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Founded i n 1949

The Newspaper of Imperial College Union

WARDEN IN SEX S C A N D A L ! Monro:

"I haven't

had

a woman

in

Weeks"

A G M INQUORATE! Last Tuesday ICU's Annual General Meeting was held in Mech Eng 220. The meeting will probably be remembered for the large amount of time spent on procedural wrangles. T h e m e e t i n g opened at 1:10pm w i t h about 250 people present. J o n F i r t h took the C h a i r , a n d whilst the m e e t i n g was discussing the minutes of the last meeting, a p r o c e d u r a l m o t i o n was m o v e d to change the ordet of business, to consider a m o t i o n o n Southside H a l l s next. J o n F i r t h refused to accept the p r o c e d u r a l m o t i o n , but his r u l i n g was challenged. J o h n Passmore ( I C U President) took the C h a i r , whilst the challenge to the C h a i r m a n ' s r u l i n g was discussed. T h e challenge was defeated on a vote, so the order of business was left u n c h a n g e d . J o h n Passmore then gave his a n n u a l report. H e was questioned on the increases in residence fees. M r W i l l i a m C o r t a z z i was p a r t i c u l a r l y interested to k n o w w h a t part of the 12% increase was for " C a p i t a l R e p l a c e m e n t " a n d it t r a n s p i r e d that the increase might be 8% if a C o l l e g e deal to b u y a h a l l of residence fell t h r o u g h . A f t e r the President's report was accepted, a p r o c e d u r a l m o t i o n was m o v e d to consider the motions on S C C finances and Southside next. J o n F i r t h refused to accept it, so the m e e t i n g went t h r o u g h the r i g m a r o l e of a challenge to the C h a i r m a n ' s r u l i n g . T h i s was c a r r i e d on a h a n d count. H o w e v e r , M r D u n c a n Suss ( F E L I X E d i t o r , 1977/8) asked that the last vote be retaken on a show of U n i o n c a r d s (at which Mr Suss subsequently successfully voted with his Accesscard-Ed.). T h i s vote was c o u n t e d , a n d the challenge to the C h a i r m a n ' s r u l i n g u p h e l d .

A shock move was revealed last night, just before FELIX hit the presses - D r D M Q Monro, Senior Warden and warden of Weeks, astounded friends and acquaintances by turning up to conduct an opera dressed as a woman! It is suspected that the move is just part of Dr Monro's master plan to increase the number of females in hall. Don had hoped to elope with an unnamed female member of the orchestra, whom he refers to as "my A-registration redhead." In an interview with FELIX, the young lady expressed her relief at the news. "I hope Don will be very happy in his new life," she said.

Royalty!

Yacht sold!

ON WEDNESDAY afternoon crowds of po l i c e m e n a n d general Exhibition populace c r a m m e d Road and C r o m w e l l R o a d , t r y i n g to c a t c h a p r c - r o y a l w e d d i n g glimpse ol the Q u e e n , w h o was m a k i n g an almost u n h e r a l d e d visit to the N a t i o n a l History M u s e u m . T h e cheering crowds of l o y a l I C students were conspicuous by their absence. It c o u l d be H e r M a j e s t y ' s last visit to the b u i l d i n g in its current Ibrm, as there is a c o n tr o ve r s i al p l a n to d e m o l i s h t h e e a s t e r n galleries a n d to erect a ÂŁl(>m ' ' storey block. v e

No. 586

I M P E T U S , the I C yacht has been sold. It h a d a history of u n m i t i g a t e d disaster. W h e n it was bought several years ago it was found to be defective a n d it took six months for the repairs to be c o m p l e t e d . Y a c h t C l u b m a n a g e d to r u n it a g r o u n d in J u l y 1979 (the r u d d e r fell off) a n d the I n i o n has been p a y i n g for its m o o r i n g at G o s p o r t ever since. A survey discovered m y r i a d faults a n d so it was put u p for sale t h r o u g h a broker, a n d it's now been purchased for ÂŁ4,35Q by a private buyer.

T h e m e e t i n g c o n t i n u e d to discuss the p r o c e d u r a l m o t i o n to consider two motions next. T h i s was passed. I m m e d i a t e l y another change to the order ol business to consider the B y e l a w changes next was proposed. T h i s was c a r r i e d on the vote. L i z L i n d s a y then m o v e d that the colours to stall be a w a r d e d next, a n d this was c a r r i e d . T h o s e r e c e i v i n g colours i n c l u d e d P r o f S u t t o n P r o - R e c t o r , J o h n S m i t h C o l l e g e Secretary, A r t h u r T u r n e r F i n a n c i a l Secretary (who was also a w a r d e d U n i o n L i f e m e m b e r s h i p ) , M a l c o l m A l d r i d g e F i n a n c i a l Assistant, M a r t i n Parsons Refectory, T o m C o t t r e l l , N a t West Bank L i a s o n Officer, Dave B u r t e n m a s t e r Estates, Sue T e l l i n g W e l f a r e Assitant, M a z F e l l o w s F E L I X phototypesetter operator, Caroline Waitt Nightline Coordinator, I Thomas Domestic Manager, D r K e n Weale U n i o n S e n i o r T r e a s u r e r , J e n H a r d y - S m i t h U n i o n A d m i n i s t r a t o r a n d Pat B a k e r U n i o n typist. A n n i e L a e t h e a n was given a U G A for her work for the U n i o n . U G A s were also presented to L i l L i n d s a y a n d M s Snee. A s L i z L i n d s a y was about to present a U G A to J o h n Passmore, W i l l i a m C o r t a z z i m o v e d a n emergency m o t i o n to prevent a l l three E x e c u t i v e members from r e c e i v i n g U G A s , but this was not accepted. B y e l a w changes were then discussed. T h e first extended the grounds for life m e m b e r s h i p of the U n i o n , the second abolished I C W A , a n d the t h i r d put the E n t e r t a i n m e n t s C h a i r m a n on U n i o n C o u n c i l . These were a l l passed, a n d w i l l n o w go to the G o v e r n i n g B o d y for a p p r o v a l . T h e S C C grant c l a i m m o t i o n was discussed. T h i s was passed a n d the U G M i n s t r u c t e d U F C ( U n i o n F i n a n c e C o m m i t t e e ) to a d d the s u b s c r i p t i o n s b a c k to S C C ' s g r a n t c l a i m . T h e s u b s c r i p t i o n h a d previously been deleted by U F C . A t this p o i n t G o r d o n Q u a r t e y successfully c h a l l e n g e d the q u o r u m , so the A G M closed due to i n q u o r a c y just after 2:00pm. T h e reports ol the D e p u t y President, H o n Sec, R e t u r n i n g O i l i ( e r a n d other officers were not discussed. T h u s , the D e p R e p elections a n d elections at the last U G M still have to be ratified. T h e reports w i l l be b r o u g h t u p a g a i n at the first U G M of next session. (Will this he another ICWA, tossed from inquorate UGM to inquorale ('CM with gay abandon?-Ed.)

