Page 1

FELIX

THE NEWSPAPER OF IMPERIAL COLLEGE UNION

Friday 16th May 1980

Issue No. 553

President of ICWA shocks AGM A new President was ratified at last T u e s d a y ' s I C W A A G M . S a n d r a O ' S u l l i v a n was the only c a n d i d a t e for the post of President a n d s o w o n the el ec t i o n . However, in a s p e e c h to the meeting s h e said that in her o p i n i o n I C W A has failed. S a n d r a said that s h e w o u l d not get rid of I C W A but w o u l d just m a k e it clear to the girls at IC how little I C W A d o e s for them. S a n d r a said that s h e w o u l d not sit o n a n y committees a n d this c o u l d lead to an attempt by other m e m b e r s of ICWA to remove her from the position. T h i s year's President said, "It's just a bit r e d i c u l o u s but all the rest of the committee are very keen - we will c o n t i n u e anyway. It doesn't matter about the P r e s i d e n t . " "

The new ICWA President Sandra O'Sullivan

Last years I C U President, M a r y A t t e n b o r o u g h , j o k e d that s h e might as well stand for C h a i r m a n of the C o n s e r v a t i v e S o c i e t y . (Mary is k n o w n for her political affilations to p o l i t i c a l g r o u p s other than the C o n s e r v a t i v e s a n d if s h e was elected C O N S O C c h a i r m a n s h e c o n s i d e r e d that it w o u l d be e q u a l l y rediculous). R o g e r Stotesbury c o m m e n t e d that S a n d r a was the only c a n d i d a t e , wh o s t o o d in the I C W A elections,who actually bothered to c o m e to the meeting. "It just s h o w s that I C W A ca n n o t survive if there is no interest," he s a i d .

RCS A G M Last Tuesday's R C S Annual General M e e t i n g m a n a g e d to elect a n A s s i s t a n t Honorary Secretary, Jane Lavers, and ratified the folio w i n g p o s t s : E n t s C h a i r m a n — Dave T h o m p s o n ; Publicity Officer — Caroline G o d i n . Wodger Stotesbury was p u s h e d i n to the p o s t of B o o k s h o p R e p . T h e c o n s t i t u t i o n a l c h a n g e to give the C a r n i v a l C o m m i t t e e its o w n t r e a s u r e r p a s s e d its s e c o n d r e a d i n g a n d the t r e a s u r e r for n e x t y e a r will be e l e c t e d at joint c a r n i v a l c o m m i t t e e . Athletic and Social Colours were a w a r d e d a n d the following r e c e i v e d U n i o n General Awards: Sean O'Boyle (Ex Officio); L i z L i n d s a y ; B a r n e y M c C a b e ; M o Misra and Martin Watson. In the D e r y c k B o n d M e m o r i a l A w a r d several interesting nominations had been r e c e i v e d : C o s t a s , for t u r n i n g u p i n ' the U n i o n B a r , in full f o r m a l d r e s s c o m p l e t e w i t h r e s p l e n d e n t female p a r t n e / a w e e k early; C h a l k y W h i t e for d i r e c t i n g J e z a n d thirsty c r e w to a ' c o s y little p u b I u s e d to (continued on page 7)

The new R C S Exec: Steve Tyson, Paul Johnson and Rich Archer


DEMONSTRATORS REPLY Dear Colin As members of the anti-AyatoUah demonstrators durirg the siege of the Iranian Embassy, we feel that the reasons behind the demonstration s h o u l d be made clear. It was intended to show disapproval of supporters of a regime which is inhumane and irresponsible. The Iranians concerned were taking advantage of a delicate situation in order to publicise their feelings for Khomeini and against President Carter and the American people. We did not want to let the World believe that the British people would sta'nd by without showing disapproval of such actions. If the

Iranians have the right to support the Khomeini regime, then likewise we have a right to protest. The IC student who feels sickened by the manner of the protest should perhaps consider the chants and slogans of the Iranian demonstrators and the unthinking way in which they worship such a dictator. Also, in response to your editorial, it should be said that the police did not keep the Iranians in isolation. They were free to lea ve the compound at any time in order to obtain food and drink and to use the toilet. Yours sincerely Bob Dean, Mark Kenrick, Dave Crossman, P Clifton (and signed by 47 others)

TICKLING THE IVORIES Dear Colin In view of C h r i s F o x ' s and other's comments regarding the responsibility of IC demonstrators at the recent Embassy siege, I would like to say a few words. Although I admit that there was temptation from the idea of playing the piano on T V , the main reason why I wheeled the R C S instrument was to add my voice to those of the many saying "don't give us that Ayatollah crap". While I was present the mood was certainly one of carnival and I feel that my contribution, and that of most others on the IC side of the fence, was to further this mood and definitely not intended to provoke violence. I felt that the presence of the pro-Khomeini demonstrations was insulting to our nation and deserved to be ridiculed by that 'Great British sense of humour'. Why insulting? you may ask. In pledging their support for Khomeini, the Iranian demonstrators were supporting the further detainment of the

fifty American hostages in Iran. (It is interesting to note here that in this case it was the 'host nation' to the terrorism (Britian) that freed the hostages, simply in upholding its laws and protecting foreign diplomats. Does Iran condone the actions of the terrorists who are still playing with the lives of fifty innocent people?) It appears the Khomeini regime itself is playing the terrorist no wonder they are prepared to sacrifice the odd life or twenty. I deplore terrorism and cannot in any way sympathise with supporters of any kind of terrorism. For Khomeini followers to parade our peaceful and civilised streets, trying to justify the holding of the American hostages by offering themselves in, shall we say, part payment, seems to me barbaric and an insult to us. No: I am not a skinhead/Nazi NF/a Buddhist monk; I believe in peace — else why did not I throw bricks rather than tickle the ivory. Yours, a little offended Barney McCabe

ISLAMIC Society comments Dear Colin Reference to the article on Relations Between Iran and the U n i t e d States in last F r i d a y ' s FELIX: I would like to point out the following. Mr Justin Newland does not have any knowledge, however, basic about Islam. He mentions that Islam means G o d , but the word means submission to the God. He speaks about Mohammedanism whereas we O N L Y regard ourselves as MOSLEMS, ie, those who submit to G o d . We regard Mohammad as a human being, just as we regard Moses and Jesus as human beings; we believe that they were all prophets with essentially the same message. Each coming to give the truth. We also believe that present day Christianity and Judaism is distorted from the original versions and therefore the remaining true teachings are those in the Quran (still in its original form) and in the documental life of prophet Mohammad.

2

Mr Newland — surely not a historian of great stature — lays down a theory about the aryan races which exposes his ignorance about the situation in Iran. Let me assure Mr Newland that the whole of the Moslem world is in turbulence because the teachings of Islam prohibit all forms of Evil (ref Quran), regards men and women as equal before God. It stresses that a Moslem's duty is to eradicate the Evil. He must use all routes laid down by G o d to do. this. (He cannot give back the other cheek when faced with evil.) The Islamic Society of Imperial College has sent a brief guide about Islam to all students and most staff. The aim was to clear many misconceptions about Islam, common in England. I suggest Mr Newland reads his. Yours Y. El-Saie on behalf of Islamic Society

Highest level of student activity at IC in years Dear Colin I think it is fair to say that IC students, in general, do not like getting involved in student union external affairs, with most demonstrations attended by just a handful. It therefore surprises me that when hundreds of IC students turn out to demonstrate against the Ayatotlah Khomeini, the Union sits back and does nothing! T h i s was a genuine protest against Iran's 'spiritual leader', who, not content with butchering over eight hundred of his own nation in the name of Islam, decides to threaten world peace by kidnapping the staff of the American Embassy. T h e n with Iranian students

The ridicule certainly did get home to the Iranian students and I am sure that the demonstration in no way affected the situation inside the Embassy. But for those that did feel that it was too frivolous, they can only blame the Union for not organising it. The same Union Officers that complain about apathy, failed to respond to the highest level of student activity at IC in years, and that is a gross neglect of duty. David Gayer

VERBOSITY

Pseudo-intellectual

having the cheek to take to the streets of London and extol his virtues, it was only right that we should show them what we think.

Dear Mr Editor ramblings We would like to communicate our displeasure at the polysyllabic Dear Colin diarrhoea emanating from the Justin Newland in his article on stylus of Mr Newland. Hisadscititious the Iranian crisis failed to explore verbosity merely serves to obfuscate the fundamental reasons why this the subject matter. is one of the most serious events of Yours objurgately the post-war period. His pseudoThe Bernard Levin Appreciation intellectual ramblings left me Society wondering why he had bothered, his vocabulary appeared to be designed to overawe rather than inform the reader. What is important is that the Sir The counter-demonstration by Iranian 'students' have violated IC students attracted much adverse diplomatic immunity, the invasion criticism in your letter columns last of the US Embassy was an act of week. The balance needs to be war since the Embassy constitutes American soil. If the Americans redressed. It was suggested that the demon- agree to the terms demanded this stration hindered negotiations with would then put every foreign the gunmen. There is no evidence embassy in the world at risk. We to support this. The demo was have an impasse. The Americans conducted in good humour and at attempted to break this by military a safe distance (set by the police). action, the one opportunity they If it had been decided that the had resulted in a dismal debacle presence of demonstrators was with the hostages d i s p e r s e d . adversely affecting negotiations the However, pressure will be applied police would have dispersed the and, in the interests of international diplomacy through which peace is crowd. ' It was also claimed that the maintained, must be successful. behaviour of the students betrayed a The Iranian leadership must apprecomplete indifference to the tragic ciate that fact. Mr Newland misses his chance events in Iran. Many full-time students are able to tolerate to contribute to this discussion violations of international law and with his fatuous essay. To accuse basic human rights only because of all western media of being "notorthe lack of opportunity to satisfy iously biased" is libellous. He fails to state that the U N is there to their conscience. However, when supporters of cope with such situations, in this the religious zealot who presides respect there are parallels with the gleefully over such traversties of fate of the League of Nations. His historical perspectives are justice sing his praises just a hundred metres down the road it rather weak, especially when warms my heart to see so many concerning the Papal Empire (I students take the chance to exercise assume he means the Holy Roman their democratic right and show Empire, he does not mention that to a large extent the temporal their disgust. It would have been irresponsible power of the Pope depended on to let slip this chance of showing the incumbant Emperor and the our condemnation of the Ayatollah support of the Hapsburg monarchies. To also equate Islam and Khomeini. Someone (in the anonymous Hitler's anti-semitic policies beggars letter) was concerned at the way description, it fully deserves the our message was put across. But I derision it must incure. In the final analysis, Mr Newland's ask you, how does one argue with a brainwashed fanatic who seriously article is no more than the ramblings believes that the gunmen were CIA of one who aspires to literary mediocrity. spies? Yours sincerely Yours faithfully Stephen Goulder Mark Clegg Life Sci 1 Neil Masom

DEMO


IC W I N D E N S E M B L E CONCERT 11th May Conductor D Edwards The annual 1812 Overture concert is now something which most people in College look forward to and everyone hears. A large crowd gathered in the sunshine on the Queens lawn to hear the Wind Band, many with picnic lunches, a

few with tablecloths, and at least one ice-bucket. The band began with Finlandia by Sibelius, a rousing piece which was given a really vigorous performance. The Wind Band version of this piece is as exciting as the full orchestra score, although the brass instruments don't seem able to play the scales as fast as the strings, so this version goes a little slower. Then there was a complete change of

mood, with Scott Joplin's The Entertainer and a medley called Instant Concert

(or

something) in

which the audience could play 'spot the tune'. I lost count. Next we came to the big one, The 1812 Overture, with everything except strings and chorus. Some of the tempi were a bit suspect and the bass line could have been stronger, but at least there were enough bell-ringers for this performance. Most of the cannon fired

succesfully, and produced a louder bang than Kensington has heard for at least a week. Instead of finishing with the 1812, which would have been the obvious programme order, the Wind Band ended with Elgar's 4th Pomp And Circumstance

March.

