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THE NEWSPAPER OF IMPERIAL C O L L E G E UNION

Friday, December 7th,

1979

Issue No.

537

£1 million CUT IN BUDGET FELIX arranged a special interview last Tuesday with John Smith, the College Secretary, to discuss how the cuts will affect Imperial. O n e percent of IC's budget (£300,000) will have to be saved this year a n d next year cuts in the order of £1 m i l l i o n are e x p e c t e d . At the e n d of the next four years the budget of £30 m i l l i o n may d r o p to £27 million. R u m o u r s that major departments will be a x e d were d i s m i s s e d by M r S m i t h as he e x p l a i n e d that the C o l l e g e has not taken any specific m e a s u r e s to freeze posts: " W h e n it is k n o w n that a post is g o i n g to b e c o m e vacant, the C o l l e g e will look very carefully at that particular area". T h e H i s t o r y of S c i e n c e department, for e x a m p l e , has three a c a d e m i c s . T w o are retiring a n d C o l l e g e is c o n s i d e r i n g h o w best to o r g a n i s e the department in the future. T h e aim is to s t r e a m l i n e t h e t r a i n i ng offered at IC by m e r g i n g c o u r s e s that are d u p l i c a t e d in more than o n e department. However, there will be m a n y talks a n d d i s c u s s i o n s a n d advice will b e t a k e n from o u t s i d e before c h a n g e s are made.

DUPLICATION A C o l l e g e w o r k i n g party is c o n s i d e r i n g the advantages of m e r g i n g the two depart ment s of B o t a n y a n d Z o o l o g y . T h e c h a i r s of both have b e c o m e vacant. Ideally, the merge, if it were to take place, w o u l d be f o l l o w e d by the c o n s t r u c t i o n of a new b u i l d i n g for the c o m b i n e d depart ment s of Life S c i e n c e s . However, there is no m o n e y for s u c h b u i l d i n g projects. In the e x a m p l e of Life S c i e n c e s , the first objective is not to save money, but the priority is to c o m e to a d e c i s i o n that m a k e s g o o d a c a d e m i c sense. O f c o u r s e , it is e x p e c t e d that m o n e y will be saved as a result. T h e e l i m i n a t i o n of d u p l i c a t i o n is the main theme of C o l l e g e ' s plans for m a i n t a i n i n g a c a d e m i c e x c e l l e n c e within the cuts that are being made to the a n n u a l budget.

T h e R e c t o r has. s a i d that in order to strengthen the m a n a g e m e n t structure of C o l l e g e s o that it c a n c o p e with different financial ties it must not allow the traditions of the past to i m p e d e g o o d m a n a g e m e n t in the future. W h e n F E L I X a s k e d for details of how the cuts w o u l d effect the R o y a l S c h o o l of M i n e s , M r S m i t h s a i d that if s i m i l a r activities were seen to be t a k i n g pl ace in both C i t y a n d G u i l d s a n d the R o y a l S c h o o l of M i n e s , then C o l l e g e w o u l d ask 'do we need both activities?': " O n e s h o u l d not diversify effort w h e n w c don't need to s p r e a d s c a r c e r e s o u r c e s over a wider area." M r S m i t h went on to d i s c u s s the departments where c o u r s e s are s i m i l a r a n d m e n t i o n e d that s o m e c o u r s e s in M i n e s a n d A e r o n a u t i c s were c l o s e to those offered by M e c h E n g .

30th ANNIVERSARY

ISSUE M r S m i t h o b s e r v e d that it is very difficult to effect c h a n g e but relatively easy to start new things. At first it may be hard to pull people together w h o haven't been w o r k i n g with e a c h other.

In order to save m o n e y c h a n g e s will o c c u r in all a s p e c t s of C o l l e g e life. T h e R e c t o r has a s k e d halls to r e d u c e c l e a n i n g c o s t s by twenty percent. C o l l e g e w i n d o w s will be c l e a n e d twice a year instead of four times in a bid to save £7,000. Water is metered at IC and they are putting in a s y s t e m to save water.

WATER Urinals will stop f l u s h i n g at a set time, say 10:00pm, a l t h o u g h o n s p e c i a l nights they will have to be left o n for a l o n g e r p e r i o d . T h o u g h t is being given to r e a r r a n g i n g the C h r i s t m a s term to give a l o n g e r hol i day, in order to save m o n e y o n heating. W h e n F E L I X a s k e d the C o l l e g e S e c r e t a r y how the cuts will effect IC U n i o n , he r e p l i e d : " T h e U n i o n will not be a s k e d to bear cuts, but they might not receive as m u c h m o n e y as they will need to cover i n c r e a s i n g posts." Referring to the R e c t o r ' s C o m m e m o r a t i o n Day address, M r S m i t h s a i d : ' " I f the cuts destroy what is g o o d at IC t h e r <\ is better that IC s h o u l d go." However, he e x p e c t e d that there was no d a n g e r of Imperial being c l o s e d a n d that implies that its e x c e l l e n c e will survive. Imperial C o l l e g e is thought very highly of and there are eight a p p l i c a n t s for every pl ace at the C o l l e g e .

PUBLIC IMAGE In general, M r S m i t h c o m m e n t e d : " I C ' students are p r o b a b l y fairly s t a i d a n d respectable. T h e r e are o c c a s i o n a l lapses in g o o d taste. P e o p l e were very c o n c e r n e d with this year's Rag M a g . T h e mag c a m e at a politically bad time for Imperial. W e must be cautious of o u r image a n d not get c o m p l a c e n t . Imperial has its s t r e n g t h s a n d w e a k n e s s e s and we must b u i l d o n o u r I strengths."


Dear FELIX Lately I have been very concerned about your letter diet. In fact I think that you, dear pussycat must be pretty sick of eating the same old thing all the time. You had enough of it last year and so far this term it seems to have become your staple diet. But of course, you can only eat what is given you, so let me direct my nutritional complaint to your feeders: For God's sake, will you stop imposing your own views on abortion on other people by giving poor old kitty-cat FELIX here a massive excess of abortion letters. I'm sure that on a subject as sensitive as this one people can make up their own minds and don't have to be told what sort of feeling the should have about abortion. So all you potential abortion letter writers out there, please, please, no more food for FELIX that comes in a big slop. Let's have something firm and meaty because I'm sure that eight out of ten IC students prefer it. From a bored cat, Oliver Kleyn Chem Eng 3

Dear C o l i n T o c h a n g e t h e subject, I'd n o w like to m e n t i o n t h e R a g M a g . In a d d i t i o n t o I C R a g M a g , I've a l s o h a d the p l e a s u r e o f r e a d i n g m a g s from O x f o r d a n d S u r r e y . T h e c o m p a r i s o n w a s very s t r i k i n g i n three w a y s ; 1. J o k e c o n t e n t 2. P a p e r q u a l i t y 3. A d v e r t i s i n g T h e first point h a s been fairly amply discussed. T h e second point h a s been m e n t i o n e d i n d e f e n c e of o u r m a g , but I can't s e e w h y w e s h o u l d b e g l a d that our m a g h a s w a s t e d m o r e trees t h a n m a g s of other universities. T h e t h i rd point has, I believe not been m e n t i o n e d . If m y m e m o r y is correct, t h e n the m a i n d e f e n c e for continued sales of the m a g w a s that it w o u l d m a k e m o n e y for t h e R a g A p p e a l , w h i c h is o b v i o u s l y d e s i r a b l e . S o w e w i s h t h e m a g to raise as m u c h m o n e y a s p o s s i b l e for chairty, but this m a k e s m y observations appear a trifle strange. RAG MAG IC Oxford Surrey â&#x20AC;˘

N U M B E R O F SIDES 42 34 50

From this comparison, one may see that purchasers of the IC Rag Mag are getting good value for money, but not IC Rag. Why is there so little advertising in IC Rag Mag? Is it because of lack of effort on behalf of the Rag Committee, is it that people who might advertise are put off by the supposed bad name of IC Rag Mag or is it just not possible to get advertising in London? If the problem is the first then the solution is simple, if it is the second then the solution is more tricky. It brings us right back to the old argument about the quality of the jokes, but lends considerably more weight to the clean-up-the-mag campaigners, after all it would be indefensible to reduce the amount of money raised by the mag, just to satisfy a desire for distasteful jokes. I'm not preaching conformity nor morals, I'm just interested in the Rag Mag raising the maximum amount of money for Rag. Yours sincerely Hodgson NUMBER ADVERTS 2 18 27

OF

SIDES

OF

O u r story begins back o n S u n d a y 9 M a y 1976. J e z e b e l , after t a k i n g part in the F E L I X T r e a s u r e Hunt, set off with h e r crew d o w n the K i n g s R o a d to view a 1912 D e n n i s Fire E n g i n e . W h i l e gently decellerating, a bang a n d clatter is heard from u n d e r t h e bonnet. O n lifting the cover, the worst is f o u n d . A c o n - r o d is b r o k e n a n d the c r a n k c a s e is c r a c k e d . T h e R o y a l C o l l e g e of S c i e n c e U n i o n M o t o r C l u b are grateful to: M r J o n D e n n i s of D e n n i s M o t o r s , G u i l d f o r d for a new, u n u s e d c o n - r o d a n d c o p i e s of their s u r v i v i n g general e n g i n e d r a w i n g s : D a v i d E v a n s L t d (Barimar) for trying to w e l d u p the c r a n k c a s e a n d s u m p (even t h o u g h they m a d e a m e s s of it); S i r H u g h F o r d , then H e a d of the M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g D e p a r t m e n t ( n o w P r o - R e c t o r ) , a n d the R e c t o r (now) L o r d F l o w e r s for a g r e e i n g that the m a c h i n i n g c o u l d be c a r r i e d out in the M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g D e p a r t m e n t ' s w o r k s h o p ; the M e t a l l u r g y a n d Materials S c i e n c e D e p a r t m e n t for d e t e r m i n i n g , a s f o u n d , that t h e a l u m i n i u m alloy of the c r a n k c a s e a n d s u m p were u n w e l d a b l e . T h e pattern makers, W H S h e p p a r d a n d C o . , w h o a r e b a s e d j u s t a f e w h u n d r e d y a r d s from the site of the d e m i s e of the e n g i n e ; M r Terry S h e p p a r d of Met a n d M a t S c i Dept for putting us in t o u c h with A l c a n L a b o r a t o r i e s , B a n b u r y , w h o agreed t o cast the new c r a n k c a s e a n d s u m p ; M r B r i a n Gillett a n d M r Keith Latimer of A l c a n L a b o r a t o r i e s for p r o d u c i n g excellent one-off c a s t i n g s of the c o m p l i c a t e d c r a n k c a s e a n d s u m p ; t h e M e c h E n g Dept; S i r H u g h F o r d ; M r Peter M o o r e ; D r H i l l ; the present H e a d of Dept, Prof S A V S w a n s o n ; t h e M e c h E n g M a i n W o r k s h o p for c o o r d i n a t i n g the m a c h i n i n g of the c a s t i n g s (even t h o u g h they didn't k n o w quite what to expect); T h o m p s o n E n g i n e e r i n g for remetalling the main bearings a n d c h e c k i n g the crankshaft. P a r t i c u l a r t h a n k s must g o to K e n B a r h a m in the w o r k s h o p for c a r r y i n g out the d e m a n d i n g task of p r e p a r i n g d r a w i n g s a n d d i m e n s i o n s from the o l d d a m a g e d c o m p o n e n t s a n d p r o d u c i n g new parts to fit the e x i s t i n g u n d a m a g e d parts of the engine. T h e expertise of his w o r k m a n s h i p is d e m o n s t r a t e d by t h e r u n n i n g of the c o m p l e t e unit. D u r i n g the three a n d a half years spent m o v i n g the parts of the e n g i n e from o n e expert to t h e next a n d a move from o n e g a r a g e ( d e m o l i s h e d just after m o v i n g out) to a n e w o n e six m o n t h s later; the p u m p has been c o n n e c t e d up, a n d , with the e n g i n e r u n n i n g , is f o u n d to work. T h a n k s to: t h e M e r s e y s i d e M e t r o p o l i t a n Fire B r i g a d e for the p u m p ; M r J o h n D e n n i s for s p a r e s for t h e p u m p ; C W V a s s , A m p t h i l l for p u m p e q u i p m e n t a n d M r L a s h b r o o k , P a x m a n D i e s e l s a p p r e n t i c e s for bearings for t h e t r a n s m i s s i o n . T h a n k s a l s o to a l l t h o s e w h o offered helpful s u g g e s t i o n s a n d other work t o w a r d s getting J e z r u n n i n g . A n d finally, t h a n k s to t h e R o y a l C o l l e g e of S c i e n c e U n i o n , Imperial C o l l e g e U n i o n , the R o y a l C o l l e g e of S c i e n c e D e p a r t m e n t s for f i n a n c i a l assistance. R C S U Motor Club


A n Energy Future for B r i t a i n ? M e c h E n g 220 was p a c k e d to c a p a c i t y on T h u r s d a y for the penultimate d i s c u s s i o n to be held in E n v i r o n m e n t a l Week. C h a i r e d by our Rector, L o r d Flowers (who is also C h a i r m a n of the S t a n d i n g C o m m i s s i o n on Energy a n d the Environment) the speakers were Nigel F o r m a n (Conservative M P and author of Another Britain), D r D a v i d O w e n (Labour party s p o k e s m a n on energy), L o r d T a n l o w (Liberal s p o k e s m a n in the H o u s e of L o r d s on energy) a n d M i c h a e l R o b s o n (member of the S c i e n c e P o l i c y R e s e a r c h Unit at S u s s e x University). S i r Derek E z r a was unfortunately unable to attend as he was ' " d i s c u s s i n g with the u n i o n s " . L o r d Flowers gave a brief i n t r o d u c t i o n stating the need to formulate a p o l i c y w h i c h industrial achieves a b a l a n c e between c o n s u m p t i o n a n d growth and c o n s e r v a t i o n . T h r o u g h o u t the d i s c u s s i o n it b e c a m e clear that Britain's future energy s o u r c e s are ' C o C o Nuke', C o n s e r v a t i o n , C o a l a n d N u c l e a r power. M r F o r m a n e m p h a s i s e d that our usage of fueld, e s p e c i a l l y nuclear, implies a 'Trade-off between generations'. The unfortunate difficulty being the difference between the 'life' s p a n of a politician a n d time taken for energy research into alternative s o u r c e s to oil a n d gas. Before we go ahead with n u c l e a r power Dr O w e n believes we s h o u l d have a full p u b l i c enquiry and debate, t h o u g h , after the speeches, a c o m m e n t was made that not even the experts c a n agree on the advantages a n d dangers of the various, if not all, types of r e a c t o r s . H e a l s o believes that c o a l p r o d u c t i o n s h o u l d be i n c r e a s e d a n d research s h o u l d be carried out into the various uses of c o a l a n d other s o u r c e s of energy a n d methods of energy c o n s e r v a t i o n . L o r d T a n l o w put forward the merits of s m a l l urban c o a l fired power stations with district heating s y s t e m s and also the electrification of railways as a useful way of d e c r e a s i n g oil c o n s u m p t i o n , s i n c e eventually cars will b e c o m e too e x p e n s i v e too r u n . M i c h a e l R o b s o n l o o k e d at m o r e s p e c i f i c difficulties in each of the fuel uses. He pointed out that nuclear plants suffer from t e c h n o l o g i c a l faults w h i c h c a u s e delays a n d i n c r e a s e d e x p e n d i t u r e w h i c h c a n ruin any government's forecast, a n d that is also foolish to go ahead with the development of three different types of reactor (PWR, A G R

Rag Queen,Viv Brown

E N V I R O N M E N T A L W E E K

Photo by Colin Pair

Dr.David Owen,Nigel Forman M.P.and The Lord Flowers. a n d Fast Breeder) at the s a m e time. There i s a n e e d for s l o w adjustment w h i c h gives the p o w e r . p l a n t industry steady work over a larger n u m b e r of years. T h e difficulty with c o a l is that it is dirty a n d firms u s i n g gas a n d oil are unlikely to return to c o a l , t h o u g h o b v i o u s l y industries (such as pottery a n d smelting) c a n n o t anyway. M a n y interesting points were raised in the brief time that was left for q u e s t i o n s s u c h as about the wastage of three quarters of the c o a l u s e d in power stations d u e to insufficient c o n v e r s i o n a n d , w h e n a s k e d about the need for Fast B r e e d e r R e a c t o r s , D r O w e n replied that the d a n g e r s of b o m b s being made from the p l u t o n i u m have been o v e r e m p h a s i s e d a n d that there is definitely a need for a p u b l i c e n q u i r y s i n c e " p o l i t i c i a n s c a n n o t make these d e c i s i o n s " . T h e y need help from t e c h n i c i a n s . Mary Freeman

Photo by Colin Palmer

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tonight's Pyjama Party


T O U C H S T O N E REPORT 24 — 25 NOVEMBER D o y o u listen to S c h o e n b e r g o r read Ezra P o u n d ? D o y o u know who they are? Perhaps y o u s h o u l d know about T o u c h s t o n e Weekends. T h e s e are informal d i s c u s s i o n weekends organised by A s s o c i a t e d Studies and are open to all members of IC. For the incredibly l o w cost of £2.00 to y o u the student, you are offered a c o a c h journey to S i l w o o d Park, just outside Ascot, overnight a c c o m m o d a t i o n in the country house w h i c h serves as a field-station for IC, great food, and a c h a n c e to express your o p i n i o n s and take part in a g o o d d i s c u s s i o n . If y o u have s o m e t h i n g to say, people will listen. T h e subject under d i s c u s s i o n varies from weekend to weekend, but is d e s i g n e d to be interesting, stimulating a n d at least mildly controversial. If y o u ' d c o m e o n t h e first weekend y o u w o u l d have been p u z z l i n g over The Control Of Personality. Modern Music And Literature - Conspiracy Or Lunacy was the title for this weekend, a n d if sparks

weren't actually flying, it certainly set e v e r y b o d y s m i n d racing. A r e these arts w o r k e d out? A r e they s o difficult a n d unrewarding? Where do s c i e n c e and society fit i n ? T h e speaker for the weekend, Dr R o w l a n d Cotterill from t h e University of Warwick gave an a b s o r b i n g review of music and literature this century with examples from Stravinsky, G K C h e s t e r t o n , Berg and others a n d offered a set of c h a l l e n g i n g questions for the assembled g r o u p to resolve. It's all so different from S o u t h K e n s i n g t o n ; on S u n d a y morning, y o u c a n explore the g r o u n d s of S i l w o o d or make your way to W i n d s o r Great Park; the fresh air is a p a n a c e a for all ills. A s s o c i a t e d Studies really d o deserve thanks for filling the gaps that o c c u r in a college devoted to s c i e n c e a n d t e c h n o l o g y and for providing a thoroughly enjoyable weekend. Lars Warnberg-Moller

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Acareerin Computers? We need good Honours G r a d u a t e s in E l e c t r o n i c s , P h y s i c s , C o m p u t i n g Science and M e c h a n i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g disciplines. If you m a t c h up to our high standards, you could find yourself involved in the development of a sophisticated new range of D a t a P r o c e s s i n g E q u i p m e n t . If you see yourself in:

ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING responsible for D i g i t a l D e s i g n of advanced c o m p u t i n g systems using L S I technology, A n a l o g c i r c u i t design, P o w e r systems, Test equipment and design, component evaluation or p a c k a g i n g concept.

or S Y S T E M S E N G I N E E R I N G concerned with C o m p u t e r A r c h i t e c t u r e definition, M i c r o p r o c e s s o r techniques, P e r i p h e r a l controller design, C P U design, D a t a C o m m u n i c a t i o n s , M i c r o p r o g r a m m i n g and diagnostic systems.

or M E C H A N I C A L E N G I N E E R I N G where you would find yourself involved in the design of sophisticated s m a l l m e c h a n i s m s , P l a s t i c s technology and m e c h a n i c a l p a c k a g i n g of electronic components. P l a s t i c technology and cabinetry design for the p a c k a g i n g of electronic components.

or S O F T W A R E P R O G R A M M I N G involved in M i c r o p r o g r a m m i n g D a t a C o m m u n i c a t i o n s , O p e r a t i n g Systems, C o m p i l e r s , Languag e Design and Specifications user Interfaces, Interpreters, and Interactive Diagnostics. If it's a first-class c a r e e r you're after then m a k e sure you meet us wherruze-vistt

IMPERIAL C O L L E G E , LONDON 24th January, 1980 or find out m o r e by contacting your c a r e e r office. The B u r r o u g h s G r a d u a t e policy is one of direct involvement â&#x20AC;&#x201D; our y e a r l y intake usually m a k e s a substantial contribution to our Development P r o g r a m s w i t h i n 3 months. Opportunities for further education, both w i t h i n and outwith the C o m p a n y s own schemes are looked on favourably. A t t r a c t i v e salaries are offered and conditions of employment are c o m m e n s u r a t e with those of a large international organisation.

