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THE NEWSPAPER OF IMPERIAL C O L L E G E UNION

Friday.November 23rd,1979

Issue No.535

- R A G ISSUE - PLEASE DONATE 5P (OR MORE)

MORPHY B A T T L E !

Photo by Steve Groves

DISGUSTING G A M E S

Photo by Paul Johnson

EXEC TORTURE

Photo by Steve Groves


S Dear Editor In y o u r report, F E L I X 16th N o v e m b e r 1979, of our recent staff/student committee meeting y o u q u o t e d me as s a y i n g that I had " o r d e r e d a c o m p l e t e freeze on all expenditure, in the hope of b r i n g i n g the true nature of the situation h o m e to the C o l l e g e authorities". What I actually s a i d w a s "....home to the C C D staff, its s t u d e n t s and the College authorities". In parallel with our call for administrative action to c h a n g e our c l a s s i c i f c a t i o n and grants to reflect the true nature of our undergraduate course, the department must l a u n c h a serious effort to p l a n e x p e n d i t u r e and eliminate waste. Apart from the fact that there is, at present, no m o n e y to s p e n d in the kitty, achievement of the necessary d e g r e e of e c o n o m y requires the active awareness a n d c o l l a b o r a tion of the entire C C D staff. It was h o p e d that a freeze w o u l d help to achieve this - indeed it has: S i n c e the freeze w o u l d inevitably affect students it needed to be b r o u g h t to their attention, h e n c e m y statement to the staff/student committee. Yours sincerely M M Lehman Head of Department and Professor of C o m p u t i n g S c i e n c e | Dear D i s g u s t e d We have d i s c u s s e d y o u r pr o bl e m at great length a n d have d e c i d e d that y o u may need to seek c o u n s e l l i n g advice. Y o u r p r o b l e m is not u n c o m m o n at IC. It begins with y o u r arithmetic i n a c c u r a c y . O n l y 8 5 % of the C o l l e g e are u n a b l e to b e c o m e pregnant a n d a lesser percentage than that are i n c a p a b l e of t a k i n g any part in the process whatsoever (these figures are not at hand). Your second problem is extreme self-centredness leading to p a r a n o i d e x c l u s i o n of all p r o b l e m s except those directly affecting yourself. In time, y o u c o u l d expect to be able to accept that other p e o p l e c a n c o n c e r n themselves with issues of i m p o r t a n c e to various minority s e c t i o n s without e x c l u d i n g the p r o b l e m s of the majority. (In fact, majorities are made up of minorities often including individuals!). Y o u r final p r o b l e m is a desire to be unpleasant to individuals or g r o u p s of individuals that y o u do not p e r s o n a l l y know, nor have any reason to bear a g r u d g e against. M o s t often this feeling results from a n inability to u n d e r s t a n d or c o m e to terms with c o n c e p t s that

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threaten y o u r o w n dogmatic i d e a s . T h i s l e a d s to your e x c l u s i o n and hatred of people presenting these differing views. Y o u w o u l d be better to deal with these problems by open d i s c u s s i o n with other people. Y o u may need-further advice in order to be able to play a c o n s t r u c t i v e role in society in the future. We c a n suggest various a d d r e s s e s (if y o u c o u l d send a plain brown paper envelope to the F E L I X Office), o r y o u c o u l d attend a c o u n s e l l i n g s e s s i o n in H u x l e y B u i l d i n g R o o m 640 today (Friday) at 2:30pm. Y o u r s helpfufly, A n n a and M a r g e (Ms' Raeburn and P r o o p s ) .

Dear I C U At the last U n i o n meeting over three quarters of an hour was spent d i s c u s s i n g a motion against the C o r r i e B i l l . Before a vote was taken on the m o t i o n the q u o r u m was s u c c e s s f u l l y c h a l l e n g e d (the c o u n t was 294, six people short of the required 300). T h e feeling at the meeting, I w o u l d guage, would have p a s s e d the motion (but we won't speculate on the reasons w h y q u o r u m was called) and I feel that most people u n d e r s t o o d the q u e s t i o n , so to repeat the whole debate w o u l d only restrict the a m o u n t of time available to d i s c u s s other topics. In this letter I will therefore outline the case presented at the last U G M and suggest a move to the vote at the next U G M on T u e s d a y . T h e motion notes the c l a u s e s in the C o r r i e bill, believes that the bill will cut the n u m b e r of legally available abortions by 2/3rds, the bill constitutes a direct attack on abortion rights and a w o m a n ' s right to c h o o s e ; the bill will mean a return to backstreet abortions. It resolves to s uppo r t future actions against the C o r r i e Bill, affiliation to the c a m p a i g n against C o r r i e and o r g a n i s e a c o l l e c t i o n for d o n a t i o n s to C a m p a i g n against Corrie. T h e bill r e d u c e s the upper time limit for abortions from 28 weeks to 20 weeks. T h i s will only effect 1% of w o m e n s e e k i n g abortions. At present less than 1% of a b o r t i o n s take place after 20 weeks . T h e s e are the most desperate c a s e s - s c h o o l girls (who h o p e if they don't say a n y t h i n g their periods will c o m e and they won't be pregnant), older w o m e n (who mistake p r e g n a n c y s y m p t o m s for the menopause), w o m e n w h o after having tests find the c h i l d they are c a r r y i n g has a high c h a n c e of p h y s i c a l or mental h a n d i c a p , if it is f o u n d that there is a h i g h risk of w o m a n d y i n g in childbirth. A n t i - a b o r t i o n i s t s always give the o p t i o n of a d o p t i o n - but besides the fact that w o m e n are not b r e e d i n g m a c h i n e s , it must be

noted that only white perfect babies are wanted - there are over 250,000 c h i l d r e n in care. T h e bill will c o m p l e t e l y s m a s h the charities w h o in performing abortions at cost (ie even t h o u g h their turnover may be ÂŁ1 million, t h i s is u s e d to p a y staff, provisions, maintenance etc., they ( B P A S , P A S ) are registered charities). In s o m e areas eg B i r m i n g h a m , the N H S perform less t han 15% of abortions in those areas - the charities perform a vital function in these areas. T h e c o n s c i o u s n e s s c l a u s e will now mean that any p e r s o n not w i s h i n g to have a n y t h i n g to do with a b o r t i o n s c a n refuse without either giving any w a r n i n g nor any reason. O b v i o u s l y no one wants u n s y m p a t h e t i c people involved in the performing of abortions or after care but u n s y m p a t h e t i c d o c t o r s who will s i m p l y refuse a w o m a n , without referring her elsewhere, are certainly not helping her in any way a n d only c a u s i n g more h a r d s h i p a n d strain. T h e British M e d i c a l A s s o c i a t i o n is against the C o r r i e B i l l . I therefore urge y o u to c o n s i d e r these arguments, r e m e m b e r i n g that a w o m a n must be able to c o n t r o l her body. T u r n up to the U n i o n Meeting. M e r c h e Clark Dear People In d i s c u s s i o n s on abortion, the most often q u o t e d rights are: that of the u n b o r n c h i l d to life, and the right of the w o m a n to determine what h a p p e n s to her body. T h e s e c o n d of these is in no way fundamental, as c o m p a r e d to the first, w h i c h is, a n d therefore, c a n n o t be used in o p p o s i t i o n to the same. I will explain the r e a s o n i n g behind this assertion. T h e s o - c a l l e d right of the w o m a n over her body is, in this case, merely an e x p r e s s i o n o f t h e Right of Might, for the w o m a n in q u e s t i o n s i m p l y argues thus: " S i n c e this pregnancy is inconvenient to me, a n d s i n c e I have the capability, whether by legal or illegal means to terminate this pregnancy , s i n c e I have the might, then I also have the r i g h t t o terminate this p r e g n a n c y . " T h o s e w h o w o u l d argue thatthe w o m a n ' s 'right' must prevail over the right of her u n b o r n c h i l d to life, must realise t h a t t h e i r o p i n i o n is s i m p l y another e x p r e s s i o n of the right of might, s i n c e the other partly c o n c e r n e d (the u n b o r n child) is in no position to give an o p i n i o n , (and c o n s e q u e n t l y no right to one!). If 5 0 % or more of abortion operations resulted in the death of the mother, c o u l d one still speak of the right of "a w o m a n to a b o r t i o n . In other words, if the 'might' element were removed, w o u l d the 'right' still o b t a i n ? I think not, c a n we c o n s i d e r t h e n , a

right that holds only under certain c o n d i t i o n s as b e i n g t r u l y fundamental? A g a i n , I think not. I w o u l d put to y o u then, that the only fundamental right that obt ai ns in an a b o r t i o n case is that of the u n b o r n c h i l d to life. D o not make the error of t h i n k i n g that 'might' is 'right'. It is not, and c a n never be. E M Ugoala Physics 3 Dear Editor I w o u l d like to thank all the p e o p l e w h o helped me after my a c c i d e n t on S u n d a y afternoon. E s p e c i a l l y those w h o carried me d o w n the stairs, held d o o r s o p e n and drove me to the hospital a n d then home. A l s o t h a n k s to Beit Security, St S t e p h e n s casuality staff, Dr S W h i t i n g a n d m e m be r s of R a g . Y o u r s gratefully Ian B r o w n Dear S i r M r P h i l i p C o l e in his letter of 16th N o v e m b e r m a d e a rather o d d statement over the c a l l i n g of the quorate at t h e l a s t U G M , s u g g e s t i n g it was neither s m a l l or u n d e m o c r a t i c , c a n he p o s s i b l y believe that 294 students are representatives of I C U as a w h o l e ? S u r e l y they will be more likely to be m e m be r s of an interested pressure g r o u p . T h i s mechanism ensures that an o r g a n i z e d g r o u p of individuals do not b e c o m e c o n t r o l l e d by elites, or to lesser extent pluralist. H e a l s o c o n d e m n s t h e c a l l i n g of quorate as a political a c t i o n d e s i g n e d to prevent a 'democratic' verdict on the motion. Yet by definition had the vote been t a k e n it w o u l d h a v e been u n d e m o c r a t i c , this alone must be a justification of M r B u r t o n ' s action. It is likely that a n y b o d y believing passionately in any c a u s e is g o i n g to use all w e a p o n s at their d i s p o s a l s i n c e they will c o n s i d e r themselves right to do so, that the e n d s justify the means, this has been r e c o g n i s e d ever s i n c e M a c h i a v e l l i wrote 'The Prince'. T h e other major point Mr C o l e . raised was that there s h o u l d be a guillotine in operation at U G M s , he indicates that it is preferable to be efficient than to fully d i s c u s s an issue, d i d he attend the lectures o n T o t a l i t a r i a n i s m ? I d o u b t whether a n y important issue c a n be fully dealt with at a UGM, to have six important motions o n o n e a g e n d a is a b s u r d if a n y t h i n g of a n y i m p o r t a n c e is to result. T h e executive must rethink its p o l i c y on the p l a n n i n g of the UGM rather than lapse into hysterics b e c a u s e people leave w h e n they overrun. Y o u r s sincerely Stephen Goulder Life S c i e n c e s 1


NAB

HOLDS

ON

Photos Mickie & Steve

RCS

WIN

by Marsh Groves

RAFT RACE

Broadsheet .... T h e M O P S O C X m a s Party is on T h u r s d a y D e c e m b e r 6th. at 7:30 p m .