Friday, May 29,1981

Free!


live i n ' c r u m m y ' bedsits. H o w e v e r , we feel that hall w i l l become a less desirable place in w h i c h to live. M a n y aspects of hall life w i l l s u f f e r a n d we w o u l d l i k e t o o u t l i n e w h y they are so v a l u a b l e to preserve. The hall's s m a l l size makes it possible for the w a r d e n to know everybody a n d to be aware ol their i n d i v i d u a l needs as they respond to the strains of College life. H e is also readily a v a i l a b l e lo advise, b e i n g f a m i l i a r w i t h m a n y aspects of C o l l e g e — f a r more than a s u b - w a r d e n , who being a s t u d e n t , does not h a v e the experience.

Dear Slevie Baby A t B e r n a r d S u n l e y we were amused to see the letter from a l l those i m p o r t a n t people in S e l k i r k H a l l ( F E L I X 585). P e r h a p s some of t h e m want I C U posts next year? N o t e the sentence: " W h i c h is w o r t h more: the w e l l b e i n g of s t u d e n t s c a t e r e d for by the special, personalised social e n v i r o n m e n t of these halls, or a lew t h o u s a n d pounds in r e n t ? " We find this Passmorian d i s r e g a r d for the s a n c t i t y of greenbacks very touching, especially a m o n g people t r a i n i n g for n o t - v e r y - s p e c i a l , i m p e r s o n a l , anti-social jobs in i n d u s t r y . T o preserve their innocence, we feel it is o n l y fair to oiler t h e m L u i g i (our warden). W e h a r d l y ever see h i m a n y w a y , a n d w h e n we do we can't u n d e r s t a n d a b l i n d w o r d he says. W e w o u l d r a t h e r have the few g r a n d : a) to renovate o u r s l u m ; b) to pay off the ^200 plus i n lines w h i c h H e r r T e q u i l l a has meted out in o r d e r to make us like h i m . Yours in charily H o u s e 44 H i t S q u a d Dear Sir It is o u r o p i n i o n t h a t t h e m e r g i n g of S e l k i r k / T i z a r d a n d Keogh Falmouth Halls would destroy their potential to p r o v i d e a supportive and stimulating environment. A s we see the proposal one w a r d e n (instead of two) s u p ported by a s u b w a r d e n in each unit w i l l be overseeing nearly 200 students. I n e v i t a b l y the attention received by each unit w i l l be reduced. In r e t u r n two penthouse Hats w i l l be a v a i l a b l e for rent a n d six rooms previously allocated as wardens' places w i l l be a v a i l a b l e to students i n the n o r m a l way. S u p p o s e d l y less s t u d e n t s w i l l have to c o m m u t e from h o m e or

Page 2

M a n y social events c u r r e n t l y o r g a n i s e d w i t l i the w a r d e n ' s guidance and encouragement w o u l d be i m p r a c t i c a l lor a large c o m b i n e d h a l l . Selkirk not only organises h a l l social events but contributes actively l o College R a g w i t h a lloat in the R a g Procession, stalls at the Fete, etc. Students In a large hall w o u l d c e r t a i n l y feel less c o m m i t t m e n t l o such ventures. A l t e r n a t i v e l y , is the w a r d e n to be expected to do twice the work, w i t h different a c t i v i t i e s in each unit? W e s u g g e s t o n e w a r d e n w i l l not have time to do the h a l l justice. M o r e pressure a n d responsibil i t y c o u l d be p l a c e d o n t h e subwardens; or w i l l their numbers be increased, hence r e d u c i n g the n u m b e r of rooms a v a i l a b l e a n d gains in rent. A h a l l like Selkirk thrives on c o m m u n i t y spirit, where everybody's part is significant a n d involvement is encouraged, be it i n social events or at c o m m u n i t y meetings where a l l residents may a i r t h e i r views. (At a recent m e e t i n g they voted u n a n i m o u s l y against the proposal to merge the balls.) The alternative in a large b a l l is a representative c o m m i t tee, a n d we seen in C o l l e g e as a whole the d u b i o u s success of such a n indirect a p p r o a c h . W i t h o u t such an e n v i r o n m e n t , w h i c h we suggest arises Irom a s m a l l c o m m u n i t y w h e r e the w a r d e n ' s close involvement is possible, the q u a l i t y of life in hall will plummet. Southside will contain merely hostel-type rooms.

Dear Sir A t a recent U G M , M a y 2G. the m o t i o n discussing the m e r g i n g ol T i z a r d a n d Selkirk H a l l s was not held o w i n g to the meeting being inquorate. I should like to make a few c o m m e n t s about the way in w h i c h this matter has been dealt With. T o a n o n - m e m b e r of the Student Residence C o m m i t t e e it appears that the whole issue has been discussed w i t h a m i n i m u m of consultation, so as to get the merger fixed without causing trouble. T h i s c a v i l l e r attitude is indefensible, surely those most experienced in H a l l life should be given first say in matters w h i c h affect t h e m most directly. O n T h u r s d a y ' s e d i t i o n of S T O I C , M a r k C l e g g (a m e m b e r of S R C ) c l a i m e d to h a v e c o n s u l t e d members of W i l l i s Jackson House about the proposed changes in H a l l accommodation. W i t h all respect, lie is f a i l i n g to do his job pr o pe r l y if these are the only people he consults. In a discussion f o l l o w i n g the U G M , both R i c h A r c h e r a n d M a r k C l e g g said that the views of students outside H a l l had also to be considered. I fully except this v i e w p o i n t , however, if the social life of a H a l l is to be j e o p o d i s e d in exchange lor an u n c e r t a i n gain in e x t r a p l a c e s , t h e n s u r e l y the present residents have a useful role to play in such a decision. F i n a l l y I should just like to ask, w h y if the present arrangements for H a l l work, do they have to be changed. ) ours faithfully A T Smith Dear Ed A f t e r the success of the Physics O p e n D a y (Fiasco) on F r i d a y , M a y 15, I s h o u l d like to thank bot h members of stall for p r o v i d i n g tours a r o u n d their research goups, a n d the students w h o helped d u r i n g the D a y . four relieving Dtp Rep M a r k Gillett

