Page 1

Founded in 1949

The Newspaper of Imperial College Union

JAMES DEENY GOES SW It was revealed earlier this week that Mr James Deeny, a Scottish first year physicist, went swimming on Monday and Wednesday afternoon. His action was prompted by finding his long lost swimming trunks amongst his home beermaking kit last Saturday. M r Deeny was reported to have said that although the water was a little cold he found the exercise b o t h r e f r e s h i n g a n d A thief ransacked three rooms in the basement of 48 Lexham Gardens, a College head tenancy, last Friday. A large carving i n v i g o r a t i n g . H e encouraged knife which was removed from one flat and found in another, may other IC students to make more have been used to force the other doors or even as a potential use of the marvellous Olympic weapon. sized swimming pool, but not on Mondays and Wednesdays. T w o of the rooms (occupied by M r J . M a r t i n Taylor, I C U External M r Deeny expressed his Affairs Officer, and M r T o m Owen, R C S Academic Affairs Officer) intention to swim twice a week were unwisely left with only a small Yale top lock to secure them, the on a regular basis as part of his stronger C h u b b bottom locks being left off. These doors were easily keep fit campaign. His campaign forced and access to a third room was gained via a window. The thief was heralded last weekend with a quickly looked through the contents of the rooms and took money from walking trip in Dorset. As well as electricity meters as well as any loose change that was lying around. giving up smoking, M r Deeny Residents returned to the basement soon after midday Friday and expressed a desire to generally discovered the three open doors. A fourth room which had been live a more "healthy and fulsecurely locked was undisturbed. The police were notified and in the filling life from now o n , " and evening detectives looked for finger prints and took short statements. get "that old twinkle" back in his The thief has not yet been apprehended and residents are advised to eye. double lock their doors whenever they leave the premises.

Theft in Lexham Gardens

An exclusive picture of Mr James

Deeny.

But perhaps this drive will prove too much for M r Deeny who was seen downing a few on Wednesday night in the Southside Bar and dozing during T h u r sday morning lectures.

RCSU Bolt With Spanner A T A P P R O X I M A T E L Y 1:45pm yesterday a team of 20 R C S U students successfuly violated Spanner and Bolt, the mascots of City and Guilds College Union. A raid was carefully planned, centring on yesterday's Guilds U G M . The plan suffered numerous setbacks but eventually succeeded owing to the initiative of the team members. The house where the two mascots were kept was located and two R C S U members a p p r o a c h e d the door i n the guise o f C o u n c i l workmen. By some means they managed to gain access and, with a further group following them, kidnapped both mascots. S p a n n e r a n d Bolt were taken away to a secret destination, somewhere in the U K .

No. 604

Above, the recently completed Southside Bar which opened last Thursday evening. With a few minor changes to complete, the bar is now in full use and is often visited by Mr James Deeny himself.

F r i d a y , F e b r u a r y 5,1982

Free!


event is because they don't t h i n k t h e y w i l l e n j o y it enough, or because they have not noticed that it is happening. T h e fault for this rests s o l e l y w i t h the o r g a n i s e r s . Y o u could organise a public h a n g i n g of T o n y Benn a n d M a r g a r e t T h a t c h e r i n Beit Q u a d , but if you don't p u b l i c i s e it w e l l , e n t h u s e about it to those a r o u n d you, and go out of your way to encourage attendance, people c o u l d w e l l n o t n o t i c e the event.

Sir

F r o m your treatment of M r Barney M c C a b e on the cover o f F E L I X 6 0 3 it is q u i t e obvious that you regard the w e ar i ng oi' ladies apparel by m e n as a bit of a joke. However, as the owner of the dress w h i c h M r M c C a b e was w e a r i n g I was somewhat s h o c k e d to see y o u r f r o nt cover. T h e " b l u e c h i f f o n " dress was, in fact, a treasured item of c l o t h i n g w h i c h went missing from the Beit l a u n d r y several weeks ago. P r e s u m a b l y the D e p u t y President is also in possession of m y black silk underwear and seamed stockings. I w o u l d be grateful if he w o u l d return them immediately. Tours

P. C r e i g h t o n - W a r d Dear

Sir

W i t h reference to N . L a m b r o u s Soapbox ( F E L I X 603) i n p a r t i c u l a r , a n d the attitude of people i n office of any kind i n general I w o u l d like to take exception to the vastly overused c o p - o u t of 'student apathy' . D u r i n g my time at College, like N . L a m b r o u , I too have formed opinions of the student body. H o w e v e r , although at this time last year I too thought our students to be a n apathetic b u n c h , I have since changed m y m i n d . It is very easy to fall into the trap of t h i n k i n g " I organised this wonderful event for them, but they were too apathetic to t u r n up. It's not m y f a u l t . " But this is i n my o p i n i o n totally the w r o n g attitude. T h e reason w h y people don't go to an Page 2

I was totally unaware of M r ' E . C . A n y a o k u ' s lecture taking place, who he is, or exactly what he was talking about. D u e to the dreary a n d u n i n s p i r i n g n a t u r e of the last week's Soapbox, I'm still unsure. If people organising events are not prepared to get off their fat backsides a n d put some life into their projects w h y should anyone else? I a m quite w i l l i n g to admit that any lack of interest i n my e v e n t s is t o t a l l y m y f a u l t . Why is no-one else honest enough to do the same? Tours

apathetically

P h i l Greenstreet RCSU VP

Dear

Sir

T h a n k you for p u b l i s h i n g N . L a m b r o u ' s Soapbox article last week! I found it very c o n v i n c i n g a n d revealing. I n my four months at I m p e r i a l , I've realised how simplem i n d e d the average I C student is I n fact I wonder h o w m a n y e v e n r e a d the Soapbox article, beyond the first p a r a g r a p h ! A r e the scientific a n d e n g i n e e r i n g c o u r s e s so d e m a n d i n g t h a t t h e r e is not t i m e to q u e s t i o n " i d e a l s " , "purposes", "ambition"? O r is it t h a t r e a l a l e , s p a c e invaders a n d heavy rock are more important than k n o w i n g about T h i r d W o r l d countries? It w o u l d be i n t e r e s t i n g to survey how m a n y know what happened in C y p r u s i n 1974? H o w it h a p p e n e d ? Who suffered? A n d w h a t is the situation now? H o p e f u l l y the new C y p r u s Society, this term, w i l l organise events to answer these questions but w i l l there be anv listeners? P.Z. (D.S.E.S.)

Dear

Sir

N . Lambrou's article in Soapbox last week highlights a c o n t i n u i n g h e a d a c h e for clubs organising meetings w ith outside speakers. O S C ' s lecture on ' N e w N a t i o n s ' was competing for audiences w ith three other meetings. T h e problem is clubs have no way of k n o w i n g what other meetings have already been arranged for a p a r t i c u l a r day w h e n i n v i t i n g speakers. A simple solution, surely, w o u l d be to keep a diary i n the U n i o n Office in w h i c h clubs c o u l d record details of meetings that they had arranged. T h i s could then be consulted by anyone w h o wanted to know whether a p a r t i c u l a r day w o u l d still be suitable for i n v i t i n g a speaker. Tours

faithfully

J . P. Stanley BE3 Dear

Sir

It is w i t h interest a n d great dismay that I have read the article of F r a n k James a n d the letters of M r L y a l l a n d M r M e r c e r . I w o u l d l i k e to apologise to F r a n k for the lack of p r e c i s i o n of b o t h M r M e r c e r a n d M r L y a l l ' s views. F o r the last two weeks I have w r i t t e n a l e t t e r for e a c h F E L I X a n d yet not forwarded them. N o w , I cannot r e m a i n silent. T o say that I a m a C h r i s t i a n needs c l a r i f y i n g for both M r M e r c e r a n d M r L y a l l have said that they are Christians. I believe that every word from Genesis to R e v e l a t i o n is Gods inspired w o r d . I believe i n a six day creation a n d have yet to f i n d o n e s c i e n t i f i c fact w h i c h can say to me " L o o k , here is evidence that demands evolution a n d forbids creat i o n " . I challenge anybody who reads this letter. M a y I point a few things out. 1. T h e order of creation is not the order of evolution. T h e sun was created after planets to state on b i b l i c a l fact. 2. Genesis 1 a n d Genesis 2 do not contradict. In Genesis 1 G o d says " T h i s is the order I created heaven a n d earth. I n chap 2 G o d reveals a little more, some of the detail, of how H e created the w o r l d . (Be careful w ith the H e b r e w tenses.)

FELIX, February 5, 1982

3. T h e word for 'day ' in G e n 1 can be translated age. But Exo du s 2 0 v 8 - l l points out that the C r e a t i o n was accomplished in six twenty lour days. M a y I finally leave a word of advice to the critics of G e n 1 and 2. If you don't believe it don't try a n d mock or refute i t ; y o u d e c e i v e yourself. If you don't believe it, leave it alone. T o M r M e r c e r and M r L y a l l ; if you don't believe the first two chapters of Genesis as Gods inspired w o r d, you might as well throw the whole book away as unreliable a n d rely on evolution lor salvation. Tours

sincerely

John Davies Chemistry 1 Six

W e i n the I s l a m i c Soc w o u l d l i k e to c o r r e c t t h e erroneous assumptions made by Messrs James a n d L y a l l in their letters to you i n last week's F E L I X . These misinterpretations were made b o t h w i t h r e g a r d to t h e objectives a n d contents of our article. Firstly our article was n o t in response to M r J a m e s ' . O u r intention was to try to show in a necessarily generalized way, that in submission to the W i l l of God—-i.e. Islam—both faith and reason are united. Since the age of enlightenment i n the West, when everything began to be red u c e d to m a n - m a d e l a w s through scientific methodology, faith in the unseen has been socially debased. Sociologists have shown that religion is at best illogical a n d at worst a cruel contrick; " t h e o p i u m of the p o o r " . A l t h o u g h some, like M r L y a l l , can honestly say that the advance of science has not affected his belief i n a C r e a t o r , n e v e r t h e l e s s it c a n n o t be denied that generally, belief in a supreme b e i n g a n d therefore worhsip of H i m has been pushed away from the centre of the stage i n Western society. M a t e r i a l i s t i c concerns have become the objects of reason, a n d the worship of G o d has become less than a secondary concern. N o w if we, i n our article, had merely printed a l l the Continued on page 4.


