i m as a likely choice to fill the f u l l - b a c k p r o v i d e d b y a large n u m b e r of W e m b l e y 85.32 W L I H E position o n S a t u r d a y . T h e y felt his k i c k i n g S . C . boats w h o were r a c i n g r o u n d some of the 86.00 C a m b r i d g e was n o t u p to scratch. same m a r k s as U L . S t . M a r y ' s H o s p i t a l M a n y thanks to a l l the I C supporters w h o Ladies' T e a m retired after b e i n g resoundingly thrashed b y t u r n e d u p to w a t c h their idols g a i n v i c t o r y . 47.16 K U L e u v e n (Belgium) I C A a n d U C . A s I C A p r e p a r e d to sail I C l T e a m : M. Thompson, D. Downs, S. 47.47 U n i v e r s i t y o f W a l e s the course was c h a n g e d a n d h a d to be sailed Thompson, J. Weir, R. Flynn, G. Fazakerley, S. 49.16 L o u g h b o r o u g h in, the opposite d i r e c t i o n . T h i s l e d to t h e Johns, J. Manzoni, C. De Rohan, P. Richards, G. I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e , not w a n t i n g to show L e w i s epic " p u s h everyone the right side o f Henderson, P. Verily, W. King, A. Warby, J. anyone u p , h a d a mens team in 75th position the m a r k a n d t h e n sail the w r o n g side Davies. Subs: J. Austin, A. Davies. a n d a ladies team i n 19th position out o f a yourself m a n o e u v r e " . F o l l o w i n g this, field of 110 men's teams a n d 29 ladies teams. C h a d w i c k leaned out over-enthusiastically I w o u l d like to th ank everybody w h o c a m e a n d missed t h e toe-straps o n the beat a n d to the event i n c l u d i n g the helpers, runners went s w i m m i n g . A j d e r i a n c o v e r i n g L e w i s o n a n d even those w h o were just spectating. the final beat forced h i m to gybe to break the cover a n d gave I C A first, second a n d fifth o n A l s o thanks s h o u l d go to R i c h a r d S m i t h , the line.. the organiser o f this year's events, w i t h o u t I C l , s a i l i n g excellently, beat U n i v e r s i t y w h o m it w o u l d not have been possible. C o l l e g e c o n v i n c i n g l y i n both the races they were to sail against t h e m . I C A b e a t i n g U C i n a close fought contest by l l ' / to l l / . , pts, made it clear that the real c o m p e t i t i o n was between two I C teams. T h e violence on the line caused surprisingly o n l y one c o l l i s i o n a n d despite five ol the six boats a r r i v i n g at the w i n d w a r d m a r k T h e I C D o u b l e s L e a g u e c a m e to a n e x c i t i n g together, there were n o collisions there. T h e c l i m a x l a s t w e e k w i t h t h e last b a t c h o f sixth boat, sailed b y C u r w e n , h a d recrossed matches l e a v i n g the final table as follows. the start line a n d was some w a y b e h i n d . Pos. Team Pintail Point Places c h a n g e d c o n t i n u o u s l y d o w n to the 1 HFC 9240 29.5 leeward m a r k where, a g a i n , A d j started 2 Pot Black 9310 29 sitting o n L e w i s a n d general malevolence 3 ' K i n Spiders 9049 29 e m i n a t i n g f r o m a l l quarters meant that by 4 Dragonslayers 8416 29 the second r o u n d i n g o f the w i n d w a r d m a r k Split Johnies 8344 26.5 5 six collisions o r infringements h a d occured, 6 Rangers 8376 25 three b y each side. T h e n i n a fair(ish) light Smith's Lot 0720 24 7 8 More Chaos 6019 19 I C l w o n b u t not b y a sufficient a m o u n t to 9 Spot-On 8865 16 have a n o v e r a l l w i n over I C A . Gra-Fez 7593 16 10 T h i s left I C A o n ly to beat U C for the W e l l we made it into the final, b u t were 11 International Rescue 6568 15 o v e r a l l ittle, they d i d this excellently p u s h i n g t h w a r t e d b y t h e L e a v e s sisters o f G u y s Handy C a p 12 4292 9 one U C boat to the back r e q u i r i n g U C to get H o s p i t a l . These t w o y o u n g ladies w i t h C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s g o to R a y C o o k a n d C h r i s first place to w i n . O n a n excellent final beat v a r i o u s E n g l i s h E u r o p e a n t i t l e s to t h e i r W e l l s , w h o m a d e up the w i n n i n g t e a m , C o o k the super heavy w e i g h t N i c k A d j a g a i n names proceeded to thrash us i n the ladies also s c o r i n g the h i g h game (245) a n d series p u l l e d t h r o u g h into first place a l l o w i n g M i l l s doubles a n d single whereas o u r w o n d e r f u l (560). w h o h a d sailed consistantly w e l l t h r o u g h o u t m e n a n n i h i l a t e d the opposition w i t h very T h e t o p i n d i v i d u a l s h a d the f o l l o w i n g little difficulty. T h i s left e v e r y t h i n g to t h e the weekend into t h i r d race. averages. T h a n k s are due to C a s t a w a y s for excellent three m i x e d doubles, w h i c h went 2-1 i n G u y s social a n d r a c i n g organisation. favour, not even the superstar p a i r i n g o f A n d y M c M u l l a n 172 I C A t e a m : S. Curwen, J. Bennett, N. C h r i s Hull'et a n d A n d r e e M i t c h e l l c o u l d Steve B r y e r 170 Ajderian, J. Redman, P. Mills, R. Tostevin. combat the younger o f the Leaves sisters M a r t i n H a r r i s o n 152 I C l team: C. Lewis, G. Dalton, G. Kennedy, influence. T h e result was 6-5 to G u y s . R a y C o o k 150 A.N. Other, D. Ghadwick, A. Tounghusband. Stage m a n a g e m e n t , t a c t i c a l c o o r d i n a t i o n K a ' i C h o o n g 150