5


O B S C U R E

E N G L I S H

or why say it in a few w o r d s w h e n y o u can use two t h o u s a n d O n c e u p o n a time there was a y o u n g child w h o wrote things like "the cat sat on the mat", but s o c i e t y s o o n put a stop to that. After many years of expensive e d u c a t i o n (probably i n c l u d i n g an O x b r i d g e degree) he started to write things like this: "Mixed hereditament means a hereditament w h i c h is not a d w e l l i n g house but in the c a s e of w h i c h the p r o p o r t i o n of the r a t e a b l e v a l u e of t h e hereditament attributable to the part of the hereditament u s e d for the p u r p o s e s of a private dwelling is greater than the proportion thereof attributable to the part used for other purposes." T h i s eye-glazing w o n d e r of official prose is from a rates bill i s s u e d by F a r e h a m B o r o u g h C o u n c i l , a n d is p r e s u m a b l y meant to be u n d e r s t o o d by ordinary mortals s u c h as ratepayers. If y o u can't u n d e r s t a n d it you're in g o o d c o m p a n y . A Department of the E n v i r o n m e n t form for a p p l y i n g for help with loft i n s u l a t i o n was s o o b s c u r e t h a t t h o u s a n d s of t h e m had to be returned to the applicants to be filled in properly. O n e local c o u n c i l even issued a leaflet e x p l a i n i n g how to fill in the forms, but n o - o n e c o u l d understand that either. But now, help is at h a n d in the s h a p e of the Plain E n g l i s h C a m p a i g n . A r m e d ony with a s h r e d d i n g m a c h i n e a n d infinite gall, they descended on P a r l i a m e nt S q u a r e last s u m m e r a n d m a n a g e d to destroy large n u m b e r s of illegible forms before being m o v e d on by the pol i ce. T h e i r latest (and -slightly m o r e constructive) effort is a glossy magazine Piam—^frgmk, dedicated to ferreting out s a m p l e s of g o b b l e d y g o o k and e x p o s i n g them to the p i e r c i n g light of p u b l i c pillory. T e n a n c y a g r e e m e n t s are, of course, n o t o r i o u s . Here is a fine e x a m p l e of the o b s c u r e E n g l i s h love of extremely l o n g s e n t e n c e s a n d dislike of t h o s e fiddly little spots k n o w n as p u n c t u a t i o n marks: S u b - s e c t i o n (v): " T o permit the l a n d l o r d or his agents with or without w o r k m e n and others u p o n giving reasonable notice to enter ATIU-A - E X P E R T S A F E B L O W E R , A T Y o o e S.£<2v/tC£. \ F o U M b THIS B t G , VAOLT; I f U O O & H T "HOST HAVE UQT5. O F M O N E Y IM IT." , S O I S L E W IT — P H Y S I C A L L Y AUfc I b t o v t A T i C A U X - IT T U R M E b O U T T o 6£ CtfeV&'S R C O N T D o o P L , fctfcNOT \T!

u p o n the premises at all reasonable times d u r i n g the daytime for the p u r p o s e s of repairing and painting the outside thereof or c a r r y i n g out and c o m p l e t i n g any structural or other necessary or proper repairs to the premises or of e x a m i n i n g the state or c o n d i t i o n of the interior of the premises and thereupon to permit the l a n d l o r d or his agents to give the tenant notice in writing...." A n d that's only half of it. T h e C a m p a i g n looks p r o m i s i n g , for not only is it a protest movement but it is actively helping to rewrite official forms a n d leaflets, consumer c o n t r a c t s a n d s o on. The organisers, C h r i s s y M a h e r and Martin Curtis, have set up a ' F o r m Factory' to help local authorities, government departments and o t h e r o f f i c i a l b o d i e s to r e c a s t t h e i r d o c u m e n t s in plain E n g l i s h . A series of Plain E n g l i s h W o r k s h o p s are p l a n n e d for next year, to provide c r a s h c o u r s e s for people w o r k i n g in p u b l i c information. O n e person w h o w o u l d benefit from s u c h a c o u r s e w o r k s at the Department of E m p l o y m e n t . H e uses a c o m p u t e r to write letters like this one, in c l o s e l y s p a c e d capitals: " T o qualify for u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit y o u must, in any one tax year, have paid as an e m p l o y e d person a m i n i m u m a m o u n t of C l a s s 1 c o n t r i b u t i o n s . T h e m i n i m u m amount required is that payable o n earnings at the level of the lower earnings limit for that year . mulitiplied by 25. For persons w h o claim benefit early in their i n s u r a n c e life this c o n d i t i o n may be modified to treat as paid in one tax year all C l a s s 1 c o n t r i b u t i o n s paid up to the date on w h i c h benefit is c l a i m e d . If this modification applies in y o u r c a s e it will have to be c o n s i d e r e d before the d e c i s i o n o n y o u r c l a i m was made. A similar d e c i s i o n will apply on a n y c l a i m s for later days on w h i c h the g r o u n d s of this d e c i s i o n have not c e a s e d to exist." T h i s horror was brought to the attention of the D O E , w h o s e s p o k e s m a n admitted, "We,.. have been aware for s o m e time that letters like this c a n be difficult to u n d e r s t a n d . " O n AND

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ROCK'N'ROLL For those of you who like heavy rock and roll but did not go to the ICWA Disco last Saturday, I can only say that you really missed out on something. Cheap Trick, and Quo just to start the evening and a live band, MIXDIX, which one person compared to Motorhead. Better luck next time!

UO

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the u r g i n g of the C a m p a i g n , the Department is now w o r k i n g on an " i m p r o v e d and simplified v e r s i o n " . What the C a m p a i g n needs n o w are s a m p l e s of o b s c u r e E n g l i s h from official leaflets, forms, contracts a n d other s u c h d o c u m e n t s to use as a m m u n i t i o n . If y o u can't u n d e r s t a n d y o u r form for rent rebates or y o u r car i n s u r a n c e policy, just s e n d it to: Plain E n q l i s h C a m p a i g n , 78 Wiltshire Street. Salford, M 7 OBD or if you're really keen, there's a meeting at the Library A s s o c i a t i o n , 7 R i d g m o u n t Street, W C 1 on M o n d a y 10 D e c e m b e r at 2:00pm. Ilfdrd c o u n c i l l o r s couldn't u n d e r s t a n d a bylaw they were a s k e d to pass, even t h o u g h it had been approved by their H i g h w a y s C o m m i t t e e a n d the H o m e Office. Part of it read: " P r o v i d e d that the by-law shall not a p p l y to any person riding a b i c y c l e or tricycle otherwise than to the o b s t r u c t i o n or d a n g e r of any person lawfully u s i n g s u c h footpath if the person riding has lawful authority so to d o . " A s k e d for advice, the D e p u t y B o r o u g h S o l i c i t o r admitted that he didn't u n d e r s t a n d it either: "I was h o p i n g that no m e m b e r w o u l d raise it a n d ask for its meaning. T h e person w h o w o r d e d it left the c o u n c i l a week ago." Tony Jones

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RAMBLING THOUGHTS OF AN AG IMG FOOL H e l l o A l l ! W e l l deep i n the h e a r t o f t h e U n i o n Store R o o m ( b a r r e l a n d g n o m e emporium), t h i n g s have been just r o l l i n g a l o n g . - A s I s a i d last t i m e , the term is waning e'en as I wax ineloquently. I a m absolutely shattered a n d I feel that the week o r so o f C h r i s t m a s hols w i l l c o m e o n l y too s o o n , i f not too late. So you've s u r v i v e d R a g W e e k a n d E n v i r o n m e n t a l Week, b o t h o f w h i c h have t a k e n m o n t h s o f p l a n n i n g b y a few people. Y o u p r o b a b l y t u r n e d u p a n d went a w a y w i t h n e i t h e r a t h o u g h t o r a c a r e for the people l i k e R o g e r a n d R a e w h o spent dozens o f h o u r s for every one h o u r o f the event, but n o w I bet y o u feel r e a l l y g u i l t y !

I w o u l d l i k e to a d d to m y defence w i t h r e g a r d to a m o t i o n p a s s e d c o n c e r n i n g my nonattendance at University C h a l l e n g e i n M a n c h e s t e r : I was elected to r e p r e s e n t the U n i o n at the Student were Residence C o m m i t t e e , who d i s c u s s i n g rent levels f o r next t e r m (something I consider very important). I s t a n d b y m y d e c i s i o n to a t t e n d that m e e t i n g , so Y a h Boo S u c k s ! G O O D NEWS T h e R e c t o r h a s d e c i d e d to i g n o r e the recommendations o f the aforementioned Residence C o m m i t t e e and will be r e c o m m e n d i n g n o change i n the rent levels for next t e r m . Because o f this there w i l l be no open m e e t i n g o f H a l l

residents. The last U G M p a s s e d a m o t i o n forming a Cuts Campaign Committee. The f i r s t o f its events w i l l be a leafletting i n the tube T O D A Y . P a r t y leaves at 4:30pm ( p r o m p t ) f r o m the Beit Arch. AT LAST: T H E END W i t h cuts a n d slashes w o u n d i n g a l l a n d s u n d r y i n e d u c a t i o n it i s nice to k n o w that w h e n it c o m e s to the c r u n c h there is a l w a y s a n escape. C o m e to t h i n k o f it, t h a t ' s a s l a s h a n d cut as well. Happy Birthday F E L I X , and Colin, please don't w o r r y about the l u n a c y o f a n a g i n g fool, xxx S i r H C

%yal College of

1. L i f e Sciences 1 — £919.87i/2 2. P h y s i c s 1 — £656.89i/2

3. C h e m i s t r y 1 — £515.51 4. M a t h s 1 — £237.32i/2 5. M a t h s 3 — £130.19i/ T h e l a t t e r i n s i s t that they w o u l d have w o n i f t h e i r c o v e r h a d not been b l o w n i n F E L I X t w o w e e k s before the event. A s ever, the d a y p r o d u c e d a n elitist c l i q u e w h o c o l l e c t e d over one h u n d r e d p o u n d s i n the day: Steve W h i t e (CI), Alan Edwards (part-time CI), J a n e L a v e r s (LSI), T o m H a y e s (LSI), A d r i a n B l a c k (LSI), A n d y N e e d h a m (el), M i k e B o o t y ( M l ) a n d Steve Sleight (el). 2

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RCS L a s t S a t u r d a y ' s y e a r c o l l e c t i o n saw L i f e Sciences 1 live u p to t h e i r u s u a l an reputation of apathy. T h i s was attitude w h i c h w a s epitomised by A d r i a n B l a c k w h o w h e n a s k e d to go out for the fifth t i m e i n t w e n t y f o u r h o u r s r e f u s e d o n the g r o u n d s that he h a d a l r e a d y c o l l e c t e d over £100. S u c h w a s the extent o f t h i s attitude, that they w e r e too idle to collect the e x t r a £80.12i/2 neede d to m a k e t h e i r t o t a l u p to £1,000. E n o u g h o f t h i s false m o d e s t y , they w e r e great r e a l l y (even i f the a u t h o r is s o m e w h a t biased) a n d led the w a y i n m a k i n g the R C S y e a r c o l l e c t i o n s the m o s t s u c c e s s f u l ever w i t h a f i n a l t o t a l o f £2,636.12i/2. T h e t o p five y e a r g r o u p s being:

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T h e d a y w a s a c r e d i t to m a n y people, e s p e c i a l l y the f i r s t y e a r s o c i a l r e p s as w e l l as to T a n s e y a n d M o w h o w e re a w a y f r o m Beit 75 for over eighteen hours! General Committee on Monday p r e p a r e d the w a y for next T u e s d a y ' s U G M w h i c h w i l l be h e l d at 12:45pm i n P h y s i c s L e c t u r e T h e a t r e 1. T h e r e w i l l be m i n c e p i e s a n d free b e e r f r o m the T h r e e - H a n d e d Pot, as w e l l as the l o n g awaited tril of Zoshia.

A l s o next week a r e s e v e r a l n o t a b s o c i a l events, w h i c h are as f o l l o w s : T U E S D A Y : L i f e Sciences C h r i s t m a s P a r t y i n J C R at 8:00pm. T i c k e t s 75p. W E D N E S D A Y : Ents C h r i s t m a s Paty in J C R at 8:00pm. B r i n g a bottle. T H U R S D A Y : Physics Christmas Party in J C R and C h e m i s t r y C h r i s t m a s Party i n the U n i o n C o n c e r t H a l l at 8:00pm. T i c k e t s 80p. Nick

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THE HEINEKIN BENEFIT OR HOW T O CLAIM RENT DURING THE VACATION WHAT'S IT ALL A B O U T ? S u p p l e m e n t a r y Benefit — k n o w n as the H e i n e k i n Benefit b e c a u s e it reaches the parts that other benefits d o not reach — is p r o b a b l y the most productive method of recovering the rent that y o u have to pay over the vacation. S u p p l e m e n t a r y benefit is a t o p - u p benefit w h i c h aims to bring a n y o n e w h o is unemployed up to m i n i m u m level of s u b s i s t e n c e and is payable even t h o u g h y o u have never paid a n y N a t i o n a l Insurance contributions. S u p p l e m e n t a r y Benefit c o n s i s t s of t w o c o m p o n e n t s , a living a l l o w a n c e a n d a payment to c o v e r t h e cost of y o u r a c c o m m o d a t i o n . In c a l c u l a t i n g y o u r entitlement a c c o u n t is taken of other r e s o u r c e s that y o u may have available. These include Unemployment Benefit, interest o n savings over £1,200 a n d , most important of all, the vacation element is taken into a c c o u n t even if y o u don't actually receive it, e g b e c a u s e y o u r parental c o n t r i b u t i o n isn't paid in full.

WILL I BE ABLE T O CLAIM IT? T o qualify for s u p p l e m e n t a r y benefit for rent d u r i n g the vacations y o u have to satisfy the following requirements: 1. B e u n e m p l o y e d . 2. B e available for work. 3. B e prepared to s i g n o n i n L o n d o n o n c e a week d u r i n g j h e vacation. If y o u are not t h i n k i n g of staying in L o n d o n d u r i n g the vacation, don't d e s p a i r b e c a u s e : 1. D e p e n d i n g on w h e r e y o u will be staying, it might be worth c o m i n g up to L o n d o n o n c e a week to s i g n on. 2 T h e benefit office may be c l o s e d for p u b l i c h o l i d a y s o n one or more of y o u r s i g n i n g o n days. 3. Y o u may be able to p e r s u a d e t h e m t o give y o u a 'holiday form' w h i c h effectively e x c u s e s y o u from s i g n i n g on.

HOW M U C H WILL I G E T ? T h i s c a n get a bit c o m p l i c a t e d . Firstly, there is the fact that there are, in practice, three rates at w h i c h benefit is paid. S e c o n d l y , t h e Department of Health a n d S o c i a l S e c u r i t y may feel that y o u are paying t o o m u c h rent a n d o n l y r e i m b u r s e y o u to the extent of what they c o n s i d e r to be a reasonable rent. T h e different rates are for three different k i n d s of o c c u p a t i o n a l status: 1. H o u s e h o l d e r 2. N o n - h o u s e h o l d e r 3. Flat sharer

There isn't actually a proper definition of what a h o u s e h o l d e r is, but in general terms it is s o m e o n e w h o is r e s p o n s i b l e for o u t g o i n g s s u c h as electricity bills a n d s o o n over and a b o v e the rent, while a n o n - h o u s e h o l d e r is usually thought of as s o m e o n e w h o just pays financial rent a n d has no other responsibilities towards his a c c o m m o d a t i o n . A h o u s e h o l d e r gets s o m e extra m o n e y t a c k e d onto his living a l l o w a n c e to cover these extra responsibilities and pay for things like s t a n d i n g c h a r g e s o n service bills. A flat sharer is treated as a p a r t - h o u s e h o l d e r a n d gets a share of the h o u s e h o l d e r addition, w h i c h depends o n the n u m b e r of .people in the flat. T h e rates at w h i c h s u p p l e m e n t a r y benefit is paid are as follows: H o u s e h o l d e r — £18.50 per week N o n - h o u s e h o l d e r — £14.65 per week N o n - h o u s e h o l d e r — £1.70 per week rent a l l o w a n c e Flat sharer — £14.65 p l u s (£18.50 - £14.65 divided by the n u m b e r of people in the flat). T h e n o n - h o u s e h o l d e r rent a l l o w a n c e is paid to people who are not p a y i n g rent eg if they are living rent free with relatives.