Jez,

Kinnock on Cuts N e i l K i n n o c k M l ' , the S h a d o w E d u c a t i o n S e c r e t a r y , a t t r a c t e d a sizeable a u d i e n c e o n Tuesday w h e n he discussed the L a b o u r P a r t y ' s a l t e r n a t i v e l o e d u c a t i o n cuts. H i s speech firstly r e v i e w e d the c u r r e n t s i t u a t i o n , a n d then i n d i c a t e d L a b o u r ' s plans. T h e C u r r e n t Situation M i K i i m o e k staled that, i n h u m a n terms, the Conservative g o v e r n m e n t lias a l r e a d y e x c l u d e d . m a n y thousands o f people f r o m highei e d u c a t i o n . T h i s is c o m p o u n d e d financially, i n that r e d u n d a n c y p a y m e n t s o f stall w i l l p r o b a b l y o u t w e i g h the savings a c h i e v e d . T h e result is that e d u c a t i o n cuts a r e " e v e n m o r e d e s t r u c t i v e t h a n even the government i n t e n d e d . " T h e d a n g e r is that the cuts, a i m e d p r i m a r i l y at arts courses, w i l l u n d e r m i n e the s tr u c tu re o f most universities. A p r o b a b l e consequence, he said, w o u l d be t h e c r e a t i o n of ovcrspeeialisod " m o n o t e c h n i c s " . S i r K e i t h Joseph w o u l d n a t u r a l l y like to see such establishments full o f students " w i t h short h a i r , shiny shoes a n d l i v i n g at h o m e o n student l o a n s " . T h e L a b o u r Alternative M r K i n n o c k stated L a b o u r ' s e d u c a t i o n p o l i c y to be e x p a n s i o n a n d c h a n g e . L a b o u r w o u l d restore h i g h e r e d u c a t i o n financially, but w o u l d expect universities to argue their case m o r e effectively. I n . p a r t i c u l a r , the a n i m o s i t y between colleges a n d the general p u b l i c must be h ealed. H e said that u n i v e r s i t y admissions procedures need to be c h a n g e d , so that they a r e p r e o c c u p i e d w i t h a c c e p t i n g , a n d n o t rejecting, prospective students. F o r this, m o r e i n t r o d u c t o r y courses a n d m o r e m o d u l a r courses s h o u l d be started. M o r e o v e r , a selection c r i t e r i o n w o u l d be w h i c h candidates c o u l d best take a d v a n t a g e o f h i g h e r education. O n overseas students, M r K i n n o c k rejected the c u r r e n t p o l i c y o f i m p o s i n g full-cost fees. T h e L a b o u r P a r t y resents w h a t he t e r m e d the g o v e r n m e n t ' s " c h a u v i n i s t p r e j u d i c e " , as it results i n the sole c r i t e r i o n for selection b e i n g money. H e a d v o c a t e d that overseas students be r e c o m m e n d e d for a place p u r e l y o n a b i l i t y . A p r o p o r t i o n o f overseas d e v e l o p m e n t s p e n d i n g , f u n d e d by N o r t h S e a o i l , w o u l d sponsor those students w h o can't afford the lees.

Jack

and Jiil L a s t M o n d a y the p o p u l a r B B C television p r o g r a m m e for c h i l d r e n , Blue Peler, p l a y e d host to J e z e b e l , the m o t o r i s e d mascot o f the R o y a l C o l l e g e o f Science. V i e w e r s were g i v e n a q u i c k history o f the 1916 fire engine a n d t o l d h o w h e r 400 gallons p e r minute pumping capability c o u l d be used i n the m o p p i n g - u p operation after a n y future London flood. M r Dave T h o m p s o n , attired i n

New Handbook. Editor A new E d i t o r for the I C U n i o n H a n d b o o k was a p p o i n t e d at the Publications Board meeting o n M o n d a y evening. M r P e t e r R o d g e r s , a first y e a r physicist, was u n o p p o s e d for the post a n d w i l l set a b o u t c o l l e c t i n g articles for the H a n d b o o k before the Easter v a c a t i o n .

the R C S U P r e s i d e n t i a l c l o a k a n d h a t , assumed most o f the v o c a l duties a n d presented a large b i r t h d a y c a r d to J a c k a n d J i l l , the B l u e Peter cats, o n b e h a l f o f the R C S U . T h r e e o t h e r officers were present, a l l w e a r i n g s p l e n d i d firemen's uniforms. Jez created a very good impression, her bodywork a n d fittings g l e a m i n g b r i g h t l y u n d e r the s t u d i o lights. S h e also started o n t h e first t u r n o f the s t a r t i n g handle. T h e m a n w h o devised the visit a n d m a d e the b e a u t i f u l b i r t h d a y c a r d was I C U D e p u t y P r e s i d e n t . Barney M c C a b e .

P i n t e n t i o n t o be s t r i c t w i t h c o n t r i b u t o r s . " I w i l l set a d e a d l i n e a n d stick to i t . " he t o l d F E L I X . " T h e Union Handbook is a n i m p o r t a n t source o f i n f o r m a t i o n a n d this year's officers, i n c l u b s a n d societies, C C U s a n d elsewhere, s h o u l d be t h i n k i n g about their contributions n o w . T h e y must ensure that they o r their successors write their articles w e l l before the e x a m s . " H

e

h

a

s

a

l

r

e

a

d

y

e

x

r

e

s

s

e

d

Hair by

A f t e r the m e e t i n g . L ' n i o n President N i c k M o r t o n t a l k e d to M r K i n n o c k . T h e President w i l l , i f a l l goes w e l l , a r r a n g e a n a p p o i n t m e n t to discuss IC.'s case w i t h the S h a d o w E d u c a t i o n Secretary. HAIRDRESSING FOR MEN & WOMEN

Maggie's Money Man Courts Cortazzi's Consoc L E O N B R U T A N M P . Chief F i n a n c i a l S e c r e t a r y to the Treasury a n d a m e m b e r o f the C a b i n e t , spoke in College yesterday at the i n v i t a t i o n o f the Conservative Society. H e a d dressed a w e l l a t t e n d e d m e e t i n g on the subject o f the G o v e r n m e n t ' s economic policy. H e o u t l i n e d the b a c k g r o u n d ol uneompetitiveness against w h i c h the present s i t u a t i o n must be set. T h e g o v e r n m e n t i s , he s a i d , i m p r o v i n g the s i t u a t i o n by a c t i n g to reduce i n f l a t i o n w h i c h has h a l v e d since the g o v e r n m e n t took office. T h e rise i n u n e m p l o y m e n t is v e r y u n f o r t u n a t e , b u t is a consequence ol o v e r m a n n i n g a n d the o n l y l o n g - t e r m s o l u t i o n is the c o n t r o l o f i n f l a t i o n . O r d e r s to industry are already increasing, as is p r o d u c t i v i t y , a n d soon a fall i n u n e m p l o y m e n t w i l l result, he claimed.

Only a week until Guilds Dinner and Dance!

g o v e r n m e n t w i l l be able to show that i n f l a t i o n is u n d e r c o n t r o l , that u n e m p l o y m e n t is f a l l i n g , and that British industry, resorting to competitiveness, is prospering again. P u b l i c s p e n d i n g is b e i n g c u t as f a r as p o s s i b l e t o r e d u c e t h e b u r d e n o f taxes a n d interest rates on i n d u s t r y . H o w e v e r he t h o u g h t that m u c h is b e i n g d o n e , at great expense, to m i t i g a t e the worst effects o f u n e m p l o y m e n t , f o r e x a m p l e the n e w Y o u t h T r a i n i n g Scheme. Afterwards M r Brittan answered several questions f r o m the a u d i e n c e about the g o v e r n m e n t ' s e c o n o m i c p o l i c y . H e is the second C a b i n e t m e m b e r t o visit C o l l e g e this session a n d t w o more, Norman Tebbit and S i r Keith Joseph, a r e expected next t e r m , all at the i n v i t a t i o n o f the C o n s e r v a t i v e Society.

20% reduction on production of a Unioncard. 68 GLOUCESTER ROAD LONDON S.W.7. TELEPHONE: 01 • 584 7193 01 • 584 0858 OPENINGTOMES:MONDAY 9-6.00 LATE NIGHTS TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY. FRIDAY 9-8.00 SATURDAY 9-5.00

H e p r e d i c t e d that by the t i m e of the next G e n e r a l E l e c t i o n the

FELIX, February

5, 1982

Page 3


med

came to teach his p a r t i -

c u l a r people h o w to w o r s h i p the

Letters from

Small Ads

O n e G o d — a l t h o u g h the

last prophet h a d a mission to the

Continued

whole

of m a n k i n d . B u t

always, t h e prophets brought

page 2.

the same u n i v e r s al message of verses God

o f the Q u r a n

where

says " I created

"

to

I s l a m ; submission to the w i l l of one G o d alone. W e d o no

show readers w h y we worship,

therefore

the

ciation

ignorance

of

readers

countenance

of any partners

about I s l a m w o u l d have m a d e

G o d —whether

them

idols,

say " O K , that's

their

book, it's the one M o h a m m e d

and

Holy

assowith

ancestors,

Ghosts o r "sons

d a u g h t e r s " of G o d .

gave the A r a b s — t h e y ' r e

F i n a l l y w i t h regard to M r

e n t i t l e d to w h a t they believe

Lyall's comments on D a r w i n -

i n — s o w h a t ? " Instead there-

ism,

fore,

discuss this interesting

we tried

to show the

reasons for o u r belief i n G o d ,

space

is t o o s h o r t

to

topic

a d e q u a t e l y — p e r h a p s we

w o r s h i p of H i m — five

should h o l d a seminar? A l l I

times a day; in a m o r e general

w i l l say here is that whilst as a

and w ay.

both

theory D a r w i n i s m is adequate

i n the

to e x p l a i n some o f the e v o l u -

T h u s we s h o w e d

reason;

represented

corrallaries scientific

between

theory

what

a n d the

tionary processes i n the plant and

animal

kingdom,

it is

(Gods last v e v e l a t i o n

i n a p p l i c a b l e to m a n k i n d . T h e

to M a n ) says about c r e a t i o n

O m n i p o t e n t C r e a t o r , created

a n d faith

us from n o t h i n g a n d returns

Quran

i n G o d are u n i t e d i n

us to n o t h i n g n e s s — a n d o n the

the r e l i g i o n o f I s l a m . It is i n this context, alone,

D a y of R e s u r r e c t i o n , each one

that we q u o t e d the Q u r a n i c

of

passages c o n c e r n i n g c r e a t i o n

able for o u r sojourn o n earth.

and

A n d some of us w i l l p r o d u c e

not as M r J a m e s m i s -

cheviously

assumed.