If they'd

played the first of these, I'm sure most of the audience would have sung along. A good patriotic note to end on.

Siege through the eyes of a camera - by Mickie Marsh 11:40am go for a pint. Wonder what all these police are doing about here. Suppose there may have been another Lybian shot. 12:35pm Colin says someone's been shot at the Iranian Embassy including some policemen. So off I rush to Linstead and collect my camera gear and a couple of rolls of film Arriving at a police cordon at 12:35 I ask what has happened. The reply was, "Don't know, mate. We think it's a siege." When I ask where I can get some information, I'm told to go round to the press enclosure. The rest is history; six or seven gunmen had held up the Embassy staff and a diplomatic patrol police officer. Given the situation, what could I do only armed with a camera, a few lenses and a FELIX 'press pass? Almost straight away we had a semi press conference where we were told there were two or possibly three gunmen holding hostages and making demands. We were not allowed to ask any questions. People were being evacuated from Princes Gate, including a girls' school next door but one to the Embassy. Some of the girls were obviously quite shocked. A NBC reporter interviewed two of the girls for US television. It was obvious that around the front nothing much is going to happen, so I try to go round the back. On the top of the swimming pool a decent view is to be had, though after ten minutes we are moved on. Try Weeks Hall, but the Chief of Security won't let me in with a camera, even though I'm from FELIX. Next try Garden Hall, via IC Radio entrance, thanks to Dave Fuller. Inside we get quite a good view of the gardens behind the

Embassy. There is a lot of police activity both on the ground and on the roofs. The view was ideal, then we heard about the twelve noon deadline, when they claimed that the Embassy would be blown up. I've got to have my camera in Garden Hall. Then I'll leave it with a friend and come in early in the morning. Meanwhile outside the Embassy, Iranian protesters wer beginning to arrive. Early evening saw people offer themselves as hostages, then the prayer sessions began. Wednesday night saw my plans change as North Side Princess Gardens was being policed. The camera had to go in before morning as I did. A friend from. Garden Hall agreed to help me 'smuggle' it in. After a few lost heart beats we were in. We were awake by eight giving us four hours to wait to see if the terrorists blew it up. Come 11:45 we were evacuated — nothing happened, but if it did I was ready for Weeks Hall to fall. The afternoon saw Barney entertain the crowds with a full repertoire of some of his better known songs, including Rule Britannia, Entertainer with a few national anthems thrown in. Friday saw an 'official' AntiAyatollah march from Mech Eng with a full prayer session to follow. Saturday — the Rag Fete Day heralded the opening of the Queens Tower and an excellent view of the Embassy. There was, however, not much activity on the roof. The p r o t e s t e r s were d w i n d l i n g in numbers and by Sunday they were almost gone. Monday (and I should have been drag racing) the police moved into the Linstead Hall canteen feeding

two hundred at a time with nonMooney food, ie, of good quality. About 3:00pm we heard shots, but no news. At 7:20pm I was told of ambulances in Exhibition Road. Upon seeing eight and making my way back to Linstead Hall an ominous boom was heard — the end had begun. No way could I get into Weeks or Garden Hall. So I went up on to Linstead roof, but couldn't see anything. A brief trip onto Elec Eng roof gave an excellent view. There were bits of burnt paper blowing all about with a lot of smoke, then the

flames began to show. Within half an hour the building was well ablaze. By 9:00pm it was virtually all " over. After a good think, I decided to sell some pictures to some daily newspapers. (The fire hadn't been too good from the front.) After a few phone calls and one refusal from The Times. The Sun said to bring the roll of film down. By 11:30pm the prints were ready — which they accepted. After a good night's sleep, and a good reading of the Sun they were nowhere to be found.


Dear Colin, In reply to the letters which condemned the counter-demonstrations outside the Iranian Embassy, I would like to clarify certain points. There were various issues at stake during the demonstrations, when there should only have been one; the safety of the hostages inside the Embassy. That would certainly justify a demonstration by Iranians concerned about their fellow countrymen/women's well being. Instead of seeing banners reading "Let our people go" or similar relevant slogans, one was met by protestors chanting immotive phrases such as "Death to Carter", "Death to Thatcher", marching round and holding up insulting caricatures of President Carter. It is difficult to see how that would have helped the hostages inside the

Embassy, instead it simply proliferated anti-Iranian feeling amongst the British onlookers, be it justified or not. Similarly, by holding up pictures of Khomeini and showing support for him, the situation was being turned into a political forum, and naturally attracted demonstrators opposed to the Ayatollah for his policy of condoning the holding of the American hostages in Teheran. Stupid and unruly behaviour by counter-demonstrators deserves no praise, but it is not for those there (A sickened IC student) hoping for political gain to criticise that behaviour, as they themselves were being publically insulting to the West, when their sole concern should have-been for the safety of those held hostage in the Embassy. Yours sincerely, John Chamberlain

Dear Sir, As is to be expected, last week's FELIX displayed a typical anti-British bias. Your attitude appears to be that if it's foreign it's great. Stuff it. You've gone further this timeT note. Not only are you anti-British, you're also anti-Civiiisation. This is to be understood, since it is the official ICU publication. I would however remind you that, in spite of ICU's efforts, London is still the official and actual capital of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. I would mention a few points. Firstly that it is typical of the hypocrisy to be expected that it should be demanded that foreign students should be freely allowed to come here .... provided they are not from South Africa. In what way does South Africa differ from Russia? Both oppress certain sectors of the population - and SA is a damn sight freeer than the USSR. Secondly, the outstanding triumph of the British security forces in coping with foreign feuding has conveniently been ignored. Without their efforts London and this country in general would be far less safe than it is. Thirdly your Editorial and contributors have taken the side of the Iranians. Why? Can you so easily overlook the illegal holding of some fifty innocent foreigners by the government in that country. And can you so easily forget the executions of hundreds of people for their services to the previous government. The

trials these people have received are surely an example of the philosophy of the government, that is to say that anyone they don't like is guilty unless proved innocent. And if they're innocent then you try the judge for crimes against the state. Any western country carrying out this practice would be instantly condemned by all the press, including FELIX, but because it concerns Iran it is acceptable. Give me the SAS, and SPG, or even the Mafia, rather than the Iranian Justice. Thirdly, remember, if Carter had succeeded he would be regarded as the greatest hero ever. Admittedly the plan displayed the typical inefficiencies and cock-ups expected of the USA. However, it is unfair to slate him so mercilessly. He was unlucky. Don't forget, if it had been the USSR Embassy, Iran would not exist by now. Fourthly, as long as it effects sport, any outrage against any foreign country is allowed by the USSR. After all, we can't stop "our lads" from going to Moscow. Who cares about Jews, Dissidents, Religion, Afghanistan, Communism, we've got to win the medals. - Musn't go to SA 'though, must we? Congrats to RCS for their demo, Congrats to the coppers and SAS also, commisserations to Carter & the US. Stuff ICU. Yours, Disgusted of Mech Eng.

Dear Colin Surfacing from exams at last, and readng your appeal for amusing articles in the FELIX last week, I thought, well — why not? When I read the article entitled " T h e American-Iranian Conflict; Some Historical Perspectives' I could see why not. If you were short of articles during the revision period, then I do sympathise, but I'm afraid that you might have considered the pompous and patronising parable (I can do alliteration too, you see) merited a whole page. It wasn't really so radically revelationary to be revered, was it? (Anything you can do . . .) I think that the piece might have been better entitled 'Some Personal Historical Perspectives' — when reading the F E L I X , Justin, ones

does not appreciate being lectured at — we get more than enough of that all week. The article was not properly reasoned, was circumlocutory and most irritating of all, I have some s u s p i c i o n that Mr Newland sits in his room after he has written a thing like this and imagines that we are all pouring over our dictionaries with unmitigated fervour while we try to decipher the writings of the man who sees all so clearly. I was interested to read your opinions, Mr Newland, but, glad as a I am that we have such a pragmatic spokesman at IC, a man of such vision as yourself — I do object to reading such a patronising and opinionated article. I could have done without you to tell me why I feel "astonishment and indignation" at the events in

4

Dear Colin, It was with mounting concern I read the letter from Andy Nicolaou, Carolin Temple-Bird, Ian Hodgson, A Gujral, K Pratt and J Czernuszka. Their letter will spark off an indignant protest from the fanatical "antiAyatollah" demonstrators themselves, however unlike, to the best of my knowledge, the co-writers of this letter, I actually watched both demonstrations for a period of several hours on the first day and about one on the second day and have a different point to make. How such a group of articulate and intelligent students can produce such a misleading and pompous letter, implying so much, and submit to a serious newspaper is beyond me. Many of us will remember a letter from one of the above co-writers in FELIX Issue 534 (Nov 161979) which was a personal attack on Steve Hutchings for suggesting that his photos should be credited. The writer admitted he knew nothing about the legal, artsitic and copyright reasons involved and had never even met Steve Hutchings but felt he could call him a "Power Mad Prat" and finished with a typically pompous ending that if Steve didn't mend his ways "what hope for the world?" Comparison between the two letters reveals a striking similarity. The writers seemed to have learnt not to come straight out with an admission "that they don't know what they are talking about" but from subsequent comments that seem to be inspired from innacurate press reports and the assumption anything I was remotely near would be a farce. The last paragraph "Are these really the kind of people who", etc, etc is more subtle but still worthy of that previous ending "If not what hope for the world" etc. I saw fellow students from IC on both sides. Many Iranian students demonstrated their obviously deeply felt support for their religious and political G o d , the Ayatollah Khomeini, with a fervour that was fanatical. One of their earliest spokesmen was from Chem Eng. While I respect their strongly held religious beliefs as I expect they respect mine, I fail to understand their politics or revolution and consider many published statements to be hyppcritical in the extreme. I can't condone the action of their government(s) which have not only flouted the Declaration of Human Rights which we have adopted but every diplomatic code. However, I'm still prepared to fight for the right of free expresion in the UK, but they seemed prepared to die for their