Sit Y o u r current c a m p a i g n against J o h n Passmore is disgraceful. S o m e of the things y o u have alleged in it are t a n t a m o u n t to suggesting that not only is he I C U President, but that he was T o subject nearly 400 students i n v o l v e d in a shady de a l c o n c e r n to l i f e i n " d e a d " h a l l s a l a i n g rape a l a r m s , he cheated in his C o l l e g e w i t h little enough of a sabbatical election campaign, s u p p o r t i v e atmosphere, to save s q u a n d e r e d ÂŁ500 of U n i o n perhaps 6 students a daily money without a second thought, j o u r n e y , seems u n j u s t i f i a b l e he is r e g u l a r l y d r u n k i n t h e madness. U n i o n B a r , he's Irish, he's an ineffectual o r gan of the Rector's ) ours sincerely o p i n i o n , he's a lousy president, a n d he doesn't deserve a L J G A . . J A t k i n s o n , H a i l Sec A W a r b y , H a l l Treasurer A l l t h e s e c h a r g e s a r e as C A Milner. Hall Treasurer unjustified as they are s c a n d a 1981 2 lous. M i n d y o u , I c o u l d n ' t help H e l e n B o l t . A c t i n g H a l l Sec, laughing. 1981 2 Pettifogger J a r n o y c e , B S c

FELIX,

May 29,

1981

Dear Sieve W h i l s t I realise not too m a n y students w i l l have found the time to wade t h r o u g h the s m a l l print o f last week's supplement, it was m o s t d i s a p p o i n t i n g to f i n d neither y o u , nor one- of y o u r minions had bothered to do so either. A s I was r e a d i n g M i s s L i n d s a y ' s report I found myself d i s t r a c t e d by the i n c r e d i b l e n u m b e r of typesetting errors. T h e other two reports b e i n g only slightly better. T h i s year, F E L I X has m a n a g e d to a t t a i n a very high s t a n d a r d i n its p r o d u c t i o n a n d it is a pity that you have a l l o o w e d it to s l i p e v e n t h i s oneee. } ours Ruth Hildebrand Ed's Note Dear Ms Wildebeest D o you not t h i n k it unwise for someone as fat a n d horrendously ugly as yourself to dare criticise a person so u n f ai r ly v i n d i c t i v e as myself? T o answer y o u r point: I, a n d my m i n i o n s , found ourselves distracted by text so i n c r e d i b l y b o r i n g that our p r o o f r e a d i n g efforts were directed to pastures more pleasant. Y o u are correct to point out the h i g h s t a n d a r d of p r o d u c t i o n m a i n t a i n e d in this year's F E L I X b u l I must confess that I was genuinely surprised that a person oi such low intelligence w o u l d have noticed. I stand corrected. H o w e v e r , do not t a k e the trouble to write another petty, n i t p i c k i n g letter to this o r gan a g a i n — u n l e s s you want me to print a picture ol you w i t h no panties on. that is! F u r t h e r m o r e , how dare you be so presumptions as to address me by m y C h r i s t i a n name. W h a t ' s w r o n g w i t h " S i r " ?

Dear Sir I was qu i te a n n o y e d to read M r G O ' R e i l l y ' s letter in last week's F E L I X in w h i c h he refers to the " l e g i t i m a t e desire of the Irish people for a u n i t e d c o u n t r y " . H e must m e a n the desire of the E i r e G o v e r n m e n t because he appears to be totally u n a w a r e of the fact that a large m a j o r i t y of people in N o r t h e r n I r e l a n d w i s h to r e m a i n part of the U K . It is u n l o r t u n a t e the views of the U n i o n i s t politicians are not as w e l l p u b l i c i s e d as t h o s e o f R e p u b l i c a n c r i m i n a l s . Despite some rash b e h a v i o u r ( b l o w n up out of a l ! proportions by the m e di a ) , the R e v Ian Paisley has a t t e m p t e d to express the concern of the U l s t e r people but has time a n d time again been represented by the m e d i a as an extremist. H e is t r y i n g to m a k e M r s T h a t c h e r aware of the S o u t h e r n G o v e r n ment despite a n y t h i n g M r H a u g h e y may say at s u m m i t talks.


H o w c a n anyone i n N I r e l a n d , Protestant or C a t h o l i c , trust a n E i r e G o v e r n m e n t w h i c h has never totally d i v o r c e d itself from t e r r o r i s t s w h o m it q u i e t l y protects by refusing to sign the European Convention on Terrorism a n d by not e x t r a d i t i n g terrorists to N I r e l a n d . T h e r e a l p r o b l e m is t h e successful p r o p a g a n d a c a m p a i g n by the I R A . T h i s is assisted by the E i r e G o v e r n m e n t ' s actions and therefore attracts support from A m e r i c a n s w h o have more money t h a n sense. T h e w o r l d ' s m e d i a are also c o n t i n u a l l y "getting it w r o n g " . It is t i m e lor M r s T h a t c h e r a n d M r A d k i n s to put the E i r e M P s i n t h e i r place a n d p a y more a t t e n t i o n to the m a j o r i t y i n N I r e l a n d rather t h a n listening to the w h i m p e r i n g s of Messrs H a u g h e y . B l a n e y , etc. L o y a l i s t p a r a m i l i t a r i e s have o n l y developed i n response to the Government's noneommitted actions i n N I r e l a n d . M r O ' R e i l l y overlooks the fact that most of the p a r a m i l i t a r i e s ' actions are against R e p u b l i c a n sympathisers and not against the security forces. B u t these loyalists are not well a r m e d a n d look to B r i t a i n to p r o v i d e the p r o t e c t i o n against the I R A . T h e a r m y are q u i t e c a p a b l e o f s u p p r e s s i n g t he terrorists in N I if they were a l l o w e d t o d o s o by M r s T h a t c h e r ' s Government. T o c o n c l u d e , I must say that I do not c o n d o n e a n y violence i n U l s t e r from either " s i d e " , but it is u p to M r s T h a t c h e r to respect the view o f the m a j o r i t y of people in N I r e l a n d a n d to take the necessary a c t i o n to dispel a n y doubts about N Ireland's position i n the U K . C e r t a i n i n the N I r e l a n d p e o p l e ' s c a m p a i g n to preserve their sovereignty, l e t t e r s s u c h as t h a t o f M r O ' R e i l l y are d e f i n i t e l y not required. } burs sincerely Jim