EXAMPLES 1. Harry has a place in hall and is g o i n g h o m e d u r i n g the vacation s o he isn't paying a n y rent. H i s requirements are £14.65 ( n o n h o u s e h o l d e r living allowance) plus£1.70rent a l l o w a n c e w h i c h totals £16.35. His resources element. A s his are £16.35 vacation requirements e q u a l his resources, he will e n d up with n o t h i n g . 2. This time, Harry is living in a bedsit with a coin-slot meter paying £15 per week rent. If he g o e s h o m e and c l a i m s there, he will only get a £2 per week retainer ( o w i n g t o a n arbitary and d i s c r i m i n a t o r y p o l i c y invented by the D H S S ) . If, on the other h a n d , he stays in L o n d o n and c l a i m s o r at any rate c a n s i g n on each week, his requirements will be£14.65 p l u s £15 rent w h i c h totals £29.25. H i s r e s o u r c e s are £16.35 (vacation element) s o he ends up with £13.30 per week. If Harry had been classified as a h o u s e h o l d e r he w o u l d have got £18.50 plus £15 less £16.35 w h i c h gives him £17.15 per week — £3.85 per week more. 3. S u p p o s i n g that Harry w a s s h a r i n g a flat with three others and p a y i n g the s a m e £15 per week rent. He w o u l d then get what he got as a n o n - h o u s e h o l d e r ie £13.30 per week plus a quarter of the £3.85 h o u s e h o l d e r a d d i t i o n . T h i s w o u l d give him £14.28 per week.

WHAT IS T H E P R O C E D U R E FOR CLAIMING? 1. R i n g up y o u r nearest D H S S office w h i c h y o u c a n find under ' H e a l t h ' in the telephone directory. B o o k an a p p o i n t m e n t with them for

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8

say, the first day of the holidays (if y o u ring them up now they may s e n d y o u a form w h i c h may o r may not make things easier). While y o u are talking to them ask w h i c h J o b C e n t r e a n d Department of E m p l o y m e n t office y o u s h o u l d go to a n d c h e c k o n the d o c u m e n t s that they will require y o u to bring to t h e interview. (They usually want to see proof of y o u r savings eg bank statement and savings b o o k s a n d proof that y o u are paying rent e g lease o r rent book. A handwritten letter from y o u r landlord is unlikely to be a c c e p t e d except under protest.) 2. G o to the J o b C e n t r e a n d look for a job. 3. Next, g o to the Department of E m p l o y m e n t offices a n d s i g n o n as u n e m p l o y e d . 4. T u r n up for y o u r interview. 5. S i g n o n e a c h week as instructed.

WHAT D O I DO IF THINGS G O G O WRONG? If they won't pay a n d y o u think that they are in the w r o n g , y o u have 21 days in w h i c h to appeal. T h i s doesn't cost y o u a n y t h i n g and s i m p l y means that y o u tell them that y o u are u n h a p p y with their d e c i s i o n (s) a n d w i s h to appeal. T h e c a s e is then reviewed by a supervisor in the office a n d if they still think that they are right it is p a s s e d o n to an 'independant' appeal tribunal. Y o u c a n get help with the tribunal hearing from the Welfare Centre. If any of this articles doesn't make sense, y o u c a n always c o m e up to the Welfare C e n t r e a n d ask m e about it. Finally, a w o r d of w a r n i n g , if y o u make a c l a i m for s u p p l e m e n t a r y benefit y o u have to sign on as u n e m p l o y e d w h i c h means that y o u are c l a i m i n g u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit. B e c a u s e of the 13 week rule, a c l a i m now m e a n s that if y o u have earned over £438 in one tax year y o u may have an entitlement to u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit next year w h i c h a c l a i m now c o u l d endanger, alternatively a c l a i m n o w c o u l d mean that y o u will be able to if y o u hadn't c l a i m e d . If y o u are not s u r e h o w y o u s t a n d o n this, it might be better to c h e c k with the Welfare C e n t r e before y o u c l a i m . Michael Arthur Welfare Adviser

DHSS OFFICES A c t o n (covers part of H a m m e r s m i t h ) : 7439131 B a l h a m : 673-7722 Battersea: 228-6454 B r i x t o n : 274-7777 C h e l s e a / F u l h a m : 736-3399 K e n s i n g t o n : 603-4633 Westminster: 834-8433

T

How does be expect Brains (ike me to force back the frontiers of Knowledge without decent working condifcions• • • 0

1


WEDNESDAY 28

MONDAY 3

FRIDAY 30

257 LOST. IN DC 10 CRASH

BRITAIN'S E E C B U D G E T

LADBROKE LOSES APPEAL

A n A i r N e w Z e a l a n d D C 10 c r a s h e d into a v o l c a n o off the c o a s t of A n t a r t i c a d u r i n g a s i g ht s e e i ng e x c u r s i o n . T h e r e were 257 people o n b o a r d a n d there were no s i g n s of survivors a m o n g the w r e c k a g e spotted by U S Navy planes.

M r s T h a t c h e r told her fellow E E C leaders to find an a c c e p t a b l e s o l u t i o n to Britain's E E C budget d e m a n d s or else face unilateral a c t i o n by Britain to c u t its payments w h i c h w o u l d result in a E u r o p e a n political crisis. M r s T h a t c h e r left the c o n f e r e n c e empty hande d after a six m o n t h c a m p a i g n to reduce Britain's payments a d m i t t i ng that there was little h o p e of a s o l u t i o n in the next few months.

L a d b r o k e s , Britain's biggest g a m e s g r o u p , has c l o s e d three of its West E n d c a s i n o s b e c a u s e the g r o u p ' s appeal against the loss of l i c e n c e for the c l u b s has been rejected. L i c e n s i n g magistrates had ruled in J u l y that L a d b r o k e was " n o t fit and p r o p e r " to h o l d c a s i n o licences. T h e three c a s i n o s involved are estimated to have contributed half of L a d h r o k e ' s 1978 profit of over £41 m i l l i o n . E v i d e n c e was p r o d u c e d w h i c h s h o w that an operation had been set up to entice g a m b l e r s away from rival c a s i n o s .

PRY FORUM OFFER The N a t i o n a l E c o n o m i c Development C o u n c i l w a s re-erected by S i r Geoffrey H o w e as a major f o r u m in w h i c h the G o v e r n m e n t might be a b l e to d o b u s i n e s s with u n i o n s a n d e m p l o y e r s . A t the s a m e time however the C h a n c e l l o r w a r n e d that pay rises at present levels c o u l d lead to tax i n c r e a s e s instead of the tax c u t s p r o m i s e d by the Tories.

BSC

LOSS THREATENS JOBS

MORE

T h e B S C is e x p e c t e d to a n n o u n c e a half yearly l o s s of £150 m i l l i o n . It is p l a n n i n g fresh r e d u c t i o n s in c a p a c i t y a n d r e d u n d a n c i e s to meet a d e t e r i o r a t i n g s i t u a t i o n . T h e C o r p o r a t i o n h a s been hit by a d r o p in d e m a n d of 1 5 % a n d t h i s h a s been aggravated by the effects of the G o v e r n m e n t ' s monetary squeeze.

THURSDAY 29 NO

S U C C E S S AT SUMMIT

DUBLIN

At the E E C talks in D u b l i n the E E C c o u n t r i e s rejected Margaret Thatcher's d e m a n d s for a vast r e d u c t i o n in B r i t ai n's c o n t r i b u t i o n to the E E C budget. T h e P r i m e Minister d e m a n d s were for a r e d u c t i o n of £1 billion as o p p o s e d to the r e d u c t i o n of £350 million to £400 m i l l i o n w h i c h the other g o v e r n m e n t s w e r e w i l l i n g to d i s c u s s . S h e w a r n e d the m e e t i n g that their refusal r i s ked p r o v o k i n g a c r i s i s in B r i t ai n's relations with the E E D . T h e present b u d g e t i m b a l a n c e c o u l d m e a n that Britain w o u l d pay £1,200 million m o r e into the E E C next year t h a n it will receive.

US RADIATION D A M A G E The U S G o v e r n m e n t have for the first time a d m i t t e d that radiation from a t m o s p h e r i c a t o m i c b o m b tests in the S o u t h Pacific from 1945 to 1962 may have c a u s e d c a n c e r a m o n g the t r o o p s exposed. The government a c c e p t e d r e s p o n s i b i l i t y in a c a s e brought by a former s e r g e a n t w h o is c u r r e n t l y d y i n g of c a n c e r . It is estimated that 250,000 p e r s o n n e l a n d i s l a n d e r s w e r e e x p o s e d to radiation in 183 tests. R e s i d e n t s of a t o w n in U t a h are s u i n g the G o v e r n m e n t c l a i m i n g that a radio-active c l o u d drifted over their t o w n c a u s i n g o u t b r e a k s of L e u k a e m i a . A H o l l y w o o d film crew m a d e a film in the s a m e t o w n a n d s i n c e then its stars: J o h n W a y n e , S u s a n H a y w a r d a n d A g n e s M o o r h e a d , have d i e d of c a n c e r as have the director, p r o d u c t i o n manager a n d people are wardrobe mistress. S o m e c o n n e c t i n g these deaths with the alleged radiation e x p o s u r e .

SHAH'S NEXT MOVE T h e S h a h s a i d that he still intended to leave the U S despite the M e x i c a n G o v e r n m e n t ' s d e c i s i o n to bar his return. H e is s a i d to be c o n s i d e r i n g other offers of political a s y l u m . C o n c e r n i n g the hostages, the sense of c r i s i s is d e e p e n i n g with no apparent way out of the impasse. T h e U S a m b a s s a d o r at the U N a c k n o w l e d g e d that it was unrealistic to e x p e c t any a c t i o n by the U N w h i c h w o u l d lead to a q u i c k release of the hostages.

TUESDAY 4

SATURDAY 1

D O C T O R S TO SPY ON MIGRANTS

THATCHER'S E E C PLANS U n d e r the P r i m e Minister's orders, plans to freeze Britain's relations with the C o m m o n Market go ahead. T h e plans are to be held ready in the event of a final b r e a k d o w n of negotiations with the E E C over Britian's d e m a n d for a r e d u c t i o n in its c o n t r i b u t i o n to the E E C budget. T h e c o n t i n g e n c y plans are reported to cover everything short of a British w a l k - o u t from the c o m m u n i t y .

NO MORE DINKY CARS T h e L i v e r p o o l factory w h i c h p r o d u c e s D i n k y c a r s is to c l o s e b e c a u s e of labour c o s t s a n d lack of productivity. M e c c a n o , o w n e d by the s a m e c o m p a n y , face the same fate. In nearly 50 years history of D i n k y cars 900 m o d e l s in crash-proof, diecast metal have s o l d in their millions. C o l l e c t o r s predict that the present m o d e l s will be s n a t c h e d up a n d carefully 'garaged' for their investment value. Earlier this year a m o d e l of a P i c k f o r d removal van, s o l d for four s h i l l i n g s in the thirties, was a u c t i o n e d for £340.

SUNDAY 2 ATTACK

ON

US EMBASSY LIBYA

BBC DISPUTE SETTLED Settlement o c c u r r e d after a p e a c e f o r m u l a was w o r k e d out by the B r o a d c a s t i n g U n i o n a n d the B B C . D u r i n g the dispute 610 t e c h n i c i a n s were s u s p e n d e d for staging o n e day strikes and the B B C lost 123 p r o g r a m m e s at a c o s t of £2 million. Priority will n o w be given to the r e c o r d i n g of C h r i s t m a s s h o w s .

D o c t o r s are b e i n g a s k e d by the H o m e Office a n d D H S S to help pool confidential facts a b o u t health service patients s u s p e c t e d of being illegal i m m i g r a n t s. A c o n s u l t a n t has complained to the B M A that private information was p a s s e d o n by the D H S S to the H o m e Office without the patients' consent. T h e H o m e Office denied this but said that d o c t o r s have been asked to w a t c h out for patients s u s p e c t e d of b e i n g j n e l i g i b l e for N H S treatment.

RHODESIA MEDIATOR S O U G H T A mediator is being sought to save the R h o d e s i a n talks from c o l l a p s i n g . T h e first mediators move c a m e from the President of S i b e r i a , in the form of a telegram to M r s T h a t c h e r in his c a p a c i t y as c h a i r m a n of the O r g a n i s a t i o n for A f r i c a n U n i t y . T h e c o n f e r e n c e is d e a d l o c k e d o n the framework of t h e c e a s e f i r e . Lord Carrington's d e m a n d i n g straight a c c e p t a n c e by the P F leaders w h i c h they are u n a b l e or u n w i l l i n g to give.

ELEVEN IN

T h e U S G o v e r n m e n t protested to L i b y a after an attack o n the U S E m b a s s y in T r i p o l i by a rioting m o b . T h e m o b i n c l u d e d men in military uniform a c c o r d i n g to the State Department. T h e attack c a m e shortly after the S h a h had been moved from N e w York to a military hospitai near S a n A n t o n i o . F o r the first time the U S G o v e r n m e n t a d m i t t ed that it was to help the S h a h find s o m e w h e r e to live.

PEOPLE KILLED ROCK CONCERT

AT

W i d e s p r e a d d r u g t a k i n g , badly thought out ticket a r r a n g e m e n t s a n d the late arrival of The Who were the main factors for a s t a m p e d e at a rock c o n c e r t in w h i c h eleven p e o p l e w e r e killed. T h e c o n c e r t had been d u e to start at 8:00pm a n d those with n u m b e r e d a n d reserved tickets were allowed in. The Who arrived at 8:30pm and as their w a r m - u p began the teenagers outside began to p a n i c . The c r o w d s u r g e d forward a n d d u r i n g the p a n i c eleven p e o p l e were killed a n d twenty s e r i o u s l y injured.

9


M I N E S

FOREIGN STUDENTS WEEK 1979 SUN

9th — S A T DECEMBER

15th

This year we will be hosts to seventeen students from various European mining schools. During this week, by day, our guests will be visiting various companies in the mining and metallurgical business. There may still be room for RSM students on these trips — check on the RSMU noticeboard for details of vacancies. In the evenings we will be organising events for their and YOUR entertainment, namely: Sunday 9th: —— G L U C K A U F PARTY in Stan's Real Ale Bar starting at opening time, and ending late. There will be free beer for all from the Gluckauf Stein. Monday 10th: — Visit to pub — we will probably attempt to drink it dry. Tuesday 11th: — DE LA B E C H E CLUB CHRISTMAS PARTY in Watts Library. Tickets from DLB Committee or RSMU Office. Wednesday 12th: BARNIGHT in the Union Bar (where else?). Need any more be said? Till late, games and a few drinkies a la Freshers Dinners. Thursday 13th: — HON PORN'S NIGHT in Union SCR at 8:00pm. Some films and one or two exotic dancers. Friday 14th: — i m MINES BALL: the event of the year. Double tickets £17.00 from RSMU Office. Saturday 15th: — Our guests say goodbye and go home, tired but hopefully impressed with RSM. Sunday 16th: — The Foreign Students' Officer (Mike Lee) goes into hospital for a rest.

The Amazing Adventures of • AND SO THE KEEPER OF 7fl£ ETERNAL BOOK SCAMPERS OVER THE CCYSTAL ROCKS, READING AS HE G O E S , WITH CAPTAIN INADEQUATE IN PURSUIT....

Captain Inadequate ' H F IS, SO INTENT TV NOTICE A LARGE OVER,...

THAT HE FAIIS ROCK,AND TRIPS j


EDITORIAL H a p p y B i r t h d a y to us! We're thirty years o l d a n d g o o d for another thirty — at least! A l o n g long term's g l a r i n g over a paste-up b o a r d has not been in v a i n . M i s t a k e s — I've m a d e a few, but then a g a i n t o o few to mention....I d i d it my way! F E L I X is alive a n d well, but I still need people, people, people; as reporters, proof-readers a n d c o l l a t o r s to mention but a few. A l l the i s s u e s I've delivered o n Friday m o r n i n g s have s o l d like hot-cakes, but a l t h o u g h it's great t o s e e y o u read F E L I X , with the e c o n o m i c strains that have been i m p o s e d o n the C o l l e g e as a whole, you're the p e o p l e w h o have to s h o w that F E L I X is justified in getting all the aid it c a n . A n d that g o e s for everything else that k e e p s y o u a m u s e d in C o l l e g e . G o to the Devils this week, go to the E n t s Free G i g next T u e s d a y evening, but above all s h o w that y o u care. It's easy to criticise, but what c a n y o u offeras alternatives? If you've got s o m e g o o d ideas, c o m e a n d tell me, b e c a u s e y o u k n o w what apathy e q u a l s ? C u t s ! S o be w a r n e d : Don't be a dodo!

F E L I X was born o n 9 D e c e m b e r 1949 as a fortnightly n e w s p a p e r c o s t i n g 3 d . Its p u r p o s e was, a n d still is, to c o m m e n t o n t o p i c a l affairs around College, bring to attention the activities of C o l l e g e m e m b e r s a n d also to entertain. It w a s felt that T h e P h o e n i x , the litereary m a g a z i n e of Imperial, c o u l d not hope to fulfil these roles a n d s h o u l d remain the tempremental bird it is, d y i n g in s o m e years a n d rising g l o r i o u s l y from the a s h e s in others. O n l o o k i n g t h r o u g h the first year's F E L I X it is quite a m a z i n g h o w t h e paper has m a i n t a i n e d a constant image. T h e first issue reported various events, i n c l u d i n g the arrest of s i x t e e n p e o p l e at the a n n u a l R a g B o n f i r e on the steps of the A l b e r t M e m o r i a l . A M o r p h y D a y report a n d a sports review were s u p p o r t e d b y regular features like the ' D i a ry of F o r t h c o m i n g E v e n t s ' a n d the already c o n t r o v e r s i a l letters page.