THE

RCS

YOU'RE NEVER TOO OLD TO JOIN A PLAYGROUP Think what it's like to be alone, miles from home (which may even be in another country) and also very ill. handicapped or undergong a series of operations It's even worse if you're only six years old. At the Great Ormond Street Hospital there are a great many children in that situation. But there's something that makes things a little better for them the p l a y g r o u p s and a c t i v i t i e s organised by Rob Pike, the voluntary help co-ordinator. He'd like people, like you, to help to run the playgroups on woodwork, playing with toy cars, dolls - all the things you did as a kid at home. The playgroups take place every weekday at 9:30-12:30 in the morning and 1:30-4:30 in the afternoon, with

GUILDS A T T H E SMOKING C O N C E R T

FLOAT extra activities d u r i n g the e v e n i n g s a n d at w e e k e n d s If y o u think y u c o u l d spare a few hurs a week h e l p i n g in the p l a y g r o u p s , please c o n t a c t me via the letter r a c k s or c o m e to o n e of the I C C A G m e e t i n g s o n M o n d a y s in the U n i o n (3rd floor follow the signs) at 12:30pm.

Kate Hill

ANY PARKING PERMIT NOT FROM OFFICE FRIDAY 30 NOVEMBER BE

RAG

PROCESSION

IMPERIAL L O S E TO CAMBRIDGE IN UNIVERSITY CHALLENGE T h e Imperial C o l l e g e team of Frank J a m e s . D a m i a n H a s s a n , N i c k Griffin a n d A n d r e w G r a y were beaten by a team from Q u e e n ' s C o l l e g e C a m b r i d g e . T h e final s c o r e was IC 140 points. Q u e e n ' s 390 points. T h e IC team m a d e late h e a d w a y with the help of a faulty C a m b r i d g e bell. O n the return journey from

M a n c h e s t e r the Supporters c o n s t r u c t e d a motion that will be p r o p o s e d by the F E L I X Editor at next T u e s d a y ' s U G M . T h e text of this motion is on p a g e 5 of this week's FELIX. , S T O P PRESS Due to the unprecedented demand to give blood at the recent visit of the Blood Transfusion Service there will be another chance on DEc 6th. in the Union Dining Hall. 3


Dear C o l i n J u s t d r o p p i n g y o u a line to thank all the p e o p l e w h o rowed for R C S on M o r p h y Day. Including the M o r p h y , Lowry and R u g b y eights and especially the L a d i e s ' team a n d coxes. A l s o many u n d y i n g thanks to For the benefit of M r H o d g s o n , I the R C S M ot or C l u b heroes who will repeat s o m e facts here. have toiled for so long and have D e s p i t e a s s u r a n c e s to t h e Dear S i r been rewarded at last by the sight contrary Steve recieved no credit I must write in reply to Ian JEZEBEL r u n n i n g again. of for his p h o t o g r a p h of Barney H o d g s o n ' s letter ( F E L I X no 533) M c C a b e a n d J i m Sarsfield (FELIX w h i c h takes a verbal sideswipe at N a m e l y J o n Hall, Nigel Reditt, 529). S u b s e q u e n t l y C o l i n Palmer me that I am not going to allow to Dave Dodge, Martin Watson and Andy Wilson. intended to p u b l i s h in F E L I X a pass u n a n s w e r e d . Cheers c o p y of Steve's p h o t o g r a p h of the He wrote (referring to my letter, R C S E x e c w h i c h appeared on the Sean O'Boyle R C S U President F E L I X no 532), " O K I don't know cover of B r o a d s h e e t (vol 12 no 3) the facts....", but surely this means Dear E d a n d the front page of a local he did not read my letter properly S i n c e I find it almost i m p o s s i b l e newspaper. Steve (who had not in the first place. I stated the facts to obtain a c o p y of F E L I X , not even been asked) refused to l e t ' as clearly a n d c o n c i s e l y as even a d i s c a r d e d one, I have p u b l i c a t i o n take place. p o s s i b l e but it seems by point was c o n c l u d e d that y o u r organ must It was at this point the letter was not grasped. Therefore I will be b o t h w i d e l y read and P a l m e r briefly w r i t t e n to C o l i n restate the important treasured. This, c o u p l e d with the c o n c e r n i n g copywright and it was details whilst endeavouring to fact that there are a great many not intended for publication answer the points raised by M r Iranian a n d M o s l e m students at IC a l t h o u g h not m a k i n g this clear H o d g s o n . has prompted me to write w a s o b v i o u s l y an oversight on the . I have taken, a n d will take, a regarding the situation in Iran. part of Steve. T h u s taken out o f , large n u m b e r of photographs Whilst everyone is aware of the the context it was written in (from d e p i c t i n g student activity at IC. I attacks against foreign d i p l o m a t i c o n e individual to another) it may have no objection to a n y o n e at IC staff, my c o n c e r n is more with the s e e m a bit pedantic. u s i n g any of these p h o t o g r a p h s rights of individual Iranians. It has already been pointed out provided that they ask me first (a There has been a lack of h u m a n to me that F E L I X is a student matter of courtesy) a n d that w h e n rights in Iran for many years, but n e w s p a p e r with limited c i r c u l a - the photograph is used I receive s i n c e the b e g i n n i n g of this year tion a n d not a national daily, but s o m e form of credit as a mark of the s i t u a t i o n has worsened surely it is the p r i n c i p l e that the work I have put in to p r o d u c e considerably. matters. Steve is a keen amateur that picture. The present regime have p h o t o g r a p h e r w h o trys hard to M r H o d g s o n wrote, " S u r e l y a e m a s c u l a t e d the press, s u p p r e s maintain his o w n very high s i m p l e and absolutely trivial sed the political and religious p e r s o n a l standards a n d perhaps matter like that c a n be solved a c t i v i t i e s of m i n o r i t i e s a n d m o r e i m p o r t a n t l y t a k e s a n without t h r e a t s ? " That is the only eradicated the very rich Persian o b v i o u s pride in his work. Fo r this part of the paragraph with w h i c h I culture. T h e streets of T e h r a n are reason he (and any o t h e r have any agreement. I will pass ruled by the m o b and intimidation photographer) has a right to over the, " a b s o l u t e l y trivial" by pervades every aspect of daily life. e x p e c t s o m e a c k n o w l e d g m e n t for merely s a y i n g I don't regard a U n e m p l o y m e n t is r u n n i n g at 20%, his efforts. potential c r i m i n a l offence, ie inflation at 30%, there are many A s avid readers of F E L I X will breach of copyright, as trivial. I shortages a n d the economy, a p p r e c i a t e there must have been m a d e every effort to resolve the despite large oil revenues, is s o m e justification in his letter as situation reasonably, s p e a k i n g to stagnating. W o m e n have been the i s s ue it was p u b l i s h e d in was C o l i n o n several o c c a s i o n s . W h e n a m o n g s t those worst affected. i n n u n d a t e d with credits w h i c h this had no result I wrote the letter. A p a r t from the obvious a p p e a r e d almost as m i r a c u l o u s l y It was not intended to read as restrictions in personal and family as the printer a n d p u b l i s h e r s ' threatening, merely as c a u t i o n - rights there are now p r o p o s a l s n a m e d i d ( F E L I X 529) after the ary. T h e effect of this c a u t i o n c a n that married w o m e n will not be be m e a s u r e d by the fact that in the permitted to attend institutions of R a g M a g controversy. last t w o c o p i e s of F E L I X (nos 532 higher e d u c a t i o n . T h e regime is Y o u r s faithfully Nick Watmough a n d 533) almost all the pictures even a threat to w o r l d p e a c e Life S c i 1 have carried a credit. b e c a u s e of its interference in I'll c l o s e by c o n s i d e r i n g the n e i g h b o u r i n g countries. Dear S i r most l u d i c r o u s part of lan A l l this is being carried out in I would liketouseyourcolumns H o d g s o n ' s letter. Having the name of Islam, but this is to thank a n u m b e r of p e o p l e w h o professed his i g n o r a n c e of the n o t h i n g more than a veil to hide have d o n e a lot of g o o d for this facts he then sees fit to pass the ugly face of fascism. K h o m e i n i c o l l e g e over the last week. j u d g e m e n t on me, c o n d e m n i n g wallows in self-aggrandisement, Firstly, all those p e o p l e w h o me as, " a p o w e r m a d prat", w h o s e s o m e t h i n g the Prophet never h e l p e d with or c o n t r i b u t e d to the letter, "got right up my nose". I am a l l o w e d himself. With executions, C a m b o d i a c o l l e c t i o n last Friday, neither a prat nor power m a d a n d floggings a n d imprisonments, the w h i c h e n a b l e d me to put a c h e q u e h o w he c o u l d infer either or both order of the day, they seem to for ÂŁ230 in the post at the of these from my letter is a total have forgotten the t e a c h i n g s of b e g i n n i n g of this week. mystery. Neither will I s t o op so Imam AM that there is a pleasure in S e c o n d l y , to the 300 people low as to " b e e x c u s e d the use of a forgiveness w h i c h there is not in w h o g a v e b l o o d o n M o n d a y a n d most distasteful e x p r e s s i o n " in revenge. T u e s d a y , a n d the h u n d r e d s more d e s c r i b i n g what I think of lan I urge e v e r y o n e to support w h o h a d to be turned away. H o d g s o n ' s letter. A l l I c a n say is I those o p p o s i n g this oppressive H o p e f u l l y the B T S may be able to h o p e the majority of students at IC regime a n d in particular moslems fit in a n o t h e r day this term, a l o ng c a n write better letters t han his. "If w h o s e religion is being brought with s o m e m o r e free tea and you'll not, what h o p e for the w o r l d ? " into disrepute. have y o u r c h a n c e then. I'm sorry Y o u r s Y o u r s sincerely about all this t r o u b l e with the Steve H u t c h i n g s Philip N a s h Metallurgy b l o o d d o n i n g , m u c h of w h i c h was C h e m 1

the facts of the matter, he made his already illogical c h a n g e of t o p i c even more l u d i c r o u s . I fail to see how his c o m m e n t s on C C U s are in any way related to the copyright of Steve's photographs .