Boucher

Dear Sir I a m r e m i t t i n g this corresp o n d e n c e to y o u i n o r d e r to r e m o n s t r a t e about the recent apparitions in your publication w i t h r e g a r d to the verbose a n d preposterous usage, or more precisely perhaps, abusage o f the E n g l i s h language as a means of communication. I refer i n p a r t i c u l a r , sir. to the inclusion of a certain N i c k Cox's r e m i t t a n c e o f t w o weeks' past, i n w h i c h the good l a d , " d u r i n g (his) s e m i - i n e b r i a t e d w a n d e r i n g s a r o u n d the ale-houses of S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n " , p r o c e e d e d to construct a n a d m i t t e d l y eloquent if somewhat l e n g t h y d i a t r i b e a p e r t a i n i n g to the e x o r b i t a n t a m o u n t s needlessly e x p e n d e d by those students w h o c u s t o m a r i l y r e p a i r to, a n d / o r reside i n , the

establishment o n y o u r premises, therein referred.. to as " S t a n ' s Bar". I wish to register f o r m a l l y m y aversion to the gratuitous misuse of o u r often elegant, frequently expressive language i n o r d e r to purvey a meaningless and l u d i c r o u s sentiment. Tours in anticipation of an improvement of the aforementioned situation, S E Farrell IF Sir It was w i t h great regret that I h a n d e d i n m y resignation as R C S President last week. H o w e v e r , even after the t i m e lapse a n d a n enormous a m o u n t o f reflection, I still c o m e u p w i t h the feeling that m y decision was the correct one. I have always believed that a President o f a U n i o n is there to represent the students ol the U n i o n a n d a l s o e q u a l l y as i m p o r t a n t l y to take responsibility for t h e i r actions. I still h o l d that belief. The reason l o r m y resignation therefore must involve conflict w i t h those beliefs. W h e n I first h e a r d o f last week's unsuccessful attempt o n D a v y m y i n i t i a l r e a c t i o n was to discover w h o was i n v o l v e d a n d discipline them through U n i o n channels. H o w e v e r I later f o u n d that t w o members of the E x e c u tive h a d given their support to the a t t e m p t . F u r t h e r m o r e a conscious effort h a d been m a d e to not contact me l o r fear I m a y disapprove.

•8 plastic one litre coftspsMe bottles for photographic chemicals or._X1.60 each. Contact Ade Adebajo. Aero 1. •GS750, S reg. VG condition. £800. Geoff Perry, int 4077 or Mines letterracks. •One china breakfast set, 72 piece, such good value! Contact Dr S H Caroline Fitzsimon, no fixed abode. •Yamaha 2S0XS, S reg. £350. Jill Pennock, int 4052. •Ladies 3-speed Triumph bicycle, £35 Phone Liz, 2635. •Flat for tour available from end of June in Hammersmith. 2dbierms, spacious lounge, kitchen, bathroom, £19.85pw each. Contact S Collier, Physics 3 or call at 38 Hamlet Gdns. •Room in house in West Drayton, £15pw and bills, summer only. Jill Pennock, int 4052. •Colony Holidays—monitors help for Covent Garden Day, May 30. plus Ceilidh after in Quiet Room, Sherfield Building. Contact M Clarke, int 3113. •Congratulations Simon on your early retirement, from Helen and Jan. •Yamaha m/c BOcc, 6,400 miles only, red, chrome gc, £100. Phone581-5382 after 6:30pm. •Male rabbit seeks useful employment. Apply "Rabbit". DOC PG. •Dear PFF: Apologies accepted. Pity they stopped at the knees. The Don. •Dear H44HS: Job well done. Cosa Nostra. • Wheelchair for hire. Contact Luigi, BSH.

Hamsoc LAST SUNDAY HAMSOC competed in the RSGB 144MHz low power contest, the general idea of the contest was to work as many stations as far away as possible. For the contest we managed to borrow a shed on the electrical engineering department roof, so we felt we had a good chance of winning since our station operated close to the upper power limit (from a good location). In the event conditions were very poor and only 170 stations were contacted during the eight hours of the contest, however, we managed to make contacts in eight countries including most of the near Europeans. It'll be a few months before the results are announced but hopefully Imperial College's callsign will be near the top of the list. In all. eight members of the club were involved with a couple of visitors from other colleges helping out.

Rag THE COMMITTEE met on Thursday, May 21. Our charities for next year are: National Deaf Children's Society, National Toy Library and a local charity which is yet to be decided—so if you know any worthy local cause, let us know. Thanks to everyone who helped at and attended the Rag Fete, it was a great success with over £600 raised. Next year's committee are Bill Durodie (Chairman), Matt Smith (Treasurer), Ronan McDonald (token transvestite/secretary), Patrick Coll (Rag Mag Editor) and Caroline Godin (Publicity Officer). We've already started arranging cunning stunts for next year, please support them and have a bit of a giggle at the same time.

Labour Club THE 500 men and women who set off from Liverpool on May 1. to march to London as a protest against unemployment will arrive this weekend. Their arrival will be marked by a mass march and rally starting at 1:00pm (assemble 12:00 noon) on Sunday from Speakers Comer in Hyde Park. (This march will go ahead even if the Home Secretary bans it)

I fail to see h o w I c a n be expected to represent a n d be responsible for a n organisation w h i c h shows this contempt ol the President's views. It is not the lirst time that lack of c o n s u l t a t i o n has o c c u r r e d a n d the people i n v o l v e d were w e l l i n f o r m e d of the feelings expressed above on the iirst occurrence. It w a s w i t h g r e a t s a d n e s s therefore, that I was left i n the position where the only o p t i o n open to me, i f I was to stand by my beliefs, was to resign. I w o u l d l i k e to t a k e the o p p o r t u n i t y to o i l e r m y sincere thanks to a l l those people w h o have helped me d u r i n g the year a n d s u p p o r t e d me t h r o u g h the t r a u m a t i c p e r i o d a n d to express a g a i n m y deep sadness at h a v i n g to take this decision.

We have just opened near South Ken Station (2A Exhibition Road) and are offering a student discount on all ourfood (on production of Unioncard).

3 burs Rich Archer

Small Ads •.75 Auto Colt Pistol—price available o n r e q u e s t , t o t a l l y i n c a p a b l e of f i r i n g : Crossbow—Rapier M k 4. F r e n c h - p o l ished stock a n d small g a m e hunting b o l t s . £ 3 5 o n o ; Fieldglasses—Commod o r e M a g , 16 x 50, £ 1 5 o n o . M H a w e s . 218 L i n s t e a d Hall. •Flatshare G i r l still w a n t e d t o o c c u p y o w n r o o m i n wonderful F u l h a m flat during summer. Keen Henry W o o d p r o m m e r preferred. Martin S T a y l o r 0 1 - 7 3 1 6 0 6 6 o r Int. 4 1 7 9 .