A r a t h e r c h i l l y , c l o u d y "day greeted t h e runners i n the race o n S a t u r d a y i n H y d e P a r k . T h i s h a d some advantages i n that the a n n u a l p r o b l e m o f spectators o n the course was less t h a n usual. T h e race was quite a success w i t h the fastest time for the men's three m i l e laps o f 13.17 by D a v e C l a r k e , o n l y five seconds slower t h a n the r e c o r d o f 13.12 set b y H . Jones i n 1980. H e was, however, ineligible for a p r i z e as he is a m e m b e r of stalf at the West L o n d o n Institute for H i g h e r Education.

Castaways Cup

Bowling

2

3

mBadminton

FELIX, March 5, 1982

Page 13


rlAUmid

I must reiterate that I abhor censorship and believe i n f r e e d o m of e x p r e s s i o n . W h i l s t sympathizing with the fight against apartheid I w o u l d not willingly exclude adverts from anyone {even vile multi-nationals) as I believe that i n d i v i d u a l s at I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e a r e intelligent enough to discriminate between the companies a n d organisations with which they want to be involved. Students are well aware of the issues involved in S o u t h A f r i c a , including Barclays' involvement, and can choose whether they wish to bank with them o r not.

An apology I apologise for the severe cuts made to articles this week. I'm afraid that t h e election manifestos have necessitated a reduction i n the space available for clubs, societies, etc. Hopefully I've included any vital information and n o r m a l service....(yawn, yawn).

Letters It has been suggested that I make u p or c o m m i s s i o n all the letters! T h i s is absolute r u b b i s h . M y l e t t e r s w o u l d b e far m o r e interesting than the drivel I've received in the past few weeks. W h e r e have all the good letters gone?

The Barclays Bit I must admit that I expected to be challenged o v e r including a B a r c l a y s advert earlier. M r G a r s i d e ' s l e t t e r is t o s a y the l e a s t f a i r l y predictable, but it does merit a response. Firstly, I will happily except adverts from Barclays for financial reasons. T h i s bank and others provide a large amount of support for various publications (and hence indirectly the U n i o n ) b y advertising. W i t h o u t their support the U n i o n w o u l d have to save in the order of £1,000 elsewhere— perhaps b y abolishing Socialist Society, A n t i A p a r t h e i d G r o u p , L a b o u r C l u b , Liberal C l u b , etc., etc.? I'm certain that s u c h c ommitte d individuals w o u l d rather fund their o w n activities than take money from B a r c l a y s . H o w e v e r this a r g u m e n t is n o t really sufficient by itself. A more important reason is personal freedom.