Dear C o l i n I w o u l d like to take this o p p o r t u n i t y to reply to lan H o d g s o n ' s valuable letter in last w e e k ' s F E L I X . I disagree, for will become reasons which apparent, with his statement that m y views o n the C C U s (ie that they are tribal and antiintellectual) are Irrelevant. However, I d o most s t r o n g l y agree with him w h e n he p o i n t e d out that the h i g h s t a n d a r d of entry requirements for this entirely s c i e n c e b a s e d c o l l e g e leads a lot of p e o p l e to d e v e l o p 'very narrow minds'. This mentality Mr H o d g s o n s u g g e s t s gives rise to the C C U s as they are at present c o n s t i t u t e d. I w o u l d therefore suggest, in the light of m y views o n the C C U s , that it w o u l d be valuable to e n q u i r e into the factors w h i c h M r H o d g s o n cites. It appears that at the e n d of the first term a c o n s i d e r a b l e n u m b e r of first year students leave the c o l l e g e never to return. N o w w h i l e s o m e of these have p r o b a b l y d e c i d e d that P h y s i c s , M i n i n g etc are not for t h e m , I w o u l d suggest that s o m e leave b e c a u s e they c a n n o t s t a n d c o l l e g e life. H o w d o the C C U s r e c o n c i l e this with their platitudes about h e l p i n g first years to settle i n ? I w o u l d suggest that the C C U s are a c o n t r i b u t o r y factor, t h o u g h not t h e o n l y one, in h e l p i n g p e o p l e to m a k e up their minds that they s h o u l d leave. T h e r e f o r e w h i l e the C C U s are, a s M r H o d g s o n rightly suggests, a n effect of pressures within the c o l l e g e , w e c a n a l s o see that they are because of their tribal structure, w h i c h , as I have previously p o i n t e d out, enforces a c e r t a i n k i n d of c o n f o r m i t y , (dare I say 'beer-swilling') contributors to that pressure. I w o u l d therefore suggest that w e s h o u l d put o u r o w n h o u s e in o r d e r (ie reform the C C U S s as they are part of I C U ) as well a s exerting o u r influance to abate the other detrimental pressure s w h i c h M r H o d g s o n s u g g e s t s exists w i t h i n the college. Yours sincerely Fr a n k J a m e s Sir I feel it is n e c e s s a r y to c o m m e n t o n l a n H o d g s o n ' s unjustified a n d ill-substantiated remarks about Steve H u t c h i n g ' s letter ( F E L I X 532) in t h e last edition of F E L I X . B y a d m i t t i n g he d o e s not k n o w

4

c a u s e d by the higher than average turnout couple with the u n a n n o u n c e d arrival of the R a g C o m m i t t e e ' s 'Real Ale' in the Hall on Sunday Concert afternoon. T h a n k y o u very m u c h J o h n Whitehouse


MOTION TO NEXT TUESDAY'S UGM FROM THE FELIX EDITOR

PUBLIC IMAGE OF ICU

Proposer: Colin Palmer Seconder: B Smith

ICU notes: 1. The thrashing of the IC team in a University Challenge television programme, which was recorded on Wednesday 21 November 1979. 2. That Queen's College Cambridge beat IC by 390 points to 140. 3. That the national image of ICU has once again been tarnished. 4. The absence of the Exec and the College mascot at one of the rare opportunities for ICU to win the public respect that we so richly deserve. 5. That the D P and the Hon Sec were both supporting each other at a Haldane Library committee meeting, which they considered more important than attending an event that will influence millions of people's opinions of IC. 6. The full coverageand assistance given by S T O I C , IC Radio and FELIX to the IC University Challenge team. 7. That the team was not suited to the questions asked as it was made up of a group of tea-slurping active heterosexual gentlemen. 8. That Bamber Gascoigne remained cool during what must have been an extremely boring programme for him to compere. 9. That the audience filmed for the closing sequence of the IC programme consisted mainly of Sussex Students. 10. That the audience filmed for the closing sequence of the Sussex programme consisted mainly of IC students. 11. The failure of the Cambridge team's bell and the slowness of the IC team to get their finger out to capitalise on the situation.

O r a m ' s

LfeiafirEpiscLfaa

ICU believes: 1. That a team made up of beer-swilling latent homosexual louts could do no worse than last week's team. 2. University Challenge is viewed by the public as one of the ultimate tests of university education in this country. 3. That either the style of questions on University Challenge should change or that the education given at'IC should cover a wider spectrum of knowledge. 4. That the audience who obtained the IC London sign, from the TV studio, showed greater initiative and ability than the team, 5. That more women should be encouraged to come to IC so that students receive a broader education and will therefore have a better chance of scoring. IC instructs:

1. ICU Exec to select a team made up of intelligent beer-swilling latent homosexual louts, when/if they are ever invited to appear on University Challenge again. 2. A representative of the ICU Exec to attend all student events, featuring IC, that receive media coverage 3. ICU Exec to send the College mascot to all events when representatives of ICU are asked to appear on television broadcasts. 4. ICU Exec to write a letter to Bamber Gascoigne thanking him for inviting IC to take part and also asking him to ensure that our team will be able to answer the questions next time by ensuring that more science questions are included in the programme. 5. The Exec to inform the Rector of the contents of this motion. 6. Prospective University Challenge team members to attend Associated Studies lectures.

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WEDNESDAY 14th HIGHER

MINIMUM RATE

LENDING

T h e G o v e r n m e n t will a n n o u n c e t o m o r r o w a s h a r p rise in the M L R from the present 14% to 16% or more. T h i s is part of a p a c k a g e of m e a s u r e s d e s i g n e d to restore the d w i n d l i n g credibility of its monetary squeeze.

CARTER

FREEZES ASSETS

IRANIAN

RHODESIAN D E A D L O C K BROKEN

THURSDAY 15th SIR ANTHONY B L U N T NAMED S i r A n t h o n y Blunt, former a d v i s o r on art to the Q u e e n is n a m e d as the fourth m a n in the " P h i l b y Affair by M a r g a r e t Thatcher. S u s p i c i o n s w e r e first raised a b o u t S i r B l u n t in 1951 f o l l o w i n g t h e d e f e c t i o n of B u r g e s s a n d M a c l e a n . T h i r t e e n years later he c o n f e s s e d to b e c o m i n g a n agent of R u s s i a n Intelligence in return for i m m u n i t y .

BLAIR P E A C H INQUEST DENIED T h e family of B l a i r P e a c h failed in an attempt to have his inquest heard before a jury. M r J o h n M o r t i m e r , Q C , a p p e a r i n g o n behalf of the family, c l a i m e d that there was m u c h e v i d e n c e to s u g g e s t that B l a i r P e a c h had been hit by a p o l i c e officer u s i n g an object heavier t h a n the regular t r u n c h e o n .

FRIDAY 16th FOR

T h e R h o d e s i a c o n f e r e n c e delegates face intensive negotiations as B r i t i s h officials, geared themselves for a short, s h a r p c a m p a i g n to b r i n g the talks to a c o n c l u s i o n in a week. L o r d C a r r i n g t o n tabled British p r o p o s a l s for a cease-fire to be i m p l e m e n t e d i n seven to ten days. T h e p r e s s u r e on the P F g r e w a s B i s h o p M u z o r e w a left for S a l i s b u r y to b e g i n a c a m p a i g n for his re-election.

6

Inflation c l i m b e d past 17% last m o n t h . It is r e a c h i n g the peak forecast for the early part of the winter. A new forecast by the G o v e r n m e n t d u e to p u b l i s h e d next week will s h o w a d e c l i ne in inflation. T h i s d e c l i ne will be at a rather s l o w er rate than previously expected.

SATURDAY 17th ANIMAL SUFFRAGE

A compromise formula drafted by P r e s i d e n t K a u n d a b r o k e the d e a d l o c k at the R h o d e s i a C o n f e r e n c e . T h i s was a c c e p t e d by t h e P F a n d it meets m a n y of the British d e m a n d s for the t r a n s i t i o n al p e r i o d .

UNDER PRESSURE CEASE-FIRE

T h e Iranian c a p t o r s of the 62 A m e r i c a n hostages threatened to take 'dramatic a c t i o n ' against them if the U S a l l o w e d the d e p o s e d S h a h to move a n y w h e r e e x c e p t to Iran. A c r o w d of 25,000 e x p r e s s e d solidarity with the captors. Ayatollah K h o m e i n i issued a statement c r i t i c i s i n g the U S for s e i z i n g 'Iranian money like thieves' a n d the U N S e c u r i t y C o u n c i l for refusing to ajlow a debate requested by Iran.

INFLATION OVER 17%

A l l assets in c a s h , securities, l a n d and g o o d s o w n e d by the G o v e r n m e n t of Iran, Iranian C e n t r a l B a n k a n d 'other c o n t r o l l e d entities r e m a i n frozen in the U S u n d e r an executive order by President C a r t e r . A c c o r d i n g to a W h i t e H o u s e statement, this order is in r e s p o n s e to reports that the G o v e r n e m e n t of Iran is about to w i t h d r a w its funds.'.

PF

US H O S T A G E S IN IRAN

F a r m a n i m a l s at a C a m b r i d g e research institute are being a l l o w e d to select their own living c o n d i t i o n s . E a c h pen is e q u i p p e d with s w i t c h e s for c o n t r o l l i n g heat, light, etc. D r Barry C r o s s , director of the institue, calls this " g i v i n g the a n i m a l s the vote".

BLUNT S T A T E M E N T M r Brian S e w e l l , a friend of Professor B l u n t is quoted to have s a i d " P r o f e s s o r Blunt has no statement to make. He feels b o u n d by the Official Secrets A c t . "

SUNDAY 18th US

W O M A N AND BLACK MARINES FREED

A w o m a n secretary a n d two black hostages were released after being kept hostage for two weeks at the A m e r i c a n E m b a s s y in Iran. T h e y are the only ones to be released so far, but there are suggest i ons that all w o m e n and black hostages will be freed. S t u d e n t s have w a r n e d that hostages not set free will be tried by Islamic courts

MOVE TO BAR AID TO

IRA

T h e J u s t i c e Department in W a s h i n g t o n d e c i d e d to move against the Irish Northern A i d C o m m i t t e e a c c u s i n g it of being limited to the P r o v i s i o n a l IRA. In a civil suit the U S Attorney G e n e r a l alleges that the C o m m i t t e e has failed to d i s c l o s e the whole truth about its activities

NERVE GAS FEARS T h e R u s s i a n G e n e r a l Staff plan to use s p e c i a l nerve gas against Nato installations, before resorting to nuclear w e a p o n s in the event of war, a c c o r d i n g to senior defence experts in U S . M a n y of the warheads on Soviet missiles are k n o w n to be armed with c h e m i c a l agents a n d s o m e analysts believe that the kill rate of the nerve gas is higher than that of n u c l e a r w a r h e a d over a given area

MONDAY 19th LEYLAND WALKOUT A walk-out by several t h o u s a n d w o r k e r s follows the d i s m i s s a l of Derek R o b i n s o n , the S e n i o r S h o p S t e w a r d C o n v e n e r , at British L e y l a n d ' s L o n g b r i d g e , B i r m i n g h a m plant. Mr R o b i n s o n was d i s m i s s e d for 'deliberately undermining the comapany's recovery programme" by p u b l i s h i n g a d o c u m e n t c a l l i n g for 'disruptive action'. T h e d i s m i s s a l o c c u r r e d at d i s c i p l i n a r y p r o c e e d i n g s where three other senior stewards w h o took part in the p r o d u c t i o n of the d o c u m e n t were given a w a r n i n g that they too face d i s m i s s a l if they do the s a m e again.