FELIX, May 29, 1 9 8 /

A few sample takeaway prices 1 chicken 2 pieces chips curry rice apple pie

50p 80p 20p 80p 30p 20p etc 7:30

midnight

Page 3


CND

A W O R D of thanks to those who supported the Appeal. The original target has been well and truly exceeded to such an extent that we can now look at a more sophisticated system to allow Phil to produce engineering design drawings. Phil, being totally paralysed from the neck down, can only use a mouth stick. At the present moment we are looking into the possibility of purchasing a terminal graphics V D U and a D M P - 7 Intelligent plotter to interface with his mini-computer (on extended loan from Prof Baker's unit at Cranfield Institute of Technology). The total set-up could cost in the order of £2,000. The final outcome of the evaluation by Cranfield, the manufacturers and Phil will be publicised later.

N A T I O N A L C N D are o r g a n i s i n g a train to Glasgow for the demonstration on Saturday, June 6, so if you're bored with exams, come and have a look round the submarine bases on the Clyde. The train costs £15 and leaves on Friday evening, returning on Sunday afternoon; tickets from Ian Heavens, Atmospheric Physics G r o u p , Huxley Building. Despite a three month ban on marches, Strathclyde police are allowing the demonstration to go ahead, which is jolly kind of them as we were going to march anyway. Nearer to home, this Sunday sees the arrival of the Liverpool and Bradford marches against unemployment, with a rally at midday at Hyde Park Corner followed by a march to Trafalgar Square and speeches. C N D supports increased employment in socially responsible ways as an alternative to labour-intensive arms industries, so join us and welcome the Liverpool unemployed on Sunday (meet 11:45am outside the Huxley Building, Queensgate).

m m i , : * '

How you all supported the Appeal: Sponsors

Donations

£

£

Mech Eng 488 Past P G students 170 H E N u c l e a r Physics 100 Computer Centre 59 34 Elec E n g C & G Motor Club — 209 Lloyds Bank F & S K E v e n i n g Instit 120 Others 66 TOTAL D e d i c a t e d , but not yet received

250 20

— 11 32 77

— — —

Total

£ 738 190 100 70 66

Engraved Pewter Tankards W e now stock a selection of these tankards, all bearing the College Crest. If by chance one is r e q u i r e d with s p e c i a l l e t t e r i n g , this c a n be ordered at a cost of 15p per letter. In choosing the six designs, I have tried to cater for all tastes, the prices are competitive and ail tankards bear the symbol of the Association of British Pewter Craftsmen.. New Penguin Titles The Yawning Heights-Alexander Zinoviev, King Penguin, £4.95 A Confederacy of D u n c e s - J o h n Kennedy Toole, King Penguin, £2.50 The Orchid Tri/ogy-Jocelyn Brooks, King Penguin, £2.95 L a m b - B e r n a r d Maclaverty, King Penguin, £1.95 Labyrinths-Jorge Luis Borges, King Penquin, £2.50 Virgin in the Garden-A S Byatt, King Penguin, £2.95 English History 1914-1945-A J P Taylor, Pelican, £3.50 Weather Forecasting the Country Way-Robin Page, Penguin, £1.00 Wheels Within Whee/s-Dervla Murphy, Penguin, ;£1.50 Letters From America 1946-1951-Alistair Cooke, Penguin, £1.50 Buying a House or Flat-L E Vickers, Penguin, £1.75 Carnival in Romans-Emmanuel le Roy Ladurie, Penguin, £3.25 iSeven Steps to the S u n - F r e d & Geoffrey Hoyel, Penguin S F , £1.25

— 209 120 66 1636 73

The following ran in the London Marathon and were sponsored for the Phil Lloyd Appeal: Ed Clayton (High Engergy Nuclear Physics); Bob C o l l i n s o n ( L l o y d s B a n k and F u l h a m a n d S Kensington Evening Institute); Peter Saunders (Mech Eng). Also running from Imperial College: N e i l W i l k i n s o n and B r i a n C l a r k , b o t h from Geology. I should like to give my personal thanks to the various collectors and all those who gave me encouragement in organising the Appeal Pete Saunders

PG Tips W E L L , another year seems to have gone by and its time to think about elections again. Papers are up in the Union for nominations for the President, Treasurer and Secretary of the Post Graduate G r o u p . These are responsible positions since the P G G r o u p is a subtle but effective voice for P G s and after all it channels a certain amount of money from 1CU to you. If you think that you might be interested in standing for any of these posts then feel free to contact any of us for a chat. The papers will be taken down on Friday, June 12 and there will be an A G M open to all P G s on Wednesday, June 17 at 1:15pm to hear the results for the first three posts and to elect the social secretary and welfare officer. Enough of this official stuff. There will be a Ploughman's L u n c h preceding the A G M . Tickets at £1.00 will be available from the Union Office. This promises to be a well attended event. So we h o p e that y o u will c o m e a n d enjoy the penultimate (sob) P G G r o u p event of this year. David Wood

Page 4

Bookshop News

Year of the Disabled-Just 1981 has been designated the International Year of the Disabled. But unless action is taken now it will also see the most vicious attack on the rights of the disabled in Britain for generations. The attack comes from a committee chaired by influenctial Labour M P , Ms Renee Short. The Short Report (the second report of the House of C o m m o n s S o c i a l S e r v i c e s C o m m i t t e e on Perinatal and Neonatal Mortality) challenges the basic human rights of the handicapped. Guinea Pigs Firstly the report wants research to be carried out o n u n w a n t e d h a n d i c a p p e d i n f a n t s " o f no particular benefit to them and which may carry some risk of harm". This change in the law would make these babies as expendable as laboratory animals. Price of Life The report goes on to describe the savings that can be made from avoiding the care of the handicapped altogether. The Short Report puts pressure on Area Health Authorities to screen all pregnant women to detect handicapped babies in time to abort them. The report states: "In a high risk area such as South Wales the annual savings from avoiding the care of severely handicapped survivors exceeds the annual cost (of screening) in the second year and every year thereafter". The Short Report shares the view of the Office of Health Economics whose booklet "Mental H a n d i c a p — ways f o r w a r d " r e c o m m e n d e d screening as the cheapest way of dealing with the p r o b l e m of d i s a b l e m e n t . By d i s p o s i n g of a h a n d i c a p p e d p e r s o n ' s life in this way it is estimated a saving of over £225,000 can be made. Dangers The Report has glossed over the dangers of mass screening. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists remains opposed to mass screening because of the high risks of mother and baby. T h e p r o c e d u r e u s e d , a m n i o c e n t e s i s , involves inserting a needle into the pregnant

FELIX, May 29, 1981

a sick joke?