There were fanatical "antiAyatollah" demonstrators, but I think that most of the IC students were there because they disagreed with the amazing "double-think" of the Iranian Demonstrators who support their own political hostagetaking but were calling for the execution of 91 sympathisers of the Princes Gate Gunmen as retaliation for someone else's political hostage-, taking. In my opinion they chose the best way to do this, not to confront fellow students with inflamatory confrontation but object to their policies not to the people who were deeply committed to their cause. Cheerful and unfrienzied ridicule of conflicting attitudes has been an accepted part of British Politics for over 100 years (listen to Parliament, or ead political cartoons). I have no idea what the original organisers were intending, however, as I do not Know them. Maybe the writers would have preferred them to put forward policy at UGMs, hand leaflets out etc, most of the demonstrators however are not as active in the Union unfortunately as the writers. The letter goes on to imply some kind of "top level" communication with themselves and the Police & Home Office enabling them to comment on their opinion. It goes on to say that because Young Skinheads turned up the next day it was all a mistake, this is like winding up London Transport because people write on the seats. I know my own prejudices and try to compensate for them, but I have nothing but respect for the Iranian students and their committment though I think their attitudes are foolish. Maybe I'm wrong, perhaps they will try and put me right. THe cowriters seem unable to recognise their own prejudices, they immediuately assume the worst, trivial, and shallowest of motives from the majority of "boring, conventional, and less articulate" students. I know that I am not "tragically indifferent to events in Iran" but if South Kensington is to become a World Stage we should try to have serious and objective letters in FELIX. The letter attacking Steve Hutchings was appalling enough, but to apply the same standards as pompous and pretentious. Ignorance to such serious subjects betrays a different sort of "tragic indifference to events going on in Iran." Yours very sincerely, Francis Rowsell BE1

Iran, and quite apart from that, neither of those feelings could truthfully be attributed to what I think about it anyway. I am very surprised that the whole thing wasn't printed on purple to go with the prose; it didn't really require such a load of old cobblers (English derivation, Justin, meaning rubbish, supply any expletives you wish) to tell me that "religion is a clear protagonist" in the struggle — possessed of superb political insight and historical hindsight — I might have guessed. I'm sorry, but the whole article

was built up from arguments as flimsy as your insight into the problem. I could criticise the whole thing, but this is not the place for it — I probably wouldn't have written at afl if this article had been a first from Mr Newland, but this is the third time I've read this sort of — wait for it — opinionated, pompous, inflated, ponderous, tautological verbal tenesmus from him, I felt compelled to reply (in the same vein, of course!). Yours sincerely Ann-Marie Tomsett Biochemistry 3

beliefs. Their letter protest.

ignored this


TEN TORS After months of training involving early morning duck visiting a n d w o o d w o r m stamping in the g y m we were p r e p a r e d for t h e height of masochism: T e n Tors. T h e spanking new 'lime' g r e e n v a n plus friend travelled uneventfully to D a r t m o o r whilst T o m a n d Matthew regaled the passengers with T r u e Life stories from an appropriate magazine. T e n t s were pitched in the boys' area (the mixed a r e a w a s full — that's o u r e x c u s e anyway), kit scrutineered a n d teams b r i e f e d b e f o r e w e p l u n g e d b a c k to town for a visit to M o o n e y ' s Fish a n d Chips E m p o r i u m . A local hostelry provided tables o n w h i c h to d e c i p h e r the maps a n d we were all t u c k e d into bed by A u n t i e C h r i s well before lights out. A w o k e n by the t a n n o y at 4:30, we crawled out for c o l d porridge, s c a l d i n g tea, runny s c r a m b l e d e g g s a n d edible s a u s a g e s . T h e n it was p a c k s o n a n d off to join t h e other two a n d a half t h o u s a n d p e o p l e at the start for the T e n T o r s h y m n , prayer a n d chat from the B i s h o p a n d M a y o r respectively. N o going back n o w !

Womens Report The route (45 miles): Raw T o r ; S t e e p e r ton T o r ; Sittaford T o r ; H u c c a b y T o r ; Hartor T o r ; Beardown; Roos T o r ; Lynch T o r ; Dinger Tor; Sourton T o r . The team: T a n s y Hepton (leader); Mary Whittam (navigator); Vicky Welsh; Karen Harget; Sally Heslop; Sunil N im a l a s u r iy a. We started fast to avoid the rush at the c h e c k p o i n t at the t op of the first tor a n d kept u p g o o d time d e s p i t e t h e s e c o n d tor living u p to its name to s u c h a n e x t e n t t h a t it t u r n e d i n t o more of a climb than a walk! Straight onto S i t t a f o r d while we were still feeling g o o d a n d then the pleasantest walk a l o n g a r i v e r s i d e path g o i n g d o w n to t h e s o u t h e r n part of t h e moor. L e g s were b e g i n n i n g to a c h e by this stage a n d a certain team leader began to get rather disheartened. However, a fairly long l u n ch b r ea k c h e e r e d e v e r y o n e up with juicy oranges as the most w e l c o m e part. W e knew o u r next tor w o u l d be t o u gh — but didn't realise how bad until we had c l i m b e d a really steep road to discover a still-open p u b enticing us! However, we pressed o n a n d , after asking the way twice (!) we fo u n d Hartor T o r a n d were greeted with the c u p final result. N o o n e is allowed to c h e c k t h r o u g h a tor after eight o ' c l o c k s o we h a d to press o n fast. T h e next stretch (excuse the pun) was mostly along the road to P r in cet o wn a n d past the p r i s o n . T h i s was certainly the most gruelling part of the d a y with blisters, knees, ankles, etc all o b j e c t i n g to s t r e n u o u s road w a l k i n g . B e a r d o w n w a s r e a c h e d at 8:06 a n d , d e s p i t e p l e a d i n g w i t h

Imperial Opera (present La Belle Ffelene by Jacques Offenbach M A Y 21 — 24, at 7:30pm in the ICU Concert Hall Tickets £1.20 Imperial Opera is a n e w g r o u p f o r m e d predominantly f r o m past m e m b e r s of Imperial C o l l e g e O p e r a t i c S o c i e t y , based in S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n . T h e aim o f the g r o u p is t o a l l o w t h e t a l e n t s a n d e n t h u s i a s m d e v e l o p e d in the college society to b e p e r p e t u a t e d o n c e the m e m b e r s ' student days are over. A t the s a m e time, a wider repertoire of o p e r a will be a t t em p t ed. La Belle Helene w i l l b e I m p e r i a l O p e r a ' s first full-scale staged p r o d u c t i o n although this follows a w o r k s h o p a n d various fund-raising events in L o n d o n a n d D e v o n , t h e M u s i c a l D i r e c t o r is M i c h a e l W i t h e r s a n d the P r o d u c e r , Ian Gledhill.

officials, we h a d to c a m p there. Blisters were attended to a n d s u p p e r c o o k e d — well apart, I'm glad to s a y ! A g o o d night w a s p a s s e d although my s u p p e r d e c i d e d it had had e n o u g h a n d got out while t h e g o i n g w a s g o o d . A n early m o r n i n g start saw us at our seventh tor by s o o n after eight in the m o r n i n g a n d another fairly flat stretch got us to o u r eighth. Unfortunately it was all rather high a n d o u r faces b e c a m e rather wind d a m a g e d — to be felt later. It was from here that o u r lack of n a v i g a t i o n a l skill b e c a m e apparent as we followed the w r o n g river valley north. O n c e we realised things weren't as they s h o u l d be we knew that the safest thing w o u l d be to head for the nearest manned tor, w h i c h we d i d . H e r e w e d i s c o v e r e d that w e . w e r e n e a r l y five m i l e s o u t a n d h a d n ' t e n o u g h t i m e to f i n i s h t h e c o u r s e by 5:00pm, s o very d i s a p p o i n t e d (but pretty glad to stop all the same) we h a d to c a l l a h a l t . T h e f r i e n d l y soldiers provided hot tea a n d 'orange j u i c e ' (with a d d i t i v e s ) a n d w e w e r e taken back to c a m p by l a n d r o v e r having walked over forty miles — a great effort a n d proof that the training had paid off.

Men's Report The route: Steeperton Tor; Sourton T o r ; L y n c h T o r ; G r e a t Mis T o r ; Hartor Tor, Hawkes Tor, Sharp Tor, M u c c a b y T o r ; Sittaford T o r ; O k e T o r . The team: N i c k Last (leader); A n d y Britton (navigator); M o Misra; T o m O w e n ; Steve H u t c h i n g s ; Matt S m i t h ; A n d y S m i t h (reserve). T h i s fifty-five mile route threw in everything D a r t m o o r c o u l d offer. T h e weather was hot a n d exceedingly w i n d y w h i c h l e d to a l l o f u s e i t h e r getting t a n n e d or s u n - b u r n t . T h e first tor proved to be the most d e m a n d i n g m o unt a ineering -wise ' s i n c e , a p p r o a c h ing from the north, we h a d to a s c e n d the steepest side — this had its effects

O f f e n b a c h w a s o n e of the most prolific c o m p o s e r s of operetta of all time, h a v i n g written o v e r a h u n d r e d of t h e m . M u s i c flowed o u t o f h i m like water f r o m a t a p . H e himself p r e d i c t e d that h e would d i e with a tune o n the e n d of h i s p e n , a n d indeed, h e died in 1880, while struggling to c o m p l e t e his M a g n u m O p u s , The Tales of Hoffmann. 1980 is thus the centenary of his death, a n d it is appropriate that we should m a r k the o c c a s i o n with a p r o d u c t i o n of o n e o f his best a n d m o s t p o p u l a r w o r k s . La Belle Hefene w a s first p e r f o r m e d at the T h e a t r e d e s Varietes in Paris 1864. Its plot deals — loosely — with the e v e n t s leading u p t o the T r o j a n War.