EEC CONCERN At a meeting today of E E C F i n a n c e Ministers it is clear that with the e x c e p t i o n of L u x e m b o u r g no E E C government is ready to r e d u c e the e x p e c t e d British net c o n t r i b u t i o n , to the E E C of ÂŁ1.2 billion by m o r e t han ÂŁ350 million. In return for this s m a l l c o n c e s s i o n Britain may be e x p e c t e d to seel its N o r t h S e a O i l at below market prices to m e m b e r c o u n t r i e s . G o v e r n m e n t officials are reported to be c o n c e r n e d at the extent of the gap d i v i d i n g Britain a n d other E E C governments.

S H O R T A G E OF PHYSICS TEACHERS At a R o y a l S o c i e t y C o n f e r e n c e today, it was s a i d that a major retraining p r o g r a m m e for b i o l o g y teachers is urgently required to c o p e with the s e r i o u s shortage of p h y s i c s teachers. F i g u r e s that the n u m b e r of p h y s i c s teachers entering s e c o n d a r y s c h o o l s this year is well below half of the figures for five years ago O n l y 256 p h y s i c s teachers qualifiedk this year c o m p a r e d with 823 biology teachers.

TUESDAY 20th US EMBASSY H O S T A G E S M r A n d r e w Y o u n g , the former A m e r i c a n A m b a s s a d o r at the U N , is to fly to T e h r a n to talk with the authorities about the hostages. T h e U S served notice that it might seek a c t i o n u n d e r the U N Charter. A s this a n n o u n c e m e n t was made, A y a t o l l a h K h o m e i n i said there was e v i d e n c e p r o v i n g the r e m a i n i n g hostages were spies and predicted a s c a n d a l w h e n they went before a revolutionary court.

BL STANDS FIRM B L s a i d that under no c i r c u m s t a n c e s w o u l d it r e c o n s i d e r the s a c k i n g of Derek R o b i n s o n , the c o m m u n i s t leader of the c o m p a n y ' s s h o p stewards. M o r e than 18,000 B L w o r k e r s went on strike in protest and more s t o p p a g e s are e x p e c t e d at the night shifts.

ARMED G R O U P SEIZES M E C C A MOSQUE T h e Great M o s q u e in the holy city of M e c c a . was s e i z e d by a g r o u p of 60-100 Shi'ite M u s l i m s . Reports s a i d that 30 hostages had been s e i z e d a n d one former government official had been killed. T h e true reasons for the seizure are not yet k n o w n .


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CITY AND GUILDS As this is Rag Week, the time since the last article has been slightly hectic. Tuesday saw our U G M with the completely unfair trial of a nameless exec member and some fun. Morphy Day followed with a slightly outnumbered (where was everybody?) Guilds contingent putting up a good fight, although we lost the oar. We managed to cover res and mines in a thick and smelly layer of shit and other disgusting bits and pieces. Some enterprising people stole rcs's fish guts, while they weren't looking. The tea in Harrods took place as ususal. Thursday saw the res smoking concert, with us taking part in a sketch which was fun although we don't always dress up in women's clothing. The Rag Procession was on Saturday afternoon with our float being built using the Guildshow bits and a few extras. We collected £525.791/2 with the bottle of wine going to Jo. The exec got wet when their raft capsized on Sunday although no one lost their voice this time.

FORTHCOMING

EVENTS

T O N I G T is Carnival, so if you haven't got a ticket come along and pay on the door, if you get there early. Be sure not to miss this event. S U N D A Y 2nd is the Guilds Rugby Sevens at Harlington. There is free transport leaving at 10:00am from Beit Arch. Everyone is invited to enter a team and there is also a ladies competition. Team names which may include one guest should be handed to Mark Jenner or in the Union Office. There will be cups and liquid prizes and in the evening, for the players and supporters (as many as possible should turn up), there will be hot soup, rolls and a film. There is a trip to see 'The Life of Brian' on T U E S D A Y 27th. Tickets are available from the Guilds Office. It has come to my notice that there are several posts vacant as official Publicity Officer's groupies. Applicants should have extreme patience, be able to put up with grumbling and above all female. Applicants to C & G Union Office. I don't want any of Jo's old ones. Cheers Bryan

WANTEDS SOMEONE T O FIX M Y M I K U N I 18-32 t w i n - c h o k e , two-stage carb. Worshop manual but no tools, s o I can't do it myself! F i n a n c i a l reward to a n y o n e w h o c a n put it right. T h i s is urgentl

Ghani, 3240.

C o n t a c t Dave

C i v E n g 3, internal

COMPLETE HEWLETT P A C K A R D M O D E L 25, 2 4 C or 33. A n y reasonable price paid. D R G r o v e s , M i n T e c h 1.

8

After three and a half years, J E Z is back on the road. Having had a small adjustment made to her engine during last week. She was fired for the first time late on Saturday night. The next day, Jon Hall et al took her out for a short trip, and by all accounts riding on the back of a 1916 Dennis fire engine is something different. The was perhaps the highlight .of a very successful week for R C S . From Morphy Day where a combined operation with RSM defeated a disorganised Guilds' force to Sunday's bar night where we outsang, outchanted and outnumbered Guilds (where were the Miners), everything was very well attended. The Ents committee richly deserve to be congratulated for Thursday's excellent smoking concert. Equally successful were Saturday's procession and the raft race which we won again. Although in the case of the latter if the Exec had gone any slower they would probably have ended up in the water with the intrepid Adrian Black who was swimming across the Serpentine for Rag. Going to smoking concerts or attending bar nights is obviously not everybody's cup of tea and suggestions for any other activities that could be organised within the framework of R C S are always welcome. By the time you read this you will no doubt be fed up of Rag. Don't worry you've got a whole week off before the year collections on 1st December. This is the last R C S collection of term and speculation is rife as to who can challenge Life Sciences 1 for the barrel that's offered to the most successful year group. Rumour has it that Maths 3 (sic) are trying hard. Even if yu haven't been on any Rag stunts yet, your social representatives will ber stunts yet, your social representatives will be more than pleased to see you. Even if you can only give an hour or two, it could help change a child's entire way of life. Work hard and enjoy yourselves, Nick Watmough.

A n y o n e interested in the H u m a n Rights M o t i o n to be pu,t before the next IC U G M on November 27th is w e l c o m e to have a c o p y of the United Nations Declaration of H u m a n Rights. C o p i e s are available from the U n i o n Office or T i m Hillyer, Maths 3.

Nominations are required for the following posts: Hon Sec, Asst Sec and one committee member for ICU O S C . The elections will be held on Thursday 6th December. Meet in the Union Office at 1:00pm. Nominations to be given in by 5:30pm Tuesday 4th Dec.

MINES Since last week's report, life has slowed down a little in Mines. On Friday there was the Rag and Drag Disco, coinciding the Royal School of Mines Association's 95th annual dinner. Not a few minesmen went to the latter and thoroughly enjoyed the dinner, speeches and fraternisation (yes, the bar for it lasted till 2:00am as well) afterwards. Saturday was the Rag Procession. Simon would like to thank all those heroes who came and helped him build the float in record time (under two hours) and also all the miners who came on the actual procession and collected. The security guard in Mines had a shock in the afternoon: he was confronted by Bernie Pryor marching past his desk with a platoon of large gentlemen in dark blue uniforms who had, as usual, helped admirably and were going for a couple of bevies with Bernie. Thanks to the bods who bore the raft on Sunday and helped to build it on Saturday we were lucky to come third. Last Tuesday, 18 minesmen went to see the London Metal Exchange in action. It was certainly interesting and surprisingly rowdy. There may be a further visit next term for those wh signed up too late this time and perhaps a lecture by one of our guides on the LME and the economies of metals in general.

FOR

THE

FUTURE

M O N D A Y 26th NOV: MIN & MET S O C Lecture by Stan Foster A R S M on Coal Worldwide in MLT 6:00pm. T U E S 26th NOV: MET & M A T SCI S O C Lecture by Prof Pashley, FRS (he's Head of the Dept) on Crystal Structure from Electron Microscopy in G20 at 6:00pm, followed by the Hot Pot Supper (tickets £1.50 from the committee). D E C 9-14th: RSMU FOREIGN S T U D E N T S WEEK - It's nearly on us, so if you want to go on any of the visits, sign up on the lists outside G20. Exact details will be coming soon. DEC 14th: MINES BALL - The event of the year. Double tickets £17.00 from RSMU Office or social reps.

This Saturday volunteers are needed to help amuse the kids will be occupying the who ICWA Lounge during the 'Latin American Women's Conference' to be held at IC this weekend. Anyone interested contact John Whitehouse in the ICCAG Room, Top Floor Union, today at 12:30pm for details.


FELIX

SUPPLEMENT IMPERIAL COLLEGE FOLK CLUB REVIEW 1979-80 UNION LOWER R E F E C T O R Y EVERY M O N D A Y ' 8:00pm

Nov 26 - SINGERS NIGHT in the lower lounge. C o m e a n d sing, play o r just listen. Free. Dec 3 - H E M L O C K C O C K AND BULL B A N D a lively band of nutters w h o play E n g l i s h and F r e n c h s o n g a n d d a n c e m us i c. A d m i s s i o n 50p, members 25p and m u s i c i a n s free. Dec 10 - CHRISTMAS CEILIDH, d a n c i n g to m u s i c by the Reelists, a six p i e c e electric folk c l u b . A d m i s s i o n 75p, members 40p. F r o m 8:30-12:00pm. Jan 7 - ROARING J E L L Y " H a c k n e y e d . . . b o r i n g " - Derby E v e n i n g T e l e g r a p h . " U n u s u a l a n d o r i g i n a l " - M e l o d y Maker. N a m e d after a jig they liked but c o u l d n ' t play, now they c a n , they don't. A n excellent b a n d for the first night. A d m i s s i o n ÂŁ1.00, m e m b e r s 50p. Jan 14 - S A M S T E P H E N S A N D A N N E L E N N O X MARTION s i n g a mixture of m u s i c hall a n d traditional folk. Very entertaining. A d m i s s i o n 60p, m e m b e r s 30p.

Feb 14 - MIDAS a relatively new male/female d u o w h o play traditional, c o n t e m p o r a r y a n d h u m o r o u s m u s i c . T h e y already have two s o n g s o n r e c o r d a n d extensive b o o k i n g s . S h o u l d have a great future. A d m i s s i o n 60p, m e m b e r s 30p. Feb 18 - BICKY ROCKIT p r o m i s e a g o u u e v e n i n g ' entertainment in e x c h a n g e for g r e e n d r i n k i n g v o u c h e r s . A l s o to divulge t h e derivation of their n a m e to the fortunate few w h o turn u p to listen. A d m i s s i o n 60p, m e m b e r s 30p. Feb 25 - L E S BARKER M r s A c k r o y d is a n excellent performer a n d L e s isn't a b a d poet himself. A d m i s s i o n 60p, m e m b e r s 30p. Mar 3 - SINGERS NIGHT free Mar 10 - MR SMITH h u m o u r i s t o n the guitar, plays u n u s u a l but familiar novelty t u n e s not written for the guitar as well a s s o m e s e r i o u s arrangements. A d m i s s i o n 60p, m e m b e r s 30p.