Perhaps most important of all, B a r c l a y s are a d a m n g o o d bank a n d a r e not the only investors in S o u t h Africa. Unfortunately S o u t h A f r i c a has a tight grip over i n t e r n a t i o n a l finance due to its mineral wealth a n d , unless we w i s h to trade with the Soviet U n i o n for gold, u r a n i u m , etc., we are stuck. Personally I find the Soviet U n i o n ' s system of ' d e m o c r a c y ' equally unacceptable. B y not giving people the chance to choose we are repressing their o w n freedom. S o come on A n t i - A p a r t h e i d persons, stop complaining. It's just not c r i c k e t .

Hustings

UGM

T h i s w a s n ' t half as e x c i t i n g o r e n t e r t a i n i n g a s u s u a l . P r e s u m a b l y this w a s d u e t o the candidates themselves. T h e o n l y positive t h i n g t o c o m e out of it w a s t o r e a f f i r m m y c o n v i c t i o n that I s h o u l d a b s t a i n in the H o n o r a r y S e c r e t a r y e l e c t i o n , as n o n e of th e c a n d i d a t e s s t r u c k m e a s b e i n g o u t s t a n d i n g . A s for the o t h e r s , judge for y o u r s e l f b y r e a d i n g their m a n i f e s t o s . R e m e m b e r to vote o n M o n d a y o r Tuesday a n d bring your U n i o n c a r d .

Credits T h a n k s to N i c k T . , Peter, Soheel, Lesley, Paul, Steve, D a v e , J o n , D a v e R., N i c k W . , M a r t i n , Izy, J e z , D a n u t a (who I forget last week), all the collators, M a z a n d Ian.

• T M Soc meeting, 5:30pm, Huxley 411. All meditators welcome.

What's On JCR.

•IC Angling club meeting, 12:30pm, Southside Upper Lounge. • B U N A C meeting, 12:30pm, G r e e n C o m m R m . •Christian Union meeting, 6:30pm, Music R m , 53 Princes Gate. Jesus' relationship with G o d . All welcome. •Election Special, 8:00pm, Southside Bar. C o m e along and ask all the awkward questions you thought of after yesterday's Hustings U G M . • S o u p Run, 10:30pm, Falmouth Kitchen.

Saturday, March 6 • N u c l e a r D i s a r m a m e n t ' T e a c h In', 10:00am to 5:00pm, Huxley Building R m 213. A n opportunity to d i s c u s s a n d l e a r n m o r e a b o u t s o m e of t h e i s s u e s involved in nuclear disarmament. Morning: four eminent speakers including Philip Noel Baker. Afternoon: workshops to discuss issues in greater depth. Price £2 waged; £1 unwaged (including students with Unioncard). •West London Chaplaincy sponsored walk, 7:45am, meet at More House.

Monday, March 8 • Hang-Gliding club meeting, 12:30pm, 'Southside Bar.

above

• B a d g e s o c l u n c h t i m e meeting, 12:40pm, S t a n ' s Lounge. • Chemsoc lecture, 4:30pm, Lecture Theatre C . Professor G . R . Luckhurst (Southampton Univ) speaking on 'Liquid Crystals'.

In the standard solution to this p u z z l e , the s e c o n d and third weighings y o u make depend on the result of the first weighing. W h a t I'm after this week is a solution t o the fake c o i n p u z z l e i n w h i c h all the c o m p a r i s o n s a r e specified before a n y of the weighings a r e made. Solutions, comments, criticisms to me at the FELIX Office, please. There is a prize of £5 (donated by Mend-a-Bike) and two tickets to the IC Orchestra concert next Friday for the correct entry selected at 1:00 pm next Wednesday. Last W e e k ' s Puzzle A b o u t twenty people got last week's p u z z l e r i g h t , a n d a b o u t t w e l v e of t h e m f o u n d it remarkably easy, since they'd all made the same arithmetical slip. I'm reluctant to a w a r d the prize to anyone w h o got a (quite difficult) puzzle right just because their maths is faulty, so I ' m h o l d i n g t h e c o m p e t i t i o n o p e n f o r another week to allow those people who gave no reasoning with their solution to submit a few words of explanation. D r . B e r k s h i r e i n t h e d e p a r t m e n t of mathematics has pointed out that there is a slight i m p r o v e m e n t to the m e t h o d for balancing dominoes w h i c h I described last week. If y o u move th e t o p d o m i n o slightly towards the centre of the table, then the b o t t o m domino c a n be m o v e d further out over the edge, allowing a minute e x t r a overhang.

•Dancing club beginners class, 7:30pm, J C R . • I C C A G Soup Run, meet 10:30pm Falmouth Kitchens.