later o n . Having p l o d d e d a few more miles w e d e c i d e d to have a break o n L y n c h — it was d u r i n g t h e trek to this tor that a certain m e m b e r (blush) felt as t h o u g h he w o u l d die, but having survived, t h e team battled o n having passed D a r t m o o r P r i s o n (and a few pubs — h o w cruel) we r e a c h e d Hartor and were s o o n o n our way to H a w k e s . We eventually fo u n d it ' h i d d e n ' b e h i n d a huge clay works and left us two a n d half hours to r.each the next tor (since they c l o s e at eight o'clock). After a valiant effort following o u r inspiring leader, Nick Last, we fo u n d w e n e e d e d at l e a s t a n o t h e r h o u r a n d s o w i t h exhaustion a n d h u n g e r settng in w e c a m p e d beneath the tor next to a river for the night. T h e food left m u c h to be d e s i r e d , although the c o o k literally put e v e r y thing he had into it! T h e team, blistered, but in g o o d spirits pressed o n , w a k i n g up at four in the m o r n i n g a n d r e a c h i n g the tor at just past six. W e then h a d the toughest stretch of the expedition — a l o n g nine mile, three hour walk without a break, to H u c c a b y . T h i s stretch certainly took its toll and s o m e of the team m e m b e r s b e g a n to feel t h e pace. T h i n g s b e g a n to drag, tempers b e c a m e strained a n d w h e n a certain M Smith d e c i d e d to c a t c h bees with his net he almost b e c a m e the subject of our p e n t - u p feelings. T e a m spirits at this point, I feel, bit a low a n d really didn't pick u p till w e finished, greeted bya jubilant M r Fox, A n d y S m i t h a n d T i m Hillyer (the base c a m p crew) not to m e n t i o n g o l d m e d a l s , c e r t i f i c a t e (cheers, and a few c a n s of S w a n Chris). T h e teams rejoined at O k e h a m p t o n (the army c a m p a n d also the start a n d finish of the expedition) to e x c h a n g e tales a n d to c o m m i s e r a t e with the girls who put u p a magnificent effort. M a n y thanks to all c o n c e r n e d especially t h e drivers T i m a n d C h r i s a n d of c o u r s e A n d y S m i t h w h o like the girls were s o near yet s o far. Mo

and

Tansy


CITY A N D GUILDS W e l l f o l k s , t h a t t i m e of t h e y e a r h a s arrived again. T h e o l d exec has been t a k e n a w a y b y t h e t h e lads i n t h e white c o a t s t o live o u t their lives at t h e h o m e for r e t i r e d E x e c m e m b e r s . W e l l a n y w a y , T u e s d a y s a w t h e h a n d o v e r m e e t i n g in t h e s u n s h i n e o n t h e A l b e r t M e m o r i a l steps, w h i c h w a s w e l l a t t e n d e d . C o l o u r s were awarded to those hard-working people a n d s o m e silly a w a r d s w e r e a l s o given o u t t o tjjose w h o w e r e j u d g e d t o d e s e r v e t h e m . J o h n n y of t h e Y e a r w a s u n a n i m o u s l y a w a r d e d t o A l C a b l e . C o c k - u p of the Y e a r w a s a w a r d e d to R C S for trying to take S p a n n e r a n d Bolt f r o m u s w h e n w e d i d n ' t h a v e t h e m h e r e . T i t of the Y e a r w a s g i v e n t o F r a n k R o u s e l l d e s p i t e stiff competition from S p a m a n d the Female Orifice w a s as usual given to the Span n er bearer, C h r i s G e a r y . T h e execs handed o v e r w i t h J o l e a d i n g h e r last b o o m a l a k a and P a t h i s first. T h e boat race w as welcome d u e to the high temptation a n d s o m e of t h e e x e c s h o w e d large d e v i a n t t e n d e n c i e s . T h e n w e a l l a d j o u r n e d t o the Queens t o celebrate. T h e Joint G e n e r a l Committee in the e v e n i n g w a s well a t t e n d e d a n d m o s t of the officers f o r n e x t y e a r w e r e e l e c t e d . H o w e v e r , w e still n e e d a S p a n n e r E d i t o r , s o a n y o n e w h o w o u l d like t o d o t h i s , it is a V E R Y I M P O R T A N T post a n d we need s o m e o n e t o s t a r t w o r k o n it e a r l y . C o m e a n d s e e S i m o n , o r m y s e l f if y o u w a n t t o d o this. A p r e s e n t a t i o n of a g o b l e t w a s m a d e t o S i r H u g h F o r d i n a p p r e c i a t i o n of all t h e w o r k he has done for Guilds, he then received a standing ovation. Special colours were awarded to M i c h a e l C o o l i n g the O C P r e s i d e n t f o r h i s h e l p d u r i n g t h e y e a r . H e d i d e a t five M o o n i e s at t h e F r e s h e r s D i n n e r s s o he does deserve it. U n i o n G e n e r a l A w a r d s were given to Jamie Atkinson a n d Bryan Stephenson (who?) a n d J o received a standing ovation o n t h e h a n d o v e r a t t h e e n d . T h e first b u s i n e s s of t h e n e w e x e c w a s t o a d j o u r n to t h e S C R for wine draughts, drink, food and games, sadistically organised by R u t h . N a b m a n a g e d t o lose t h e d r a u g h t s a n d the c o n t e n t s of h i s s t o m a c h . P a t also m a n a g e d t o l o s e d e s p i t e a l l t h e helpful (?) comments from onlookers. O n a note of s u c c e s s , G u i l d s have c o l l e c t e d £6,000 f o r R a g this y e a r . £2,000 u p o n last y e a r . A f a n t a s t i c , s t u n n i n g , far o u t total a n d I . t h i n k t h a n k s s h o u l d g o t o all t h o s e i n v o l v e d w i t h c o l l e c t i n g this amount. T h e final e v e n t of t h e y e a r t h e S e a s i d e i T r i p o n S a t u r d a y 19th. T h e r e s h o u l d still be s o m e t i c k e t s left s o c o m e i n t o t h e U n i o n Office t o p a r t w i t h y o u r 7 5 p . T h e t r i p is t o a m y s t e r y d e s t i n a t i o n , n o n o t M a r g a t e . T h e r e a r e a l l the usual seaside p a s t i m e s , funfairs, p a d d l i n g i n t h e s e a , watching J o having a s w i m a n d others.

THE T h i s is a g o o d c h a n c e t o h a v e a final fling before t h e e x a m s . S e e y o u a l l t h e r e . F i n a l l y , a s this is p r o b a b l y m y last a r t i c l e , I w o u l d like t o t h a n k a l l t h o s e people w h o helped, especially S i m o n , Jamie, Dave a n d all the others. A n especially big t h a n k - y o u to J o a n d the rest of the E x e c for being great a n d putting u p with m e ! Cheers

Bryan

Accommodation Bargains Four single bedsits, own kitchen, 10 mins walk from College. £14.50per week Available now till the end of term. Baker St: Flat-share own bedroom, own lounge, share kitchen and bathroom. £15.50 per week. Available till end of June.

FOR FURTHER DETAILS CONTACTTHE WELFARE

CENTRE

RHESUS F A C T O R

A b ^ n t o n e b a b y i n e v e r y t w o h u n d r e d is born a Rritaus baby, needing a complete c h a n g e of b l o o d . I w a s o n e of t h e s e , s o y o u c a n blame m y existence entirely o n b l o o d d o n o r s — I w o u l d have d i e d at b i r t h if it w a s n o t for p e o p l e like y o u . A l m o s t a n y o n e c a n give b l o o d — if y o u are' n o t sure w h e t h e r y o u c a n , c o m e a l o n g a n d a s k at t h e s e s s i o n . It's q u i t e f u n really — y o u get a n i c e r e l a x i n g l i e - d o w n a n d a c u p of t e a w i t h b i s c u i t s . Y o u also find o u t w h a t y o u r b l o o d g r o u p is. T h e most c o m m o n is O positive, a n d the r a r e s t is A B n e g a t i v e — t h i s o n e is needed especially. G i v i n g blood does not take long, a n d does not d o y o u any harm. Y o u could s a v e s o m e o n e ' s life. P l e a s e c o m e a l o n g t o o n e of t h e sessions, w h i c h are in the U n i o n Dining H a l l o n T u e s d a y 20th May b e t w e e n 10:00 a n d 12:00, a n d 2:00 a n d 4:00; a n d o n Wednesday 21st May b e t w e e n 9:30 a n d 12:00 a n d 2:00 a n d 4:00. T h e r e a r e s o m e leaflets s t u c k o n t h e wall of t h e J C R , if y o u w a n t t o k n o w m o r e a b o u t it. T h e r e is a l s o a list for p e o p l e t o s i g n if t h e y w a n t t o c o m e at a p a r t i c u l a r t i m e . P l e a s e c o m e — y o u r blood is needed! Fiona Sinclair ( I C C A G Chairman)


(continued from front page)

frequent', w h e n w e got t h e r e we f o u n d it h a d b e e n p u l l e d d o w n ; a n d finally, N i c k W a t m o u g h for p u s h i n g the J4 v a n d o w n Linstead ramp. This tough decision was put to a v o t e a n d the m e e t i n g v o t e d u n a n i m o u s l y t o give this a c c o l a d e to N i c k Watmough. A f t e r a s l o w K a n g e l a b y the i n c o m i n g E x e c and a p r o p e r K a n g e l a b y the r e t i r i n g

E x e c , the m e e t i n g m o v e d to the J e z G a r a g e w h e r e the m i x w a s t o be s e r v e d . S e a n , M o and T a n s y rejoiced in painting the new E x e c with p u r p l e , black a n d w h i t e g l o s s paint before the m i x t u r e , m a d e from an old north country recipe, and c o n s i s t i n g m a i n l y of p i g s b l o o d a n d rhinoceros droppings was p o u r e d over the n e w E x e c . A q u i c k j o g t o the r o u n d p o n d t o w a s h off a n d it w a s b a c k t o the

Q u e e n s for a q u i c k pint before the •"tedious a n d o f t e n i n t i m a t e t a s k of r e m o v i n g the p a i n t . The B a r Night in the evening was poorly a t t e n d e d , but the spirit was all there. A n i m p r o m p t u O k i e - K o k i e a n d a n u n p r e c e d e n t e d d i s p l a y of A u s t r i a n F o l k D a n c e helped to m a k e this the m o s t unusual a n d enjoyable R C S Night in the B a r this y e a r .

EDITORIAL

R C S Ten Tors team relax at the start

ICU A G M Union Concert Hall Next Tuesday at 1 p.m. F E L I X is p u b l i s h e d by the E d i t o r , o n be naif o l t h e I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e U n i o n P u b l i c a t i o n s B o a r d . F E L I X is p r i n t e d o n the U n i o n p r e m i s e s i n P r i n c e C o n s o r t R o a d , L o n d o n S W 7 . E d i t o r C R. P a l m e r F E L I X I S S N 0 1 4 0 - 0 7 1 1 . R e g i s t e r e d at the P o s t O f f i c e . C o p y r i g h t F E L I X 1980 F E L I X , the E d i t o r o l F E L I X a n d U n i o n O f f i c e r s c a n n o t a c c e p t l i a b i l i t y i n r e s p e c t of errors or omissions contained in articles herein.