T h e Felix S o c i e t y will h o l d its last meeting this term o n M o n d a y at 12:45 in the F E L I X Office. S u b s c r i p t i o n to the S o c i e t y is n o w fixed at 3 0 p (cheap!). C o m e a l o n g a n d hear what's h a p p e n e d this term in F E L I X a n d tell us all y o u r ideas for next term.

CREDITS A u s t i n , Lars, M a r k , Mary, Ian, F r e d , Margaret, J e r e m y , P a u l , A r c h i e Evans, J i l l D a w s o n , Dave B r y a n a n d a n y b o d y else w h o with true C h r i s t m a s spirit has hel ped on FELIX.

MNM T h e first s i x h u n d r e d c o p i e s s o l d q u i c k l y s o the s e c o n d issue i n c r e a s e d to o n e t h o u s a n d c o p i e s to avoid a black market. T o quote the editor, E M H u g h e s : "....and it was reported that some sportsmen were offering their copies to latecomers at 4d, and finding plenty of takers." H a v i n g o v e r c o m e the threat of a black market, the staff d e c i d e d to i n c l u d e s o m e regular features: 'Profile' a n d ' T h e D r i n k i n g M a n ' s G u i d e T o L o n d o n ' . T h e first subject of 'Profile' was o u r o w n U n i o n bar: "....and in a few years its place in history was assured by the formation of four clubs closely connected with it and by its firm installation next to the lavatory. The 21. 22. Chaps and Links Clubs made the Bar a congenial meeting place, a good talking shop, a place for warriors to return to tell the tale and lick the odd wound (from rag or honest game), and of course a place in which to liberate great exuberance for such is the/oyous outcome of bibulation." T h e r e was also a letter from the Ents C h a i r m a n d i s c u s s i n g m e t h o d s of k e e p i n g n u m b e r s down at the S a t u r d a y night 'hop'. Issue three i n d i c a t e d more diverse material was being attracted: a c r o s s w o r d , poetry a n d an article on the e m a n c i p a t i o n of w o m e n . T h e trend c o n t i n u e d in future issues. B y i s s u e four the a c c o m m o d a t i o n p r o b l e m w a s b e i n g aired — issue 7, refectory prices a n d s o o n the various political societies were e d g i n g for space. Issue 10 s a w a new style F E L I X ; printed rather t h a n d u p l i c a t e d o n a R o n e o m a c h i n e as h a d previously been the case. A m a p of

L . W . H .

C o l l e g e s u p p l i e d to F r e s h m e n gave particular emphasis to the local public houses. Times don't c h a n g e m u c h . With a new editor a n d new format the paper was u n d o u b t a b l y d e s t i n e d for better things. T h e first a n n i v e r s a r y i s s u e s u m m a r i s e d the status of F E L I X very w e l l : "The end of the year found the paper established as part of the College and recognised and constituted by Council as the official newspaper of IC." F E L I X h a d e m e r g e d a great s u c c e s s , its coat well g r o o m e d a n d as black as printers ink. N o w , thirty years later, w e celebrate a no t he r birthday. P e r h a p s it is best to look back at the p e r s o n a l view of the first editor, Ted Hughes: "Although the paper is financially responsible to Council and exists by their consent, it is free to express such opinions as it sees fit. The FELIX Board therefore carries a considerable responsibility for in the hands of irresponsible persons the paper could be a powerful and mischievous weapon. In the event it would undoubtably be suppressed, and I should be extremely sorry to see that happen. I hope, therefore, that future FELIX Boards will bring new ideas and new life to the the paper, but will maintain essentially same spirit." Hopefully we have kept true to these ideals d u r i n g the e n s u i n g thirty years as deviation from these is i n e x c u s a b l e . Happy thirtieth birthday FELIX, long may you continue! MARK SMITH

11


STUDENT TELEVISION OF IMPERIAL C O L L E G E

CHRISTMAS PROGRAMMES O n T u e s d a y at 1:00pm and again at 6:00pm Paul J o h n s o n will be talking to the R e c t o r (colour). O n T h u r s d a y at 1:00 and 6:00pm there is a n o t - s o - s e r i o u s News-Break Christmas S p e c i a l , featuring B r y a n Steele in a kilt plus the It'll Be Alright On The Night S T O I C S p e c i a l . T h e parts even Denis N o r d e n c o u l d n ' t s h o w (with c o l o u r e d bits). Y o u c a n watch S T O I C in the J C R , U n i o n B u i l d i n g , S o u t h s i d e L o w e r T V L o u n g e and Beit a n d S o u t h s i d e Halls on C h a n n e l 21.

WANTED: BANDS

STOIC 10th ANNIVERSARY F E L I X celebrates its 30th birthday with this issue, IC R a d i o celebrated one year of M e d i u m Wave b r o a d c a s t i n g last week and STOIC will be c e l e b r a t i n g its 10th anniversary in February next year. A series of special programmes win oe s h o w n . to celebrate this event, but in the meantime S T O I C h a s a s p e c i a l p r o g r a m m e s c h e d u l e for the last week of term.

THE LAND WE LIVE IN E n v i r o n m e n t a l Week started, naturally e n o u g h , with an i n t r o d u c t o r y talk, w h i c h was presented by T o m B u r k e , an ex-director of Fr i e nd s of the Earth. If y o u ever w o n d e r e d what F o E a c t u a l l y d o e s (and has done) then y o u may have m i s s e d an excellent c h a n c e to find out. H e gave a view of the b a c k g r o u n d to the present day e n v i r o n m e n t a l movements w h i c h d e v e l o p e d from the c o n c e r n of o u r a n c e s t o r s about the preservation of footpaths a n d m o n u m e n t s in the 1890s. Today, afterthe rapid birth and growth of many e n v i r o n m e n t a l g r o u p s in the sixties, the e c o n o m i c rather t han altruistic pressures are b r i n g i n g h o m e to p e o p l e the need for conservation. It is not a c r i s i s of c a p i t a l i s m as the c o m m u n i s t s w o u l d have it, nor is it a crisis of c o m m u n i s m as capitalists call it, rather it is a crisis of society. T h o u g h energy is the most o b v i o u s and most advertised, c o m m o d i t y that needs c o n s e r v i n g there are m a n y different aspects of energy p r o d u c t i o n that need l o o k i n g into This is the f u n c t i o n of the S t a n d i n g C o m m i s s i o n on Energy and the E n v i r o n m e n t of w h i c h L o r d Flowers is a member. His talk, given later on the s a m e day, gave a brief, but detailed, e x p l a n a t i o n of this function Starting with the government's green paper o n e n e r g y p o l i c y they are n o w s t u d y i n g the various a s p e c t s of energy p r o d u c t i o n , use a n d its e n v i r o n m e n t a l side effects. T h e i r first report, o n c o a l , is d u e to be c o m p l e t e d in 1981. Though Lord Flowers' committee decided that n u c l e a r p o w e r c o u l d be left until late orf their list of e n e r g y s o u r c e s for d i s c u s i i o n T h u r s d a y week s a w an a l m o s t full P h y s i c s L e c t u r e Theatre 1 w a i t i ng avidly for the debate of this p a r t i c u l a r t o p i c . T h e y were not d i s a p p o i n t e d . With M r B r o o k e s , e c o n o m i c adviser to the U K A t o m i c E n e r g y A u t h o r i t y 1

12

MUSICIANS

AND

S T O I C are at present in the p r o c e s s of r e c o r d i n g s e s s i o n s with m u s i c i a n s and g r o u p s of ail types. A l t h o u g h the r e s p o n s e to an article in F E L I X earlier this term was very good, we still want to hear from people who have not yet c o n t a c t e d us. W e c a n r e c o r d s e s s i o n s in either c o l o u r or m o n o c h r o m e and we are very interested in d o i n g s o m e location r e c o r d i n g . S o , if y o u are interested in f e a t u r i n g in a STOIC p r o g r a m m e a n d w o u l d like to see what y o u r band looks like o n television why not c o m e to the T V studio and talk to A d r i a n J e a k i n g s or J i m D o n a l d s o n ? We might even be p e r s u a d e d to s h o w y o u s o m e of our previous recordings.

a n d Dr G o o d a r d , k n o w n to M e c h E n g as a lecturer, s p e a k i n g for the motion a n d a professor from H ull University a n d Professor S c o r e r of the M a t h s department s p e a k i n g against the debate they d i s c u s s e d fully the various e c o n o m i c and safey factors involved, the H a r r i s b u r g disaster being a m u c h quoted example. At the e n d it s e e m e d that the speakers for had a s o l u t i o n to the 'energy crisis' a n d the speakers against thought that the s o l u t i o n was w r o n g a n d there might not be a crisis at all. B o t h sides however s e e m e d u n h a p p y about n u c l e a r waste storage and nuclear arms proliferation. T h e d i s c u s s i o n on the C h e m i c a l A s p e c t s of F a r m i n g A n d F o o d P r o d u c t i o n was d e s i g n e d to e n c o u r a g e people to think whether that o r d i n a r y lettuce leaf on their plate is really g o o d for y o u , seeing as, w h e n c o m m e r c i a l l y p r o d u c e d , it is sprayed with a pesticide every week of its growth a n d traces will always remain and the undertakers do very well out of preservatives in our food, they c a n now keep dead bodies for d a y s without refridgeration or decay N o w hands up those who like helping children. N o w keep y o u r hand up if y o u put theory into practice. Yes, as I thought, most went d o w n again. Put y o u h a n d s d o w n the few that are left and thank y o u for attending the A d v e n t u r e F u n Days at the w e e k e n d w h e n a p l a y g r o u n d was to be rebuilt and painted for L o n d o n children with no other place to play except the streets. The debate on what to c o n s e r v e s e e m e d to be of interest only to 'conservationists' j u d g i n g from the turnout, but the talks, especially the one given by M r H o o k w a y of the C o u n t r y s i d e C o m m i s s i o n were very interesting and in s o m e ways e y e - o p e n i n g . D i d y o u know that IC destroyed a beautiful 19th century square in order to build SouthsideV

IDEAS S T O I C is Y O U R o w n T V service so why not develop it? (Don't worry, no work involved unless y o u want to!). If y o u w o u l d like to help with S T O I C p r o d u c t i o n s or have any ideas for S T O I C p r o g r a m m e s , c o m e to the T V studio or ring int 2637 a n d talk to A d r i a n J e a k i n g s or Grant Richmond.

M r H o o k w a y started with a quotation: "What has posterity done for m e ? " P e r h a p s this s u m s up the attitude of IC students to the environment. At the E n v i r o n m e n t a l Fair on the other hand it was hard to j u d g e the a m o u n t of interest, but a lot of p e o p l e did c o m e for a look a r o u n d . Societies, s u c h as F r i e n d s of the Earth, the W o r l d Wildlife F u n d , the National S o c i e t y for C l e a n A i r and even the Vicotian The Preservation S o c i e t y were present. C y c l i s t s T o u r i n g C l u b was of particular interest to students s i n c e the L o n d o n branch is trying to create ' b i c y c l e w a y s ' in various streets in, L o n d o n . If y o u did not manage to attend any of the events but are still interested in j o i n i n g or finding out more about any of the societies, here are s o m e a d d r e s s e s : Friends of the Earth, 9 P o l a n d Street, L o n d o n W1V 3 D G Nature C o n s e r v a n c y C o u n c i l , 20 Belgrave Square, London S W 1 X 8PY N a t i o n a l S o c i e t y for C l e a n Air, 136 North Street, B r i g h t o n B N 1 1 R G T r a n s p o r t 2000, 40 J a m e s Street, L o n d o n W1M 5HS C a m p a i g n A g a i n s t L e a d in Petrol, 63 D o r a R o a d , L o n d o n S W 19 7 H H T h e S o i l A s s o c i a t i o n , W a l n u t T r e e Manor, H a u g h l e y , Stowmarket, Suffolk 1P314 3 R S . (They offer a s p e c i a l student m e m b e r s h i p ) . C y c l i s t s T o u r i n g C l u b , C o t t e r e l l H o u s e , 69 Meadow Godlaming, Surrey N a t i o n a l C o n s e r v a t i o n C o r p s (South East), Z o o l o g i c a l G a r d e n s , Regents Park, L o n d o n NW1 4 R Y T o w n a n d C o u n t r y P l a n n i n g A s s o c i a t i o n , 17 C a r l t o n H o u s e Terrace, L o n d o n S W 1Y 5 A S Railway D e v e l o p m e nt Society, B M â&#x20AC;&#x201D; R D S , London WC1V 6XX T h e V i c t o r i a n Society, 1 Priory G a r d e n s , L o n d o n W4 1TT or ask for Mary in the F E L I X Office. Mary Freeman


REACTION TO LAST WEEKS MICRO ARTICLE I was interested to read Mary A t t e n b o r o u g h ' s article in F E L I X no. 536. M s A t t e n b o r o u g h presents a s c e n a r i o a n d then just leaves it without p o i n t i n g out its c o n s e q u e n c e s o r how things got like that. I refer to her remark " O f the p e o p l e in work, we c o u l d be left with a t e c h n o c r a t i c elite a n d deskilled m a s s e s . " N o government w o u l d survive for very l o n g if this state of affairs existed (except a regime like the one in C a m b o d i a w h i c h was prepared to kill off a large fraction of the p o p u l a t i o n for purely e c o n o m i c reasons), as the " u n s k i l l e d m a s s e s " w o u l d 'revolt'. What is more interesting is h o w t h e situation c o u l d get that bad in the first place. The answer is that in this c o u n t r y it c o u l d n ' t because of the w a y that the t e c h n o l o g y works. Very few of the factory 'robots' w h i c h will replace h u m a n jobs c a n d o s o without having been taught how to do that job by the human operator. Whenever a factory starts p r o d u c i n g a new item, the m a c h i n e s have to be taught how to deal with them, by s k i l l e d human operators There are very few paint sprayers, for example, w h o w o u l d t e ach a m a c h i n e to spray a chair if it meant the he/she a n d his/her mates w o u l d be out of a job as s o o n as they'd d o n e it. S o what is the answer: H i d e v o u r head in the s a n d (the A u s t r a l i a n s have a lot of that)? N o , chiefly because the c h i p gives a great c h a n c e to improve the environment, as I shall e x p l a i n . The a n s w e r is for t h e paint sprayer to copywrite his work, s o that each time the m a c h i n e paints a chair the c o m p a n y pays him, well actually not him, but a u n i o n who distributes t h e m o n e y a m o n g s t the paint sprayers w h o are registered as w o r k i n g for that factory. S o what to d o with the time that used to be spent s p r a y i n g c h a i r s ? O d d l y e n o u g h , m u c h of it will be spent painting chairs b e c a u s e :the guy w h o gets the next job is the best paint sprayer a r o u n d , s o every o n e keeps in practice. T h e reason I say that mi cros are g o i n g to i m p r o v e t h e e n v i r o n m e n t is b e c a u s e e c o n o m i c p o l i c y of firms is based o n r e d u c i n g unit costs, c o n v e n t i o n a l l y this is done by r e d u c i n g l a b o u r costs, but if labour costs are fixed (as above) then the only way to reduce unit costs is to use less resources, land energy, raw materials etc, and therby d o i n g a l l the things the environmentalists want us t o do. A c t u a l l y m i c r o s aren't that clever either, the brain surgery m a c h i n e m e n t i o n e d by M s A t t e n b o r o u g h couldn't deal with any thing it h a d n ' t m e t b e f o r e ( w e l l a c t u a l l y t's

PROF. B R E M S S T R A H L U N O

programmer, w h o w o u l d also have to be a brain s u r g e o n ) whereas t h e e x p e r i e n c e d h u m a n c o u l d , not for any spiritual reason but s i m p l y b e c a u s e t h e data storage a n d data h a n d l i n g c a p a c i t y o f t h e h u m a n brain c a n n o t as yet be rivaled b y any c o m p u t e r a r o u n d today (or tomorrow). A n y one w h o has written software for a real p r o b l e m will k n o w that most of the skill is defining t h e p r o b l e m a n d selecting t h e compromises (there are always c o m p r o m i s e s ) . T h e c o d i n g is a very m i n o r part of t h e work, c o m p u t e r s c a n d o t h e c o d i n g but none of the rest. S o m y view of t h e future is of a society based on skill not ' s l o g ' w h e r e people do what they are g o o d at, a n d sell the c o p y r i g h t o n their skill. I believe this future is inevitable, e c o n o m i c a n d s o c i a l pressures will ensure it g o e s that way. If y o u are frightened by, or even interested in m i c r o s then c o m e t o o n e of the m i c r o c o m p u t e r c l u b meetings at 7:00pm o n T u e s d a y s . T h i s week our illustrious editor is giving a talk. Tim Panton

COMPOSING MUSIC BY COMPUTER BY T H E FELIX EDITOR, COLIN PALMER S o m e h o w they (micro club) m a n a g e d to rope m e into giving a lecture o n M u s i c C o m p o s i t i o n by c o m p u t e r s . Before y o u turn to page 12 of this illustrious n e w s p a p e r I promise not to bore y o u with detailed d e s c r i p t i o n s of 12,000 line P a s c a l p r o g r a m s . For those of y o u w h o r e m e m b e r my election c a m p a i g n for F E L I X Editor, last M a r c h , y o u may recall a weird election poster based o n my experiments with c o m p u t e r music composition. Most programmers create g a m e s p a c k a g e s w h i c h use u p large a m o u n t s of units. In these d a y s of cuts I believe one s h o u l d write p r o g r a m s that create usable output rather t han eat u p units .... however t h e p r o g r a m h a d a 6 h o u r C P U e x e c u t i o n time a n d thus defeated t h e objective of s a v i n g units (it was run over the s u m m e r v a c a t i o n 1978). If y o u are interested i n c o m p u t e r m u s i c c o m p o s i t i o n then c o m e to t h e M i c r o c o m p u t e r c l u b next T u e s d a y (I don't k n o w

refuse to beiieve t+ijir I ccjn be beaten

Come an Pro)"' It's

h

Before c o m p o s i n g m u s i c o n e has to write an output p a c k a g e that will d i s p l a y the notes in a readable format. It is useless trying to interpret m i l l i o n s of n u m b e r s a n d s y m b o l s . Fortunately several students have d e v e l o p e d an attractive plotting p a c k a g e for t h e K i n g m a t i c plotter (a great device that a l s o p r o d u c e s attractive s p i r o g r a p h i c patterns). However, I d e c i d e d it w o u l d be interesting t o develop a p a c k a g e that w o u l d output m u s i c a l s c o r e s o n a lineprinter. After a few weeks the lineprinter w a s merrily c h u r n i n g o u t single v o i c e r a n d o m tunes. I was not satisfied with just o n e v o i c e b e i n g c o m p o s e d a n d set to work p r o d u c i n g a p r o g r a m , that w o u l d output four-part h a r m o n y o n the lineprinter! 3 m o n t h s a n d 20,000 units laterthe p r o g r t a m began to r un . It i n c l u d e d a s e l f - c h e c k i n g s u b r o u t i n e that needed a c h e c k i n g routine to detect b u g s in the c h e c k p r o g r a m . Before l o n g the first a i m to p r o d u c e a p r o g r a m that c o m p o s e d m u s i c had been a m e n d e d t o p r o d u c i n g a g o o d output p a c k a g e . I was able to c o m p o s e s o m e c a n o n s w h i c h c o u l d never have been c o n s t r u c t e d by a human being because they had a m a t h e m a t i c a l perfection a n d h a r m o n i c 'fit' that w o u l d have taken years to c o m p o s e . T h e p r o g r a m was able to give a mark out of 60,000 points for e a c h attempt that it c o m p o s e d . T h e c o m p u t e r stored the 'best' attempts a n d r e p r o d u c e d t h e m at the e n d of the s e a r c h to find s p e c i a l c a n o n s . T h e ability for a m a c h i n e to evaluate its p e r f o r m a n c e s m a c k s o r artificial i n t e l l i g e n c e a n d that is o n e of the areas in w h i c h I next h o p e to write articles for FELIX. If y o u ' d like to s e e s o m e of t h e output please d r o p into the F E L I X office.