We

us w i l l be held

account-

accounts w h i c h show that we

believe that from our c o m m o n

tried

ancestor A d a m t h r o u g h to the

p a t h o f belief in G o d , w o r s h i p

last p r o p h e t , M o h a m m e d , the

of

message to m a n k i n d has been

Others

the single one o f the unity and

d i d n ' t believe, d i d n ' t w o r s h ip

oneness of God.

prophet

G o d , a n d b l i n d l y chased after

f r o m A d a m t h r o u g h to A b r a -

the m a t e r i a l things of this life!

ham,

Each

L o t ,Joseph,

Jesus a n d P r o p h e t

to follow

Him

H a / / s and

Houses

For the purpose of applications to Halls and Houses, you will be considered either as a reapplicant if you have lived in a Hall or House before or a new applicant if you haven't. People who have lived in Residence before can only be considered as new-applicants if: a) They lived in Residence as an undergraduate and will be a postgraduate next session. Page 4

action.

that

T.S.

Moham-

The time has come to start thinking seriously about whether you want to apply to live in College accommodation next year and about what type of accommodation you want to go for. Application forms will be available from Student Services on Monday, February 15. The closing date for applications is Friday, March 12. On Friday, February 12, FELIX will carry an illustrated supplement giving full details of available accommodation and how to apply for it. W h i l e y o u are waiting for the F E L I X supplement, here are a few thoughts to keep you going.

righteous

a n d right w i l l show

Moses,

Accommodation for next year

a

they

Sheriff

Islamic Soc

• F e n d e r B a s s m a n T e n 50w C o m b o , b a r g a i n at o n l y £150, C r i s p i n D o b s o n , int 2175. • H o n d a C B 1 2 5 S (1974), 14,000 m / s , tax a n d M o T till Sept, s o m e s p a r e s , £120. C o n t a c t Dave K e l s a l l , C h e m E n g P G , int 2594 o r 727-7741 e v e n i n g s . • R i f l e R u g e r .22, 10 shot, s e m i - a u t o b r a n d n e w , £85. F i r e a r m s is a must. • W a n t e d : further c o n t r i b u t i o n s f o r • P u s h b l k e , 10 s p e e d r a c e r i n f u l l The Phoenix. O n e m o r e will d o u b l e working order, but needs some the s i z e ! attention £30ono. C o n t a c t J . E a g l e s o n , • B a s s p l a y e r w a n t e d to f o r m b a n d . N o R S M undergrad letter-racks. b e g i n n e r s . C o n t a c t T o n y , R m 421, • G T 3 8 0 ultimate street racer, b o r e d t o Linstead Hall. 440, e x p a n s i o n s , K & N s , t w i n d i s c s , • G o l d c h a i n a n d St C h r i s t o p h e r lost in r o a d r u n n e r s , etc., etc. A n y offer over swimming pool changing rooms o n £375. 5 4 3 - 1 2 6 3 or C . G r o v e s , M i n T e c h e v e n i n g of T u e s d a y , J a n u a r y 26. If U G letter-racks. a n y b o d y k n o w s of its w h e r e a b o u t s , • T e c h n i c s S L - B 2 turntable, P h i l i p s p l e a s e tell M a r k D a n i e l . M i n i n g 2 " B l a c k T u l i p " a m p (45w) 3 m t h s o l d , ( R S M ) . O f great s e n t i m e n t a l value. £100 f o r both. F e r g u s Stewart, G e o 1, • Two girls wanted to complete a Mines letter-racks. g r o u p of 8 s o that w e c a n a p p l y f o r a • T w o m a n p u p tent, c a n v a s with a n t i C o l l e g e h e a d t e n a n c y flat next year. m o s q u i t o a n d s n a k e s c r e e n , £25. P l e a s e c o n t a c t P h i l i p A d e y , A e r o 2 via C o n t a c t P a l l a b G h o s h , P h y s i c s 2. l e t t e r - r a c k s . T h i s is a s e r i o u s request! • A K A I C S - 3 4 D c a s s e t t e d e c k , £45, • B a d g e s o c make badges for any o l d vgc. C o n t a c t P a u l Dent, P h y s i c s 1. pleb. Taste no object! e.g. " G a y • T u s k / F l e e t w o o d M a c £4.50: a l s o whales against racism". "Atomic Going Through the Motions/Hot p o w e r ? Y e s please". N . B . e l e c t i o n C h o c o l a t e , £2.75. C o n t a c t M. S a t c h candidates. Contact Lee Mercer, well, G e o 2. Mech Eng letter-racks. • T o d a y is t h e last d a y f o r entries in • A n y o n e i n t e r e s t e d in v i s i t i n g o l d the Imperial C o l l e g e O p e n Darts people and taking them out (in T ournament, Fremlin Singles C u p , wheelchairs) shopping and to F R E E Scottish a n d Newcastle Pairs C u p . concerts (funded by Community N a m e s t o R o g e r a n d J i m m y in t h e A c t i o n G r o u p ) c o m e to the m e e t i n g o n Union Bar. M o n d a y , 12:30, t o p of the U n i o n . • D o y o u a c c e n t a n d m a n n e r s let y o u • D o y o u g o to H T B ? If s o c o u l d y o u down? For charm and elocution nelp C o m m u n i t y A c t i o n G r o u p c a r r y l e s s o n s , c o n t a c t M m e T a n z i , R m 52, c l o t h e s from the c h u r c h to t h e U n i o n W e e k s Hall. B u i l d i n g after the e v e n i n g s e r v i c e this S u n d a y ? Wait there a n d h e l p . • 126: T h e wet b e d w a s d u e to t h e f o u n t a i n . B u t I still d o not believe that • L a c e m a k e r s of the w o r l d unite. that h o l l o w / g r a n d c a n y o n in y o u r b e d W o u l d a n y o n e interested in m a k i n g is d u e to just s l e e p i n g ! B r u c e . (or d e s i g n i n g ) l a c e c o n t a c t M A . B r o w n e . M a t h s 3. If there's e n o u g h • F o o t b a l l u p d a t e : C i v E n g 1 require interest w e c o u l d start a L a c e C l u b . o p p o s i t i o n , preferably better than • Cardiff, F e b 12 to 14. S p a c e in c a r f o r P h y s i c s W a n d e r e r s . C o n t a c t R. a n y o n e w i l l i n g to s h a r e cost. C o n t a c t L a n g f o r d , C i v E n g racks. S. C o x . R m 357a, H u x l e y , 12:30 a n y • M u g g i n s : C o n g r a t s a n d c o m m i s e r a day tions o n S u n d a y ' s events. Don't w o r r y y o u c a n n o w fly there (except for • A r e y o u J a c k the L a d (or J i l l ? ) — London T M A ) . M. Enter the Welfare Week Condom Inflation C o m p e t i t i o n . T e a m s o f 3 to • H e l p ! A n i m a l l o v i n g m a l e a l l e r g i c to N i c k P y n e c / o U n i o n O f f i c e . £1 entry. c e l o t a p e d e s p e r a t e l y requires n o n C a s h prizes. split hamster. • B a r n D a n c e & D i s c o , 8:00 till late, • Cars suck! From the new green W e d F e b 17. T i c k e t s £1 from I C U or meanie, V G J 86R. C C U Offices. • T w i n k l e t o e s : Let's have s c r a b b l e • T h e r e will be a Y a c h t C l u b m e e t i n g s o o n — b u t c u t y o u r nails first. D e s p e r o n T h u r s d a y F e b 11 f o r a l l t h o s e ate of K e n s i n g t o n . nterested in w e e k e n d sailing this • A m a n d a : Didn't y o u have those term. socks on yesterday?—Kremmen. • R C S bus refunds from monopoly • " L u c k y " S e l k i r k 2, P h y s i c s W a n Rag c a n b e c o l l e c t e d from R C S U derers 0. T h e lads will s o o n b o u n c e Office. H u r r y hurry! back. P.W. rule O K .

b) They have only lived in Residence during the second half session i.e. they moved in after the beginning of the spring term. Third

Year New

Applicants

It is anticipated that all third year new applicants will be successful in obtaining place in Residence, in single room accommodation. This is by no means a guarantee since we may have an unexpectedly high demand. Nevertheless, there is a good chance that we will be able to house everybody in this category. Second

Year New

Applicants

Because of the priority given to third years, second year new applicants stand less of a chance of getting in and, if they do, there is a high probability that they will be offered shared rooms. Re-appllcants

These are selected by a sub-committee of each Hall and House Committee whose members have not applied for a further year in Residence. Postgraduates

Postgraduate re-applicants are treated in the same way as other re-applicants. Applications from p o s t g r a d u a t e new a p p l i c a n t s are considered by the Postgraduate Admissions Tutors in the Departments. The closing date for these applications is Friday, July 16. Head

Tenancies

and

College

Flats

Present Head Tenancies include: Hamlet Gdns, Hammersmith: flats for 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8. FELIX, February 5, 1982

Cambridge Gdns, Notting Hill: a flat for 4 and one for 6. Lexham Gdns, Kensington: flats for 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8, also double flatlets and single bedsits. Earls Court Square, Earls Court: single and double rooms. Sinclair Gardnes, Shepherds Bush: flats for 5 and 8. Gerrard Mansions, Soho: flats for 2. The College flats which will be available are two Southside penthouse flats and one mews flat behind Southside—all flats suitable for 4 people. You can make one application for Residence and one for the Head Tenancies and flats, if the latter application is successful, y o u r a p p l i c a t i o n for R e s i d e n c e will be withdrawn. If you are applying for the Head Tenancies and flats, then except in the case of single rooms and bedsits, you will need to apply with one or more others. You will only be considered for accommodation suitable for the size of group in which you apply. I hope this has started you thinking about next year. Look out for next week's FELIX and the illustrated supplement (we should have some extra copies of the supplement at Student Services if you miss the FELIX). If you have any queries in the meantime, don't hesitate to contact us. Michael Arthur Student Services 15 Princes Gdns


CLUBS AND SOCIETIES HG.