First a big thank-you to everyone who wrote an article for this week's • FELIX. Derrick Everett for the review of the IC Wind Ensemble and the IC Symphony Orchestra. Mo and Tansy for a comprehensive report on Ten Tors. Steve Hutchings, Mickie Marsh, Steve Groves and Marie-Therese for their help with the photographs. Roger Stotesbury, who is leaning over my shoulder, for letting me misspel his name on the front page. Tim Hillyer for being a hero ("as usual" - T.H.). Everyone who wrote letters - no matter what side they're on. The book, the Elephant Man was reviewed by Allan on page 9. It is a moving book and I look forward to the film. Cheers to Maz and Ian and anyone else who I have forgotten to mention. I've just realised that Steve Groves will be angry with me for giving Mickie Marsh a credit for his front page picture - sorry Steve. With reference to the Justin Newland article in last week's issue. There was a printing error. Justin did write that Islam means submission to God. Julia Towns has just asked me to write that she needs a Goalkeeper for the Ladies Hockey tour of Holland on Fri 23 May to Mon 26 May. The accomodation is with Dutch people and most expenses are covered. Due to exams it has been difficult to get a complete team together even with the temtation of going to Zandvort ("a place with a fantastic beach " - J.T.) If you have a basic knowledge of hockey and are interested please contact the captain, Julia Towns, in Botany G10. The ICU A G M is next Tuesday in the Union Concert Hall. Let's make it quorate. I hope you really enjoy the Silwood Ball tonight.... I will be asleep but I'm looking forward to it next year. THe review of the year is coming together nicely and there are going to be quite a few fun photos never printed before in the review including the Rugby Club tpuir of Holland! One last thought. This year at IC could be compared with a football match ' where all the goals are scored at the end of the second half - So much is happening. Commiserations to Arsenal. Well done West Ham. Cheers, Colin Palmer FELLX Editor

Purples Awards

Jumble Sale

Dinner-in-Hall

Sportsmen and women who achieve high standards of sport with the University of L o n d o n are awarded purples (the equivalent to our colours) for their labours. Obviously since the University of London competes at very high standards these are very hard to get, but the following sportspeople from IC were awarded them. Full Purples: J C Evans (Rifle Club); Austin Reeve (Rifle Club); H McCulloch (Judo Club); Sue Wilton (Swimming Club); R McLachlan (Swimming Club); Kevin Hillsden ( A s s o c i a t i o n F o o t b a l l ) ; Kathy Snook (Hockey); Mike Weiner (Athletics); E C a m e r o n (Cross C o u n t r y ) ; Steve Kirk ( C r o s s Country); Suki Kalirai (Volleyball). Half Purples: A Piper (Golf) and K Warren, A Parker and C Smith (Orienteering).

The Nursery Jumble Sale held last Friday in the Consort Gallery managed to raise £280. This money will be used to buy toys and equipment for the Day Nursery.

Dinners-in-Hall will be held on the following dates during the summer t er m : T u e s d a y 20th May and Tuesday 17th June. Members of the Senior Common Room wishing to attend are requested to complete the application forms distributed during the spring term and forward them to: Miss V F White, Room 158 Sherfield. Additional forms may be obtained from Miss V F White by telephoning Internal 2225 or from Miss K Dailly on Internal 2231. Students wishing to attend dinner-in-hall should continue to book through the ICSU Office.

RCS

N A T HIST S O C

We are pleased to announce that the R C S Nat Hist Soc is not approaching extinction as promised in RCS Broadsheet. Next year's exec consists mainly of last years officers with the notable additions of Mike Morgan and Mark Hankins as joint Hon Sec. The next meeting is a trip*to Kew G a r d e n s . Meet 12:15 on Wednesday 21st May in Beit Arch. Light refreshments provided in a near by lounge pub. (Members only)

Subwarden Assistant Subwardens Falmouth Hall Applications are invited from male or female students for the post of Subwarden of Falmouth Hall. Rentfree accommodation in the form of a small self-contained flat is provided. The essential duties of the post are to assist the Warden in the day-today running of the Hall. In addition, one or more Aositonr Subwardenships are likely to be available. These posts carry with them rent-free accommodation in the form of a study bedroom in return for duties associated with those of the Subwarden. Successful applicants for any of the above posts will be expected to display conscientious application in their duties and would normally be postgraduates of lively personality and responsible outlook. Further details may be obtained from the Warden, Dr P W Jowitt, Department of Civil Engineering, to whom applications should he -addressed, to arrive no later than Friday 23 May 1980. A single application will suffice for both categories.

FOR

SALE

A u d i o Signal G e n e r a t o r : sine and square wave o/p lhz to lOOkhz, solid state circuitry, £70. Oscilloscope: 5 inch screen, D C to 5mhz vertical bandwidth, solid state circuitry, £70. Kodak Instamatic Camera: with telephot lens, £7.50. Philips 3 head r a z o r , £12. All items very little used and in immaculate condition. Contact Nigel Brown Racks.

via Chem

Eng

Letter

Fujica AZ-1 camera with zoon lens and case (8 mo old) and computer flash (new) and auto winder (2fps) (new) for £180. Seiko L C watch with memory bank calendar for £75. Contact C Lam by note to RSM Letter Rack or ring 262-2081 exn 538 (evenings).

M o t o G u z z i , V50II June 1979, 7,000 miles, lovely bike in good c o n d i t i o n . £ 1 , 0 5 0 . Contact G Wigglesworth, Mech Rcks or 381-3757.

Eng

Letter

L a v e r d a M o n t j u i c , May 1979, 3,000 miles, fast you said it, £1,580. Contact G Wigglesworth, Mech Eng Letter Racks or 381-3757.

H o n d a C B 5 5 0 F 2 , S-Reg, only 8,000 miles, regularly maintained. Crash bars, carrier, TTlOOs, taxed, excellent c o n d i t i o n . £ 7 5 0 o n o . Contact Geoff 373-9940.

Cox,

Elec Eng 3 or

Practica Super T L 3 S L R camera, T T L metering, 50mm f 1.8 pentagon lens. J u s t over one year o l d , with case. A l s o , M i t s u k i 135mm f2.8 telephoto lens to fit. 42mm universal screw fitting. Less than one year old with case, £100 the pair (camera and telephoto case). Will split if required. Contact Geoff Cox,

Bee

Eng 3 or 373-9940.

WANTED Proficient drummer with gear to join band immediately. Send details (name and dept) to A Robinson, Life Sciences 2. Summer room wanted by American student starting June in Chelsea, S Ken, Central L o n d o n area for £20—25 per week. Call Cathy Tao 673-4911/7949/2441.

7


PIPERIAD COLLEGE

301m/999kHz Medium Wave I. C. Radio Top Twenty 12th May 1980 i

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

(1) \ The Cure - A Forest

11 12 13 14

(2) Pete Townshend - Rough Boys (16) Peter Gabriel - No Self Control (13) The Undertones - My Perfect Cousin (9) Squeeze-Pulling mussels from theshell (7) . Boz Scaggs - Breakdown Dead Ahead (3) New Musik - This World of Water (10) Steve Hackett - The Show (-) Steel Pulse - Don't give in (8) Jona Lewie-You'll always find me in the Kitchen at Parties (17) The Chords - Something's Missing (-) Graham Parker - Stupefaction (18) Rodney Franklin - The Groove (-) Genesis - Duchess

15 16 17 18 19 20

(14) (-) (12) (-) (-) (-)

The Ramones - Rock 'n' Roll Radio The Photos - Irene Sham '69 - Tell the Children Delta 5 - You The Only Ones - Fools Phoenix - Juliet

Tha chart la compiled by Sarah Talbotfromtha moat played racordt on I. C. Radio In tha paat two waaka.

Neil Young in Focus Despite considerable acclaim from fellow musicians during his extensive career as singer / song-writer, Neil Young has never really been a formidable figure in the British charts. . On Sunday, Jon Firth looks at the man and his music and explores the influence he has had on today's music. That's Focus on Neil Young on Imperial College Radio, Sunday at 5:00.

Transalpine announce the opening of their new "quicktrip" travel centre at 214 Shaftesbury Avenue. Now you can enjoy the fast, efficient Transalpino service in the heart of London. If you're under 26, Transalpino offer fantastic discounts to over 2,000 European rail connected destinations -immediate booking, no delay! - so get along there now! Transalpino 214 Shaftesbury Avenue London WC2 01-836 0087/8 also at LST Office, Walkway, Sherfield 71-75 Buckingham Palace Road London SW1 0QL 01-834 9656/6283 Kiosk Hudson's Place, At Victoria Station London SW1 Offices in Liverpool, Birmingham. Dublin and all over Europe

TRAVEL O

for the best deal going In association with British Rail and Sealink


m The

True

History

of

the

ELEPHANT M A N by

M

Havell and

T h i s b o o k is c o n c e r n e d with J o s e p h M e r r i c k w h o w a s afflicted b y a p r o g r e s s i v e disfiguring disease k n o w n a s n e u r o f i b r o matosis. M e r r i c k w a s b o r n i n L e i c e s t e r i n 1860 a n d his d i s e a s e b e c a m e a p p a r e n t after t h e age of five y e a r s . A f t e r h i s m o t h e r d i e d his family b r o k e u p a n d h e w a s f o r c e d t o w o r k as a pedlar a n d then cigar-maker, until his disease r e n d e r e d s u c h w o r k i m p o s s i b l e . In m i d - t e e n a g e , h e s p e n t f o u r y e a r s i n a w o r k h o u s e until h e d e c i d e d u p o n a c a r e e r a s a p r o f e s s i o n a l freak. Managed by T o m Norman, Merrick toured England; whilst on show in Whitechapel there came a chance encounter with William Treves, a doctor at a n e a r b y h o s p i t a l , w h o c o n d u c t e d a n » e x a m i n a t i o n a n d gave M e r r i c k h i s c a r d . M e r r i c k then went to E u r o p e , only to be r o b b e d a n d left d e s t i t u t e ; b y a n i n c r e d i b l e effort he m a d e his w a y b a c k t o L o n d o n and to Treves. Treves, by n o w an eminent a n d respected doctor, placed h i m in an isolation w a r d staffed b y v o l u n t e e r n u r s e s , who h a d been prepared for M e r r i c k ' s , b y n o w , g r u e s o m e sight. B y a d v e r t i s e m e n t i n the London Times t h e g o v e r n o r s of t h e L o n d o n H o s p i t a l , at w h i c h M e r r i c k w a s staying, raised enough funds to equip a b a s e m e n t b e d s i t f o r M e r r i c k . T h e r e it became fashionable for the rich a n d famous to visit h i m . H i s deformities, however, were worsening a n d he died i n his sleep d u r i n g A p r i l of 1890. To someone w h o has not read the b o o k , it m a y a p p e a r g r u e s o m e , a n d i n b a d