Wednesday, March 10 • B o a r d s a i l i n g c l u b meeting, 12:30 a n d 6 : 1 5 p m , Southside Upper Lounge.

Friday, March 5

There's a very famous problem involving twelve c o i n s , all of w h i c h look the same, but one of w h i c h is a slightly different weight f r o m the o t h e r e l e v e n . W i t h just a n o r d i n a r y balance, w h i c h c a n be used t o c o m p a r e the weights of two piles of coins, y o u are a s k e d to find the fake c o i n a n d determine whether it is too heavy o r t o o light.

•Wellsoc proudly present the world's leading authority on vampires. C o m e at your peril. 7:30pm, Elec Eng 408.

Tuesday, March 9 •Socialist Society Bookstall, 12:30-2:30pm, Books and Campaign Coffee for sale.

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•Catholic mass and lunch, 12:30pm, C h e m 231. Nominal charge for lunch. • 3 F ' s Scandanavian sausage lunch (bring your own sausage), 12:30pm, Southside Upper Lounge. •Riding club meeting, 1:00pm, R m 1009, Elec Eng. •Nat Hist soc lecture, 1:00pm, Botany Basement L T . D r K. Dalby (IC) on 'The Biological Monitoring of Pollution'. • S T O I C programme, 1:00pm, J C R , Southside and all Halls. A second chance to see the S T O I C Christmas Special. •Speaker meeting: Apartheid and Sanctions, with Lord Beaumont, Cosmas Desmond, and Mike Terry, 1:00pm, Huxley 213. Arranged by Left Alliance. • M e c h Eng Soc presents 'From N A S A to spaceb l a n k e t s — a new t e c h n o l o g y in m e t a l i s e d p l a s t i c s ' , 1:15pm, ME542. •Anti-apartheid picket of Barclays, 2:00pm. •IC Amnesty group meeting, 5:30pm, G r e e n C o m m Rm. • S i r K e n n e t h C o r f i e l d o n ' T h e F u t u r e R o l e of Engineers', 6:00pm, C h e m . Eng Theatre 1. • D r Raine lecturing to Astrosoc on 'The Superstructure of the Universe', 6:30pm, Physics L T 2 . Free to members. • S F Soc Film: The Big Bus, 6:30pm, ME220. 50p nonmembers, 20p members. See last week's S F Soc Bulletin for details. •Socialist Society speaker meeting: The Ecology Party, 6:30pm, G r e e n C o m m Rm.

• T M society meeting, 1:00pm, Huxley 411. Videotape of M a h a r i s h i M a h e s h Y o g i t a l k i n g a b o u t ' L o v e , E x p a n s i o n of H a p p i n e s s a n d R e f i n e m e n t of t h e Physiology'. • A n t i - a p a r t h e i d m e e t i n g , 1:00pm, U n i o n U p p e r Lounge. The Anti-Apartheid Secretary, Mike Terry, will be speaking. •Wargames club meeting, 1:00pm, Union S C R . •IC Trampoline society meeting, 5:30pm, Courtauld Hall, Q E C , Campden Hill R d . •Dancing club intermediate class, 7:30pm, J C R .

Thursday, March 11 • T h e Underground Eiger, a film about cave-diving in Yorkshire, 12:30pm, Mines 303. • S T O I C presents News-Break, 1:00 a n d 6:00pm, usual places. •Christian Science group meeting, 1:00pm, Seminar R m , Level 2S, Botany. • S T O I C programme, 1:00pm, usual places. Election Special! Live from the Great Hall. Results of Union elections as they happen. Summary at 6:00pm. • M O P S O C Lecture T h e use and applications of the I C L D A P ' by Dr Heather M . Liddell from Q M C , 1:10pm, Physics L T 2 (level 1). Free to members. Non-members lOp. •Dept ot Humanities presents a lunch-hour concert: David Bogle (violin) and Maureen Parrington (piano), 1:30, Music R m , 53 Princes Gate. •Gliding club meeting, 5:30pm, Aero 254. •Real Ale soc meeting, 7:30pm, Union C r u s h Bar. A G M and three different beers. S U cards required. •Mines/IF Party, 8:30pm, J C R . £1.00 from R S M U .

FELIX is published by the Editor for and on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board, and is printed by the Union Print Unit, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BB (589-5111 ext 1048 int 2881) Copyright FELIX

1982. Editor: M A Smith, Advertising

Manager:

S M Giblin.


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