CLUES ACROSS 1 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 16 19 22 23 24 25 26 28 29

For each creation (10) Guildsmobile....then again (4) Record Metal Band (8) Create traditional dog food (6) Boss (5) Sounds like informal drink (8) Futile (4) Speech has time period (5) Contain (4) Sounds of annoyed cash? (8) Retain (4) Detention place insect? (10) A party? (3) Stay away from (5) Encircle (4) Brown off upper class type (7) Angry hidden in refuge perhaps (8)

C R O S S W O R D

C L U E S DOWN

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9a 14 15 17 18 20 21 27

Domestic animal Xmas insect? (8) With regard to before dispatched? (9) Belongs to us 'little people' (9) Contain by wheat (7) Small ball (7) Batchelor of Arts in table supplies at this College (8) Beam (3) Suspended motion (6) Sight hinted editor? (8) Fool Dwelling (7) Hail angered (8) Things people did (8) Plunge in (7) Before T Group (6) Colloquial riot (3) BACK DUE T O POPULAR APATHY! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; IAN F O R R E S T E R

THE EAGLES THE LONG RUN' (SINGLE REVIEW) T h e s e c o n d release from the a l b u m of the s a m e name, this is a record that I actually like (it's a g o o d t h i n g that I'm not reveiwing t h e new F l o y d single, despite b e i n g a F l o y d fan). It makes an excellent follow-up to ' H e a r t a c h e Tonight', a recent chart s u c c e s s for the b a n d . L i k e 'Heartache' it has a strong beat, but isn't quite s o r a u n c h y , being more in t h e traditional Eagles style, although the influence of J o e Walsh is present a n d certainly prevents the m u s i c being in a rut. T h e lyrics are written by D o n H e n l e y a n d G l e n Frey, a n d s u r p r i s i n g l y for the E a g l e s , give an optimistic m e s s a g e of h o p e w h e n in difficulties; they are s u n g with feeling by D o n Henley. J o e W a l s h directly c o nt r i but es s o m e excellent work o n slide guitar, there is also a pleasing b a c k i n g of D o n Felder o n o r g a n . T h e new d r u m m e r , T i m S c h m i d t formerly with P o c o , provides a rock steady beat with interesting a n d imaginative variations in exact r h y t h m . In all this is an excellent p r o d u c t i o n by Bill S z y m c z y k (what a name!) w h o has very c l o s e l y followed G l y n n J o h n ' s p r o d u c t i o n style of this masterful West C o a s t band . T h i s is a g o o d c h o i c e of s i n g l e for p r e C h r i s t m a s release, a n d if y o u don't already o w n the a l b u m , w o u l d m ake a r e a s o n a b l e addition to y o u r r e c o r d c o l l e c t i o n . Jeremy Nunns Record courtesy of IC Radio.


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Living on a grant is not the easiest things at the best of times, and if, for example, the full parental contribution is not forthcoming, it can be well nigh impossible : Rising accommodation costs and the effects of inflation all go to making survival that little bit more difficult. When the grant figures are worked out the bureaucratic mind is no doubt influenced by other benefits w h i c h students may be entitled to and the grant is calculated a c c o r d i n g l y . This article is a quick survey of s o m e of the ways in w h i c h you can increase your i n c o m e simply by filling in the right forms at the right time.

DO

YOUR PARENTS HAVE T O MAKE UP YOUR GRANT?

If so, by u s i n g a covenant a n d getting the tax that y o u r parents have already paid o n their c o n t r i b u t i o n back from the t a x m a n , y o u c a n e n d up with 1.43x w h a t y o u g e t a t t h e m o m e n t (nearly half as m u c h a again). T h e r e used to be a n u m b e r of c o m p l i c a t i o n s with c o v e n a n t s arising from the c h i l d tax-allowance, but these have n o w d i s a p p e a r e d a n d virtually a n y o n e receiving a parental c o n t r i b u t i o n c a n benefit hugely, s i m p l y by filling in a form. Further information o n how to draw u p a covenant c a n be o b t a i n e d from the Welfare Centre.

HAVE YOU EVER EARNED OVER £375 IN ONE TAX YEAR? If y o u have, y o u may be able to c l a i m : Unemployment Benefit d u r i n g vacat i ons a n d Sickness Benefit if y o u are ill for more t h a n three days (even d u r i n g term time) P L US various other benefits. Eligibility for these benefits is b a s e d o n the national i n s u r a n c e c o n t r i b u t i o n s w h i c h y o u have paid on earnings d u r i n g the R E L E V A N T T A X Y E A R . T h e 'relevant tax year' is t h e c o m p l e t e tax year p r e c e e d i n g the c a l e n d e r year in w h i c h y o u are c l a i m i n g . T h u s if y o u c l a i m in 1979 it is A p r i l 1977 - A p r i l 1978 a n d for 1980 it is A p r i l 1978 - A p r i l 1979. T h e a m o u n t s that y o u have to have earned a n d the benefits they p r o d u c e :

A p r i l 1977-1978 £375-569 £570-749 £750 plus

A p r i l 1978-1979 £437.50-664 £665-874 £875 plus

W e e k l y Benefit £9.25 £13.88 £18.50

If y o u have earned more than this y o u s h o u l d get an e a r n i n g s related s u p p l e m e n t as well. If y o u have e a r n e d this kind of m o n e y in a n y - tax year a n d y o u r 17th birthday fell after A p r i l 1977, y o u may be eligible even t h o u g h y o u didn't earn the right m o n e y in the right tax year.

T H E R E A R E 9 S P A R E NURSERY PLACES....Contact University of London Union, Malet Street. Nearest tube: Russel Square. The places are for children aged between two and five. See Michsel Arthur or phone 580-9551 ext 41.

O n e t h i n g to w a t c h out for is the effects of the d r e a d e d 'thirteen week rule'. What this m e a n s is that if y o u make one c l a i m a n d then make another within thirteen weeks of the first, then the s e c o n d c l a i m is treated as being a c o n t i n u a t i o n of the first c l a i m s o that it is y o u r entitlement from the s e c o n d c l a i m . T h i s means that y o u have to do y o u r s u m s carefully before m a k i n g a c l a i m or else y o u , may e n d up l o s i n g out. E x a m p l e : Harry's entitlement d u r i n g 1979 will be based o n the £520 that he earned d u r i n g s u m m e r 1977 b e c a u s e it falls into the 1977-78 tax year. If he c l a i m s in 1980, his entitlement will be based o n the £880 that he earned d u r i n g s u m m e r 1978. T h e first three days of a period of s i c k n e s s or u n e m p l o y m e n t d o not c o u n t for these benefits so Harry will be entitled to a week's s i c k n e s s benefit, two weeks u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit for the C h r i s t m a s 1979 vacation anf four weeks benefit for the Easter 1980 vacation. If Harry c l a i m s at C h r i s t m a s , his c l a i m at Easter will be affected by the thirteen week rule a n d he will get the s a m e rate at Easter as he d i d at C h r i s t m a s . If y o u look at the benefit rates listed above, y o u will see that this entitles him to £9.25 per week. If Hary doesn't c l a i m at C h r i s t m a s , his c l a i m at Easter will not be affected by the thirteen week rule and a q u i c k look at the benefit rates s h o w s that he will be entitled to £18.50, based o n the £880 that he earned in the 1978-79 tax year. S o , if he c l a i m s at C h r i s t m a s 1979, he will get: £9.25 s i c k n e s s benefit, £18.50 (2 weeks at £9.25) u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit (Christmas) and £37.00 ( f o u r w e e k s at £9.25) u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit (Easter) m a k i n g a total £64.75. If Harry doesn't c l a i m at C h r i s t m a s however, he will get £9.25 s i c k n e s s benefit and £74.00 u n e m p l o y m e n t benefit (Easter) m a k i n g a total of £83.25. S o , if Harry plays his cards right he c a n make £18.50 more by ommitting to m a k e o n e c l a i m than he w o u l d have d o n e if he had made the c l a i m .

SUPPLEMENTARY BENEFIT A n o t h e r way of p a y i n g y o u r rent d u r i n g the vacat i ons is to c l a i m S u p p l e m e n t a r y Benefit. This involves s i g n i n g o n as u n e m p l o y e d in L o n d o n e a c h (or at any rate most) w e e k s d u r i n g the v a c a t i o n. O n c e y o u have s i g n e d o n as u n e m p l o y e d , y o u then go to the offices of the Department of Health and S o c i a l S e c u r i t y to fill in s o m e more forms a n d have an interview. One snag about claiming Supplementary Benefit is that it m e a n s that y o u are automatically claiming Unemployment Benefit. T h i s m e a n s that if y o u c l a i m for y o u r rent at C h r i s t m a s a n d were t h i n k i n g of c l a i m i n g U n e m p l o y m e n t Benefit at Easter y o u will be c l o b b e r e d by the thirteen week rule. If y o u w o u l d like further information on a n y of this or want s o m e of the a b u n d a n t c o n f u s i o n clarified, please c o m e a n d see me in the Welfare C e n t r e (third floor, U n i o n B u i l d i n g ) . MICHAEL ARTHUR Welfare A d v i s e r .

FELIX SOCIETY The first meeting will be held on Monday 26 November at 12:45 in the FELIX Office. Matters arising are elections to posts on the committee and the 30th anniversary issue of FELIX. All are welcome to attend. Contact the Editor for further details.

DO YOU PAY RENT? Rent p r o b a b l y a c c o u n t s for more than o n e third of y o u r weekly i n c o m e a n d it is one of the areas in w h i c h the biggest savings c a n be made. T h e Rent A c t s provide m a c h i n e r y whereby any tenant c a n a p p r o a c h their local Rent Officer or Rent T r i b u n a l a n d ask them to register a fair rent. (The c h o i c e of w h o you go to d e p e n d s o n the kind of a c c o m m o d a t i o n that y o u live in.) A fair rent is likely to be a r o u n d half of what y o u are p a y i n g at present. M a n y l a n d l o r d s try to offer y o u a deal w h i c h takes y o u outside the ambit of the Rent A c t s but most of these are s h a m s a n d needn't deprive y o u of y o u r rights.

DO

YOU HAVE T O PAY RENT DURING THE VACATION?

If y o u do, y o u c a n c l a i m a Rent A l l o w a n c e and a Rate Rebate from the h o u s i n g department at y o u r T o w n Hall. A c t u a l l y , y o u c a n c l a i m these all the year r o u n d , but they are m u c h more beneficial d u r i n g the vacation w h e n the grant doesn't cover a c c o m m o d a t i o n . T h e s o o n e r y o u start c l a i m i n g these, the more m o n e y y o u will e n d up with.

U G M Union General Meeting, this Tuesday 27 November at 1:00 in the Great Hall, Sherfield Building. Motions include Cambodia, Human Rights, Student Grants for Cities, Education Cuts and the Corrie Bill. T A B L E TENNIS C L U B presents A CHRISTMAS HANDICAP COMPETION Last two weeks of term. Entrance 25p to Pete Hewkin, Physics 3. Festive Prizes. O p e n to any member of College. See posters for more details. 13


If you've never hitched out of London, then knowing where to start from can be a problem, so here are some bits of information I've gathered: G o West Young Men (or Women) The number 2 7 bus goes to Bristol, South Wales and the South West. Well, not all the way, but you can catch the 27 from Barkers on High Street Kensington and it will take you to Chiswick roundabout. This is a famous hitching spot: it is the junction between the North and South Circular Roads and the M 4 and is heavily used by all sorts of traffic. The best place to stand is by a couple of small laybys on the slip road leading on to the M 4 just a few yards from the roundabout. I would strongly recommend this spot if you want to go anywhere in the West: on the dozen or so occasions I've hitched from there I've never waited more than fifteen minutes for a good lift. (NB Gunnersby tube is only a few hundred yards away from the roundabout too.)