Peter

Ford

taste; h o w e v e r , there a r e v al i d r e a s o n s w h y it s h o u l d h a v e b e e n w r i t t e n . T h e h y p o c r i s y of t h e V i c t o r i a n s is v e r y evident. S h u n n e d , forced into the squalor of t h e w o r k h o u s e a n d s u b s e q u e n t freaks h o w p e r f o r m a n c e s , M e r r i c k is a n o u t c a s t i n s o c i e t y ; b u t w h e n t h e p a t r o n a g e of M e r r i c k became popular, he was held as a p r i m e e x a m p l e of V i c t o r i a n p h i l a n t h r o p y . M o r e o v e r , t h e c l o s e r e l a t i o n s h i p that d e v e l o p s b e t w e e n T r e v e s a n d M e r r i c k is a h e a r t - w a r m i n g o n e a n d b y t h e e n d of • the b o o k Treves appears almost saintly. M e r r i c k , p e r h a p s s u r p r i s i n g l y , is u n e m b i t t e r e d a b o u t societies t r e a t m e n t d u r i n g h i s e a r l y life a n d , w h e n l i v i n g i n t h e L o n d o n H o s p i t a l is c o n s t a n t l y t h a n k f u l . N e v e r t h e l e s s t h e b o o k , I feel, fails t o t a k e full a d v a n t a g e of its o w n p o t e n t i a l i n t h a t it w o u l d h a v e g o n e m u c h m o r e d e e p l y into t h e s o r d i d w o r l d of t h e freaks h o w . A l s o , i n t h e c e n t r e of t h e b o o k , there a r e s o m e v e r y n a u s e a t i n g p h o t o g r a p h s that p e r h a p s a d d c h e a p j o u r n a l i s t i c sensation. T h e b o o k is a bit p r i c e y for its s i z e , retailing at £6.95 i n t h e K a r n a c B o o k s h o p , a n d c a n easily b e r e a d i n a n a f t e r n o o n . O n e feels t h a t , i n s o m e c h a p t e r s p a r t i c u l a r l y , the b o o k has been padded o u t with irrelevant facts. P e r h a p s it is i n t e r e s t i n g t o n o t e that the p u b l i s h i n g of this b o o k h a s c o i n c i d e d w i t h t h e p r o d u c t i o n of a film a b o u t M e r r i c k with o n e of the s c r e e n s great sufferers, J o h n H u r t in the leading role. Nevertheless the b o o k provides a good read a n d is a worthwhile purchase. Alan

Goulder

IC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conductor R Dickins

14th May

D e s p i t e t h e T U C ' s d a y of i n a c t i o n , a few people ventured into I C to hear the O r c h e s t r a o n W e d n e s d a y night. P e r h a p s w e s h o u l d gloss o v e r t h e B e e t h o v e n F i r s t S y m p h o n y (the first p i e c e a l w a y s s e e m s t o suffer) a n d start w i t h t h e G r i e g p i a n o concerto, i n w h i c h the O r c h e s t r a played really w e l l i n s u p p o r t of R i c h a r d C o k e r , a n RCM g r a d u a t e , w h o gave a flawless p e r f o r m a n c e . A f e w of t h e s t r i n g s w e r e o u t of k e y i n p l a c e s , b u t t h e b r a s s e n t r i e s w e r e impeccable. A f t e r t h e i n t e r v a l t h e first i t e m w a s that w e l l - w o r n f a v o u r i t e of a m a t e u r o r c h e s t r a s , the " F o l k S o n g S u i t e " b y V a u g h a n - W i l l i a m s , w h i c h h as s o m e p r e t t y t u n e s b u t n o t m u c h

Leader D Bogle

else t o r e c o m m e n d it. T h e final offering w a s K o d a l y ' s " H a r y J a n o s " s u i t e , w h i c h begins with an impressive "sneeze". The orchestration of this suite is r a t h e r colourful, with prominent solos for h o r n , t r u m p e t , violin a n d viola at v a r i o u s p o i n t s , a n d i n c l u d e s a p a r t for the c e m b a l o n -1 d o n ' t k n o w if all H u n g a r i a n folk t u n e s s o u n d t h e s a m e t o m e , but the first m o v e m e n t of this is of t h e c o m p o s e r ' s very reminiscent "Summer Evening". Not counting cembalon a n d p i a n o , there w e r e five p e r c u s s i o n i s t s and they were kept busy, especially in the " M u s i c a l C l o c k " p i e c e . T h e last m o v e m e n t really a l l o w e d t h e b r a s s t o " l e t r i p " i n a l o u d a n d e x c i t i n g finale.

Derrick Everett Dear Colin, As you have probably heard, last Saturday saw a very successful "Bol .cks to Ents" Gig in the Union Concert Hall. We would like to take the chance to thank all those who helped us to put the gig together. Firstly, Jazz Club and S C A B for financial support; D R A M S O C and O P S O C for the stage and lighting; A C M E Disc C o . for the music; IC Radio for overall presentation; the

R E V I E W S

badge sellers and equipment movers; the sweepers and moppers who made the hall respectable; Ents (??!!) who lent us their PA/DISCO .... "no hard feelings"; finally, all the bands, who played for next to nothing. By the way, something in the order of £70 was raised for Rag. Cheers, SP3 Pete Hunt, Laurence Herbert, John Romer

A L L IS REVEALED Everyone w h o has been within a quarter of a mile of t h e U n i o n B u i l d i n g o n a n e v e n i n g will k n o w of t h e e x i s t e n c e of t h e J a z z C l u b ' s r e h e a r s a l r o o m (labelled, n o t altogether i n a c c u r a t e l y , t h e n o i s e r o o m ) b u t o n ly t h e f a v o u r e d few h a v e s e e n t h e deeds committed therein. Until Saturday night that w a s . T h e " B o l l o c k s to E n t s " gig in the U n i o n C o n c e r t Hall was a n attempt to showcase some of the bands existing in a n d around College, w h i c h have not appeared before in t h e J a z z C l u b / E n t s r u n of t h i n g s , a n d as s u c h w a s s o m e t h i n g of a n e x p e r i m e n t . I think I a m not alone in considering the experiment successful. First up were the 'Mystery Guests', w h o s e l f - d e p r e c a t o r y m a n n e r s u g g e s t e d at all t i m e s that s o m e t h i n g w a s a b o u t t o g o wrong, a n d a few things d i d , bu t they c a r r i e d off t h e m a i n s t a y of t h e i r r e p e r t o i r e (solid electric blues) v e r y w e l l i n d e e d . T h e Ian R i t c h i e Q u i n t e t f o l l o w e d t o give us s o m e tight m o d e r n j a z z a n d it w a s v e r y p l e a s i n g t o s e e this g o d o w n w e l l a s this is a d o z y h o r s e I, f o r o n e , h a v e b e e n t r y i n g t o flog i n C o l l e g e f o r a w h i l e . A l l the players were e x t r e m e l y c o m p e t e n t a l t h o u g h I felt t h e y d i d n o t really h a v e time t o settle d o w n a n d b l o w . B u t t h e n I'm b i a s e d . M e m b e r s of t h e a u d i e n c e w i t h ' Y ' c h r o m o s o n e s will p a r t i c u l a r l y r e m e m b e r their a n n o u n c e m e n t s . Cliff R e s c u e a n d t h e H e l i c o p t e r s ( w h e r e d o t h e y get these n a m e s ? ) b o u n d e d o n t o stage n e x t a n d p r o c e e d e d t o e x p e n d h u g e a m o u n t s of e n e r g y e n t e r t a i n i n g u s w i t h all the r a b b l e r o u s i n g m a t e r i a l at their disposal, from G a r y Glitter to modified S e x P i s t o l s . A s k a v e r s i o n of Paranoid w a s p a r t i c u l a r l y g r e e t e d for its p e r v e r s i t y . P e r h a p s m u s i c a l c o m m e n t is i n a p p r o p r i a t e t o a g r o u p w h o s e m a i n s t r e n g t h is i n p u r e entertainment, but the backing vocals w e r e s o far off p i t c h t o b e really d e t r i mental. G o o d fun though. T o p p i n g t h e bill w e r e S P w h o h a v e b e e n t r e a d n g t h e t h i m line b e t w e e n t h e 'jazz people' a n d the 'rock people' in C o l l e g e f o r a c o u p l e of y e a r s n o w a n d w h o p l e a s e d s o m e of b o t h o n S a t u r d a y night. T h e y suffered a bit f r o m g o i n g o n s o late — s o m e of t h e a u d i e n c e h a d g o n e to beddy byes o r been t a k e n suddenly drunk — a n d from following the Helic o p t e r s w h o a r e n o t really a n a p p e t i z e r for c o m p l i c a t e d , s o m e t i m e s elusive m u s i c . T h e performance w as slick a n d obviously very well rehearsed, b u t s o u n d e d m u d d y s o m e of t h e time b e c a u s e of t h e l a c k of a well defined lead i n s t r u m e n t . 3

F i n a l l y , I w o u l d like t o give o u r s e l v e s a plug by saying " J o i n the J a z z C l u b a n d instantly become a star" a n d more seriously to thank Pete H u n t a n d L a w r e n c e H e r b e r t of S P w h o d i d a gr e at job in o r g a n i s i n g t h e w h o l e v e n t u r e . E x c e p t this review. D a m n . John "I'll write anything for a fee" Kotre 3

9


JUST A SEC

What's On

AGM O n Tuesday the U n i o n holds it Annual General Meeting. It is somewhat special as Social C o l o u r s , Athletic C o l o u r s and U n i o n General A w a r d s will be presented as well as annual reports. Place: U n i o n C o n c e r t Hall Time: 1:00pm Day: Tuesday O n Thursday I circulated around College the annual reports. However, if you were unable to get one you may pick one up in the office or at the A G M .

FRIDAY 16th M A Y VEGSOC 12:30pm.

A G M i n H u x l e y 6 6 9 at

I C Christian Union Meeting at 7:00pm in 53 P r i n c e s G a t e . W e a r e m e e t i n g t o g o to ' T o L o n d o n W i t h L o v e ' at t h e C h e l s e a O l d T o w n hall. Badge Soc A G M i n t h e G r e e n C o m m i t tee R o o m at 5 : 3 0 p m .

Elections T h e result of the M e t and M a t D e p R E p elections was: J C z e r n u s z k a , 24; A H t u n , 29. T h e r e was only one abstention. T h e election will be ratified at the A G M . T i m N e e d h a m is next year's Geoiogy D e p Rep. Papers have gone up for External Affairs Publicity Officer, and B o o k Buyer. T h e y will come down three days after someone has stood.

S A T U R D A Y 17th M A Y The Garden Hall Club presents the 'Time Warp Disco* at 8 : 0 0 p m i n G a r d e n hall, 11 P r i n c e s G a r d e n s . E n t r a n c e 4 0 p o n the d o o r . F r e e glass of w i n e .

T U E S D A Y 20th M A Y I C C A G A G M i n the I C C A G R o o m (top floor U n i o n B u i l d i n g ) at 5 : 3 0 p m . Blood Doning b e t w e e n 10:00am a n d 12:00, a n d a g a i n b e t w e e n 2 : 0 0 p m a n d 4:00pm i n the U n i o n Dining Hall. S T O I C Transmission Riding Club Meeting b e t w e e n 12:30 a n d 1:30pm i n R o o m 1110 (level 11) E l e c E n g .