woman's womb and withdrawing some of the amniotic fluid. In one study one in twenty-five w o m e n who h a d u n d e r g o n e a m n i o c e n t e s i s suffered serious complications. A letter in the Lancet told of a thirty-five year-old woman who_ underwent the procedure in the sixteenth week of p r e g n a n c y . T w e l v e w e e k s later, the m o t h e r delivered a premature baby. The baby was so m a l f o r m e d that he d i e d four minutes later. Amniocentesis had revealed a perfectly normal child but it had caused amputation of his limbs and severe injuries to his head and pelvis. Imagine how the mother must have felt. Error Another problem is that the test is not very accurate. Twins can be mistaken for spina bifida and aborted in error. Similarly, it is not possible to assess the degree of handicap. A n article in the New Scientist reported that "the human cost of preventing some 555 spina bifida births per year (by prenatal diagnosis and abortion) in England and Wales would be 120 dead or damaged normal infants." Liquidation What the Short Report's recommendation will do if implemented will be to divide people in to two groups, one with the right to live and the other expendable. If that seems familiar, remember under Nazi Germany the handicapped "useless bread eaters", were the first to be 'liquidated'. Alternative There is an alternative. It is well established that the incidence of mentally handicapped births is linked to s o c i o - e c o n o m i c and e n v i r o n m e n t a l factors. Currently no research is being done to establish why this is so. We want to make people at IC aware of Short's recommendations so that they can make a positive contribution to the Year of the D i s a b l e d b y s t a n d i n g u p for t h e fundamental rights shared by us all, handicapped or fit, rich or poor, loved or unloved. Frank Rouseel and J P Stanley.


SUBWARDEN ASSISTANT SUBWARDENS FALMOUTH—KEOGH HALL

sssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

The Phoenix

Choir Concert

S I N C E L A S T Y E A R ' S edition of The Phoenix was deservedly well circulated, a fair number of y o u will already k n o w a little about the magazine. F o r the rest of y o u , however, a few words of introduction will be in order. The Phoenix was founded in 1886 by H G W e l l s , who at the time was a student at Imperial College. Since that time the magazine has taken many forms, and the views and aims of its editors have varied greatly. M r Wells would certainly have approved of the philosophy of the magazine over the past few years. T h e aim has been to present original w o r k b y members of the College in the field of art rather than science; drawings, poems, stories and articles of general interest, as well as more obscure art forms, have all been included. This year's offering, edited by Sean G i b l i n , achieves this end admirably.

However h i g h the reputation of a student c h o i r , one never quite expects t h e m to achieve their c u s t o m a r y standard d u r i n g the D a m o c l e a n s u m m e r t e r m ; this concert was an outstanding exception. For although i m p e n d i n g e x a m s had slightly r e d u c e d the size of the c h o i r , they had obviously been t h o r o u g h l y r e h e a r s e d , a n d there was certainly no r e d u c t i o n in quality. T h e first work performed was H a n d e l ' s Dixit Dominus, a spectacularly lively exultation of praise (is romp too irreverent a word?) with plenty of fast movements d e m a n d i n g the clear d i c t i o n a n d rhythmic s i n g i n g for w h i c h IC C h o i r is r e n o w n e d . Sadly, the o p e n i n g was rather strained, and the initial 'Dixit, dixit D o m i n u s D o m i n o meo' l a c k e d the p u n c h y a t t a c k it n e e d e d ; b u t t h e c h o i r q u i c k l y w a r m e d up a n d were well on top of the later movements, even at the literally breathtaking s p e e d s Eric B r o w n took t h e m at.

T h e magazine inevitably invites c o m p a r i s o n with last year's edition, but s u c h comparisons would be rather unfair. A l t h o u g h the magazine has the same format (A4 ;size, glossy cover, well printed on art paper, etc) the a p p r o a c h to the selection of material is somewhat different. It is noticeable, for example, that this year's Phoenix is a lot stronger o n photographs and poetry. T h e poems include some real gems (Patrick C o i l ' s "Shall I compare thee to a pint of G u i n n e s s ? " for e x a m p l e ) a n d a lot o f thought a n d care has gone into their presentation and layout. It's nice to see an original H G Wells p o e m reprinted from an early edition of The Phoenix; it's well w o r t h buying the magazine for that p o e m alone. It's a pity, though, that M r Giblin did not see fit to reprint the original f o o t n o t e s to the poem—surely these were just as funny as the p o e m itself? T h e magazine also showcases w o r k by no fewer than four photographers, all of w h o m have turned in some very nice work. It is the photos in particular that justify the high quality printing. Unfortunately, while the magazine scores over last year's in photos and poems it loses on p r o s e . D a v e B r i t t o n ' s " T e s t i m o n y of a Traveller" is the only piece which stands out in this category, the rest being rather uninteresting. H o w e v e r , there are a number of unusual items which more than compensate for this fault. Ian W i e c z o e k ' s four page strip is w o r thy of mention as is the page of sheet music by Barney M c C a b e " B r o n t o s a u r a u s B l u e s " . T h e excellent use of artwork and the written w o r d to complement one another, which is apparent throughout the magazine, is best typifisd by the incorporation of a S c a r a m o u c h e chess puzzle into a drawing by Margaret Ramsey. In summary, this year's Phoenix is w o r t h 50p of anybody's money. A s with all s u c h productions, risks have been t a k e n , and not everybody will like all the material. H o w e v e r , this year most of the risks seem to have paid off. B u y one and find out for yourself. Dave J ago 5SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS IC Union Duplicating/Postal Services As from June 1 all material bought from the Union Duplicating Services has to be paid for in cash. Cash also has to be paid by clubs and societies using the Union postal facility.

Applications are invited for the post of Subwarden of Falmouth/Keogh Hall Rent free accommodation in the form of a small self-contained flat is provided. The essential duties of the post are to assist the Warden in the day-to-day running of the Hall. In addition, one or more Assistant Subwardenships may be available. These posts carry with them rent-free accommodation in the form of a study bedroom in return for duties associated with those of the Subwarden. The posts require individuals who can display conscientious application, initiative, personality and responsible outlook. The successful applicants for any of the above posts would normally be postgraduates, but applications from others will be considered on their merits. Applications, including a concise but informative curriculum vitae, should be made to the Warden, Dr P W Jowitt, Department of Civil Engineering. The closing date is Wednesday, June 10, 1981. A single application will suffice for both categories of appointment.