Wells Society

SF Soc

W e have seen the size of the planet earth shrink at an incredible rate this century. U n t i l relatively recently few people ever left the security of their o w n t o w n or village a n d the thought of venturing overseas never entered their heads. T h i s was at a time when it w o u l d take months, even years of uncomfortable travel to reach y o u r destination. It t o o k manifest d e s t i n y , t o i l , sweat a n d great h a r d s h i p for the A m e r i c a n people to traverse their continent in a century. W o w all it takes is $140 a n d a G r e y h o u n d b u s to take y o u to L o s Angeles i n a day or so. This century has seen newer and faster forms of transportation. R o a d s and m o t o r w a y s have m e a n d e r e d their way through most parts of the western w o r l d , with their tributaries running past everyone's doorstep. Airplanes particularly have seen the time for journeys that w o u l d have taken m o n t h s melt away to mere hours. In an age w h e n we c a n travel through the air faster than the speed of s o u n d , w h e n we c a n get out of b e d in L o n d o n to m a k e it in time for tea in N e w Y o r k , what does the future of transportation hold for us? If y o u want to find out, c o m e along to this M o n d a y ' s lecture by R . M . T a y l o r entitled ' W h e r e now and W h a t n e x t ? '

Industrial J o h n de L o r e a n , not content with dashing the hopes of the Irish, gave Industrial S o c a s m a c k in the gob last F r i d a y w h e n Ian R o s s was called away (on Thursday) to talk to h i m instead of us! B u t many thanks to all those who did c o m e to C h e m E n g — t o find only the C o m m i t t e e M e e t i n g and no Ian Ross. O u r next event is the T h a m e s Barrier T r i p , on Friday, F e b r u a r y 11, in the afternoon. This mighty edifice protects a large amount of L o n d o n from flooding, w h i c h we are assured c o u l d happen at any time that heavy rain and spring (boing a n d Zebedee) tides c o i n cide.

Ents M c V i c a r is c o m i n g ; T h u r s d a y , M E 2 2 0 , be there. T h e Breakfast B a n d (jazz/funksee music papers for rave reviews) is coming: S u n d a y , F e b r u a r y 14, J C R (so are ' I F ' by the way!). Weekend (ex-Young Marble G i ants) are c o m i n g : W e d , F e b 24, Concert Hall. Films are very c h e a p , all other entertainments £1.

ICCAG F a n c y having a game of football and frisby with some energetic c h i l d r e n ? C o m e and find out about helping with battered wives' children. If y o u are free o n W e d n e s d a y afternoons, y o u c a n help at St. P a n c r a s H o s p i t a l by t a k i n g patients out on trips every fortnight or draught-proofing old peoples homes. Free afternoons c a n be spent visiting o l d ' people at a h o m e in H i g h Street K e n s i n g t o n . S a t u r d a y a f t e r n o o n s c a n be spent helping with mentally h a n d i c a p p e d children. Interested? If so c o m e to the meeting, 12:30pm, M o n d a y , top of the U n i o n .

ICYHA After an e x t e n d e d break (due to bad weather) we finally went on o u r first trip of the new year last w e e k e n d — a long awaited visit to the D o r s e t coast. W e also have p l a n n e d a full t e r m ' s a c t i v i t i e s given below: F e b 12-14: Peak District F e b 26-28: B r e c o n B e a c o n s M a r c h 5-7: A cycle tour staying at Saffron W a l d e n and H o u g h t o n Mill (Cambridgeshire area). M a r c h 12-14: L a k e District M a r c h 2 7 - A p r 3: G l e n C o e in the heart of the Scottish Highlands. These trips will cost a r o u n d £10 for a w e e k e n d a n d £35 for the w e e k at E a s t e r . If a n y of t h i s sounds interesting c o m e along to S o u t h s i d e U p p e r L o u n g e any T h u r s d a y b e t w e e n 12:30 a n d 2:00pm, or see our noticeboard in Southside.

A r e y o u an E d Emshwiller fan? I am! T h a t ' s why this T u e s d a y is my date of the year because we are showing (6:30pm, M E 2 2 0 , etc.) Relativity, the all-time classic film, of, er, u m , well yes. It's h a r d to describe, but if y o u want to see a film containing pot-holing, d a n c i n g , fencing, nudity, violence, r a n d o m numbers, the size and c o m p l e x i t y of reality, a n d the catchiest tune in k n o w n space, all inside twenty minutes, don't miss it. A l s o in the p r o g r a m m e , Plan 9 from Outer Space, the worst film ever m a d e . A l i e n s a t t e m p t to prevent m a n k i n d from destroying everything with a new form of energy they are about to discover by resurrecting bodies with their a m a z i n g rays from their flying saucer. It stars Bela L u g o s i a n d C r i s w e l l (who?) and must be seen to be disbelieved. T h e last time I saw it was at 3 o'clock in the m o r n i n g . It took me weeks to recover. W e challenge y o u to see b o t h films in one p r o g r a m m e , but be w a r n e d , the result could be a permanent personality change, so t r y n o t to t u r n u p u n d e r t h e i n f l u e n c e of a n y t h i n g o r y o u r doobries could remain severely boggled. Entrance 50p for brave non-members, a n d 20p for already slightly damaged members. Students arise, y o u have nothing to lose but your brains. Until next week (if I survive)— Deedle deedle deedle deedle dee. The Sweetheart of Sigma Chi and Mr Ed

Cypriot For those who missed our 'Kafenio': It was a disaster! T h e coffee was bitter...the c a k e s were too sweet...the sandwiches were stale...the b a c k g a m m o n was boring...the newspapers were old...the c a r d games were unexciting...the conversation was lacking...and the r o o m was cold. But I still had fun...played games and kept w a r m . . . w i t h Tofalos F o r those who c a m e on F r i d a y : look out for posters a n d notices for the next Kafenio (please tell committee if Friday is unsuitable). R e m e m b e r not to miss the O v e r seas Student C o m m i t t e e ' s lect u r e s . . . m o s t are very relevant for C y p r i o t s .

Rail Soc U n l i k e B r i t i s h R a i l (all p r a i s e , g r o v e l , g r o v e l , h e r e is t h r e e h u n d r e d million for modernisation) Railsoc is at last running smoothly. A S L E F , strikes and L T apart, there is a lot on this term. See Southside noticeboard. O u r live steam loco is, I'm sad to report still in bits (like the A P T ! ) a n d our model railway (in gauge) is on indefinite strike due to lack of interest! If y o u like trains, be they in m o d e l form or real life, c o m e to our next meeting, everyone welcome! Signed M r T h r e e Percent with Productivity.

Wing Chun Debating Society D i s e n c h a n t e d , b o r e d , would you like to get your b a c k o n the rest of this rotten world?....But seriously, W i n g C h u n is a form of C h i n e s e K u n g F u w h o s e r o o t s c a n be traced back to S h a o l i n C h i n a . It is neither a hard or soft style but encompasses b o t h , being in its nature a close contact fighting art emphasising c o m p a c t n e s s , short distance a n d p o w e r a n d e c o n o m y of movement. A t the last A C C M e e t i n g the club was ratified to b e c o m e a n I C U n i o n club a n d consequently we hope to better equip the club with protective equipment as we s o o n hope to be entering into competitions. N e w members are always welcome, so if you're interested and w o u l d like to k n o w more, we meet in the U n i o n G y m on W e d n e s d a y afternoons a n d o n S a t u r d a y s f r o m 9:30 t o 12:30, o r contact W i n g L a i , P h y s i c s 2 v i a letter-racks.

F o r those of y o u who have not yet w o k e n up after your C h r i s t m a s holiday, the I C D e b a t i n g S o c i e t y held a debate o n C a p i t a l i s m in the s e c o n d week of t e r m . F o r those of y o u who w o k e up long enough to drag yourself to the debate, thank y o u for your support. W e are planning further debates this t e r m , including, hopefully, a N u c l e a r W e a p o n s debate, a n d , possibly, a S o u t h A f r i c a — A p a r t h e i d debate. A l m o s t certainly there will be a debate o n the superiority of the male sex (no contest really), w h i c h will be held in a place with ready refreshments, and debated by members of the society. W h i c h brings me to the next, a n d most important point: membership. A t p r e s e n t we h a v e o n l y the five c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s : D e r m o t M c C a u l e y , M a t h s 3; C h r i s L e e , M a t h s 3; Steve T u r n e r , Physics 1; Steve P a r r , P h y s i c s 1; Steve C h a m b e r l a i n , P h y s i c s 1. A s well as the superiority debate, I have a few other ideas, but these c a n only be implemented if we have some membes. C a r d s are now available, and the fee will be 50p (contact one of the above five). J o i n the society now, and we c a n have plenty of serious, half-serious and lunatic debates; delay too long, and the society will fold up as it has done in the past; and this would be a sad end to a valiant effort to bring informative entertainment to I C . Steve Turner Publicity Officer P S : S o r r y for the solemn report. Y o u will cheer me up no end if lots of y o u join. A f t e r all, in the words of the immortal S i r R o b e r t , this could turn out to be " . . . . a major contribution to lunchtime entertaiment".

FELIX, February

5, 1982

Page 5


CLUBS AND SOCIETIES'

Bookshop News If I may m a k e a simple request, please into the B o o k s h o p . W e are forever eared sandwiches, crisps, etc., a n d bookshelves. T h e y do not enhance

do not bring food a n d drink finding the remains of d o g various d r i n k s , left on our the beauty of the b o o k s .