W E D N E S D A Y 22nd M A Y Graffitti 'At Home' b e t w e e n 12:30 a n d 1:00pm i n t h e Graffitti W o r k s h o p , s e c o n d floor, U n i o n B u i l d i n g . Blood Doning i n t h e U n i o n D i n i n g H a l l between 9:30am a n d 12:00a n d again, b e t w e e n 2:00 a n d 4 : 0 0 p m .

T H U R S D A Y 22nd M A Y S o c i a l i s t S o c i e t y present Margaret L i n g f r o m I D A F on Zimbabwe and South Africa i n M a t h s 3 4 0 at 1:00pm. S T O I C Transmission at 12:45pm a n d a g a i n at 6 : 0 0 p m . Hot A i r Balloon Club Informal Meeting at 1 2 : 3 0 p m a b o v e S t a n ' s B a r . Ents Film: Confessions of a Driving Instructor i n M e c h E n g 2 2 0 at 6 : 3 0 p m . Entrance 30p.

Bicycle

Last week I pointed out that bikes are not insured by the U n i o n if y o u live in Hall or H o u s e . Since then there have been further reports of bikes stolen, especially from behind Linstead. I gave details of one such policy to students — Cycleguard. Since then Roger Nuttall has p o i n t e d o u t to m e i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m Freewheeling and Daily Cyclist.

IC Christian Union Meeting i n 53 P r i n c e s G a t e at 6 : 3 0 p m . A talk o n ' G o d ' s G r a c e ' will be p r e s e n t e d .

S A T U R D A Y 31st M A Y Guys Hospital Summer Festival w i t h b a r o p e n f r o m 11:00am t o 1 1 : 0 0 p m w i t h d i s c o , b a r b e q u e a n d k n o c k - o u t g a m e s at t h e Honor O a k Sports G r o u n d ( B R from L o n d o n Bridge).

London Cycling Campaign T h i s is the c a p i t a l ' s c y c l i n g a c t i o n g r o u p . Membership is £1.00 per year which provides the quarterly newsletter Daily Cyc/ist,legal and campaigning power and discounts (up to 10%) at many cycle shops. Insurance is arranged through the Salvation A r m y General Insurance Corporation. £5.50 provides theft only coverage for any cycle up to £200 vaue and £250,000 third party cover. F o r details send a 9" by 4 V " sae to: L o n d o n Cycling C a m p a ign T h e C o l o m b o St Centre C o l o m b o Street London SE1 2

The British Cycling Federation National and local cycling authorities received notification of Cycleguard insurance, arranged t h r o u g h t h e N a t i o n a l A s s o c i a t i o n of B r i t i s h C y c l i s t s i n J a n u a r y of this y e a r . F o r £ 9 . 5 0 membership of the Association the applicant receives loss or damage cover for a cycle up to £200 value, third party and personal cover. However, in M a r c h , the Association claimed to have a membership of 6,000 recruited in two months, which seems to be rather far fetched. A l s o nobody from the A B C had moved into Linburn H o u s e , their quoted address. Evidence of registration for the Association. Cycleguard or Cycleguard Managers L t d (the company backing the Association) has not been formed. N o one has yet (in March) received a copy of the master insurance policy and none of the authorities M r Bassett, the chairman of the Association of British Cyclists, claims to have contacted have any record of him.

This is the national racing cyclists' association and it too c a n arrange insurance cover for its members. F o r details: British Cycling Federation 70 Brompton R o a d London S W 3 1EN I have been told of a policy held by Victoria Bicycle C o m p a n y , of 53 Pimlico Road (73068981) which for £5 premium gives y o u £125 w o r t h of p r o p e r t y i n s u r a n c e f o r theft of complete bike a n d £200,000 of public liability. A l s o b i k e i n s u r a n c e c a n be h a d f r o m M a r m o t , Booths a n d Heylin (0625-610161).

F E L I X for W U S T h a n k y o u for donating 5p towards last week's F E L I X . Altogether we raised over £60 for the Third W o r l d Scholarship F u n d .

Next Cycle

FRIDAY 23rd M A Y

Insurance

£300,000 third party insurance; touring information service; cycletouring magazine (bimonthly); r e c o m m e n d e d accommodation a n d c y c l e s h o p s ( s o m e with d i s c o u n t s for members) and local activities throughout the country. T h e C l u b also carries some weight in arguments over British Rail cycle s c h e m e s , cycle tracks, road building schemes, etc and it is respected by the authorities. C y c l e i n s u r a n c e is a r r a n g e d t h r o u g h a Cornhill master policy which covers the cycle against theft or damage and provides personal accident cover. T h e cost for this is approx 6% of the cycle value with a 15% discount if more than one cycle is insured. Cyclists' Touring C l u b Cotterell House 69 Meadrow Godlaming Surrey G U 7 3HS

Insurance

A s a student, separate cycle insurance will be difficult if not impossible to obtain. Cycles c a n be covered by some household policies but be careful — some will only cover the cycle when it is i n s i d e t h e h o u s e ! I n s u r a n c e c a n b e a r r a n g e d t h r o u g h m e m b e r s h i p of c e r t a i n documented and active organisations (compare Cycleguard!).

Cyclists' Touring Club A n n u a l membership is £7.00 (£4.20 for age 20 and under) for which y o u will receive: free legal aid ( w h i c h s e e m s to be m o s t s u c c e s s f u l ) ;

Year's

Committee

B y now most of the A G M s would have been held, so if y o u are a club/society chairman, please hand into Annie the line up of your new committee.

French Kids Next wee'J*, College shall be further discussing whether it is right that we in Southside must tolerate screaming, shouting, running F r e n c h kids o n campus at a time when revision is a priority. If you are in K e o g h , Selkirk, Falmouth or Tizard I a m certain y o u know what I a m referring to. If y o u see me over the weekend do tell me your views.

Roger

Stotesbury

The captain of the IC Boat Club, replies to Mary's article on page 11 I a m sorry to inflict u p o n y o u all yet another article o n the neverending saga of the Boat C l u b a n d S o u t h A f r i c a . It's u n f o r t u n a t e l y r e q u i r e d however to prevent distortions of the truth, of which our M a r y is so fond. Since m y o w n views obtained directly in S o u t h A f r i c a m a y be said to be biased, as is the usual comment, I would like to bring to y o u r n o t i c e the r e p o r t by an i n d e p e n d e n t c o m m i s i o n sen t to investigate activities (interestingly

containing an ex-South African coloured, Basil D'Olivera). It s t a t e d t h a t m a n y s p o r t s including cricket, soccer, athletics and boxing were already F U L L Y integrated, and recommended that national bodies should review the situation in the light of the report. It e m p h a s i s e d that while it c o n d e m n e d apartheid it believed that the position of multi-racial sport in S o u t h Africa was changing all the time. I feel

many

of the p e o p l e in

South Africa (of all colours) feel deeply resentful when they hear d e s c r i p t i o n s o f t h e m s e l v e s as 'token blacks' or 'puppets', these are those actively, and successfully working at changing the whole of society and sport in the Republic. S u c h slanderous writings of those totally incompetent to judge them can only be a sad indictment of the 'politicians' in this country. Lastly, the student crews with which we formed great friendships are from a multi-racial university, of

left-wing views (surely Mary would approve) who are one of the major critics of the present government, a l t h o u g h s u p p o r t i n g the p r e s e n t liberalisation tendencies. Must all people be put in the same basket as their leaders, it so does that make Mary and company pro Maggie a n d Sakarhov supporting Brezhnev for the presidency. C o m e now let's have some consistency please!

Steve Webb Capt I C B C


C R I C K E T

IC 1st XI IC 1st XI vs CHARING CROSS HOSPITAL Imperial College 1st XI did little to restore their dented pride after having lost at the weekend to M a g d a l e n College, Oxford by 127 runs. With a stronger team, Neil Price won the toss, and chose to bat on a wicket that was neither c o n d u c i v e to b at t i ng yet offered little assitance to the bowlers. IC got off to a poor start losing their first wicket with only five minutes on the board, but an excellent partnership between D Everett and J White began to heal the wounds and saw off the best of the bowling until D Everett fell for 23. As often h a p p e n s when a partnership breaks up, J White lost his wicket to a shot he will not want to remember. Although we had now reached 60, time was slipping by and the need for quick runs was apparent. These were superbly supplied by Andy Harris who with Guy Simpkin put on the biggest partnership of the innings of 60 runs, 42 of which were hit by Andy in 20 minutes, including 6 fours. With tea imminent and with the need for more runs, wickets fell quickly with a valuable contribution of 20 from Sam Seneviratne. The declaration made at tea at 139-7 proved to be over g e n e r o u s and a l t h o u g h P r a s a n a D'Silva took 3 for 31 and the bowling was of a high standard only 3 an over was needed. This soon increased to 5 due to tight bowling from M Ellacott and R Fefield and with very g o o d catches being taken. With only seven overs left, 23 was hit off the first over and they had little trouble getting the rest. It was a much improved performance and IC should do well in the Cup on Sunday. Guy

Simpkin

NOT CRICKET A N T I - A P A R T H E ID

GROUP

A n Imperial C o l l e g e B o a t C l u b t e a m h a s r e t u r n e d f r o m a t o u r of S o u t h A f r i c a . It has n o w b e e n d i s c o v e r e d that they h a v e offered to l e n d a S o u t h A f r i c a n t e a m their b o a t i n o r d e r to r o w i n t h e H e n l e y r e g a t t a this s u m m e r . T h i s w o u l d be u s i n g I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e U n i o n facilities to e n c o u r a g e s p o r t i n g links w i t h S o u t h A f r i c a . The U n i o n has the right to c o n t r o l these facilities. T h e A n t i - A p a r t h e i d G r o u p calls o n all o p p o s e d t o a p a r t h e i d t o c o m e a l o n g t o t h e A n n u a l G e n e r a l M e e t i n g of I C U o n T u e s d a y 20th M a y at 1:00pm i n the U n i o n C o n c e r t H a l l a n d o p p o s e this m i s u s e of o u r facilities.

IC 1st XI vs Kingston Poly 1st XI

IC 2nd XI vs HOUNSLOW

Having arrived at Harlington more than an hour too early, Price withdrew his team to a local hostelry to discuss the a f t e r n o o n ' s t a c t i c s . S u i t a b l y refreshed, and i n s p i r e d by talk of actually a winning a game, IC won the toss and elected to bat. The openers, White and Slator, were cruising to a large total when Slator was caught with the score at 40. This brought Simpkin to the wicket. He faced one ball and returned whence he came. Kenrick then spent twenty minutes avoiding scoring a run, and was then given out. M e a n w h i l e , White was s c o r i n g steadily. Seneviratne joined White and was soon tearing the bowling apart, before White was unfortunately run out for 67. Seneviratne continued his stylish play with Salter hacking at the bowling at the other e n d . Despite being dropped three times, Salter was out for 13. This left Price to come in, score a run and then declare at 157 for 5 with Seneviratne 60 not out. Ellacott, i n c e n s e d by not being allowed to bat, opened the bowling with his medium pace mediocrity. He managed to take two wickets for eleven runs before being taken off by Price and led away to the outfield. At the other end, Silva, who was not bowling at his best, was replaced by the dynamic Seneviratne who took one wicket. Price toiled without success at the other end. Ratnam was brought into the attack, but not even his naked pace and nasty glares could capture a wicket. This was left to Simpkin, who, bowling his gentle daisycutters, forced the omnipresent Seneviratne to take two fine catches. Alas, time was not on our side and at the close of play Kingston Polytechnic were 121 for 5, even though the groin-stained Slator was brought into the attack for the last few overs. Result: a draw.