The Northern Lights Staples C o r n e r , the start of the M 1 , appears to be a most unsuitable place to try and get a lift: the motorway leads straight off the r o u n d a b o u t junction with the North C i r c u l a r a n d there is nowhere for cars to pull up except the hard s h o u l d e r (where it is illegal for motorists to stop for you). Nevertheless it is a popular spot for hitch-hikers a n d on Friday evenings it's like a bus q u e u e there. Don't be put off if you're tenth in the queue: offers of lifts c o m e very frequently (every two or three minutes) and o n c e past Watford G a p you're well o n y o u r way to any city in the M i d l a n d s , North East a n d North West. T h e 16A from H y d e Park C o r n e r and the 266 from H a m m e r s m i t h g o to the roundabout; the 16 a n d 616 g o to the C r i c k l e w o o d Garage, w h i c h is o n l y ten minutes walk away. Cambridge Rejects If y o u want to visit the town where y o u might have g o n e to university, the M11 goes most of the w a y there but is a s u r p r i s i n g l y quiet road. T h e central line tube station at R e d b r i d g e is by the start of the M i l . Alternatively y o u c a n try the A10 : P i c c a d i l l y line tuve to T u r n p i k e L a n e then the W1 bus to the Great C a m b r i d g e R o u n d a b o u t , also o n the North C i r c u l a r . Oxford Rejects T h e road to that other d e n of dons is the

SOME LITTLE KNOWN PHYSICAL LAWS Everybody has heard of the celebrated Murphy-Sodde Law usually in the form defined by one Jennings: "The probability that a piece of bread dropped onto a carpet will fall with the buttered side down, is directly proportional to the cost of the carpet" or else in the original, "If something can go wrong, then it will." There are many minor laws of sciences which are related to these, but unfortunately less well-known. One is the Law of Selective Gravity attributed to one of Galileo's pupils: "An object will fall so as to do the most damage." No doubt the reader will have heard of the experiments carried out from the leaning Tower of Pisa in order to prove this, in 1612. This Tower is itself an example of Murphy's law of course. A variant of the above law is "A component will fail so as to do the most damage." There is also the Law of Cussedness of Natural Objects which states that "the likelihood that a component (eg nut or ball-bearing) will roll away into an inaccessible place, is directly proportional to its importance in the apparatus." O'Toole has made an important Observation on Murphy's Law, viz, "Murphy was an optimist." Murphy's law is a comment on our difficulty in understanding causality and coincidence in the Universe, and is therefore applicable to many disciplines. For instance, applied to the theory of queues, it yields Etorre's Observation, "The other line alway moves faster." There a number of quite separate rules governing scientific research. These include Gordon's Law, "If a project is not worth doing at all, then it is not worth doing well," and Hoare's Law of Large Problems, "Inside every large problem is a small problem struggling to get out." Those who have studied Physics will have encountered Fermi's Golden Rule but may not know the Second Golden Rule, viz, "whoever has the gold, makes the rules."

14

Parkinson's Law is of c o u r s e very well k n o w n , stating that "work e x p a n d s to fill the time available"; derivative of this is the ninetyninety rule of project schedules: " T h e first 9 0 % of the job takes 9 0 % of the time, a n d the last 1 0 % of the job takes another 9 0 % . " T u r n i n g to Thermodynamics, there are four laws, of w h i c h n o - o n e c a n remember the z e r o t h law (which is actually a mathematical formulation of t h e r m o d y n a m i c equilibrium); but t h e first three laws have been paraphrase d as follows. 1. Y o u can't win, y o u c a n o n l y break even. 2. Y o u c a n o n l y break even at absol ute zero (273 C ) . 3. Y o u can't ever reach absolute zero. T h e s e c o n d law leads to Zymurgy's First Law of Evolving Systems Dynamics, " O n c e y o u o p e n a c a n of worms, then t h e o n l y w a y to recan t h e m is to have a larger c a n . T h e scientific m e t h o d itself is neatly e n c a p s u l a t e d in Mater's Law, "If the facts d o not c o n f o r m to the theory, then they must be d i s p o s e d of." A quite s e r i o u s law, for a c h a n g e is that thought u p by W i l l i a m of O c c a m (1284-1349) a n d k n o w n as Occam's Razor this states, " 9 0 % of a n y theory c a n usually be d i s p o s e d of" or " a g o o d theory has a m i n i m u m of variables in i t . " In the p s e u d o - s c i e n c e s , very few of the laws very sensible (it's said that if y o u laid all the e c o n o m i s t s in the count ry e n d to e n d , they'd never reach a c o n c l u s i o n ) but I rather like Barth's distinction: " T h e r e are t w o types of people; those w h o divide p e o p l e into two types a n d those w h o don't." I a m s u r e that the Editor will be p l e a s e d to hear of"any other laws of s c i e n c e , whether variants of M u r p h y - S o d d e ' s law o r o t h e r w i s e , w h i c h readers may have c o m e a c r o s s . ( Y o u w a n n a bet â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed) Derrick Everett

A40. Y o u c o u l d try starting at P a d d i n g t o n or S h e p h e r d ' s B u s h , but the r e c o m m e n d e d spot is the A4/North C i r c u l a r Interchange at H a n g e r L a n e - central line tube right there. Deep South I hate h i t c h i n g s o u t h from L o n d o n : S E L o n d o n e s p e c i a l l y is a maze of roads t h r o u g h s u b u r b i a with n o clear routes. Here are a few possibilities t h o u g h : A 2 for Dover, C a n t e r b u r y etc: S h o o t e r s Hill s e e m s to be the best bet, p r o b a b l y at the junction with R o c h e s t a r Way, but I've never tried it myself (!) (36 bus to L e w i s h a m , then the 108 to R o c h e s t a r Way). A 3 for P o r t s m o u t h . C a t c h the 14 bus to P u t n e y and then walk towards R i c h m o n d . After a mile there's a d a m n g o o d r o u n d a b o u t to hitch at. If y o u want to get o n the M 3 there are several r o u n d a b o u t s a l o n g the C h e r t s e y R o a d that are quite reasonable. T a k e the tube to R i c h m o n d a n d walk from there. Epitaph That's my lot, but p r o m p t e d by a letter in F E L I X two weeks ago, I started t hi nki ng about the idea of a h i t c h - h i k i n g race a n d w o n d e r e d about c o m b i n i n g it with a way of raising m o n e y for R a g . H o w about a day's s p o n s o r e d hitching race a r o u n d Easter t i m e? (ie w h e n the weather is better). If you've a n y ideas o n this, d r o p m e a line v i a the F E L I X Office. Gilly Anchors

S U M M E R IN A M E R I C A Wouldn't you like to work in America next summer and earn enough to tour the States and Canada? Of course you would, so why not do it next year with the British Universities North America Club? B U N A C is a non-profit making national club which organises an exchange program enabling students at British universities - including overseas students - to work in the USA and Canada. B U N A C arranges members' work permits, flights, insurance and the first night's board in America. They also have an office in New York to give help to the participants, should they need it. Members have the choice of finding their own job or of working at a kids' summer camp. Those who choose to work at a camp have the further choice of whether to work with the children (it helps if you are a bit extrovert) or working on the kitchen an maintenance side. Those who choose to work on a camp have everything arranged for them. However, those members choosing the other scheme have to arrange their own job for themselves, although B U N A C does publish a small job directory early next year to help. It is possible to get jobs in industry that are even better paid than the casual labour jobs that most participants work at. The idea of the schemes is Âť ~.t members should be able to break even overall if they wish. K

Interested? Then come and find out more about the BUNAC schemes at our weekly meetings, every Friday between 12:30 and 1:30 in the Green Committee Room on the 3rd floor of the Union Building. IC BUNAC Committee: Philip Harper (Physics 3) and James Rowley (Physics 2).

AWFUL

RECORD

REVIEW

Sarah Brightman and the Aliens 'LOVE IN A U F O ' (release date O c t o b e r 12th) S i m i l a r to 'I L o s t my Heart to a S t a r s h i p Trooper', w h i c h is all that need be s a i d , except that it c o n t a i n s the t o u c h i n g lyric: " O h what a trip it was - s o c o s m i c - l y o r g a s m i c , I'd no idea he was an a n d r o i d made of plastic". Simon Hodgson


FRIDAY 23 N O V E M B E R 5:00 T u n e In - J o n

Fewtrell

6:00 S o u n d s C o u n t r y - J o h n C l a r k w i t h C a W t h a t you

I.

C . Radio

Times

are g u a r a n t e e d to e n j o y .

7:00 V i e w p o i n t - C h r i s D a l t o n w i t h t h e r e v i e w o f t h e week. 9:00 R o u n d a b o u t - N i c k

Melling

11:00 T h r o u g h M i d n i g h t - G e r a r d J e n n i n g s 1:00

Closedown

S A T U R D A Y 24 N O V E M B E R 8:00 W a k e u p w i t h J o n - J o n F i r t h i n c l u d i n g w e e k l y l o c a l c i n e m a g u i d e a n d a listen to s o m e of Oldfield's new album

Mike

Platinum.

11:00 W i b b l y W o b b l y W i r e l e s s S h o w - D a v e F u l l e r

D

i n c l u d i n g IC Y e s t e r d a y f e a t u r i n g n e w s a n d e v e n t s o f f o r m e r t i m e s at I C . 1:00 301 S p o r t s L i n e w i t h s p o r t s r e p o r t s at 1:30,2:30, 3:25, 3:50, 4:25, 4:50 a n d

E

5:30.

6:00 H e a v y M e t a l S h o w - J u l i a n Pitt 8:00

(for

this

week

only)

Roundabout

-

Sahara

T a l b o t . T h e D e s s e r t S h o w in w h i c h a n y t h i n g

you

DAODO

want gets played. 11:00 T h r o u g h 1:00

Midnight

Closedown

SUNDAY 25 N O V E M B E R

301 metres, 9 9 9 k H z m e d i u m w a v e

8:00 W a k e u p w i t h J o n - J o n F i r t h w i t h I C S p o r t s d e s k at 10:30. 11:00

S&M

S h o w - S i m o n Milner

g u i d e to g r a v e l p i ts w i t h S l i m e y 1:00

Harvey

Harvey

Takes

including

your

Mildew.

Y o u T h r o u g h the A f t e r n o o n

-

Nadin.