R C S C A R O L SINGING NEXT MONDAY M E E T R C S U FOR FREE PUNCH A T 6 p.m.

Too bad Prof !

b.j a. mierg

rrKu-bin<- ... , r., thai :

the v e n u e b u t I s u p p o s e it's i n t h e U n i o n b u i l d i n g ? ) . T o wet y o u r appetite i'll try and give y o u a brief d e s c r i p t i o n of t h e main elements of the p r o g r a m .

/

Lj

o u

can't huff i t s king !

wmnina'

13


I.C. RADIO TIMES

Friday 7th December

5.00

T u n e In

6.00

American Rock

7.00

Viewpoint

9.00

Roundabout

11.00 1.00

L

Simon -

8.00

-

Gererd Jennings

W a k e U p W i t h J o n - J o n F i r t h ; i n c l u d i n g l o c a l c i n e m a g u i d e at 1 0 . 3 0 a n d

Harvey

track

Nadin

Alan Hlgginson

3.00

Paul Farrington

4.00

Steve M o s e s

6.00

Heavy Metal S h o w

-

J u l i a n Pitt a n d N e a l K a y ;

9.00

Roundabout Through

between

six

and

nine

-

S a h a r a Blott; -

Midnight

Wake U p With Sarah S & M

-

Simon

-

Sarah Talbot

1.00

T h e most O u t s t a n d i n g A l b u m s of the D e c a d e

4.00

Roundtable

-

Nick Melling;

F o c u s o n E . L . O (part 2) Sunday Special

This week

8.00

N e a l K a y , t o p R o c k D . J . r e s i d e n t at t h e B a n d w a g o n , o n t h e r o a d w i t h

10.45

t h e S o u n d h o u s e R o a d s h o w , c o n c e r t c o m p e r e (for R u s h , M o t o r h e a d

1.00

-

-

J o n Firth

a p a n e l of g u e s t s review the n e w releases

Harvey

I.C. R a d i o live f r o m S t a n ' s B a r Through

Nadin Simon W o o d s & Sarah Talbot

Midnight

Closedown

He w i l l be b r i n g i n g w i t h

s o m e u n r e l e a s e d D e m o T a p e s w h i c h y o u w i l l be a b l e to hear;

Monday 10th December

y o u c a n a l s o r i n g i n o n i n t e r n a l 3 4 4 0 a n d t a lk to N e a l d u r i n g the A l s o l i s t e n i n for n e w r e l e a s e s b y R i o t , S a m m y H a g a r ,

T r i u m p h , Iron M a i d e n , P r a y i n g M a n t i s , A p r i l W i n e

etc..

S o g i v e L a r r y a n d Isla a m i s s a n d let it a l l h a n g o u t . Julian Pitt

5.00

T u n e In

6.00

Folk: R a g g e d Heroes

7.00

Viwpoint

9.00 11.00

P.S. -

y o u after

Milner

6.00

programme.

w i t h m u s i c t o relax

Sunday 9th December

5.00

et a l , w i l l be c o - p r e s e n t i n g t h e s h o w .

Nunns;

y o u r C h r i s t m a s Party. Closedown

p.m.

let s o m e real e t h n i c m u s i c p u t y o u r b r a i n i n t o o v e r d r i v e .

R i n g in r e q u e s t s o n 3440 t o k e e p h e r quiet

Jeremy

t o m o r r o w - c a n c e l it. S i t u a t e y o u r s e l f by a n o u t l e t of I.C. R a d i o a n d

him

s e e feature

i n c l u d i n g 301 S p o r t s d e s k at 8.30

8.00

etc.)

with w e e k e n d T . V . g u i d e

A i d e n Sutcliffe

2.00

11.00

doing

-

Closedown

301m/999kHz Medium Wave

are

Dave H o d e s c

Chris Dalton;

featured long a l b u m 11.00

1.00

you

Littlejohn

Saturday 8th December

11.00

Whatever

-

Through Midnight

1

E

DACI

-

If I h a v e m a g n e s i u m flares a n d d r y i c e w i l l y o u l i s t e n ?

1.00

-

Barry -

Wareing -

Eric J a m s ;

Huw Baynham;

Roundabout

-

Simon

T h r o u g h Midnight

-

producer: S i d

w i t h I.C. R a d i o T o p T w e n t y at 8.30

Littlejohn

Gerard Jennings

Closedown

Tuesday 11th December 12.00 2.15

I.C. Radio Top Twenty

3/12/79

Midday Spin Closedown

5.00

T u n e In

6.00

That's J a z z

-

Mark J o n e s

7.00

Viewpoint

-

Harry Magnay;

producer S i m o n Milner

- K a r e n ; f e a t u r e d g r o u p : S k i d s , G i g G u i d e f o r W e d n e s d a y at

8.45 a n d h e r f a v o r i t e r e c o r d s of 1 9 7 9 9.00

(D

Electric Light Orchestra

2

(4)

Boomtown Rats

3

(11)

1

Status Quo Madness

-

-

-

Last Train to London / Confusion

Diamond Smiles

1.00

(2) (3)

Jam

6

(-)

Joe Jackson -

It's Different for Girls -

7

(5).

B.A. Robertson

(8)

Inmates -

9

(20)

10

(7)

11

(13)

Gary Newman

-

Complex

12

-

Send O n e Your Love

Knocked It Off

The Walk The Long Run

Dr. Feelgood

-

(6)

Stevie Wonder

(9)

Matchbox

14 15

(19) (15)

16

(10)

17

(-)

18

(16)

Santana

-

19

(-)

Darts -

Reet Petite

20

(-)'

Rachel Sweet

Ruts

-

-

chart

301 N e w s l i n e

7.00

Viewpoint

-

-

News a n d Views from around Co l l ege J o n Firth;

i n c l u d i n g 301 S p o r t s d e s k at 8.30, c h a r t of

Gig Guide 11.00 1.00

-

Roundabout

-

Gerard Jennings

Through Midnight

-

Simon

Littlejohn

Closdown

Union City Blue -

Life in the City

Thursday 13th December

You Know that I Love You -

compiled

12.00

Baby Let's Play House

by

Carolyne Mas Sarah

-

Talbot

records on I.C. Radio over the past two weeks.

Quote G o o d b y e Quote from

the

most

played

Midday Spin

2.15

Closedown

5.00

T u n e In

6.00

Disco / Boogie Time

7.00

Viewpoint

9.00 11.00 1.00

14

S i d ; t h i s w e e k a l a r g e f l a v o u r i n g of P u n k R o c k .

Jah War

After The Fire

is

R ft B -

6.40

9.00

Rockabily Rebel

Most played Album Track : T he

spot the s w a p with T h u r s d a y .

K e n Strachan

Yesteryear, chat with Stole about tomorrow's p r o g r a m m e a n d T h u r s d a y

Moonlight and Musak

Blondie

5.00

Put Him out of Your Mind

13

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-

Wednesday 12th December

8

M

Simon Woods;

Closedown

Eton Rifles

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-

Living on an Island

5

Eagles

Roundabout

Through Midnight

O n e Step Beyond

4

-

11.00

-

Tim Tuggey

Roundabout

-

Alan Burton

Sarah Talbot;

T h r o u g h Midnight Closedown

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S i m o n Milner - Sid

d i d y o u s p o t it ?


T h e C h r i s t m a s U G M is at 12:45 i n M E 220 on T u e s d a y . F a t h e r C h r i s t m a s w i l l be giving out pressies to the Exec. O t h e r things w i l l also h a p p e n . In the evening we w i l l go c a r o l s i n g i n g i n L o n d o n w i t h Scarf. M e e t i n the U n i o n B a r at 6:00pm for a r e a l l y good evening. T h e r e w i l l be m i n c e pies a n d p u n c h a f t e r w a r d s i n the U n i o n Office.

CITY-AND GUILDS T i m e for the p e n u l t i m a t e F E L I X article o f this t e r m . D u e to good a r r a n g i n g there was a whole week to recover f r o m C a r n i v a l , s o m e o f us needed this. B y S u n d a y enough people h a d r e c o v e r e d to p a r t i c i p a t e i n the r u g b y sevens. T h i s was a good d a y out at H a r l i n g t o n despite the fact that s o m e of the m a t c h e s d i d n ' t t u r n out the w a y that they were intended. T T w o n the plate a n d the w o m e n ' s t e a m o f t e n f a r e d w e l l despite s o m e o f the o p p o s i t i o n not enteri n g into the s p i r i t o f the g a m e . T h e food a f t e r w a r d s was good a n d the f i l m was r a t h e r funny. T h e n o m i n a t i o n p a p e r s for H o n Sec c a m e d o w n last F r i d a y w i t h o n l y one n a m e o n the sheet, so it only r e m a i n s for S a r a M c G u i n e s s to be r a t i f i e d at the next U G M . We w i l l be r e q u i r i n g a new A s s i s t a n t H o n Sec to be elected at the next G e n C o m i n the s p r i n g t e r m . A n y b o d y who t h i n k s they w o u l d like to s t a n d s h o u l d c o m e a n d see J o i n the office. FORTHCOMING EVENTS

T h u r s d a y 13 we are g o i n g ice s k a t i n g at Queens. M e e t at the U n i o n B a r at 6:00pm. F r i d a y is the end o f t e r m w h e n we a l l get p i s s e d a n d go h o m e .

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A s this is the 30th a n n i v e r s a r y issue I d e c i d e d to look up s o m e i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m the last t h i r t y years. D u r i n g the 1950s G u i l d s were quite active w i t h large n u m b e r s t u r n i n g u p for the events. M o r p h y D a y was s i m i l a r to today w i t h m o r e p a r t i c i p a t i o n f r o m the boys i n blue especially w h e n a b r i c k w a l l was built a c r o s s P u t n e y T o w p a t h a n d the t r a p p i n g o f an innocent p a n t e c h n i c o n . In 1958 S o u t h a m p t o n U n i v e r s i t y stole Bo o n l y to f i n d the police c a l l e d i n to get it r e t u r n e d as it was as inviolate then as it is now. T h e old C&G b u i l d i n g b e g a n to be d e m o l i s h e d at the end o f the decade. In 1961 the o l d w o o d e n Spanne r was stolen only to be f o u n d three m o n t h s later i n the left luggage office o f a s m a l l r a i l w a y station near K o b l e n z i n the R h i n e Valley.

S a t u r d a y 8 is the Y e a r R a g . T h i s i s the event where a l l the years o f G u i l d s compete w i t h each other to collect the m o s t m o n e y d u r i n g the twenty-four h o u r s between m i d n i g h t F r i d a y a n d m i d n i g h t S a t u r d a y . So c o m e a n d collect the cans o n F r i d a y f r o m the U n i o n Office i f y o u want to start c o l l e c t i n g at m i d n i g h t . T h e r e w i l l be a h a l f b a r r e l for the year that collects the m o s t a n d another for the year that collects the m o s t p e r h e a d . W e need a g o o d t u r n o u t as R C S collected j£2,700 last week. If y o u want to start o n S a t u r d a y be at the Office at 9:30am (don't forget y o u r licences). S u n d a y 9 is the B a r G a m e s N i g h t . T h i s is a slightly m o r e refined B a r Night. T h e r e w i l l be a selection o f g a m e s s u c h as c a r d s , nine m a n s m o r r i s , d o m i n o e s , d a r t s , chess a n d m a n y others. S i n g i n g w i l l also take place as w e l l as a few quiet p i n t s . M e e t i n the U n i o n B a r at 7:00pm.

PROF BREMSSTRAHLUNG

GUILDS CAROL SINGING

A l s o d u r i n g the early p a r t of the 1960s a t h i r t y foot Spanne r was fixed to the side o f the new p h y s i c s b u i l d i n g b y s o m e m o u n t a i n e e r i n g G u i l d s m e n . It took College two days to r e m o v e one night's w o r k . In 1963 we lost S p a n n e r again a n d at M o r p h y D a y we w o n the

Meet Union Bar 6.00 pm Tuesday 11th December

M o r p h y a n d L o w r y races a n d c o v e r e d two police m o t o r c y c l i s t s i n f l o u r a n d tomatoes. In 1964 T h e t a was taken by a Guildsmen dressed as a w a i t r e ss d u r i n g a F r e s h e r s D i n n e r . In 1965 o u r U n i o n Office was f u r n i s h e d . T h e p o l i c e ' a c a d e m y j o i n e d i n M o r p y y D a y i n 1967 a n d they got a bit m u c k y . 1969 saw ideas to dissolve the C C U s (things don't change), 650 people t u r n e d u p at a G u i l d s U G M to protest a n d a sixty foot d r a g o n c o n t a i n i n g twenty G u i l d s m e n was m a r c h e d t h r o u g h H a r r o d s . D u r i n g the years o f J e n n y Jones, 1974-1975, Guilds had many mascots. Cheers, Bryan.

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- • •

15


TORY REFORM GROUP vs MONDAY C L U B T h e Conservative S o c i e t y recently invited M r T i m S m i t h (a m e m b e r o f the T R G ' s National Executive) and M r B r i a n R a t h b o n e (a s o l i c i t or and member of the M o n d a y C l u b ) to take part in a friendly d i s c u s s i o n about the merits (or otherwise) of their respective groups. T h e T R G a n d the M C are pressure g r o u p s within the Tory party, the former o n the leftw i n g a n d the latter o n the right. T h e y try to present alternative policies, put forward particular points of view a n d generally promote d i s c u s s i o n within the party.

IC

.LIBERAL, /

CLUB

\

O n T h u r s d a y 29 November, IC L i b e r a l C l u b hosted a very s u c c e s s f u l meeting with David A l t o n , Liberal M P for Liverpool Edge Hill. David, the y o u n g e s t m e m b e r of the H o u s e of C o m m o n s , s p o k e for about half an hour o n a wide range of issues under the broad title Britain N e e d s A Liberal G o v e r n m e n t . His s p e e c h i n c l u d e d the f o l l o w i ng points: 1. That we need a s y s t e m of proportional representation to e n d the twoparty s y s t e m a n d the endless p e n d u l u m - s w i n g i n g that g o e s with it. T h e c y c l e s of L a b o u r nationalisation a n d T o r y denat i onal i sat i on are detrimental to the health of the nation. 2. That we need greater workers participation in industry and they must partake in the profits of industry. 3. That violations of h u m a n rights are o c c u r i n g all a r o u n d the w o r l d . He severely attacked M r s T h a t c h e r for c o n t i n u i n g to r e c o g n i s e the regime of P o l Pot in C a m b o d i a . T h i s regime may well be the worst in the history of the world and was r e s p o n s i b l e for g e n o c i d e o n a massive s c a l e but sf/7/ we c o n t i n u e to give the stamp of approval to it. He also referred to the plight of d i s s i d e n t s in the U S S R . 4. That p u b l i c s p e n d i n g cuts are a myth. In fact, total p u b l i c s p e n d i n g will be i n c r e a s e d next year with large increases in defence and law and order. He attacked the government' i d e o l o g i c a l ' d i s m a n t l i n g of the welfare state' a n d the proposals c o n t a i n e d in the E d u c a t i o n B i l l . 5. That we need to invest more in alternative energy research. He m e n t i o n e d that many buildings now derived their energy from solar panels. Q u e s t i o n s from the floor i n c l u d e d one o n David's attitude to the C o r r i e Bjll. He replied that he was against a b o r t i o n for d e e p l y - h e l d moral reasons. He was also a s k e d about L i b e r a l p h i l o s o p h y , and referred the questioner to a cassette of the p h i l o s o p h y debate at Margate. At the A s s e m b l y , D a v i d had s p o k e n on the ' T r o o p s O u t ' motion on Northern Ireland a n d he was asked about this. H e replied that he had never c o n d o n e d the activities of the IRA a n d was l o o k i n g for a negotiated s o l u t i o n involving the withdrawal of troops.