After the interval (I thought the purpose of coffee tokens was to shorten queues) came M e n d e l s s o h n ' s S e c o n d S y m p h o n y , a great surprise to anyone who, like me, always assumed M e n d e l s s o h n s t a r t e d his s y m p h o n i c output at N o . 3. In fact, most of the audience seemed quite unfamiliar with the work, and it was a pity t h e r e was s o little w r i t t e n a b o u t it in the programme. The symphony starts with three movements E L E V E N INTREPID cricketers and one following a more of less conventional pattern, but bearded W e l s h m a n , t r a v e l l i n g under the the fourth movement takes the form of a short pretence of being an umpire, set out on safari cantata beginning with, ending with, and generally to Essex. With Flinstone's y o u n g e r s o n B a m based on a short motiv (Alles was Odem hat, B a m at the wheel the b o y s of the Q M C c o u l d lobe d e n H e r r n ) w h i c h r e c u r r e d s o often it quite reasonably have expected a w a l k o v e r as seemed to be something of a joke among the in the first r o u n d , when it took G u y s over a members of the orchestra. day just to find the g r o u n d . Some of the choir were concerned lest they However, having arrived at the g r o u n d our r e p e a t last t e r m ' s m i s t a k e a n d e x h a u s t driver and c a p t a i n , D Everett, s u r p a s s e d themselves during the first half of the concert, himself by l o s i n g the toss and IC were put in leaving too little energy for the second. But the to bat o n a wicket that r e s e m b l e d a wet first three m o v e m e n t s of the M e n d e l s s o h n s p o n g e . O u r captain not satisfied with l o s i n g obviously provided enough of a rest, and the the toss o p e n e d the batting himself and gave Lobgesang was presented with both the force and us the s o l i d start of 7 before being removed the confidence it needed. Ibw. T h e entire IC middle order then followed their captain's e x a m p l e and IC were reeling at M u c h criticism has been aimed at the soloists in 37 for 7. T h e n G o d d a r d and Rook c a m e previous choir concerts, but apart from the together a n d our middle order batsmen were counter-tenor who seemed to have some sort of s h o w n just how to s c o r e runs on a a b s y m a l frog in his throat, these soloists did the choir great wicket. Y o u use the edge of the bat not the credit. Among all the solos, I can't resist singling middle. Q M C fielders were t h r o w n into utter out Richard Frewer's beautifully moving 'Hiiter, c o n f u s i o n and a l l o w e d IC to s c r a p e 75 off 40 ist die Nacht bald hin?' overs with G o d d a r d left on 21 not out. But it was the choir's concert, and the choir who made it a great c o n c e r t . T h e t e n o r s , After a resplendent tea, IC bowlers were notably, produced a very fine noise, all the more p r e p a r e d a s u s u a l t o m a k e up for the remarkable since there were only eleven of them deficiencies in the batting. (I counted 'em). They also managed to avoid J T h o m s o n a r m s t e a m i n g (at least tepid) in being swamped by the rather heavy basses, who to b o w l t h e f i r s t b a l l , w h i c h a f t e r b e i n g on one or two occasions hinted that they might s n i c k e d bythe batsman was c a s u a l l y have been more at home in Cardiff Arms Park. d r o p p e d by, y o u g u e s s e d it, Everett esq. With the s e c o n d ball, T h o m s o n infuriated by his T h e gold m e d a l , t h o u g h , must go to the sopranos. • Dixit Dominus is a five-part work c a p t a i n ' s i n a d e q u a c i e s , h a d t h e b a t s m a n p l u m b Ibw a n d the trail of Q M C b a t s m a n back ( S S A T B ) so there are only half as many sopranos singing each line. As if this wasn't enough of a to the pavillion had b e g u n . T h i s trend was accelerated by the i n t r o d u c t i o n of Slator's handicap. Handel rather unchivalrously makes spin b o w l i n g ? With a c o m b i n a t i o n of long t h e m s i n g a top B flat at e v e r y a v a i l a b l e h o p s and full tosses Q M C batsmen threw opportunity. Admittedly the very first high note their wickets away in desperation. Q M C were was a struggle, but having gained self-confidence, all out for 51 and the victorious 1st XI m a r c h the sopranos went on to produce a sound of quite on in to the next r o u n d of the c u p , l o o k i n g impressive clarity and controlled power and they forward to p l a y i n g cricket and not w a t e r - p o l o kept this up right to the end of the concert. in the next r o u n d . It was obvious from the prolonged applause

Cricket

IC v QMC

that the rest ot the audience had appreciated the performance as much as I had, and wished to thank Eric Brown and the choir for a most enjoyable evening. Martin S Taylor

FELIX,

May 29,

1981

(ULU

Cup)

V Capt Ed's Note T h e h a n d w r i t i n g on this article was a p p a l l i n g ! Next time, type it o r write neater o r y o u r report won't be i n c l u d e d .

Page 5


by U n i o n C o u n c i l and hence does not carry behind it the stigma of having been awarded by an incompetant, lazy, good for nothing, drunk of an I C U President. H o w e v e r , C o u n c i l with only a few exceptions, are the biggest b u n c h of ego-centric, pseudo-politico, nancy-boy pettyfogging twats that I have ever had the pleasure of insulting. N o t only do they crawl up the College's arsehole on every matter from residence to refectories, they have the gall to poke their heads out and shout " H e y , chaps, come o n in, it's great!"

Social Colours, UGAs and the whole charade Congratulations to L i z L i n d s a y o n receiving her deserved U n i o n G e n e r a l A w a r d . I cannot, however, bring myself to congratulate J o h n P a s s m o r e or R a c h e l Snee on theirs. O n l y last week M s S n e e was expressing her desire to turn d o w n a U G A if offered one (these days, a practice with more respect and honour a t t a c h e d t o it t h a n b e i n g t h o u g h t fit to receive one in the first place!) W h a t a noble thought! That she would actually think of herself as undeserving of a U G A . N o s u c h luck! M s Snee's reason was she had little respect for J o h n P a s s m o r e as P r e s i d e n t — t h e m a n w h o awards s u c h honours. H o w e v e r , Snee (two-faced as ever) w o u l d now lead us to believe that she has renewed her faith in M r Passmore's abilities. R a c h e l Snee has only two things going for h e r — t h e fact that she voted against J o h n P a s s m o r e ' s U G A , a n d the size of her breasts. W h a t of Passmore's U G A ? T h i s is voted o n

T h e y fail dismally to represent the students who voted them "into p o w e r " a n d God-onlyknows why they think Passmore deserves a UGA. A t this stage, let me tell y o u now that I'm bloody annoyed about this and I intend to rant and rave for a further few paragraphs yet. Bo r e d ? Listless? T h i n k I "go o n " a bit to m u c h ? T h e n piss off as you probably haven't understood or cared about a single w o r d I have written this year. M a y I resume, what is a U G A ? It's the highest award doled out by the U n i o n ; all e x c e p t for his o w n , at the P r e s i d e n t ' s d i s c r e t i o n . O n l y four or five a year. It is awarded for oustanding contributions to the Union. S o m e say J o h n P a s s m o r e has done " a lot behind the scenes" and "only the bad things get r e p o r t e d " . In n o u n c e r t a i n t e r m s — bollocks! Speaking as a serious observer of the U n i o n , J o h n Passmore arrives at the office a r o u n d 10:00am, just in time for coffee. T h e n he puts his feet on his desk and waits for Ruth Hildebrand to trot up to the office. A t this point they pet for the rest of the morning. T h e n they have lunch together. T h e n they have sherry from the U n i o n Office's vast supplies of sherry (all bought out of your U n i o n subscriptions folks!). T h e n they pet more. J o h n then signs a few forms, gets pissed in the Queen's and then goes to Residence C o m m i t t e e where he is trampled all over due to his brain being fuddled by alcohol. (Then he gets more pissed in the bar and goes to bed.)