Recent Titles from Pluto Press D i s u s r e r - G l y & H a r r i s o n , £2.95 The British Economic Continuous e x c u r s i o n s - M a r s h a l l C o l m a n , £3.95 Technology of political c o n f r o f - A c k r o y d & M a r g o l i s , £4.95 Trouble with the law, £1.95 Power Corrupts-Bacon & V a l e n t i n e , £2.50 The L a d y / d / / e r s - B o b b i e J a c o b s o n , £1.95 The Boy Looked at J o h n n y - B u r c h i l l & P a r s o n s , £1.50 Politics of Nuclear D i s a r m a m e n t - M a r t i n R y l e , £2.50 Revolutionary of our Times-Rosa Luxemburg, Stephen Eric B r o n n e r , £2.95 For Her Own G o o d - E u r e n r e i c h & English, £3.60 Psycho Politics-Peter S e d g w i c k , £4.95 D o it Yourself-Janos H e n e d i , £2.95 Destruction of nature in Soviet U n i o n - B o r i s K a m a r o v , £2.95 Cohabitation H a n d b o o k - B o t t o m l e y & G i e v e , £3.95 Capitalism, the family & personal /i/e-Eli R a r e t s k y , £1.95 Race Against the D y i n g - E l i z a b e t h S i g m u n d , £1.95 Hidden from H i s f o r y - S h e i l a R o w b o t h a m , £2.95 Poland, the state of the Republic, £4.95 Jack, London, Man writer & rebe/-Robert B a r l t r o p , £2.95 Political Economy of H e a / t h - L e s l e y D o y a l , £4.95 Women in the 80s Cis Report, £0.95 Cis Anti Report, £1.95

F o r t h c o m i n g events are as follows: M o n F e b 8: Joint E n t s / C a r n i v a l Comm W e d F e b 10: Rag M a g trip to O x ford, Beit A r c h , 12:30. Sat F e b 13: Election papers up. S u n F e b 14: S o c c e r S i x e s (with prizes) B o o k i n g s for the O x f o r d trip s h o u l d be m a d e as s o o n as possible as they seem to be in d e m a n d . T h e date of the annual dinner has been moved to T h u r s day, M a y 18, and the m e n u a n d cost will be available shortly.

collecting, it is a waste of m o n e y — y o u r m o n e y ! — a n d is a g r e a t financial help for any charity. S o why not d o something useful next W e d n e s d a y afternoon a n d c o m e to O x f o r d . W e will return by 9:00pm — therefore you could even do some w o r k or go to the bar when y o u get back! C o s t of c o a c h is £2—with a money back scheme if y o u sell lots of R a g M a g s . G e n C o m m , M o n d a y , 5:45pm, M i n i n g Con fer en ce R o o m . See you W e d n e s d a y . Caynor

Page 6

A l l the charitable institutions listed below have successfully effected deliveries to P o l a n d since the military take over. F o o d for P o l a n d Polish C a t h o l i c C e n t r e 1 Courtfield G d n s London W13 0 H D (01) 997-8822 L o n g r e c o r d of delivery of food parcels distributed by the C a t h o l i c C h u r c h in poland to the most needy. A c c e p t s : money. M e d i c a l A i d for Poland 107 Beaufort Street London S W 5 (01) 351-2605 Delivers aid to hospitals a n d to the C a t h o l i c C h u r c h . A c c e p t s : money, paramedical and medical supplies. Will also accept food and clothing. Sue Ryder Foundation S u e R y d e r H o m e for the S i c k and Disabled Cavendish Suffolk (0787) 280252 Distributes help through its o w n homes in P o l a n d . A c c e p t s : money, food, clothing. Polish W o m e n ' s Benevolent Association L t d 16 W a r w i c k R o a d London S W3 9 U D (01) 373-9936 Distributes help to expectant mothers, mothers and children. A c c e p t s : money, babies clothing. Save the C h i l d r e n F u n d 157 C l a p h a m R o a d L o n d o n S W 9 OPT (01) 582-1414 H e l p s families with children and children without families. A c c e p t s : money. O c k e n d o n Venture Guildford Road Woking Surrey (04862) 72012 Deliveries by o w n transport to hospitals a n d children's homes. A c c e p t s : money, food and w a r m clothing. T h e everyday basic necessities w h i c h y o u ake for granted are not available in P o l a n d . The Polish people need your help.

CND City & Guilds

A n y o n e want to go to O x f o r d on Wednesday? I hope everyone realises by now the conditions under w h i c h we are l e g a l l y p e r m i t t e d to go R a g collecting. W e have no street or house-to-house collection licences th er efore we are only legally permitted to go Rag M a g selling on university campuses. This is the r e a s o n t h a t we c a n n o t c o l l e c t locally a n d hence have to hire coaches to get to other campuses. C o a c h hire is expensive, a n d if n o b o d y s i g n s u p to go R a g

people. You can help the Polish A List of institutions which send help to Poland.

W e l l here's another exciting, funp a c k e d instalment (yes I remembered). O n W e d n e s d a y there's an O C M e c h E n g / C h e m E n g penultimate year party (contact G Y R ' s ) and next Friday it's D & D . O n F e b r u a r y 14 there are the Rugby Sevens so you've still got time to get a team together— details from posters or G u i l d s O f f i c e . T h e F i e l d C u p is o n T u e s d a y , F e b r u a r y 16 (see G u i l d sheet for details) so get yourselves into teams for that as well! Finally the L i n k s C a r n i v a l is o n Friday, Febr u ary 19 a n d stewards are needed, so if you're interested see A n d y R. (your glorious president) g e n e r a l l y f o u n d e i t h e r in the G u i l d s Office or the U n i o n B a r .

The first two lectures in the series " N u c l e a r W a r in E u r o p e " (organised by the College E N D group a n d Humanities department) have seen both Professor N e i l d and L o r d C a r v e r c o n d e m n the danger a n d futility of Defence and F o r e i g n Policies centred a r o u n d nuclear weapons. W i t h o u t condition both speakers supported C N D ' s premises and arguments for nuclear disarmament. H o w e v e r , L o r d C a r v e r raised doubts about C N D ' s ' proposed process of disarmament. T h e lectures were both attended by upwards of 200 people', a trend hopefully repeated with the third last Tuesday. T h e last lecture of the series takes the form of a debate between P r o f e s s o n M i c h a e l Pentz a n d L o r d Chalfont. This promises to be a heavyweight tussle between two accomplished speakers, a n d it is important that b o t h sides (especially C N D ' s ) are adequately represented in the audience. F u r t h e r m o r e , please note that a veteran disarmer, L o r d Z u c k e r m a n , will present the sixth Jubilee L e c t u r e entitled ' N u c l e a r Illusion and Reality'. T h e Rector will chair the occasion w h i c h takes place in the G r e a t Hall on F e b r u a r y 18 at 5:30pm. S o as a ttnal reminder: Tuesday, February 9 at 1:00pm, Physics L T 1 , ' N u c l e a r Deterrencefact o r f i c t i o n " — a d e b a t e b e t w e e n P r o f e s s o r M . P e n t z a n d L o r d Chalfont. Thursday, February 18 at 5:30pm, G r e a t H a l l , ' N u c l e a r Illusion and Reality'—sixth Jubilee L e c t u r e presented by L o r d Z u c k e r m a n .

FELIX, February

5, 1982


.—y /

The Hypochondriac by Moliere. Translated by Alan Drury. Directed by Michael Bogdanov. The Olivier, National Theatre. " O h , the powers of nature! She knows what we need, and the doctors know nothing." Benvenuto Cellini, Autobiograpy (1558-66) "Doctors cut, turn, and torture the sick, and then demand of them an undeserved fee for such services." Heraclitus (c 500BC) Moliere would doubtlessly have nodded with mocked approval at these words. He was obsessed with illness, medicines and doctors all his life, and no less than six of his plays are comic but biting attacks on the medical profession. The incomparable Daniel Massey plays the totally self-absorbed hypochondriac, Argan, in Moliere's play Le Malade Imaginaire, otherwise known as The Hypochondriac. Argan draws comfort in his pitiful life from only two sources: his loving wife and enemas (liquid medicines injected into the rectum). In between hurried shuffles to the toilet catalysed by ingesting his beloved medicines he tries to marry off his daughter (played by Emily Morgan who also plays her very young sister in a truly comic and unforgettable way) to a doctor. With Michael Bogdanov directing in his typically exuberant style, the result is a hilarious and delightful evening of buffoonery. The Hypochondriac, like all Moliere's plays, is based on the Italian Commedia delVArte, a form of rough, improvised theatre abounding in earthy humour and bursting with vitality. It is an art-form that is currently enjoying a great popular revival and it is one that 1 personally have taken a great liking to. The National Theatre production retains these elements which materialise in the form of revels, masques, street plays, acrobatic displays and song and dance. The Commedia delFArte consists of popular 'stock' characters and I was surprised to discover that Moliere took as his model (he himself acted in his plays) the character of Scaramouche who clownishly personifies a cowardly braggart. Scaramouche! Now there's an interesting aside! Are we not forced to the inevitable conclusion that the FELIX puzzle-setter with his self-adopted penname Scaramouche, is no more than a selfconfessed cowardly braggart, so cowardly he has to c o n c e a l his identity under this pseudonym? The Hyprochondriac must be one of the most enjoyable plays currently on stage in London. However, it is unfortunately coming to a close and its last four performances are on February 15, 16 and 17 (matinee and evening). I am very tempted to go again—something I very rarely do. Nick Bedding

iM&/2jlfT0 Good by CP. Taylor directed by Howard Davies. The Royal Shakespeare Company at the Warehouse. This is the first time I had been to The Warehouse and I was somewhat overawed (or perhaps the word should be 'underawed') by its interior, and coming in with only a few moments to spare meant that I wasn't paying the attention I should when the play began. The small theatre occupies the loft of an old building and the overall appearance is one of shabbiness and temporariness, but it does p o s s e s s a rather likeable i n t i m a c y . T h e W a r e h o u s e is the R S C ' s e x p e r i m e n t a l platform, and such current successes as Educating Rita began life here. C P . Taylor, author of Good, unfortunately died at a tragically early age only a few weeks back, just when his work was achieving national recognition. Good is a mature and intelligent play about a 'good' man, a lecturer in German Literature, who gets caught up in the m a e l s t r o m of the T h i r d R e i c h and eventually becomes its turning force. This character, Haider, is played with commanding presence by Alan Howard, who has just won The Standard Award for Best Actor for his performance in the play. Haider unintentionally becomes involved with the forerunner of the Nazi party and although he vaguely perceives in the distance the injustices and horrors Nazi policy is leading to, his immediate personal problems are of more importance to him. His Jewish friend tries to awaken him, but to no avail. Haider suffers from a mental disturbance