C L U B NEWS IC Liberal C l u b has elected P h i l i p C o l e as S e c r e t a r y a n d Ian Prosser as ordinary committee member. The a n n u a l d i n n e r of the C l u b will be held o n T u e s d a y 11 D e c e m b e r at the National L i b e r a l C l u b . The cost is ÂŁ5.05 and a n y o n e c a n c o m e a l o n g (you don't even have to be a Liberal!). Finally, don't forget o u r informal meetings at 1:00pm o n Fridays in Stan's Bar. Richard Earl

RAILWAY M e t r o p o l i t a n â&#x20AC;&#x201D; C a m m e l l , of W a s h w o o d Heath, B i r m i n g h a m is Britain's last remaining private builder of rolling stock and as s u c h was the subject of a R a i l s o c visit on W e d n e s d a y 28 November. Initially we had p l a n n e d to travel to B i r m i n g h a m on the 8:50 from P a d d i n g t o n , but this proved impractical owing to railcards not being valid on this train. To E u s t o n therefore and journey h e n c e to B i r m i n g h a m on the 9:35 ' C l a n s m a n ' . At B i r m i n g h a m we were due to wait an hour for Steve C l a y t o n to arrive on the 10:40, this proved elastic as the 10:40 arrived thirty minutes late due to loco failure at R u g b y . Washwood Heath w o r k s is currently engaged on b u i l d i n g trains for three contracts, the D78 stock for the District L i n e as well as trains for the Tyne and Wear and H o n g K o n g metros. T h e D78 trains represent quite a major departure from previous practice in L o n d o n T r a n s p o r t surface stock. F o r o n e t h i n g , it will be the first time the District has recieved new s t o c k rather than cast-offs from other lines.

16

G i v i n g a brief s u m m a r y of the development and beliefs of the Tory Reform G r o u p (founded in 1963), M r S m i t h e m p h a s i s e d that there is no 'right' a n s w e r to the p r o b l e m s facing us and c o n s e q u e n t l y there is a need for o r g a n i s a t i o n s to put forward alternative views. N o party s h o u l d be m o n o l i t h i c and it is foolish to rule out certain c o u r s e s of action simply for p h i l o s o p h i c reasons: "There is no room for d o g m a " . The power of any government to intervene is limited â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this fact must be recognised. Replying'for the o p p o s i t i o n , so to speak, M r R a t h b o n e e x p l a i n e d that the M o n d a y C l u b also dated from 1963; its formation was a response from members of the party w h o felt it was g o i n g t h r o u g h a bad patch and losing sight of traditional C o n s e r v a t i s m . In the early 1970s, everything went w r o n g again, c u l m i n a t i n g in a " r i c h l y deserved defeat" in 1974 for the Heath government. Mr R a t h b o n e e x p r e s s e d approval of the present administration, now taking determined steps to reduce the power of the government "....the hard d i s c i p l i n e s w h i c h this c o u n t r y must endure b e c a u s e of m i s m a n a g e m e n t dating back almost to the e n d of the last war. T h i s government will maintain its policy with vigour until it gets results. It will however, take a long time to reap these benefits". The essential difference between the T R G a n d the M C was stated as being o n c e of e m p h a s i s : a q u e s t i o n of priorities. For the M o n d a y C l u b , freedom of the i ndi v i dual a n d traditional C o n s e r v a t i v e values were very important; for the T o r y Reform G r o u p , equality of opportunity. S o m e interesting c o m m e n t s were made in answer to questions from the audi e nc e . O n trade u n i o n reform, M r R a t h b o n e said firmly that the limited reforms p r o p o s e d were not e n o u g h ; the power of trade u n i o n s was quite frightening. He a d d e d : " T h e true doctrine of monetarist policies will not work if the e c o n o m y is distorted by an a g g l o m e r a t i o n of union power". B o t h he a n d Mr S m i t h agreed that the 1976 act s h o u l d certainly be repealed. Less agreement was reached o n electoral reform; M r S m i t h said that he had gradually moved round to favour the idea of s o m e sort of proportional representation. W h e n M r R a t h b o n e v o i c ed fears of this p r o d u c i n g a 'soft centre' government a n d fragmentation of parties into small units, Mr S m i t h s a i d he thought it w o u l d help to preserve some kind of political stability. U n d e r the present system and with the rather g l o o m y prospects for the 1980s, he foresaw with s o m e anxiety the possibility of dissatsified voters s w i n g i n g wildly from left to right and back, voting in different governments every five years or so, w h i c h w o u l d be pretty d i s a s t r o u s . Further d i s c u s s i o n o n s c h o o l s a n d e d u c a t i o n was unfortunately cut short t h r o u g h lack of time, a n d the a u d i e n c e d i s p e r s e d , enlightened, to seek k n o w l e d g e of a different k i n d . IC Conservative Society

SOCIETY A n a l l - a l u m i n i u m train, they have only four single leaf d o o r s per vehicle a n d these are e q u i p e d to be operated by the p a s s e n g e r s by way of a button next to the doors. W h e n the speed of the train has fallen to a suitable low value, the g u a r d c a n press a d o o r release button to allow passengers to use the buttons on the doors. T i n t e d glass is fitted, a n d a force-ventilation system is u s e d with distribution a l o n g the train by way of s m a l l centrifugal fans. New trains are delivered by BR to their West Ruislip depot a n d the first D78 trains are now being used for crew training at D a g e n h a m . T h e H o n g K o n g metro cars are very different to any in Britain. O n e feature immediately noticed is their sheer size, they are seventy-five feet long and twelve feet wide, w h i c h gives them a c a p a c i t y per car of 450 i n c l u d i n g only 45 seated. T h e cars are m ar s hal l e d into six car trains, a n d o n e e q u i p e d with overhead current c o l l e c t i o n , this time 25 Kvac. T h e w h o l e metro project

has been a really e x c i t i n g e n g i n e e r i n g venture, involving the c o n s t r u c t i o n of a tunnel a c r o s s the harbour, that is really a series of tubes s u n k into position from the surface. T h e other activity at the w o r k s is busb u i l d i n g . T h e standard bus built is the M e t r o b u s as used by L T with all integral c o n s t r u c t i o n . T h i s c a n take a variety of diesel e n a i n e s s u c h as those by R o l l s - R o y c e or G a r d n e r . T h e p r o c e s s of p a i n t i n g was rather interesting, as was the m e t h o d of m o v i n g the b u s e s a r o u n d the works. A n electric trolley with j a c k i n g c a p a c i t y is m o v e d underneath the front e n d of the bus, w h i c h is j a c k e d up a n d the bus c a n be pulled a l o n g by o n e man. T h e future of the c o m p a n y s e e m s a s s u r e d for the moment with a full order book for both rail a n d road vehicles. Future new trains are to i n c l u d e the 1983 tube stock for L T ' s J u b i l e e Line. Chris Veale


Sir On this, not immoderately salubrious occasion, may I most humbly and I hope graciously, proffer my warmest (and even most heartfelt) thanks, regards, best wishes congratulations to your extremely worthy, and notably unpretentious publication; on reaching its thirtieth anniversary, despite the frequent, possibly even'boringly, repetitiously, unpunctuatedly regular occurences of traumatic, catastrophic and usually far-reaching interruptions, sometimes as if conspired at and effected by an almost Jesuitical inquisitory panel of warped evil minds (of obviously, by necessity, awesome and majestic mental capabilities) intent with total obsession, on their goal of the complete annihilation of the perpetrators of discussions on the correct juxtaposition of conjunctions; a topic that reminds me of the words of dear old Bertrand Russell, it was at a British Kidney Patients Association Annual Airlines Ball, when whilst listening to an embarrassingly, interminably uncomfortable

after dinner speech, by the then young Patrick Campbell, that he turned to me and (in his characteristically, clinical, concise style) mildly, morosely, murmured, mischievously "maybe, and and it, but not and and and or and and but, are also but and if, and if and if, but not if and but and if, despite if but also and which and and and and and which, being and butthen, not then and which, but instead but if only, are also which is then and but not and then, is is is?" "Maybe' I tentatively replied and of course he was forced, albeit reluctantly, to agree with me, though these perennial "is is is?" discussions are as objectionably irrelevant as his sort of unwieldly sentence structure is annoying and incoherent; that have occurred during this period, that have occurred during this period. Yours unobtrusively Bernard Levin Physics 3 (Hon)

PHOTOSOC PRINT COMPETITION R E S U L T S

1st

2nd Terry Arnold (Chem Eng 3)

Phillip Hollinshead (Metallurgy)

3rd John Guidon (EE3)


Mining & Metallurgical Society

Royal School of Mines

ROBERT N PRYOR jj MEMORIAL LECTURE The Mining and Metallurgical Society is sponsoring the First Annual Memorial Lecture to the late Professor Robert N Pryor. The lecture will be given by Sir Mark Turner, Chairman and Chief Executive of Rio Tinto Zinc Corporation Ltd, on Monday 14 January 1980 at 6:00pm in the Mining Lecture Theatre at the Royal School of Mines, South Kensington, London SW 7. The lecture will be on the topic of International British-based Companies in a Nationalistic World. All are cordially invited to attend.

ROWING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ALLOM CUP REGATTA O n S a t u r d a y , the w h o l e of the IC B o a t C l u b t u r n e d up at the U L B o a t h o u s e by Kew B r i d g e , to c o m p e t e in the A l l o m C u p Regatta for U L c o l l e g e s . In the evening, we returned to P u t n e y w i t h n i n e pint t a n k a r d s , n i n e halfpint t a n k a r d s a n d five men's m e d a l s together with the A l l o m C u p for M e n ' s O p e n V l l l s and the R o d e r i c k H i l l C u p for M e n ' s S e n i o r C V l l l s . E v e n m o r e e n c o u r a g i n g , w a s that the 2 n d VIII r e a c h e d the final of the o p e n event, p r o v i n g that IC has t w o V l l l s faster t han any other L o n d o n c o l l e g e . T h e results were:

A L L O M C U P (OPEN Vllls) In the first heat, the Ist VIII r a c e d against a r c h - r i v a l s a n d p r o b a b l y the o n l y c r e w w h o c o u l d beat IC, U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e a n d H o s p i t a l . Off the start, U C & H took an early lead, but c o u l d not get a w a y from IC. A s the race p r o g r e s s e d , IC f o u n d their r h y t h m and s t r o k e by stroke, c a m e b a c k at t h e m , a n d eventually p a s s e d t h e m a n d w o n by the narrowest of m a r g i n s : t w o feet. In a n o t h e r heat, the 2nd VIII r a c e d the K i n g ' s C o l l e g e 1st VIII. In this race, IC led from start to finish a n d w o n by a c o m f o r t a b l e o n e a n d a half lengths. T h e final w a s between I C I, I C II a n d a n VIII from L o n d o n H o s p i t a l . L o n d o n took the early lead but the 1st VIII s o o n f o u n d their rhythm a n d w e r e in front by the half w a y point. At about t h i s time, b a d s t e e r i n g by the H o s p i t a l

18

c o x c a u s e d a c l a s h between t h e m a n d the IC 2 n d VIII (who w e r e level w i t h them). T h i s c a u s e d the u m p i r e to stop t h e race a n d L o n d o n H o s p i t a l were d i s q u a l i f i e d . O u r row then took place between t h e 1st VIII a n d the 2 n d VIII a n d as e x p e c t e d t h e 1st VIII w o n by about t w o a n d a half lengths.

RODERICK HILL C U P (SENIOR C Vllls) T h e 2 n d VI11 w e r e c l i m b i n g up in this event a n d d i s c o v e r e d that no other c o l l e g e c o u l d p r o d u c e a s e c o n d VIII to m a t c h t h e m , a n d came away comfortable winners.

NOVICE Vllls T h i s w a s the first o p p o r t u n i t y for the freshers to get a taste of r a c i n g . T h e i r first race w a s against C h e l s e a C o l l e g e a n d G u y ' s H o s p i t a l . T h e y got off to a b a d start, d u e to not h e a r i n g the starter c o r r e c t l y a n d w e r e never able to m a k e up the deficit. T h e y lost by about o n e l e n g t h to G u y s , w h o went o n to w i n the final.

LADIES O P E N IVs We entered two c r e w s in this event. T h e A c r e w beat L o n d o n H o s p i t a l A a n d Q M C by two lengths a n d easily w o n their heat, while the B c r e w had a n e a s y w i n o v e r L o n d o n H o s p i t a l B. In the final, the t w o IC IVs w e r e j o i n e d by a c r e w e n t e r e d as U n i v e r s i t y C o l l e g e a n d H o s p i t a l . It t u r n e d out that the

U C & H girls â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a University of L o n d o n crew and were actually competing in U L e q u i p m e n t . T h e race was very c l o s e with U L l e a d i n g a l l the way but they w e r e p u s h e d very hard by the IC A crew. T h e final result b e i n g a w i n for U C & H by one length.

LADIES NOVICE IVs In their first race, o u r girls novice c r e w had a very comfortable win over St Bartholomew's Hospital and Chelsea C o l l e g e . In the final, they set of s l o w l y against Q M C , but in the latter stages of the race, proved they had p a c e d themselves perfectly by r o w i n g t h r o u g h a n d w i n n i n g by a half a length.

TEAMS 1st VIII: P M o y s l e y , W B r a d b u r y , J Urry, S W e b b , M F e l l o w s , A Rowe, P G e r r a r d , A Reynolds and I Simpson. 2 n d VIII: R M a d d o c k , S C o l l i e r , E H o b h o u s e , C Adams, C Geary, P Allen, T Joslin, M Pritchard and S Crampton. N o v i c e VIII: P Tebbutt, P A l l e n , S A l l i n s o n , A Purdy, R Redhead, J Marsden, P Mance, M Agnew and M J o h n s o n . A C r e w : A T o n e y , G Griffiths, N Ray, C Weir, and M Canvin. B Crew: E Lindsay, S Gray, J Pearson, A B u r g e s s a n d W Partridge. N o v i c e !V: J J e n d r i c k , S Drane, H J o h n s t o n e , A C l o u g h and M Canvin.


REVIEWS I

MIKE HARDING at the Dominion Theatre, 4 Dec M i k e H a r d i n g first c a m e into the limelight with his single Rochdale Cowboy a n d s i n c e then has delighted a u d i e n c e s up a n d d o w n the country with his o w n b r a n d of L a n c a s h i r e h u m o u r a n d wit. His s h o w c o n t a i n e d a h i g h l y entertaining selection of e x p e r i e n c e s , past a n d present i n c l u d i n g c h i l d h o o d , his life o n the road, his tour of A m e r i c a , life in a rock b a n d in the sixties a n d his first time in L o n d o n . A s well a s s h o w i n g his s u p e r b talent for telling stories he also proved his worth as an extremely versatile m u s i c i a n by accompanying his s o n g s with a c o u s t i c guitar, electic guitar, ukelele, banjo, mandolin and harmonica. D u r i n g the three hour l o n g s h o w he d i d two m o n o l o g u e s : o n e as a d r u n k e n vicar with a witty parody of the N o a h ' s ark story a n d the other as a C a r r u t h e r s type C o l o n i a l (complete with a set of flying d u c k s o n the wall). M i k e H a r d i n g s h o w e d another side to his performance in s i n g i n g a very s a d but beautiful s o n g about the First W o r l d W a r d u r i n g the C h r i s t m a s of 1914. M i k e H a r d i n g is a n d always will be the m a n to see if y o u want a t h o r o u g h l y enjoyable night o u t with a L a n c a s h i r e flavour. Lesley Horrocks

IC CHOIR'S XMAS C O N C E R T IN THE G R E A T HALL ON FRI 7 D E C AT 8.00 pm. TICKETS ÂŁ1.10 (75p for s t u d e n t s ) FROM THE H A L D A N E LIBRARY OR T H E UNION OFFICE. Tickets for T H E DEVILS are on sale at ÂŁ1.00 from Dramsoc (store room, Union East Staircase). Posters also available.

imperial college FOLK CLUB lower refectory prince

contort

rd-

S-W. 7

members.

mort. 10 dec.

40 p

THE G O L D E N LADY (Director: Jose Larraz) J u l i a H e m m i n g w a y ( C h r i s t i n a World) is hired by a b u s i n e s s t y c o o n to help him obtain an oil c o n c e s s i o n by e l i m i n a t i n g the three o t h e r bidders for t h e c o n c e s s i o n before t h e ruler of the s m a l l o i l - r i c h emirate arrives in London. With the help of three 'specialist' ( a n d very attractive) assistants, D a h i l i a (Suzanne Danielle), L u c y ( J u n e C h a d w i c k ) a n d C a r o l ( A n i k a Paviel) a n d a c o m p u t e r , J u l i a begins a preliminary investigation of all the bidders a n d d i s c o v e r s that m o r e is at stake than s h e had s u p p o s e d . M o s t of the ' a c t i o n ' takes place between H e a t h r o w a n d the H y d e Park H o t e l , despite an o v e r - c o m p l i c a t e d plot involving t h e G r e e k s , the Israelis, a n e x - N a z i a n d the A m e r i c a n a n d Soviet intelligence services. D u r i n g the investigation, w e are t a k e n to a c h i c night c l u b in L o n d o n for the pleasure of seeing Blonde on Blonde and Hot G o s s i p perform, p r e s u m a b l y to remind us of t h e high-living a n d s o p h i s t i c a t e d w o r l d in w h i c h the G o l d e n L a d y operates. However, this d i s c o interlude, together with a c o u p l e of dull b e d r o o m scenes, serves o n l y to l e ng t hen an already uneventful story, i n w h i c h even t h e c h a s e s e q u e n c e s lack a n y pace. Simon Hodgson


R E V I E W S wmmm MADNESS AFFECTS

STUDENT

The new album by Madness, that is. Titled ONE STEP BEYOND it is their debut a l b u m . Of the three groups currently enjoying s u c c e s s by reviving s k a , whatever that is, Madness are arguably the best, certainly at writing g o o d tunes. T h e Specials' first single was excellent.but they have since failed to follow it, and the Selector are really non-starters. STIFF M a d n e s s have now c h a n g e d labels to Stiff R e c o r d s from the original ska revival c o m p a n y , 2-tone. Stiff were never slow to capitalise on any new trend, and they have got themselves a band here w h o will s o o n be a very powerful force in the world of pop. They are to reggae what the B o o t o w n Rats were to punk when they started so long ago, when Peter Powell was an undreamed nightmare and the Sex Pistols were still the greatest rock'n'roll band in the world. NME O K so you've read about them in the music press, you know all about them already and you have heard the rumours that s o m e of their fans are N F supporters, but last week the NME featured an interview with the band in w h i c h they all r e n o u n c e d the Front, and one claimed to have s o m e black friends in the Front as well because they disliked G r e e k s and Italians. Surely this shows the ignorance on w h i c h the Front is based, and bands like this do not deserve bad publicity b e c a u s e s o m e of their fans are stupid. MUSIC In case you forgot, this is a record review so I'd better mention the music now. There are fourteen tracks on this album and to go through each one in detail, as all deserve, would only be a bore and you'd probably stop reading, w h i c h you are not to do O K ? I must therefore attempt to single out a few tracks w h i c h I shall arbitrarily claim are the best. SINGLE S i d e one begins with the title track One Step Beyond currently a single and z o o m i n g up the charts. It is typical ofthe M a d n e s s style, heavy on the sax with a

PROF BREMSSTRAHLUNG

reggae beat, inject s o m e rocking guitar and a loony pianist and the whole thing vibrates with life. The next track is a sort of ballad called My Girl it begins with the line "My girl's mad at me...." and a heartstring twangs in every male who ever had a girlfriend who got mad at him. A gentler approach this. Night Boat to Cairo bounces magically around a middle eastern s o u n d , which I'll mention again later. The Prince was their first single and this version is still very catchy. A s we romp on to the end of side one and we c o m e to.... NUTS Tarzan's Nuts. If you remember R o n Ely as Tarzan in that wonderful T V series you will be z o n k e d by this reggae/ska version of the theme tune. S i d e two is slightly less memorable, but has its moments. In The Middle Of The Night is about a nice old newsagent who u n b e k n o w n to his customers nips out under the cover of darkness to nick their underwear off the line. (Perhaps a relative of A r n o l d Layne?) SEX Have y o u ever wonder e d what w o u l d happen to Swan Lake if it was given a reggae beat? Well, you can find out on this album. It c o m e s out like Egyptian Reggae; maybe J o h n a t h a n R i c h m a n was really ahead of his time. Rocking In A Flat is the next track and is, as the title suggests, more tradtional rock'n'roll. The piano goes fast and furious down below and the guitaring c o u l d be Nick Lowe in places. VIOLENCE C l o s i n g the s e c o n d side is a s o n g called Chipmunks Are Go, well less of a s o n g , more of a sort of U S Navy chant. It is great fun to sing the responses when u n d e r the i n f l u e n c e : "Sound pff

Chipmunks,

Sound

Are

you in t h e r e ?