IC won the toss and elected to bat. This decision looked dubious as the first three wickets fell for 17 runs; however, Nick Croft was in fine form and held the innings together with a fine 53, including six fours and a six. Redmond (15) and Salter (11) s u p ported Craft and IC were 122 for 8 at tea. C o n f i d e n t of v i c t o r y , S a l t e r d e c l a r e d at this s c o r e . T h i s left Hounslow to get 123 runs off 40 overs. Hounslow were 25 when their first wicket fell. A fine throw from Magness on the cover-point boundary caught a batsman out of his ground. Redmond was brought on to replace Sen and took a wicket with his s e c o n d ball. Bowling his assorted legcutters and d o n k e y d r o p p e r s , R e d m o n d took another two wickets. Meanwhile, the pace of the man-of-the-match Croft captured two wickets. With twenty overs to go, Hounslow required only 55 runs for victory and then 30 off the last ten overs. However, fine bowling by Croft and Ellis allowed Hounslow only two runs off the last ten overs — a remarkable feat. At the close of play, Hounslow were 95 for 8 and this most enjoyable match ended in a draw. As a footnote, I should like to add that the IC team set a record by staying in the bar at Harlington longer than the opposition!

Vadid

Ratios

The views expressed in this article are not necessarily those of the Editor of FELIX

S o u t h A f r i c a is a racist state. In r e c e n t years s o m e cosmetic changes have been made inside the country. Occasionally b l a c k s play i n w h i t e t e a m s a n d v i c e v e r s a a n d t h e r e is also s o m e s p o r t i n g f i x t u r e s b e t w e e n t h e four m a i n r a c i a l g r o u p s . T h i s d o e s n o t c h a n g e t h e essentially racist w a y s p o r t is o r g a n i s e d n o r c a n n o t i n a n y w a y b e g i n to c h a n g e t h e vast i m b a l a n c e i n facilities w h e r e b y t h e largest r a c i a l g r o u p r e c e i v e s t h e m o s t i n a d e q u a t e facilities. T h e S o u t h A f r i c a n t e a m at H e n l e y will be w h i t e . If w e a l l o w I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e t o s e e m to s u p p o r t the p r e s e n c e of this t e a m it will be s e e n as a slap i n t h e face for t h e v a s t m a j o r i t y of S o u t h A f r i c a n p e o p l e a n d as a s h o w of s u p p o r t for t h e racist r e g i m e . T h e A n t i - A p a r t h e i d G r o u p at i m p e r i a l C o l l e g e w i l l c o n t i n u e t o

Idvad

Ratios

UL ATHLETICS The UL Championships and the trial for the team to compete in the BUSF Championships have been combined into one event, which will be held at Motspur Park on Wednesday 21st May at 3:00pm. It is probably that many of the athletes selected for the B U S F Championships (which take place in Nottingham on the 7th and 8th of July) will be from Imperial. Would all track or field athletes, male or female, who wish to take part in the trial please sign either of the n o t i c e s w h i c h have been p l a c e d outside the Multi-gym in the Sports Centre or in the Cross-Country noticeboard in the Union or contact Evan Cameron, Physics PG or Roy Rosser, Physics PG, Internal 4181. a d v e r t i s e t h e activities of o u r B o a t C l u b and call o n other student unions to c u t off c o n t r a c t s w i t h t h e m . W e h o p e that t h e s h a m e o n t h e n a m e of I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e c a n b e l e s s e n e d b y a s t r o n g s t a n d against s p o r t i n g l i n k s c o m i n g out of t h e A G M . Mary Attenborough on

behalf

of

the

Anti-Apartheid

Group

11


CRICKET IC1st XI vs CHURCHILL COLLEGE 1st XI The IC team were forced to make an early start in order to arrive at Churchill in time for an 11:30 start. The early start was a bit much for many with Crowe, in particular, showing very few signs of conciousness all day. Skipper Price won the toss which was the only good t h i n g he did all d a y . IC batted first. Everett (17) and White (53) got IC off to a . good start on a good wicket T h i s start to the i n n i n g s might not have been so good if the opposition had held on to one of the many c h a n c e s the o p e n i n g pair offered. Stantiford scored twenty lucky runs but was put to shame by Simpkins who has perfected the art of scoring runs off the edge. Simpkins and Turner saw IC through to lunch. T u r n e r ' s lunch weighed heavily on his stomach and he s o o n departed for six runs. Simpkins' run of luck continued until he reached 53 when he lobbed a simple c a t c h to square leg. Fortunately Morton had arrived

on the scene and he showed his true class rushing to a quick 50. Morton's modesty showed through when he declined the opportunity of being outright top s c o r e r and threw his cricket away on 53 runs. T h e tail e n d e r s led by Price never looked capable of scoring runs, but Price was able to declare on the respectable total of 230 for 9. Ellacott and Crowe were given the new ball. Neither seemed to know how to use it, but Ellacott picked up one wicket. Slator was quickly brought into the attack and it is safe to say his bowling has not improved since last year. He bowled his usual full tosses and long-hops but sneaked a wicket before tea. After tea Slator continued with the same rubbish but actually took two wickets with consecutive balls. He then avoided a jug by not going for a catch off his own bowling on the hat-trick ball. Eventually Churchill started to hit Slator all around the ground and he was wisely r e m o v e d from the attack with figures of 3 for 34. This left Crowe (3 for 19) and Silva (1 for 16) to clean

up the rabbits. Both bowlers are flattered by their figures. With a run-out at the end, Churchill were dismissed for 106, giving IC a convincing win by 124 runs. The first victory of the season was celebrated in suitable fashion. Rock Mlnton

TABLE TENNIS 1979/80 Final Report IC 1st T e a m win Central London Trophy! Division 4 IC1 (P)20, (W)18,(L)256pts. Players Average: P Rutherford, 75%; K Lakhani (Capt), 74%; G Hong, 67%. IC 2nds Position in Div 4: 7th. Their players averaged: A Tye (Capt), 63%; J Blount, 69%; R Edde, 50%; P Walker, 48%, G Etheredge, 43%. IC 3rds Lose Div 6 Sectional Play-off by 5—4: still promoted to Division 5 as they won secion 6B. Their players averaged: J Stean, 94.4%; I Reed, 88.9%; H T Man, 85.2%; A Cowling, 80.6%.

IC 4ths finished third in 6A, just missing promotion by one p l a c e . T h e i r p l a y e r s averaged: L Josefsson, 84%; M Ho, 75%; P Wilson, 59%; P Hewkin (Capt), 54%. Also played for IC during 1979/80: F S o b h a n p a n a h , E Ugoala, M Lambert, S Wong, K Ansah, D Biddle, J M F a l c o n e , D Sutcliffe, K Nair and Kumar Singarajah. T h e final event of the table tennis season at Imperial was the playing, last week, of the C l o s e d Men's and Ladies' Singles Championships. In the ladies final, Eva Lan defeated Karen Bond while the Men's final saw second team captain Andy Tye lose a very fine match against the University of London team player Richard Fifield. The Club officials thank all the team players and generally you 140 club members who have all made the Club the success it now is. G o o d luck next year to Andy T, Phil, Andy C and Chili (my successor), I hope I am still playing next year. . . . . somewhere; Bye from Superhewk, Incredible Hewk, Hewkules, Cool Hand Hewk and other more o b s c e n e pseudonyms. CROSS C O U N T R Y

For the third consecutive year the Cross-Country Club went on tour to the Batavierenrace in Holland. As last year we teamed-up with St Mary's College, Twickenham, added a few past masters of more mature years to drive the minibuses, and the Impalas were reborn. At 5:00am on Thursday 24th April the team assembled outside the Union and the minibuses headed for Dover to take the 8:30am ferry to Zeebrugge. T h e r e f o l l o w e d the drive a c r o s s Belgium a n d Holland to reach Nijmegen. The yellow minibuses went all the way at a stately 40mph with the blue van in hot pursuit. Nijmegen was reached at 7:30pm and we were too late for our first Dutch Mooney. Not all was lost and we persuaded the race organisers to pay for a trip to a local hamburger joint, complete with Knickerbocker Glory. We also met our hostess, Ellen Brahens who had looked after us so well last year. The race itself is a twenty-five stage relay starting at midnight on Friday in Nijmegen, passing into Germany and finishing at 5:00pm on Saturday in the grounds of the polytechnic at Enschede. Six of the stages are for ladies and there are two restarts during the race in

order to keep the field together. Of the one hundred and fifty teams competing, f o u r t e e n were f o r e i g n , i n c l u d i n g Surrey, the only other British team, Germans, Swedes and for the first time a Polish team (who seemed to be subject to a no fraternising edict). Last year the Impalas were seventh a n d d e s p i t e b e i n g short of three runners were looking to do well again and were, as ever, intent on thrashing Surrey. On the first two stages Dawn and Alan got the team off to a fine start and by the end of the third stage we had taken the lead four minutes ahead of their nearest rivals Surrey, despite the appalling weather c o n ditions. T h r o u g h o u t the night this advantage was extended until the tenth stage when Delft, the eventual winners, took the lead, but third team Surrey were over eight minutes down. During the morning stages, Delft went further ahead and Surrey made a little ground until after eighteen stages they were only three minutes adrift. The shortage of runners meant that three of the team had to race for a second time during the afternoon. Despite this we opened up our lead over Surrey again and although Delft were by now uncatchable the Impalas held s e c o n d place with some fine

running and a brave Surrey made it a British double by finishing third. The whole team ran superbly with* most people finishing in the top ten on their stage. A s p e c i a l mention for Louise Barnes who became the first Impala to win a stage outright, and came back to record a very fast third place on stage 22. Martin O'Halloran came second on the longest stage and bounced back to run well on the final leg, and Bryan Acford, who despite having no sleep ran twice, recorded the s e c o n d fastest time on both occasions. Following the race there was a massive party in the unusally designed union building which seemed to go pretty well; however, the writer's recollections are somewhat blurred on this point. For the return journey on Sunday the yellow minibus was once again in less than perfect health and cruised up the hills on the M2 in first gear. We finally reached London at 2:30am on Monday. Still when twenty-two bodies fell onto the pavement outside the Union, all were of one mind. The Impalas will be back next year and aiming to go one place better! L

Hayler


http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1980/1980_0553_A  

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1980/1980_0553_A.pdf

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you