4:00 R o u n d t a b l e - J o n F e w t r e l l , p r o d u c e d b y J o h n C l a r k a n d J o n Firth. 5:00 F o c u s o n E L O - T o n y F e r g u s o n 6:00

J C Sunday Special - J o h n Clark including a

s p r i n k l i n g o f c o m e d y b e t w e e n 6 : 0 0 - 7 : 0 0 p l u s at 7:30, the w h o l e of G e n e s i s ' S u p p e r ' s R e a d y f r o m Foxtrot. 9:00

Gramophone

Bennett

plays

two

Request hours

Programme

of

your

-

Peter

requests

and

dedications. 11:00 T h r o u g h M i d n i g h t e a s e i n t o M o n d a y w i t h H u w Baynham 1:00

Closedown

M O N D A Y 26 N O V E M B E R 5:00 T u n e

In

6:00 R a g g e d H e r o e s - E r i c J a r v i s p r o d u c e d b y S i d . 7:00 V i e w p o i n t - D a v i d F u l l e r w i t h IC R a d i o T o p 20. 9:00 R o u n d a b o u t - S i m o n

Littlejohn

11:00 T h r o u g h M i d n i g h t - S i d 1:00

Chris

Closedown

Photo by Jeremy Nunns

D a l t o n in the I.C. R a d i o main studio.

He presents V i e w p o i n t tonight a n d every Fri day. T U E S D A Y 27 N O V E M B E R 12:00 M i d d a y S p i n - S i m o n W o o d s 2:15

Closedown

IC RADIO T O P TWENTY 19/11/79

5:00 T u n e In - M a r k J o n e s 6:00 T h a t ' s J a z z - H a r r y M a g n a y p r o d u c e d b y S i m o n Milner.

1

7:00 V i e w p o i n t - K a r e n 9:00 R o u n d a b o u t - S a r a h T a l b o t . L i v e d a n g e r o u s l y a n d p h o n e r e q u e s t s in o n internal 3440. 11:00 T h r o u g h M i d n i g h t - T o n y O l i v e r 1:00

Closedown

W EDNESDA Y 28 N O V E M B E R 5:00 R & B - S i d 6:40 301

(-)

E l e c t r i c L i g h t O r c h e s t r a - C o n f u s i o n / L a s t T r a i n to London

2

(D

Madness - O n e Step B e y o n d

3

(2)

B A R o b e r t s o n - K n o c k e d it off

4 (14)

B o o m t o w n Rats - D i a m o n d S m i l e s

5

(8)

D r F e e l g o o d - P u t h i m out of Y o u r M i n d

6

(7)

D a m n e d - S m a s h it u p

7 (12)

Matchbox - Rockabilly Rebel

8 (15)

Clive

Newsline

Pig

and

Birthday Sweet

7:00 V i e w p o i n t - J o n F i r t h w i t h 301 S p o r t s D e s k at 8:30, c h a r t o f y e s t e r y e a r a n d T h u r s d a y ' s g i g s a n d a

9

(9)

10 (10)

the

Hopeful

Chinamen

Chicago - Mama

Take

c h a t with S T O I C a b o u t their p r o g r a m m e this w e e k .

11 (20)

Santana - Y o u Know That I Love You

12 (13)

N o o s h a Fox - Skin Tight

11:00 T h r o u g h M i d n i g h t - N i c k

Melling

Closedown

T H U R S D A Y 29 N O V E M B E R 12:00 M i d d a y S p i n - T o n y 2:15

Closedown

5:00 T u n e In - J o n M a r s d e n 6:00 D i s c o / B o o g i e T i m e - A l a n B u r t o n 7:00

Viewpoint

- S i m o n Milner with w e e k e n d

g u i d e at 8:45 a n d t h e f e a t u r e d n e w a l b u m . 9:00 R o u n d a b o u t - S i m o n W o o d s 11:00 T h r o u g h 1:00

Happy

S h a m 69 - You're a Better m a n T h a n I

9:00 R o u n d a b o u t - G e r a r d 1:00

-

Sixteen

13 (17)

Def Leppard - Wasted

14 ( - )

S p o r t s - W h o L i s t e n s to the R a d i o

15 ( - ) 16 (18)

Jam

17 (16)

Dirt B a n d - A n A m e r i c a n

18 ( - )

Stevie W o n d e r - S e n d O n e Y o u r L o v e

19 ( - )

Robert J o h n - Sad Eyes

20 ( - )

M a t u m b i - P o i n t of V i e w .

- E t o n Rifles

K o o l a n d the G a n g - L a d i e s Night Dream

gig Compiled

b y S a r a h T a l b o t f r o m the m o s t

r e c o r d s o n IC R a d i o o v e r t h e p a s t t w o

played

weeks.

Midnight

Closedown

15


LIFE IN THE BALANCE NICE BIT Once Rag Week is over the term is officially on the wane and, with only the Monster C & G Carnival to go, that is nearly the case. At the time of writing, the first week of the 'Rag 11 Days' has been a wild success, both in terms of attendance and (more importantly) profit for the Rag charities. I must congratulate all those who have taken part, in an organisational capacity. Especially those from Mines who made the Chaps Ragarama, great fun and also Rick Archer and his committee who produced the Smoking Concert to be proud of. NASTY BIT Which brings me onto a bit of a niggle. I have watched with interest as the letters have piled in urging the Union to deal with the internal issues and leave the external issues to personal commitment. I agree with that absolutely and it was the very lynch-pin of why I stood. The letters then go on to cite refectories and accommodation as such internal issues, which is true, and the education cuts as an external issue and it is here that I must disagree. The effect of the reduction of the College budget is going to have drastic repercussions on the overall service offered by College. The college, in the next few years, will be looking for massive savings in its expenditure and the first things to suffer will be the non-academic areas, ie the afore-mentioned internal issues. This is not to say that the academic standard and number of courses offered won't suffer because they will. So this is where the compartmentalisation breaks down the internally important issues which will be directlyu affected by the external dictates of the present government. As to what the Union is doing in the face of these problems? Well the residence and refectory accounts are both very vulnerable beasts and I have been in lengthy discussions with all those concerned in the hope that the present inflationary situation (as well as the cuts) does not lead to hardship to consumers, and too great a reduction in standards.

CLARIFICATION BIT I would like to point out one or two things. The profits from the bars, including the Union Bar do not go to the Union, the bars are run and priced by College. Although the Bar C o m m i t t e e has a student c h a i r m a n (Malcolm), the prices are ultimately set by the Rector and the Committee serves only to recommend. On the subject of residence I would like to underline that an adequate number of places near college at a reasonable price is a priority. The Lexham Gardens Head Tenancy Scheme has proved successful, and I emphasise, owes its existence to the Student Union's pressure on Administration. Michael Arthur, the Union Welfare Adviser, has just had his brief changed taking on increased accommodation responsibilities and an increased sphere of influence in College block, to counter this an extra person in the Welfare Centre will be employed part-time to cover for Michael, when he is out of the Welfare Centre.

ON THE SUBJECT OF REFECTORIES Instead of just p r o d u c i n g n i h i l i s t ic complaints there is a mechanism for constructive criticism. T he Refectory C o m m i t t e e has a C o m p l a i n t s a n d Suggestions Sub Committee which has a specific brief to handle ideas from consumers, ie Y O U ! So use the complaints boxes. END BIT Environmental Week is coming. There a number of excellent discussions coming up, don't miss the.n. You've been here long enough now to have formed constructive ideas on the way the Union can best serve the interests of its members. Why don't you stop me, tell me, and at the same time test my humanoid quotiant.

hope this has cleared up the doubts. I have also had enquiries about whether stuff left in your college room over the vacation is insured. The answer is this: If you go on vacation and leave various articles in your room or in a locked baggage room this is covered. However, the policy is subject to a condition that you take all reasonable care. An interpretation of this is that If you leave your room unlocked and/or occupied by strangers, then those valuables would not be covered. The moral is this: If you wish to leave articles in your room over the vacation, ascertain whether your room will be occupied during the vacation. The Housekeeper should promise not to give anyone your key, in which case you are covered. If they do not and you are told it will/may be used, then difficulties would/could arise in the event of a claim.

Bye....Chris.

BADGES

JUST

A

SEC

After Rag Week there is a slight rest period and then comes ENVIRONMENTAL WEEK. I do hope this will catch you imagination and excite-you sufficiently for you to turn up to a number of events. The programme is listed in the centre pages, so I needn't repeat that here, despite urging you all to turn up to the opening event and the concert on Friday 30th November with Brothers K, one of the best bands I've seen for ages (tickets 75p from Union Office). I would especially like to thank all those who have given up time to help: David, Veronique, Kim, Paul and College Day Bookings.

ELECTIONS If you are in Elec Eng, you finally have a departmental representative. He is a first year, Richard Lucas. Papers are up, until 5:30pm Monday, for another ordinary representative' on the University of London Student Representative Council. If you are interested, get a proposer and five seconders and sign your name up on the papers.

FIRST

YEARS

If you are a first year and are interested in organising an International Conference on Science and Technology in 1981 come and see me. ICU will be hosting this annual venture and due to its sheer nature and extent preparations must begin now. I attended the conference last year, which was held in Paris. It is a most informative meeting and increases links between students from all over Europe.

BIKES I am assured by College that there are plenty of bike racks dotted over College that are barely used. A map will be going in FELIX shortly.

BIKE INSURANCE AND VACATIONS I have had enquiries about whether bikes are insured by the Union, if on College premises. There are, but O N L Y if you live in a College Hall of Residence, Head Tenancy or Student House. All other bikes are N O T insured. I

You are still able to produce your very own badges in the Union Office. The cost is 9p to clubs and societies and 15p to individuals. Also if you want to be cool buy an Environmental Week badge.

UGM See you at the U G M this Tuesday at 1:00pm in the Great Hall. See you around, Roger.

TICKETS ON SALE for IC Choir's Christmas Concert in the Great Hall on DECEMBER 7th at 8:00pm. Tickets £1.10 (75p for students) from the Union Office or the Haldane Library (or contact Sue McClaughry, int 3840). A E R O S O C DARTS C O M P E T T I ON The annual competition held in Beit Quad attracted a large number of entrants than in previous years. The total takings were just under £10, therefore a record prize of £4.60 was awarded to the winner, Mike Napier, Aero 2 (need I say more!), the rest going to Rag. Also, a special mention goes to Alex Kam, Aero Postgrad (need I say more again!), whose sophisticated design might have won if it had not kept changing direction and buzzing the spectators in the Quad. Thanks also to those who helped organise the event. L O S T AND

FOUND

If a n y o n e lost a red a d d r e s s book at H a r l i n g t o n o n Saturday, contact D C o r n w e l l , M e c h E n g 2. ONE HEART-LINK BRACELET HAS B E E N F O U N D in the L o w e r Refectory. O w n e r c a n c o l l e c t it from IC U n i o n Office.