Chipmunks,

VIRGIN The record can be had for under three quid at Virgin R e c o r d s , w h o m I hate for c h o p p i n g a further 70p off the price since I bought it. G o o n , get into the nuttiest s o u n d around. Leigh

Survival - Bob Marley and the Waiters (Tuff Gong/Island ILPS 9542) This is the first a l b u m from B o b Marley and the Wailers, since Marley's pilgrimage to Ethiopia (and the rest of Africa) a n d c o n s e q u e n t l y the album's main focus is upon Africa. T h e cover has the flags of all the Af r i c an nations (as w e l l a s t h e Z a p u a n d Z a n u flags) as well as the storage plan of a slave ship upon it. A n d s o to the music. T h e overall s o u n d is very polished a n d is not 'hard' as s o m e of the sounds currently emanating from J A . However, the lyrics and music are s o m e of the most powerful that Marley has written, especially, 'Zimbabwe', 'Africa Unite', ' O n e D r o p ' ' B a b y l o n S y s t e m ' a n d 'Wake up and Live'. T h e lyrics deal with the problems that the black man faces today, as Marley sees them, also the p e r c u s s i o n a n d bass are consistently g o o d throughout although I felt that the l-Threes vocals were a little obtrusive s o u n d i n g like t h e S h a n g r a - L a s ' in places. T h e many g o o d points of this album far outweigh the bad, the best part being (in this critic's eyes) the opening to 'Zimbabwe' - 'Every man gotta right/To d e c i d e his o w n d e s t i n y ' - w h i c h s u m s up the basic message of the a l b u m . This record is B o b Marley at his militant best a n d is definitely a record worth buying, even if y o u don't like reggae. Simon Jerome

SINGLES REVIEW Steve Hillage - Don't Dither Do It (Virgin) T h e intro to this reminds me of that to Pink Floyd's 'Sheep' o n A n i m a l s . In fact, the guitar b a c k i n g right t h r o u g h the record has a Floydian feel to it. However, that is where the s e m b l a n c e ends. There is a c o n t i n u a l d r u m beat w h i c h c o u l d make it popular in discos, but as it isn't very strong this c o u l d similarly be g o o d for a fair amount of radio play. The lyrics are rather unimaginative, being merely the title repeated over a n d over again; the quality of s i n g i n g is not particularly g o o d . Steve Hillage s h o u l d stick to guitar playing (at w h c i h he is exemplorary) a n d release the b a c k i n g track. T o s u m up, this is a reasonable single a n d 'rocks along well', with excellent guitar but sadly d i s a p p o i n t i n g s i n g i n g . Jeremy Nunns

Foster

T History is in the making Quork ! in a few seconds

Hey Prof'

off

1234 1234" and so it goes. The w o r d s a r e easy and don't embafass anyone, so you could have a go.

ALBUM REVIEW

will have some astounding the L o c h N e * »

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1

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20


NEWS FROM THE IC WINE CELLARS A n y member of the C o l l e g e i n c l u d i n g students c a n buy for personal use direct from the cellars. A n extensive selection of F r e n c h a n d G e r m a n wines is available with t o k e n examples from Italy and Y u g o s l a v i a . A folder was prepared last s e s s i o n with s o m e general notes setting out the aims and aspirations of the Wine C o m m i t t e e . T h e folder is d e s i g n e d to hold s o m e wine lists, o n e for e a c h of the major regions, and these have been updated recently. C o p i e s of the new lists c a n be obtained from t h e Refectory Office, g r o u n d floor, Sherfield. S o m e of the wines and the wine list are to be put o n display in the Sherfield B u i l d i n g . M e m b e r s of the C o l l e g e are to be e n c o u r a g e d to experiment a n d to 'drink their way t h r o u g h ' the c h o i c e s offered for e a c h region. T h e C o m m o n R o o m Wines have been s h i p p e d in bulk by t h e C o l l e g e direct from Franc e and

represent a better class of wine for the s a m e price than the usual 'plonk' served in many a restaurant. It s h o u l d be remembered w h e n s t u d y i n g the wine list that the prices are for use at C o l l e g e functions a n d these are t o b e c o m p a r e d with those c h a r g e d in restaurants for wines of similar quality. T o assist members of t h e C o l l e g e with p u r c h a s e s for private use a d i s c o u n t of seven a n d a half percent is offered for orders of six or m o r e bottles, w h i c h c a n be made for p u r c h a s e s of a single bottle of the fortified wines (Madeira, Sherry, Port) and of brandy and spirits. Everyone is w e l c o m e to widen their knowledge by b u y i n g from o u r cellars but s t o c k s must b e protected a n d substantial orders are not allowed. S t o c k s have been laid d o w n of s o m e fine B o r d e a u x a n d B u r g u n d y wines w h i c h need to mature further. T h e 1978 vintage is still lying in B o r d e a u x . S t o c k s of vintage ports, not s h o w n on the list, are very limited and are to be used for s p e c i a l C o l l e g e o c c a s i o n s o n l y . S t o c k s of the C o c k b u r n 1967 vintage are slightly more plentiful a n d this port is d r i n k i n g very well. Orders c a n be p l a c ed with the Refectory Office a n d s h o u l d be c o l l e c t e d within five days of o r d e r i n g . T h e seven a n d a half percent d i s c o u n t applies only to payment made o n c o l l e c t i o n o r against a pro-forma invoice. PG

TIPS

If y o u a r e a p o s t g r a d u a t e ,

THE C O N S O R T CHAMBER ORCHESTRA presents Vivaldi's 'The Four Seasons' with soloist HIDEKO UDAGAWA on TUES 11 D E C at 1:00pm. Admission FREE!

IC H O C K E Y C L U B Bank of E n g l a n d fell to t h e long awaited b a c k l a s h from the 3rd team w h i c h has h a d a series of d i s a p p o i n t i n g results. T h e m a t c h started with IC d o i n g most of the attacking but B a n k w o r k e d their way into the m at ch a n d after fifteen minutes C h r i s B i r d had to save off the line from a B a n k short corner. T w o minutes later IC o p e n e d their a c c o u n t with a goal from a long corner. Phil W e b b was the s c o r e r with a s p a r k l i n g display of stickwork. T h e s e c o n d half started well with an early goal for IC. C h r i s P o u n d e n d e d a g o o d run d o w n the right by p a s s i n g the ball a c r o s s the area to T i m M i t c h e l l w h o s c o r e d with a fierce shot. T e n minutes later B a n k were back in the match with a well struck goal from a short

TENPIN BOWLING Last Saturday the a n n u a l charity marathon was played at B i r m i n g h a m . T h i s involved b o w l i n g from midnight Friday until n o o n S a t u r d a y with the a i m of s c o r i n g as many points as possible. T h e Imperial team, s c r a p e d up at the last moment, fought will c o m i n g fourth to last, beating S a l f o r d Ladies, S a l f o r d B a n d B r u n e i C teams. J o h n K n i g h t (159 average) with consistent b o w l i n g c o m e fourth overall whilst erratic b o w l i n g resulted from t h e rest of t h e team. A few m i n o r injuries were s u s t a i n e d ,

CITY & GUILDS A E R O S O C At a short cermony yesterday P r o f e s s o r P O w e n , the h e a d o f the aeronautics d e p a r t m e n t , w a s a w a r d e d the R o y a l A e r o n a u t i c a l Society's g o l d m e d a l f o r his ' o u t s t a n d i n g c o n t r i b u t i o n to the f i e l d o f a e r o n a u t i c s ' . T h i s a w a r d is m a d e once each y e a r a n d p r e v i o u s recipiants have been the W r i g h t B r o t h e r s (the f i r s t so honoured) , G D e Havailland, Dassault and K u c k e m a n n , to n a m e a few. It w a s f o l l o w e d b y a lecture b y H a n d e l D a v i e s , C B , also a p r e v i o u s r e c i p i a n t about ' B a r r i e r s to p r o g r e s s i n aerospace, past, present a n d future'. A n y o n e i nterested i n b e c o m i n g a m e m b e r o f A e r o s o c c a n contact m e v i a the letter r a c k s i n the A e r o D e p t (especially those o f y o u w h o e x p r e s s e d interest at the b e g i n n i n g o f t e r m ; I ' m a f r a i d I lost y o u r names). S o m e o f you m a y be i n t e r e s t e d i n lectures h e l d at the R o y a l A e r o n a u t i c a l Society, being o n l y twenty m i n u t e s w a l k away, especially i f c o n s i d e r i n g a c a r e e r i n aerospace. Merrie Mannassi Aero 3 President Aerosoc

1. T h e h i g h p r i c e o f the tickets (£6.50). you will

probably

2. G e n e r a l p o s t g r a d u a t e

apathy.

have received o u r q u e s t i o n n a i r e by n o w . I urge y o u

3. T h e u n a t t r a c t i v e n a t u r e o f the event (ie it was to

to till this i n a n d r e t u r n it p r o m p t y since there is

be h e l d i n t h e e v e n i n g ) .

n o w a w i d e s p r e a d a p p r e c i a t i o n i n C o l l e g e circles that P h D s take t o o l o n g . T h e R e g i s t r a r has a g r e e d to c o m p i l e

statistics o n t h e m a t t e r

a n d i f the

p o s t g r a d u a t e v i e w c o u l d be a c c u r a t e l y represented to h i m (and others;, I a m sure that some effective discussion c o u l d take place. T h e P G D i n n e r w a s c a n c e l l e d d u e to l a c k o f interest. I ascribe three causes to this:

corner. However, IC fought back strongly and victory w a s s e c u r e d by a goal from C h r i s P o u n d w h o this time c o l l e c t ed a pass from T i m M i t c h e l l a n d p l a c e d his shot well. Mark Talbot's hard work was rewarded w h e n , with five minutes to go, he forced the ball past the keeper to give IC their fourth goal. A n y further attacking moves from Bank were s c a r e d off by R a l p h Dean's slide tackles and the g a m e e n d e d at 4-1 to IC. T h e team was: D M o y n h a m , R Dean, C B i r d (Capt), M Clift, P Webb, J Watkin, C P o u n d , T M i t c h e l l , J Ebner, M Talbot, D Woollard, D B e n h a m (sub). Other results: IC 1sts vs St B e r n a r d s H o s p i t a l : 0-6 a n d B a n k of E n g l a n d 2nds vs IC 2nds: 4-2. Chris Bird

mainly to right t h u m b s , although a severe s c r a t c h a p p e a r e d o n P a u l J e y n e s ' ball after hitting the gate. M a n y t h a n k s to S i m o n E n g w e l l a n d Heather (sexiest m e m b e r of the team) J e y n e s w h o b o w l e d at a last minutes notice. T e a m : M i s s Heather J e y n e s , Pete L u c a s , T i m Hillyer, P a u l J e y n e s , S i m o n E n g w e l l and J o h n Knight. E v e r y o n e had a great time and it was a pity a few more members of the c l u b weren't more • enthusiastic towards s u c h a g o o d c a u s e (stiff os). JB

T h e r e f o r e we s h a l l not be s t a g i n g a p l o u g h m a n ' s l u n c h o n T h u r s d a y 13 D e c e m b e r at 1 2 : 0 0 a m i n the U n i o n Concert H a l l . N o b o d y can c o m p l a i n about this - tickets p r i c e d 5 0 p w i l l n o t be o n sale. T h e r e w o n ' t be a n y free ale a n d I w o n ' t see y o u there!

Richard Earl PG Affairs Officer

IC

VOLLEYBALL VICTORIOUS AGAIN!

After a s o m e w h a t debatable start to t h e s e a s o n , IC V o l l e y b a l l C l u b have finally entered into the spirit of the g a m e a n d have started to win matches! S i n c e our last report in F E L I X , two further m a t c h e s have been played. T h e first, against M i d d l e s e x, was on 21 N o v e m b e r and was w o n in a c o n v i n c i n g style: 15-6, 15-5, 15-6. T h e valued points from this m a t c h he l ped u s t o gain a few places in t h e ' S e e t e c h League'. T h e s e c o n d match was against H e n d o n , to w h o m we had previously lost earlier in the s e a s o n — the IC team really rose t o the o c c a s i o n with a dramatic victory with a final s c o r e o f 13-15, 15-3, 15-17, 15-10 a n d 15-11. T h i s h a d e v e r y b o d y biting their fingernails up until the very last point had been w o n . T h e victory has taken us into the s e c o n d r o u n d of t h e c u p , w h e r e w e s h o u l d play against University of L o n d o n in t h e s e c o n d match. T h a n k s are, of course, due t o all members of the teams, without w h o m this report w o u l d not be possible. T h e s e heroes are: M Banasiak, H Szyszko, S Kalirai, L B o g d a n o w i c z , D Penty, S Tarn, P D i a z Lalcaca, B Hermanssen, C Wachnicki and A C i u k s z a . T h a n k s must also g o to our few, but vociferous supporters.

21


M e c h E n g III

Semi Finals

Quarter Finals

Preliminaries

Final

20"

C h e m E n g l/ll

4 M e c h E n g (Bye)

Links (Scratched) M e c h E n g III T o t a l T e c h (Bye)

T. Revs T o r n a d o e s Total T e c h

Man S c i 4

T. Revs T o r n a d o e s

0 28

4 12

T. R e v s T o r n a d o e s 18

T. Revs Tornadoes 18 Civ Eng III 12

C i v E n g l/ll ( B y e ) Civ E n g l/ll Ladies 6

24

Mech Eng I 4

M e c h E n g I 14 C i v E n g l/ll Civ E n g III

Civ E n g III

4

Pryor's Pride 0 Civ E n g III Elec Eng I 4 M e c h E n g II

M e c h E n g II

18 0

6 10

Cup Winners: T. Revs Tornadoes Plate Winners: Total Technology

16

Guilds Rugby Sevens

Photo by Colin Palmer

The ladies Rugby Team in Action

Memorable Environmental Week says Roger Stotesbury

Dickie

B E A I T 22

way.Thanks I've t h o r o u g h l y enj oyed t h e last week a n d feel p l e a s e d that the U n i o n has been able to c o n t r i b u t e to C o l l e g e life in this way.

like

to say a

very

to the boys a n d

g i r l s w h o eat i n t h e U n i o n f o r t h e i r kindness for

lovely

i n h e l p i n g t o c o l l e c t £6:98 prizes

presented

charity ball. M i s s T r i m m a the d e l a y i n t h a n k i n g was

T w o of the events were i ndeed memorable, a n d reflect a w i d e interest in E n e r g y P o l i c y ! refer to the N u c l e a r P o w e r Debate a n d the Energy Future for Britain d i s c u s s i o n . T h e s e I will r e m e m b e r for a l o n g time.The other events were more s p e c i a l i z e d , of less general appeal.Yet all were g r a c e d by interesting,if in s o m e c a s e s c o n t r o v e r s i a l s p e a k e r s a n d held our attention f o r t w o hours.In a d d i t i o n the fair a l l o w e d everyone t h e c h a n c e to speak to various e n v i r o n m e n t a l i s t s a n d s e e the research c a r r i e d o n here c o n n e c t e d with the environment.Thankyou to everyone for taking part a n d to t h o s e w h o h e l p e d me in any

would

special thank-you

at the regrets

y o u .... t h i s

due to illness.

HE

* BREHSSTRAHLUNG BOOK

'Zizilz-.rVkUx „..,,..,

„;„.»