The Battle for the Labour Party by David ÂŁ1.75, 151 and Maurice Kogan, Fontana, pages. This book is about the activities of the left wing groups in the Labour Party. It takes a fairly objective approach, it's not the sort of book Denis Healey might write, but it's clearly sympathetic to the right of the Labour Party, it concentrates on what's happened between 1979 and the end of 1981, with a little background material about dissent in the Labour Party since 1900. The organisations described in the most details are the Campaign for Labour Party Democracy (which pressed for the constitutional reforms) and later the Rank and File Mobilising Committee (which supported Tony Benn's election campaign. The R F M C recently appears to have been superseded by 'Labour Liason '82'). If you think that that paragraph was boring then you aren't going to like the book, which is written like a textbook. It's a pity about the style because the subject matter is important, so long as there's still a chance of Labour forming a future government. The book makes it clear that the left are much better organised and more intelligent in the way they persue their aims than the right wing of the party. But you can see this already from the big changes the leftist groups have accomplished in the last few years ( c o m p u l s o r y r e s e l e c t i o n , the electoral college, the SDP). More interesting are the descriptions of exactly hou; the activists go about getting support for their FELIX, February 5, 1982

clearly hears hears orchest orchestral music in 'in which he clearly moments of personal drama. This is a clever device employed by Taylor to add lighter touches to the play, the actors bursting into song now and again to the accompaniment of a trio, but I did feel slightly uneasy about this at times; the subject upon which the play is based is of the type that demands a finely tuned balance between humour and d r a m a . Unaware of the maelstrom inexorably pulling him towards its c e n t r e , H a i d e r is only conscious of the people and the problems immediately around him. The play is based on documentary material, including unpublished transcripts of interviews with SS officers who played an important part in administering the N a z i concentration camps. But above all the play is a work of imagination and of the present day; of people not having the time, the foresight or inclination to appreciate where world events are leading and by their very inaction bring about the arrival of horrendous situations which those world events foreshadowed. Hitler said in c o n n e c t i o n with the J e w s " t h e art of leadership....consists in consolidating the attention of the people against a single adversary and taking care that nothing will split up that attention." This 'art of leadership' is again being practised today, but this time across the Atlantic Good has been a sell-out success since it opened last September but discussions are underway about a possible further London life for the p r o d u c t i o n at the e n d of the Warehouse session in March, followed by a season in Broadway. Nick Bedding n

w

n

i

c

n

n e

aims. They depend on the fact that local parties are always controlled in practice by a small number of people who bother to turn up to meetings and stand for committees (just like ICU). " T h e C L P D bombarded every constituency with c a m p a i g n i n g material which included the standard resolutions to be proposed at that year's conference." So at a conference, forty or fifty constituency parties might all propose the same resolution (skillfully drafted for them by the C L P D ) giving the impression of enormous popular pressure for c o n s t i t u t i o n a l c h a n g e . T h e r e ' s nothing underhand about such tactics of course, and the book emphasises that the left are generally careful to follow constitutional methods. T h e book also deals with the deputy leadership campaigns, involving the Rank and File Mobilising Committee (partly Trotskyist, the Kogans say) and its backing for Tony Benn. Then there's fourteen pages or so about Ken Livinstone and the G L C , then the last chapter which is a mildly pretentious and boring discussion of the 'theoretical' basis for the left's campaigns. The authors are better at reporting and describing events than they are at getting at the reasons why they happen and the postcript, added a few months after the main text was finished, is one of the most interesting parts of the book. They recount how the parliamentary party is becoming more left wing: " O f 25 MPs retiring, 17 had voted for Healey and were replaced by candidates of the outside or inside left." It looks like a race between the activists and the S D P to se who can finish off the Labour Party first. O n the whole, 'The Battle for the Labour Party' is a reasonably interesting but not very well written book. N.

Willson Page 7


_____

Football

8RBHI

Firsts

R E S U L T S Wednesday, January 27 Football IC I vs IC II vs IC I V vs IC V I I vs

Goldsmiths I Goldsmiths II Goldsmiths III Westminster Hosp II

4-2(H) 2-2(H) 3-0(H) 3-1 (A)

Rugby IC II vs

Borough R d II

3-23(H,

Hockey IC I vs Ladies vs

M i d d x Hosp (Cup) St Georges II

1-0(A) 3-l(H)

Badminton IC Mixedvs Q M C M i x e d

8.1(H)

F'irst h a l f they h a d t h e w i n d . S e c o n d half w e h a d the w i n d . A f t e r A r t h u r ' s beans they h a d the w i n d . A few beers l a t e r w e h a d the w i n d . P . S . 4-2.

ft Hockey Firsts After a short tour o f S i d c u p , I m p e r i a l d e s c e n d e d o n M i d d l e s e x for a second r o u n d c u p tussle. B o t h teams started w e l l o n a s m o o t h p i t c h but after 1 ' / hours the surface cut u p l e a v i n g I m p e r i a l c o n t r o l l i n g the m i d f i e l d a n d M i d d l e s e x p a c k i n g t h e ir defense a r e a . A f t e r a scoreless first half I m p e r i a l set u p several chances, b u t even a series o f short corners f a i l e d to p r o d u c e a goal. T h e b a l l e v e n t u a l l y f o u n d its w a y t o t h e s t i c k o f 'entrepreneur' midfield controller Geoff A y e r s w h o m u f f l e d u p a shot l e a v i n g it to the r e l i a b l e B e l l t o c a s u a l l y slot h o m e a reverse stick w i n n e r . 4

"Careful with that fork, you might cause an accident."

Summer Vacation Employment

Fencing CLP

Foil (Ladies) Foil (Mens) Epee Sabre

rc

l 2 5 1 T w o Assistant Managers required for the T h e I C F e n c i n g C l u b p u t u p four teams Summer Letting Scheme of the College flats at against t h e C e n t r a l L o n d o n P o l y t e c h n i c i n Hamlet Gardens for the forthcoming summer. a n a w a y m a t c h o n J a n u a r y 26. T h e epee The job offers excellent managerial experience, t e a m was the o n l y v i c t o r i o u s one, w i n n i n g b y g o o d p a y , free a c c o m m o d a t i o n a n d a n five fights to four. P h i l B i r d a n d Steve T a y l o r enjoyable summer in London. If interested, were responsible fortwo wins each a n d please write in detail to J i m D o n a l d s o n G r a h a m e Barfleet the fifth. (Manager H G S L S ) for an interview, c / o the T h e first fight i n b o t h the L a d i e s F o i l a n d Student Services Office, 15 Princes Gdns, or the sabre were w o n b y I C , t h e o p p o s i t i o n directly to 216 Hamlet Gdns, London W6. Any t h e n went o n to w i n the subsequent 8, w h i l e undergraduate may apply. Closing date for the t w o fights i n the mens foil t e a m were w o n applications Monday, February 22. by P e t e r Boines.

Wood's Golden Turkey atlC Imperial College Science Fiction Society is to show the film Plan 9 from Outer Space on Tuesday (6:30pm, Mech Eng 220), which has been hailed as the bad film cult classic. Plan 9 concerns the bid by alien beings to prevent the destruction of the entire universe. T o do this they must stop the human race from developing a bomb which would explode the sun. When peaceful methods fail they invoke Plan 9, whereby the human dead are raised from the grave and set against their own race. The film has received many awards: The Worst Film Ever Made at The Worst Film Festival held in New York in November 1980, and IVorsf Film in the book The Golden Turkey Awards. The plot is complemented by some highly amusing acting and dialogue. Director Edward D . W o o d J n r . shot about three minutes footage of veteran actor (and friend) Bela Lugosi stalking and around his home dressed as Dracula. When Lugosi died, a "double" was needed to complete the film, who was a good foot taller and concealed his imposture with a cloak draped over half of his face. Some of the classic dialogue is typified by the line "Inspector Clay is dead. Murdered. And somebody is responsible!" Entrance is 20p to members, 50p to nonmembers.

Page 8

T h e results are s o m e w h a t m i s l e a d i n g , i m p l y i n g that C L P m a d e light w o r k of I C , a n d a l t h o u g h this was the case i n some of the fights, several o f t h e m went t o 4 - a l l before b e i n g lost. A l l i n a l l it was a n e n j o y a b l e m a t c h a n d it m a d e a pleasant c h a n g e to fence o n a floor w i t h a g o o d g r i p as opposed t o the s k a t i n g r i n k o n the t h i r d floor of the U n i o n B u i l d i n g !

Continued

from

back

M i d d l e s e x fought back i n the final m i n u t e s , b u t e n d e d second i n a close m a t c h , the first t h e y ' v e lost this season. T h a n k s to J o n for t r a n s p o r t (nuff said!) a n d T i m for u m p i r i n g . T e a m : Slatter, Clarke, Riley, Parker, Ayres, Rao, Bell, Garmes, Franklin, Bateson, Farmer.

Ladies W e w o n last week. W e w o n a g a i n this week. W e beat U C H 10-2 last week. W e beat St. G e o r g e s 5-1 this week. K a r e n scored a g o a l . S o d i d J o . A l i s o n got t w o . T h e i r goalie . scored one for us as w e l l . E v e r y b o d y p l a y e d r e a l l y w e l l a n d C a r o l i n e was very pleased w i t h us. W e s a w lots o f b i g aeroplanes. A f t e r w a r d s we h a d l e m o n a d e w h i c h was very nice. Guess w h a t , M u m m y said she w i l l b u y me J a n e t a n d J o h n B o o k 2 for w i n n i n g . I hope w i n a g a i n next week.

page.

Solutions to this week's puzzle, together with any comments or criticisms, should be sent to me at the FELIX Office as usual. There will be a prize of ÂŁ5 (donated by Mend-a-Bike) for the correct solution randomly selected at 1:00pm on Wednesday. L a s t Week's Solution Oi the forty-five people who discovered that three long and shaggies together with two short and sophisticated make up 150 grams, Steve Westcough, Maths 1, was chosen as the winner, and he can collect his cheque o n Monday afternoon. Many of you thought that the last two puzzles were too easy. Well, this week's is the sort which some people will see immediately, and others will find very hard; it's just a matter of spotting the correct approach. Next week I'll try for something really tough!

FELIX, February 5, 1982

Next week's Ents film is McVicar starring Roger Daltry and A d a m Faith. It is the story of the convicted criminal James M c V i c a r , formerly Britain's " M o s t Wanted M a n " .