Solutions, comments, criticisms to me c/o FELIX Office. There is a prize of £5 (donated by Mend a Bike) for the first correct solution randomly selected at 1:00pm on Wednesday. I wonder how many of you remember Prong and Quirk, two of the lecherous mathematicians from Primelia who appeared in this column last year? W e l l , following the m y s t e r i o u s a n d s u d d e n retirement of several wardens recently, each of them has been put in charge of two mixed halls of residence. Primelia has four of these, all different sizes; the largest are Lizard and Foulmouth, and the smallest Keyhole and Selclique. Prong has been put in charge of Lizard and Selclique and as soon as he heard this he dropped in on the Senior Warden to find the percentage of women in each of the four halls. Later he met Quirk in the Queen's Legs. ' Y o u realise' he boasted 'that of the two larger halls, mine has a higher proportion of women then yours.' 'What about the smaller halls?' asked Quirk. 1 win again. Selclique has a higher proportion of women than Keyhole.' 'It doesn't really worry me,' replied Quirk. 'Next year your two halls will be amalgamated, as w i l l m i n e , a n d a l t h o u g h t h e r e is to be no redistribution of women at all, my combined hall will have a greater proportion of women than yours.' N o w y o u may r e m e m b e r that Q u i r k is a statistician, and therefore is not totally truthful; and Prong is extremely doubtful about his last assertion. Is it possible that Quirk is telling the truth? O r can Prong be sure he is lying?

Many thanks to Michael Arthur for providing the inside information on which this puzzle is based.

If this is the " b e h i n d the s c e n e s " w o r k , is it any wonder that " o n l y the b a d things get r e p o r t e d . " J o h n Passmore has d o n e nothing t h i s y e a r w h i c h c o u l d be d e s c r i b e d as constructive for the U n i o n . It is a m o c k e r y of the awards system a n d a disgrace to the small b a n d of people with U G A s w h o m M r P a s s m o r e will be joining. Likewise Rae Snee, who certainly c o u l d not be described as lazy, but simply misguided by her o w n personal v e n o m for the average student. I urge P a s s m o r e a n d S n e e to c o n s i d e r carefully just what a U G A means. What about social colours? C o n s i d e r i n g the bitterness, personal anxiety and bitchy backbiting these " a w a r d s " cause, I am tempted to say scrap ' e m . B u t so many people seem to appreciate "being a c k n o w ledged for the part they p l a y e d . " S o touching! If you've just been aw ar ded t h e m , what have y o u got? Basically, an ugly black, yellow and white tie w h i c h if y o u dare to wear y o u get labeled a poser, p s e u d , or hack. (I've only ever seen three being w o r n a n d the wearers w o u l d fit that description admirably.) T h e only way to w i n in the social colours street credibility points game is to adopt a "couldn't care less" attitude. If you've just been awarded social colours, just remember that there's always s o m e o n e who's done more who hasn't got t h e m a n d s o m e o n e w h o has done less w h o has. W h e r e does that leave y o u ? While I'm trying h a r d not to cast aspersions o n individuals who get colours, I d i d notice one thing. N o fewer t h a n nine people received colours for w o r k o n the I N C O S T Conference at Easter. While not wishing to criticise any of those •nvolved in this worthwhile venture I w o u l d say that if they all did one tenth (counting L i z Lindsay) of the w o r k involved, none of t h e m should have received colours. I feel colours committee a n d L i z L i n d s a y (as chief organiser) should have been m o r e selective. E n d of o u t b u r s t . A s s u m e n o r m a l student boring, ineffectual lifestyles

What's On Friday May

29

t

• C h r i s t i a n U n i o n M e e t i n g , theme " G i f t s of the F a t h e r " ,

L a s f Weefc's

Solution

I C C U D I Y , 6:00pm, M u s i c R o o m , 53 P r i n c e s G a t e .

Sunday,

0 X 0 X X o o X X X 0 X X o o o X X Top Layer

Middle Layer

•IC G r o u p Unemployment

May

31

M a r c h f r o m H y d e P a r k to

Trafalgar S q u a r e , meet 11:45am outside H u x l e y Building.

Wednesday, •United Nations

Society

June 3 A G M , 1:00pm,

tion of c o m m i t t e e . A H m e m b e r s to attend. • I C L A S L a t i n A m e r i c a n P a r t y , 7:00pm, U n i o n U p p e r Lounge.

Thursday,

June 4

• S T O I C B r o a d c a s t , 12:45 a n d 6:00pm. T h i s w e e k ' s p r o g r a m m e includes: F E L I X ' b e h i n d c l o s e d d o o r s ' — S T O I C ' s enquiry into the M o n r o ' s a N u r d p h o t o s c a n d a l , a n interview with the new B o o k s h o p

Bottom Layer

The winner is Jari Kallio, M e c h Eng, who can collect his cheque on Monday afternoon.

0 o X X X 0 0 X 0

Southside

U p p e r L o u n g e . P l a n n i n g next year's activities a n d elec-

Manager,

p r o b l e m s for cyclists r o u n d C o l l e g e , the K a g P r o c e s s i o n , R a g & D r a g D i s c o , Raft R a c e , D r a m s o c ' s 3 r d o p e r a , a n attempt at

making pancakes,

something

that

vaguely

r e s e m b l e s a B l u e P e t e r c o o k e r y sport a n d m a n y

more

events y o u m a y o r m a y not r e m e m b e r . • H a n g G l i d i n g C l u b M e e t i n g , 1:00pm, Stan's B a r . • G l i d i n g C l u b M e e t i n g , 5:30pm, A e r o •Summer

254.

s i n g i n g , 5 : 4 5 p m , 53 P r i n c e s G a t e . All wel

come—totally Mass'.

informal. W o r k s

include H a y d n

'Nelson

• U L U G a y s o c M e e t i n g , 8:00pm, R o o m 2 D , U L U B u i l d ing, Malet St.

FELIX is published by the Editor for and on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board, and is printed by the Union Print Unit, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BB. (589 51J J ext. 1048/int. 2881) Copyright FELIX 1981. Editor: S.J. Marshall, Advertising Manager: M.A. Smith. Registered at the GPO as a newspaper.


http://www.felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1981/1981_0586_A