BREMSSTRAHLUNG CARTOON BOOKS WILL BE O N S A L E IN T H E FELIX OFFICE FROM TODAY PRICE 20p (for Rag)


IC

BILLIARDS AND CLUB

SNOOKER

O n W e d n e s d a y last, three teams of s n o o k e r 'haven't quite m a d e its' were s u p p o s e d to play matches. In fact a tragedy h a p p e n e d . T h e A team w o n 5-0 by default, f r a u d i n g their o p p o n e n t s of what w o u l d have been a negligible e f f o r f a n i h i l a t i o n like w h e n Wales beat E n g l a n d at rugby. T h e C team p l a y e d Q M C at ho m e . O u r immortal team were defeated 3-2. First to play was o u r e n t r e p r e n e u r a n d r a c o n t e u r buffoon David w h o s e c o n s i s t a n c y kept up his z e r o r e c o r d . G r a h a m 'not T o n y ' C u r t i s f l o u n d e r e d to the table next, bravely fighting off the U S seventh a r m y a n d the w o b b l e d y g o b b l e d y D a m i a n ' O m e n II' Kelly, in that order. S o with typical nitro g l y c e r i n e stability D Kely fumbled his feeble wav to the c l o t h . O w i n o to the fact, his o p p o n e n t had a severe attack of 'two left feet' in his hands, D a m n f o u n d he was able to s h a k e his w o b b l y c u e to an underestimatable w i n a n d a night win r a c q u e l Welsh's mother. S o at this point in the p r o c e e d i n g s I a p p r o a c h e d the s a c r e d c l o t h k n o w i n g that the night before I had attempted to break t h e ' F u l l e r ' s p a s s p o r t k n o w i n g that certain P A s in P h y s i c s 2 had d o n e it in twenty days (must be a record). Well I might as well have d r o w n e d myself for the c o n t r a s t i n g i m p r e s s i o n I made o n m y o p p o n e n t w h o knew I was the greatest s n o o k e r player a n y o n e c o u l d ever k n o w . T h e B t e a m p l a y e d L S E A team away a n d a l t h o u g h b e i n g as h a r m o n i o u s as a stringless guitar, they w o n 4-1, the o n l y loser being the 'I can't help c o m p l i m e n t i n g y o u , b e c a u s e y o u keep w i n n i n g ' T o m s k . T h e L S E A team's first player a p p r o a c h e d the table f o l l o w ed by o u r first player the r o t u n d S i m o n Bennet, ' d e s c r i b e d by s p h e r i c a l c o o r d i n a t e s his s n o o k e r c o m p a r e s favourably w i t h a flat pint of A l b r i g h t s bitter (I'm a m e m b e r of the A A A A l b r i g h t s A p a t h y A s s o c i a t i o n ) . S e c u r e l y tied d o w n s o as not to float away like a hot air b a l l o o n , he s c i n t i l l a t i n g l y sent his o p p o n e n t r o u n d the b e n d a n d w o n his first g l o r i o u s match. Nest o n was R a s p u t i n ' s g r a n d s o n , R a n d y C r u s e w s k i w h o between s w i g s of C o s s a c k V o d k a a n d the o d d U k r a i n i a n folk d a n c e potted a few balls c h a n t i n g K G B s l o g a n s like: "I like a G r e m l i n in the K r e m l i n " a n d " B u y a o n e way return ticket to M o s c o w " . After this his nervy o p p o n e n t was f i n i s h e d and gave him the g a m e in return for (a visit to the) Political A s s y l u m . Well, S t e v e M e a n s B e a n s c a u t i o u s l y a p p r o a c h e d the table next, b r i m m i n g with the c o n f i d e n c e of a religious Iranian. Well, not w a n t i n g to lose a g a i n a n d k n o w i n g the loser ve as m u c h c h a n c e of c o n t i n u e d e x i s t a n c e as a D C 10, he a s t o n i s h e d the b e w i l d e r e d yet stupid audience and won.

PROF BREWS STRAHLUNG

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SAILING C L U B IC S a i l i n g C l u b sailed their s e c o n d league m a t c h of the s e a s o n last Saturday, against O x f o r d . O x f o r d brought a s t r o n g team a n d in the first race, IC were ' c a u g h t c o l d ' a n d easily b e a t e n . R a c e two started w e l l for IC, a n d after the first lap, they were in a c o m m a n d i n g p o s i t i o n . O n the final leg they fought t h r o u g h to take the first three places a n d so tie the s c o r e with the final race to d e c i d e . T h i s r a c e p r o v e d to be very c l o s e , w i t h I C c o m i n g t h r o u g h from b e h i n d to t a k e t h e race, t h a n k s to s o m e excellent teamwork. T h e s t a n d a r d of s a i l i n g within the team is i m p r o v i n g all the time and o ur c h a n c e s of w i n n i n g the league now look g o o d . T e a m : J o h n W i l l i a m s (captain), J a m e s Baxter, Dave C u l s h a w , C o l i n M u r r a y a n d C a o l a n Patterson. B U D W O R T H PAIRS IC w e r e invited to the B u d w o r t h Pairs c o m p e t i t i o n last w e e k e n d a l o n g with L o n d o n University. C a m b r i d g e fell to IC after a c l o s e l y fought first race, but the s e c o n d race w a s lost o n the starting line with West K i r b y S C t a k i n g first a n d s e c o n d at the finish. With the w i n d i n c r e a s i n g , gear failure marred the third race with C h r i s L e w i s a n d A l a n B e a n y t a k i n g a d u c k i n g as their mainsheet parted from the b o o m . T h e last race of the day saw a decisive victory a g a i n s t M a n c h e s t e r University. After S a t u r d a y night's festivities IC sailed U L l o s i n g o n l y o n the last leg after having a w i n n i n g p o s i t i o n . With the c h a n c e s of q u a l i f y i n g for the semifinals now d i m i n i s h i n g , the IC team sailed the r e m a i n i n g races with d e t e r m i n a t i o n , but little s u c c e s s . IC were r e p r e s e n t e d by l a n R o b s o n , C h r i s Lewis, A l a n B e a n y a n d C a r o l y n Jaffy. U L h a v i n g w o n o ur league were narrowly beaten in a semifinal by C a s t a w a y s after w i n n i n g the first race from the best of three. Dave D e r b y a n d G e o f f T i t m u s f r o m IC w e r e s a i l i ng for U L ' s team.

y^^HejProf!

T A B L E TENNIS D u e to the lack of quality h u m o u r in recent articles, I'm not writing this one....instead he is. H e l l o , well after that s u c c i n c t l y instructive i n t r o d u c t i o n , batten d o w n the hatches a n d button u p y o u r flies ' c o s we're off! J u s t to c e l e b r a t e F E L I X ' S 30th B i r t h d a y (perhaps het r o o f p r e a d i n g will imperve) IC m a n a g e d a c l e a n s w e e p of victories (yes, we gave every o n e the b r u s h off) in league matches, but lost their return friendly with Q M C (more later abut the Q u a g M i r e C r e t i n s ) . Let's deal with v i c t o r i e s first: IC 1 vs Sarah Siddons (home): 7-2 With 'Rutherford Scattering' all his opponents before h i m , K a r t i c k flabberg a s t i n g his, a n d W i l d - M a n - o f - B o r n e o H o n g tearing l i m b s a n d s c r e a m i n g i n c e s s a n t l y in the i n a u d i b l e t o n g u e of his native l a n d , this slip of a girl....er, team s t o o d not an earthly. (Phew!) IC 2 vs Dept of Employment (away): 9-0 It really was time the 2 n d s w o n a g a i n (this is the s e c o n d time) e s p e c i a l l y with an exL e b a n e s e international a n d a C l i v e L! l o o k - a - l i k e in the side. IC 3 vs B S C 33 Club 3 (away): 9-0 B e n d i n g B r i t i s h S t e e l before t h e m like trees in a h u r r i c a n e (quaint huh?), the thin reinforced their c l a i m to the c h a m p i o n s h a n d (the s e r i o u s bit) o n l y have to defeat H o u s e to be certain (I think) of the championship. IC 4 vs L U C S (home) Well the s a n d w i c h e s w e r e nice, but I don't like w a i t i n g an h o u r for a t e a m , and the'b e i n g t o l d o n the p h o n e that the C h i n e c a p t a i n has g o n e h o m e for six m a t c h e s ! A joint m e n s a n d ladies tie e n d e d with QW w i n n i n g t h e m e n s a n d IC w i n n i n g their fir ever ladies m a t c h 4-2. Yet a g a i n fielding a team without IC's b e a h a l f - d o z e n players (who o n l y play for U L U ) but nevertheless a g o o d team of regulars, IC gave Q M C ' s strongest trio a very g o o d run l o s i n g o n l y 3-6 a n d t a k i n g a l m o s t every set to three g a m e s . S p e c i a l credit to E z e (2nd team IC only) w h o o u t s h o n e even Kartik a n d K u m a r (well he l o o k s so n i c e w h e n he's playing) S i n g a r a j a h . E a c h player w o n o n e set. E v e n better t h o u g h were the ladies, C P a n g (not C h i - C h i P a n d a ) , E v a S o m e t h i C h i n e s e a n d A i n e all w i n n i n g at least o n e set (the o n e from Eire — g u e s s w h i c h — w o n two). If y o u didn't enter the Handica0 C o m p e t i t i o n y o u don't KIIOW what missed. I'll be back next week — The Other Write %

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What a let d o w n the next m a t c h was, T o m s k w h o m u s t be o n e of the best s n o o k e r pl ayers a r o u n d , next to J o h n B i n d e n in drag, played like he had a half starved ferret d o w n his trousers. . T h e final c h a p t e r of this b o r i n g s a g a of s n o o k e r misery w a s c o m p l e t e d by A l a n 'I don't rip s n o o k e r c l o t h s m u c h ' L e c l e z i o , still l o o k i n g like an overweight M o s h a D a y a n with his black eye, he c o n f o u n d e d his o p p e n e n t with an e x h i b i t i o n of ture fairyness. T h e p r o b l e m was, he s a w ' L o r d o f t h e R i n g s ' a t t h e p i c t u r e s the night before a n d now k n o w i n g what a true H o b b i t l o o k s like he c a m e in w e a r i n g a funny pair of feet a n d a rather s t u p i d n o s e that m a d e h i m look more g o r m l e s s than a r o m a n n o s e d T o u l o u s e Latrec. O n this form w i n n i n g was as u s u a l just a formality, so the B team w o n 4-1.

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BUNAC Interested in w o r k i n g and travelling in North American next summer? For more details come to a B U N A C meeting. They're held every Friday between 12:30 and 1:30 In the Green Committee Room on the third floor of the Union Building.

BLOOD DONING RESULT 19 and 20 November The free barrel goes to Civ Eng 2 who gave more blood than any other department at the above session. The leading departments were: 1. Civ Eng 2 with 17 pints. 2. Elec Eng 1 with 12 pints. 3. Mech Eng 2 with 10 pints. T h e totals of exclusive of yesterday's session.

URGENT Crisis at Christmas needs food (non-perishable) and clothes and helpers to b r i n g C h r i s t m a s to homeless people in Central London. Contact John W h i t e h o u s e or F i o n a Sinclair(666 Selkirk or internal 3357).

O B O E L E S S O N S given by experienced teacher. For more information c o n t a c t Martin Browne, Blochem 2. £30 REWARD to a n y o n e w h o c a n find m e a s/c o n e b e d r o o m flat I like, at about £30 a week. R i n g 258-3928.

A cheap return coach to PORTSMOUTH will be leaving Beit Archway at 10:00am on Sunday 9th December and returning about 5:30pm the same day. Cost: £2.50

FOR SALE: BIKING GEAR. a n d overWaterproof jacket trousers £20. White full-face helmet £15. C o n t a c t Phil Harper, P h y s i c s 3.

FELIX is published by the Editor, on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board. FELIX is printed on the Union premises in Prince Consort Road, London SW7. Editor: C R Palmer FELIX ISSN 0140-0711. Registered at the Post Office. Copyright FELIX 1979.

XMAS SPECTACULAR D E B A T E : Exec vs C C U reps on Thursday 13 December at 1:00pm In the Union Concert' Hall. Free Beer. Be there!

UNDERGROUND

EMERGENCY

RAG MEETING to elect delegates to the National Rag Conference will be held at 6:00pm on TUESDAY 11 DE C in the Green Committee Room, third floor, Union Building.

Ever wanted to take Victoria Station by storm? Well, on Friday evening you'll get the chance, as the IC 'coffin' will be taken to Victoria Station, where leaflets will be given out. There will be a brief meeting about this TODAY at 12:30pm in the Union Office and the assembly will meet in the Union Office at 4:30pm. BE THERE!

FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER COMMUNIST SOCIETY BOOKSTALL s e l l i n g Marxist a n d R a d i c a l B o o k s will be in the J C R between 12:30 a n d 1:30pm. IC C H E M S O C C H R I S T M A S L E C T U R E with D r P W A t k i n s a s k i n g the q u e s t i o n Why Physical Chemistry?in C h e m T h C at 5:30pm. S h e r r y from 5:15pm. A d m i s s i o n F R E E . IMPERIAL C O L L E G E CHRISTIAN UNION c l u b activity in the m u s i c r o o m , 53 P r i n c e s G a t e at 6:30pm. WIST C H R I S T M A S P A R T Y in the ICWA L o u n g e at 8:00pm. E v e r y o n e w e l c o m e . B r i n g a bottle. E N T S D I S C O in the U n i o n L o w e r L o u n g e at 8:30pm. A d m i s s i o n 20p. B A L L in B e d f o r d C o l l e g e U n i o n C o m m o n R o o m at 8:00pm. T i c k e t s £3.30 from K e n S t r a c h a n , M e c h E n g 2.

SATURDAY 8 DECEMBER L A S T N I G H T : T H E D E V I L S in the U n i o n C o n c e r t Hall at 7:30pm. A d m i s s i o n £1.00.

MONDAY 10 D E C E M B E R EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE M E E T I N G in the G r e e n C o m m i t t e e R o o m at 12:30. M e m b e r s M U S T attend, but observers welcome. CAMPAIGN FOR PLAIN ENGLISH MEETING at 2 : 0 0 p m at t h e L i b r a r y A s s o c i a t i o n , 7 R i d g m o u n t Street, W C 1 . C O M M U N I T S T S O C I E T Y M E E T I N G o n the C o m m u n i s t Party C o n g r e s s in the I C W A L o u n g e at 6:30pm. B E D F O R D C O L L E G E J A Z Z C L U B in their U n i o n C o m m o n R o o m at 8:00pm. A d m i s s i o n 75p a n d S U c a r d s are required. CHRISTMAS C E I L I D H in the Lower Refectory at 8 : 3 0 p m . A d m i s s i o n 4 0 p members, 75p non-members. JOINT COMMUNIST S O C , SOCIALIST S O C , A N D L A B O U R C L U B P A R T Y in the I C W A L o u n g e at 9.00pm. B r i n g (a) bottle(s).

W H A T ' S

O N

TUESDAY 11 DECEMBER

THURSDAY 13 DECEMBER

IC S O C I A L I S T S O C I E T Y M E E T I N G with s p e a k e r s from the S o c i a l i s t S t u d e n t A l l i a n c e a n d Left A l l i a n c e in the S C R at 12:30. S T O I C T R A N S M I S S I O N with a n interview with L o r d F l o w e r s at 1:00pm a n d 6:00pm. R I D I N G C L U B M E E T I N G in R o o m 1110 (level 11) E l e c E n g between 1:00pm a n d 2:00pm.

H A N G - G L I D I N G C L U B M E E T I N G in M e c h E n g 342 at 12:45pm. S T O I C T R A N S M I S S I O N with N e w s - B r e a k a n d C h r i s t m a s S p e c i a l at 1:00pm a n d 6:00pm. OPEN MEETING TO DISCUSS THE SETTING WOMAN'S RIGHT T O C H O O S E G R O U P in the I C W A L o u n g e at 1:00pm. ASSOCIATED*STUDIES PRESENT: 1. F I L M : Edward VII And The House Of Windsor i n the G r e a t Hall at 1:15pm. 2. L u n c h - h o u r C o n c e r t : V e n e t i a n S e r e n a d e with M a r i e A n g e l , H e l e n W a t k i n s a n d D a n S a n d e r s in the M u s i c R o o m , 53 P r i n c e ' s Gate. G L I D I N G C L U B M E E T I N G at 5:30pm in A e r o 254.

N A T H I S T S O C L E C T U R E o n Protozoan Motility by D r L a w r e n c e B a n n i s t e r of G u y s H o s p i t a l M e d i c a l S c h o o l in B o t a n y B a s e m e n t L e c t u r e Theatre at 12:45pm. F I L M : Mr Hulofs Holiday at 5:30 a n d 8:30 in B e d f o r d C o l l e g e T u k e 97. A d m i s s i o n 25p a n d 30p a n d S U c a r d s are required. R B S N I T E O U T to the D i c k e n s St Katherine's D o c k . Meet at B S H at 7:00pm or at the D i c k e n s at 7:30pm. F R E E G I G with B l a n k S p a c e , T h e B e a s t a n d the A n d r o i d s of M U in the U n i o n C o n c e r t Hall at 7:30pm. S F C L U B P R E S E N T : Barberella at 7:00pm in H u x l e y 213. A d m i s s i o n free to members, but 20p to n o n - m e m b e r s . L I F E S C I C H R I S T M A S P A R T Y in the J C R at 8:00pm. T i c k e t s 7 5 p available from K a t y T a t c h e l l a n d Life S c i S o c R e p s . MOPSOC LECTURECANCELLED.

FRIDAY 14 DECEMBER ICWA C H R I S T M A S B A L L O O N D E B A T E (with m i n c e pies) at 1:00pm i n t h e I C W A Lounge.

TUESDAY 18 DECEMBER IC C H E M P O S T G R A D G R O U P C H R I S T M A S C H E E S E A N D W I N E P A R T Y at 12:30 in R o o m 231. T i c k e t s 80p.

WEDNESDAY 12 D E C E M B E R TENPIN BOWLING CLUB CHRISTMAS B O W L I N G W I T H P R I Z E S . C o a c h leaves from A e r o ( o p p o s i t e Beit A r c h ) at 2:30pm prompt. IC S K I C L U B A N N U A L ' P I S T E U P ' . Meet U n i o n B a r at 6:00pm. HANG-GLIDING C L U B SOCIAL EVENING at 8:00pm upstairs at Stan's Bar.

THE EXPLORATION SOCIETY H O L D S INFORMAL MEETINGS EVERY LUNCHTIME A T 12:30 IN SOUTHSIDE UPER L O U N G E . FOR F U R T H E R DETAILS C O N T A C T MARTIN JUDKINS, BIOCHEM P G , INT 3184.

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0537_A  

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0537_A.pdf

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