R E S U L T S

^

Saturday, January 3 0 Football IC I \ IC II \ I t IV \ IC V \ IC V I x

London Hosp I Kings II (Cup) London Hosp II Q M C III (Cup) London Hosp III

6-1 (H;

Rugby IC I \ IC II \ IC III \

Belsize Park Southbank Poly Belsize Park

22-0 10-15(H) 16-10

Hockey IC I A IC II \

Southgate Adelaide Raynes Park

l-l(H) 5-0(A)

Badminton IC Mixedvs Q M C M i x e d Bowling IC vs

Portsmouth Poly

4-l(H) 13-0(H) i-2(A) VV.O. (H)

7-4(A) 1- 9(A)

Sunday, January 31 Mixed Hockey IC vs U C L

2- 1(A)

•^Badminton ULU Knockout Cup F o r t h e first t i m e t h i s c e n t u r y I C h a v e a c t u a l l y reached the finals o f the U L K O C u p . T h o s e weeks o f h a r d t r a i n i n g ( i n .Southside Bar) have p a i d d i v i d e n d s , w i t h a 7-4 w i n over Q M C away. T h e m e n were consistently b r i l l i a n t as ever, w i t h the ladies t u r n i n g o n the style just at the right time. W e l l p l a y e d everyone.

Hockey

Seconds

Thirds C o n t r a r y to expectations Belsize P a r k were shit hot. But we were better. Y e t a g a i n I C had a far smaller pack, a n d w o u l d have to rely u p o n the backs lor any a t t a c k i n g p l a y . T e n minutes into the game saw some slick passing to the w i n g , a n d intelligent p l a y put J u l i a n N o r l e y away o n the o v e r l a p for I C ' s first try. I C kept u p the pressure t h r o u g h o ut the first h a l l t a k i n g advantage of Belsize's mistakes, w h i c h resulted i n J o h n W i t t r i c k p o u n c i n g o n a loose b a l l for our second try. T h e second hall saw Belsize attack h a r d d e n y i n g I C possession o f clean b a l l . A f t e r c o n c e d i n g a try, spirited p l a y took I C up the field where I a n Magness forced his way over for t h e t h i r d t r y . B e l s i z e l a t e r s c o r e d a b r e a k a w a y try. A t no time d i d the thirds look in serious trouble h a v i n g l u l l confidence i n their o w n abilities, a n d i g n o r i n g the c a p t a i n . S t i l l unbeaten this season. T e a m : J. .Norley, M. Shepherd, /.. Spring, N. Windsor, M. Brundrett, I. Magness, A. Davies, S. Kirby, J. Mulligan, J. Coghlan, M. Patterson, P. Baleson, B. Hinmers, J. Wittrick, A. Hunter, Slug (Kef).

Scene: A m e d i e v a l j o u s t i n g tournament, the eleven c h a m p i o n s f r o m the realm o f I C take on the g r o v e l l i n g challengers from R a y n e s P a r k . T h e t w o captains h o l d - c o u r t . R P : Greetings sire, I fear I have to ask o f thee a f a v o u r — c a n s ' t we have one o f y o u r m e n to make o u r feeble team u p to full • strength? I C : Y o u ' v e got to be jesting m a t e — l e t battle commence! R P : O h t r a g e d y ! — o u r d e f e n c e is s p l i t asunder a n d the great W y l i e , k n i g h t o l N o r t h u m b r i a hast perforated our b a c k b o a r d . I C : T h y defence ist more de c r e pi d t h a n I C 1st X I — s e e E r i c the R e d K n i g h t has scored ye second g o a l — e v e n if it was at ye f o u r t h attempt! R P : W e shall take refreshment a n d extract revenge. I C : T h o u couldn'st extract juice f r o m ye halft i m e oranges! See h o w t h e great W y l i e springs ye offside t r a p a n d scores thrice more. O u r cups w i l l be o ' e r l l o w i n g w i t h a l e this night. R P : O u r m i d f i e l d ist frustrated, look how o u r left h a l f seeks to plant one o n thy right winger.

Q Sailing Firsts

K e n n e d y a n d B u t l e r ; 4 t h , 5th, 3 capsizes, broken k i c k i n g strap a n d r u d d e r . M i l l s a n d R e d m a n : 5th, 2 n d , 4 capsizes, broken seat a n d bent centreboard. Bennett a n d D a l t o n , D N F , 4 t h , n u m e r o u s capsizes, one boat sunk! W e lost 0-2, 2 0 ' / p t s — 2 7 p t s . I n a light force 7 the team generously offered to test U E A ' s boats to destruction. In the first race the team got off to a good start but this c o u l d not last for long. Bennett a n d D a l t o n were r a m m e d o n the first beat i n a vicious (illegal) m a n o e u v r e b y the o p p o s i M a j o r disaster! T h e b o w l i n g team lost for the tion. T h i s was followed by a dastardly m o v e second week r u n n i n g , this time on the grotty (also illegal) against M i l l s a n d R e d m a n w h i c h lanes o f the P o r t s m o u t h B o w l . resulted i n their subsequent capsize, they O f t h e A a n d B teams, only A n d y then proceeded to dredge the c h a n n e l for M c M u l l a n , K e v i n Short a n d P a u l G e a r , w h o twenty minutes. K e n n e d y a n d B u t l e r , o n first e q u a l l e d a n d then i m p r o v e d o n his h i g h their w a y past, hysterical w i t h l a u g h t e r , s c o r e , b o w l e d w e l l a n d b o t h i e a m s lost executed " a superb death r o l l " a n d j o i n e d heavily. T h e C team lost the firs! game by M i l l s a n d R e d m a n in their industrious w o r k . over 100 pins but fought back to w i n the next N o t to be o u t d o n e Bennett a n d D a l t o n j o i n e d two games a n d so gain a d r a w overall N e i l in, p e r f o r m i n g numerous ' i m m e r s i o n tests' o n G r i m w o o d once a g a i n i m p r o v e d his high their boat, a n d sank!! T h i s meant a n easy series. O n c e a g a i n , we failed to field a ladies w i n for D E A , 1 0 / p t s - 1 6 p t s . team b u t A l i s o n a n d J u l i e d i d their jobs as A l t e r a break to recover Bennett's boat, cheerleaders a d m i r a b l y . ieffect repairs a n d eat l u n c h , the second race A T e a m : R . C o o k , M . H a r r i s o n , li. iwas started w i t h some t r e p i d a t i o n . M i l l s a n d MacGown, W.C. Man, A. McMullen K e n n e d y m a d e good starts a n d the t e a m B T e a m : P. G e a r , K . S h o r t , M . S m i t h H. were placed 2, 3. 4 r o u n d the first m a r k . T h i s T h o n g , C . Wells. temporary situation was soon rectified w h e n , C Team: A . Davis, N . G r i m w o o d , T at the second m a r k , K e n n e d y demonstrated a N e w p o r t , J . Q i i i n n , M . Stanley. classic 'gybe a n d s w i m for i t ' m a n o e u v r e . A l s o last weekend, six I C howlers look pari T h i s was copied beautifully b y Bennett w h e n i n the B r u n e i doubles t o u r n a m e n t . C o o k . he a r r i v e d at the same m a r k a few minutes Wells, Smith a n d T h o n g all bowled later. O n the second lap K e n n e d y repeated respectable series but K e v i n Short bow led his his d i s p l a y s i m u l t a n e o u s l y w i t h a U E A highest series to t a k e t h i r d p l a c e i n the b o a t — d e m o n s t r a t i n g that ballet o n water is i n d i v i d u a l h i g h h a n d i c a p scries, a n d w i t h his possible! M i r a c u l o u s l y M i l l s stayed the right partner, W a i M a n , w o n tlit- doubles high way u p a n d the race finished w i t h U E A i n h a n d i c a p game. C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s lo both ol 1st, 3 r d , 6 t h p o s i t i o n : 9 V p t s vs l l p t s ; them. 2 capsizes vs 3 capsizes.

T e a m : A. Mitchell, B. Ions, L Honoris, S. Ridd, C. Hujjlet, S. Willis, H K. Wor>^ G. Adamson. Stage management a n d t a c t i c a l c o o r d i n a t i o n by I B u l l .

2

Bowling

3

4

4

FELIX, February

5, 1982

IC: T r u e , 'tis M a n g a t showing fearful displeasure, I must end this terrible carnage. — Y e final whistle b l o w s — R P : T h y defense was too strong sire. I C : A y e , i f t h o u ventures into these parts agai n we shall give thee another wigging. Y e T e a m : P. Butler, P. Cunningham, R. Roessink, A. Whitehead, J. Rhodes, A. Streamer, B. Shindler, S. Gray, M. Bansal, G. Wylie, E. Mahers. Thanks lo Chris Jones for umpiring.

Mixed T h e usual S u n d a y m o r n i n g enthusiasm for hockey was i m m e d i a t e l y apparent d u r i n g the w a r m - u p , b u t once the effects of S a t u r d a y night h a d been r u n off, the team settled d o w n to play its usual attractive, c r o w d - p u l l i n g hockey. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , after about twenty minutes the i n e v i t a b l e happened w h e n T i m C o a t e s w o r t h , despite being relegated to a defensive position, m a n a g e d to p o a c h yet another goal f r o m the f o r w a r d line by s c o r i n g f r o m a s h o r corner. Soon alter o u r persistence p a i d off a n d history was m a d e w h e n a cross b y A n d y S t r o o m e r was converted by A l i s o n W a l l . T h i s was our first " n o n - C o a t e s w o r t h " goal o f the seas,in. U C seemed confused by a l l of this a n d for some obscure reason decided to attempt the systematic r e m o v a l of A n d y S t r o o m e r ' s fingers! Despite the openness of o u r defence at times, U C never m a n a g e d to find that e x t r a bit o f p e n e t r a t i o n w i t h T i m , R u t h a n d Steve coping admirably. Goalkeeper Chris Jones m a n a g e d to t h r o w w h a t e v e r part o f his a n a t o m y was a v a i l a b l e at the time at the b a l l a n d was o n l y beaten late i n the game b y a w e l l - t a k e n ' v o l l e y ' . F i n e w o r k d o w n the left by C h r i s , R u t h a n d A l i s o n p r o d u c e d a set of chances nearly converted by J o a n d K a r e n . T h e u n b e a t e n r u n continues a n d w e look f o r w a r d to next week when a n a t t e m p t w i l l be m a d e to keep G r a y off the " t e a s " ! T e a m : Chris, Ruth, Chris, Steve (Capt), Coathanger, Simon, Jo, Karen, Alison, Andy. Page 9


Publicity Offer

Attention all Election Candidates The papers for the sabbatical elections go up .next Friday and soon we will be flooded with publicity for I C U and C C U elections. After giving the matter of elections some thought it has become apparent to me that it is very difficult to be both informative and completely unbiased. After all, it is hard for the electorate at I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e to m a k e i n f o r m e d decisions, when all they have to rely on is the candidates' o w n publicity in the form of posters, handouts, a FELIX manifesto, IC Radio and S T O I C ' s promos. For this reason I have decided to run a special series of Soapbox articles running up to the elections. Starting next week I invite any member of College to submit articles on why they think they are the right candidate for a post or alternatively why someone else isn't. Y o u could even say what qualities you would expect from anybody standing for a particular position. If the articles are concise, informative and to the point then I shall attempt to print as many as possible. This unique service gives both candidates and electorate the chance to say exactly what they want about the elections. The only limitations will be length, factual accuracy and, of course, the laws of libel. So to start the ball rolling.

M r Harold Christopher Webb This week C h r i s W e b b , former E x t e r n a l Affairs Officer, came into the office to ask me about publicity charges. It is rumoured that Mr Webb is proposing to stand for I C U President. In my opinion (and remember that these are purely my personal feelings), Chris Webb is just a b o u t the worst p e r s o n w h o c o u l d possibly stand for this post. The past two years have been typified by a middle of the road "reasonable" I C U President. John Passmore had the added quality of being completely lazy and a bit of a drunk, whilst Nick Morton, who is a terribly nice person, has probably not achieved everything he wanted to merely because he is too easy going to stand up to College. Chris Webb, on the other hand is so wet that he r e s e m b l e s B a n g l a d e s h after the ravages of the monsoon. H e is an ardent Tory,' but is so middle of the road that he makes the S D P look like the Hitler Youth. If he is elected as I C U President then I think it will be a dark day for IC Union. I can see him now, agreeing with the Rector over a large glass of claret and selling the students down the river. He is a born politician and as such has ambition which greatly outweighs his ability. Sincerity is a word which would not pass my lips when describing him. What we need is a President with firm opinions who will represent the students strongly to the College authorities. C h r i s Webb is not such a person.

Valentine's Day Next week there will be a special Valentines section in the Small Ads column. Please collect forms from the office and return by 5:30pm on Tuesday if you want a short message included. FEUX

This time of year always becomes a bit of a p a i n in the a r s e w h e n the s w a r m s of prospective sabbaticals arrive at the office two days before the elections wanting posters printed. In a move to encourage would-be sabbaticals to get publicity in early, I am intending to have a special discount price for any publicity handed (complete and ready for printing) to me by 5:30pm on Tuesday. This special offer is open to all candidates and will allow those who have planned their ideas well the chance to benefit just a little. They could have a few extra posters and handouts or even save some money!

M y very own radio show I have accepted the invitation to appear on IC Radio on Tuesday evening at about 8:00pm. I will be interviewed live on air by ace presenter M o and will be asked about many aspects of College life and, of course, FELIX. So listen in on Tuesday if you want to learn who James Deeny really is and where he buys his coffee.

Credits My thanks this week to Lesley, Pallab, Peter, James (star), Paul, Eddie, Alistair, Soheel (still going strong), N i c k , Steve, Martin S . , J . Martin, Jez, Mo, all the other collators (inc. N . Willson), Ian and Maz.

What's On Friday, February 5 • I C A n g l i n g C l u b , 12:30pm, Southside U p p e r Lounge. • B U N A C w e e k l y c l u b m e e t i n g , 12:30pm, G r e e n Comm Rm. • V e g s o c r e s t a u r a n t t r i p to Thai restaurant, High S t K e n , 7:00pm, meet Beit A r c h , £5 a head.

Saturday, February 6 • I n d i a S o c R e p u b l i c D a y c e l e b r a t i o n , 7:00pm, J C R , £1.50.

Sunday, February 7

• W a r g a m e s c l u b m e e t i n g , 1:00pm, U n i o n S C R .

• C o n s o c s p e a k e r m e e t i n g with Roger Harrison, H e a d of Political S e c t i o n , A m e r i c a n Embassy, o n ' C N D ? N o Thanks!', 1:00pm, H u x l e y 139. A l l welcome. • I C A m n e s t y g r o u p m e e t i n g , 5:30pm, G r e e n C o m m Rm. • S o c i a l i s t S o c i e t y s p e a k e r m e e t i n g with James M c C a r t h y o n 'Pacifism', 6:30pm, G r e e n C o m m R m . • A s t r o s o c l e c t u r e by Prof J o h n Taylor (of 'Black Holes' fame) lecturing on ' C a n we unify gravity with the other forces of nature?', 6:30pm, Physics L T 2 . Free to members. • S p e a k e m e e t i n g : W a r o n Want talking about multinationals, 6:30pm, G r e e n C o m m R m . • 3 8 t h A n n u a l C h e m E n g S o c d i n n e r , 7:00 for 7:30pm, • D a n c i n g c l u b b e g i n n e r s c l a s s , 7:30pm, J C R . •ICCAG Kitchens.

'Soup

R u n ' , meet 10:30pm

Falmouth

Wednesday, February 10

Monday, February 8 c l u b m e e t i n g , 12:30pm,

• S T O I C p r o g r a m m e featuring 'Star C h a t ' with J o n Pertwee, who starred as the third D r W h o and has just finished a theatre run as W o r z e l Gummidge, 1:00 and 6:00pm, J C R , Southside T V Lounge, Southside, Beit, Linstead a n d W e e k s Halls.

Sherfield L o w e r Refec, £5 for students.

• C h a p l a i n c y C o m m u n i o n S e r v i c e , 10:00am, C o n s o r t Gallery.

•Hang-gliding Southside B a r .

Those of you who remember Weatherspoon may remember that near his cottage a long straight path crosses a long straight river (not at right angles) and that Weatherspoon's pig lives on the land in the acute angle between the two. Last week Weatherspoon was able to buy a piece of land on the other side of the path. It's triangular in shape, with the path and the river (forming an obtuse angle) as two of its sides, and a long fence as the third side. But it's a little large for Weatherspoon to cultivate on his own, so he's planning to divide it into smaller plots which he will share out among his friends. O f c o u r s e , it isn't that simple. Firstly, Weatherspoon insists that each plot must be triangular. A n d secondly, he objects to what he calls 'long thin triangles'. He says they're "all fence and no grass". So I've offered to show him how to divide his field up into triangular plots in such a way that no plot has an angle greater than or equal to a right angle. But I hope Weatherspoon realises he will be sharing his land with at least—how many others? Continued on page 8.

above

Tuesday, February 9 • B a d g e s o c l u n c h t i m e m e e t i n g , 12.40, lounge about Southside B a r . • W e l l s o c present ' W h e r e n o w a n d W h a t next?' with R . M . Taylor, 7:30pm, Elec E n g 408. Entry by membership. • D a n c i n g c l u b a d v a n c e d c l a s s , 7:30pm, J C R . • B o a r d s a i l i n g c l u b w e e k l y m e e t i n g , 12:30 a n d 6:15pm, Southside U p p e r Lounge. • C a t h o l i c m a s s a n d l u n c h , 12:30pm, C h e m 231. N o m i n a l charge for lunch. • 3 F s l u n c h t i m e m e e t i n g , 12:30pm, Southside U p p e r Lounge. • D e p t of Humanities present: 1. N u c l e a r W a r i n E u r o p e ? Pt 4 Nuclear Deterrence-Fact o r Fiction? A debate between the R t H o n the L o r d Chalfont O B E , M C , F o r m e r m i n i s t e r of state at t h e F o r e i g n a n d C o m m o n w e a l t h Office (1964-70) and Professor M i c h a e l Pentz, D e a n of the Faculty of Science at> the O p e n University; C h a i r m a n of Scientists Against Nuciear A r m s , 1 : 0 0 p m , T h e a t r e 1, B l a c k e t t L a b o r a t o r y . Arranged by IC European Nuclear Disarmament G r o u p . 2. M a n , M i n d a n d S p i r i t Pt 4 Challenge of a Multi-racial Society, the Reverend K e n n e t h C r a c k n e l l , B r i t i s h C o u n c i l of C h u r c h e s , 1:30pm, Read Theatre.

• C r o s s C o u n t r y C l u b : Claybury Hospital race, East L o n d o n . S e e noticeboard for details. • R a g M a g s e l l i n g t r i p / j o y ride t o O x f o r d , 12:00 noon, Beit A r c h w a y (return by 11:00pm). £3 (each 20 mags sold gives £1 refund. Y o u don't have to sell any.) • W a r g a m e s c l u b m e e t i n g , 1:00pm, U n i o n S C R . • A s t r o s o c o b s e r v i n g m e e t i n g , 3:30pm, 'Waveguide', Physics Building (level 1). Free t o members, • I C T r a m p o l i n e s o c i e t y m e e t i n g , 5:30pm, C o u r t a u l d Hall, Q E C , C a m p d e n Hill R d . • D a n c i n g c l u b i n t e r m e d i a t e c l a s s , 7:30pm, J C R .

Thursday, February 11 • Y a c h t c l u b m e e t i n g to discuss weekend sailing, 12:30pm, Botany C o m m o n R o o m . • C h r i s t i a n S c i e n c e g r o u p m e e t i n g , 1:00pm, Seminar R m , Level 2S, Botany. • S T O I C p r e s e n t s N E W S - B R E A K , 1:00 and 6:00pm, usual places (see Tuesday). D o you have a secret Valentine? Let her/him know over the air o n February 11 at 1:00 and 6:00pm. S e n d cards, notes, etc., to S T O I C , T V Studio, before Wednesday, February 10 at 1:00pm. • G l i d i n g c l u b m e e t i n g , 5:30pm, A e r o 254. • D e p t of Humanities presents: 1. F i l m : T h e W q r l d a t W a r Pt 14 T h e B o m b , 1:15pm, Great Hall. 2. L u n c h - H o u r C o n c e r t Plaegau Piano Quartet, 1:30pm, M u s i c R m , 53 Prince's Gate.

is published by the Editor for and on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board, and is printed by the Union Print Unit, Prince

Consort Road, London SW7 2BB (589-5111 ext 1048 int 2881) Copyright

FEUX

1982. Editor: M A Smith, Advertising

Manager:

S M Giblin.

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