RUGBY S T R E A T H A M & C R O Y D O N 2nds vs IC 1st XI: 18-0 This match was expected to be t o u g h and it lived up to our expectations. T h e g a m e was a lively affair played in a hard s p o r t i n g spirit. For twenty minutes after the kick off, IC were on the defence and apart from a few breaks into the o p p o n e n t s half, most of this time was spent keeping t h e S t r e a t h a m pack at bay. O u r most p r o m i s i n g break c a m e after twenty-five minutes. The ball was w o n by the forwards on one side of the field and smartly passed a l o ng the 3's to Dick P u l l i n , m a k i n g an overlap on T h e w i n g , he ran forward a n d was o n l y s o p p e d , a c o u p l e of yards from the tryline. T h e s e c o n d half, started in a similar fashion and only after Streatham had managed to score their points, did IC begin to make a real impact using our superior fitness, is not strength, we were b e g i n n i n g to c a u s e them some problems. There were s o m e g o o d team efforts with s uppo r t always their w h e n needed. The best c h a n c e of the match came, when Will B u r g o y n e made a swerving run through the middle o f t h e field only to c o r n e a c r o p p e r three yards from the line. A l t h o u g h IC were unable to put any points on the boards, the play in the last quarter of the match was an e n c o u r a g i n g sign for future matches. EGB IC 1st XV vs HAPPY H O O K E R S (PLUS ONE): 8-32 F r o m the outset this was g o i n g to be one of IC's toughest but m o s t interesting confrontations. T h e H a p p y H o o k e r s , were a team of ' o u t s t a n d i n g ' athletes, w h o by persistent pressure (applied to varius anatomical areas), ran their o p p o s i t i o n into the g r o u n d . Straight from the kick-off, the H o o k e r s (still happy) c o l l e c t e d the ball and C a t h y m a k i n g a blinding run up the w i n g a n d evading six tackles s c o r e d the first points of the day. F r o m an early point in the match, it was clear that the H o o k e r s w e r e g o i n g to be l a c k i n g in pure brute strength, but they more than made up for this in brains a n d g o o d l o o k s , e s p e c i a l l y E d w i n a in her (?) d e e p b u r g u n d y skirt and m a t c h i n g a n k l e s o c k s . S h e (?) m a d e the o p p o s i t i o n look d e c i d e d l y ugly! A s the m a t c h progressed, the H o o k e r s ( b e c o m i n g happier all the time) began to do m i nat e all aspects of play (apart from 'groping'. 1st prize Steve G u n n , 2 n d prize R o b i n Davies). T h r o u g h s o m e inspired penalty moves ('I like the C a t h y S n o o k Special') m o r e tries c a m e from: C a t h y Z, Faye, Shirley, S i l v a n a and a few others. T h e only s u c c e s s f u l c o n v e r s i o n attempt was put over by S i l v a n a (who we ' p i n c h e d ' from Milan). T h e match finally finished with the s c o r e l i n e reading: IC 8pts a n d H a p p y H o o k e r s 32pts a n d 2 pairs of shorts. T h e teams a b a n d o n e d the pitch for a g o o d 'sesh' in the bar. H a p p y H o o k e r s : S h i r l e y (Capt), C a t h y , Sue, C a t h y (different), E d w i n a , S i l v a n a , J a n e , C a r o l i n g , B a r b a r a , (Killer) Mary, J u l i a ('Sit on my head'), Faye, J e n n y Lesley a n d L y n n . T H A N K YOU L A D I E S ! ! EGB

HOCKEY M I L L H I L L vs IC 1st XI: 0-2 I bet you have all been w o n d e r i n g w h y there has been no H o c k e y C l u b 1st XI reports in F E L I X of late. Well, I will keep y o u g u e s s i n g but here is a full report of last S a t u r d a y ' s match. This being the fifth m a t c h in our relatively new M i d d l e s e x league d i v i s i o n 1 a n d c o n s i d e r i n g all our previous results in this division, IC went to the field fully prepared to g o for the kill (or be s l a u g h t e r e d again). T h e g a m e started with the C o l l e g e fielding o n l y 10 players because Pete H u g h e s was not a r o u n d (his e x c u s e was that he had a puncture). However, this did not deter the players as they went straight in to attack. After about 10 minutes, Pete H u g h e s arrived and did a magnificent strip on the sideline to c h a n g e into his playing gear. T h i s must have distracted the o p p o s i t i o n s m i n d s because they s e e m e d to loose their rhythm all of a s u d d e n (Oh B o y ! It was exciting!). Having fielded a full side, it b e c a m e quite obvius that IC was in full control o f t h e g a m e judging by the super crosses made by G r a h a m Forbes and the way T o n y A m e e t R a o and Martin S h a w kept moving a r o u n d . R o u n d about the 20th minute, T o n y (Kehar) De B arr started a s p l e n d i d move and passed the ball through Ameet to y o u r s t r u l y who magnificently ran into the D, but was unfortunately c r u s h e d by the two defenders and therefore got IC a penalty corner. A s usual, M r Ian C r o w e was called to the rescue. The push was taken by Martin S h a w and beautifully h a n d s t o p p e d by Ameet before being superbly belted t h r o u g h the keeper's feet into the net by M r C r o w e . This I must confess was the goal of the match because the ball p l u c k e d off the toe nail of one of the defenders on its destruction course into the net. The rest o f t h e first half saw Mill Hill putting on some pressure but, they were kept off the post by Phil W e b b and his five aides. T h e s e c o n d half c o n t i n u e d in the same fashion with Tony, Pete and A n d y Lilies harassing in

midfield while Martin S h a w kept r u n n i n g from one side of the field to the other in an attempt to loose his s h a d o w (he did n o f s u c c e e d ) . T h e s e c o n d goal of the m a t c h c a m e froma free hit just outside the D w h i c h was taken by T o n y . T h e hit left two defenders flat-footed, thereby giving A m e e t e n o u g h s p a c e to beat the goalkeeper before d e c i d i n g to tuck the ball away in the net. After the s e c o n d goal, Mill Hill seemed to dig up s o m e h i d d e n strength and again started putting pressure o n the IC defence until they w o n a penalty stroke. Before the penalty was taken, Phil W e b b took 11/2 minutes off to say a s p e c i a l prayer w h i c h completely paralized the striker who then p u s h e d the ball straight to Phil's feet (magic Phil). After the penalty, Mill Hill still kept the pressure up a n d w o n themselves several penalty c o r n e r s s o m e of w h i c h were hit out while the few that were well directed were dealt with a c c o r d i n g l y by P h i l . We did however c o m e back into the g a m e â&#x20AC;˘ with yours truly streaking d o w n the right w i n g and C h r i s Liles flashing d o w n the left w i n g . Marin later d e c i d e d to c h a n g e places with C hris w h o then r e s u m e d the job of r u n n i n g across the field. With about ten minutes to go, C h r i s had a g o o d run d o w n the right w i n g before h e a d i n g for the D (don't ask me how he m a n a g e d it) and then got the ball over the keeper into the net. This goal was however d i s a l l o w e d because y o u r s truly was said to be offside (sorry C h r i s , the ref was wrong). The rest of the g a m e saw IC i n c r e a s i n g the pressure again with Mill Hill's keeper narrowly saving two more C r o w e S p e c i a l s . Overall, it was a fine IC performance a n d I can promise y o u that this team has a very g o o d future in their new d i v i s i o n. Team: P Webb, I C r o w e , A Liles, R Davey, P H u g h e s , A Rao, T De Barr (Capt), G F o r b e s , J Afilake, M S h a w a n d C Liles. Johnson

IC LADIES H O C K E Y

IC Ladies vs London Hospital: 3-1

O n W e d n e s d a y N o v e m b e r 14th, in a c u p match against K i n g s C o l l e g e we lost 2-1.

Last Saturday IC Ladies took o n L o n d o n Hospital, last year's runners up'in the league. To start off with we were at a disadvantage as they were wearing our c o l o u r s (we h a v i n g had to c h a n g e our shirts). A few p e o p l e mistook their players for ours hence we w e r e 1-0 d o w n shortly after the g a m e started!

After their 13-0 win over Surrey University the previous Wednesday, IC ladies sat back and let a c u p match slip away from their grasp in the last five minutes of the game. D u r i n g the first half of the match there was a lot of pressure on IC, even so at half time we were 1-0 up from a goal by Mary H a r r i n g t o n . There were several attempts at goal, by IC during the s e c o n d half but to no avail. T h e n five minutes before the end, K i n g s broke free, with o n l y two defenders to beat, they s c o r e d . IC were just recovering from this w h e n K i n g s s c o r e d again. T o win the m a t c h 2-1. T e a m : Averil H o r t o n , A l e x B u r n i p , C a t h y Crossley, Caroline Brown, Julia Towns (Capt), D a n a C l a r k , D e b r a M e n d e s , K a r e n J o n e s , W e n d y Slaughter, M a r y H a r r i n g t o n a n d A l i s o n O v e r s b y (Umpire).

IC pulled back not long afterwards w i t h a g o o d clean goal by Kathy S n o o k . F r o m t h e n on IC were in c o m m a n d , s p r e a d i n g the ball well across the field and not giving L o n d o n Hospital many o p e n i n g s . Kathy S n o o k went on to s c o r e a hat trick m a k i n g the final s c o r e 3-1. ,

Team: Fay H o o d , C l a r e Davy, C a t h y Crossley, Julia Towns (Capt), Shirley Course, Dana Clark, Debra Mendes, Karen J o n e s , Kathy S n o o k , J a n C l a r k e , a n d A l i s o n Oversby (umpire a n d player). Julia Towns

17


HOCKEY: IC 1st XI vs HAYES: 5 - 5 Last S u n d a y , IC played their first m a t c h in the M i d d l e s e x C u p series a n d as y o u must have g u e s s e d from the result, it w a s no easy match. S p u r r e d o n by yesterday's victory over Mill Hill, IC went in to play this match with a well renewed e n t h u s i a s m , particularly s i n c e this s a m e team annihilated us by defeating us 5-1 four weeks ago. T h e g a m e started with H a y e s g o i n g right in to attack a n d getting the first goal of the m a t c h after only eight minutes of play. This h o w e v e r d i d not stop IC b e c a u s e we immediately c o u n t e r attacked a n d after several g o o d runs, w o n a penalty corner. A s usual the trio of Martin, A m e e t a n d l a n took the corner, a n d another C r o w e s p e c i a l brought IC level. This s u r p r i s e d H a y e s a n d they again started p r e s s u r i z i n g the IC defence a n d w o n several penalty c o r n e r s and a penalty stroke of w h i c h none f o u n d the net. J u s t before the e n d of the first half, H a y e s had a n o t h e r penalty c o r n e r a n d very d u b i o u s l y s c o r e d there s e c o n d goal. T h e s e c o n d half r e s u m e d with IC g o i n g straight in to attack a g a i n a n d this time w o n their s e c o n d penalty c o r n e r of the match w h i c h was s u p e r b l y put away by l a n , drawing IC level a g a i n . S p u r r e d o n by this, IC kept the pressure u p and w o n several penalty corners w h i c h were well kept out of the goal by H a y e s defenders. However, they gave a w a y a long c o r n e r w h i c h was this time taken by C h r i s Liles, h a n d - s t o p p e d by A m e e t a n d hit right into the net by G r a h a m to put IC in the lead for the first time. With IC n o w in the lead, their style of play c h a n g e d c o m p l e t e l y with Pete, T o n y , A n d y a n d R o g e r c o n t r o l l i n g the midfield beautifully. With less t han four minutes to the e n d of the m a t c h , H a y e s w o n a penalty c o r n e r a n d this was put into the goal b r i n g i n g t h e m level. T h e full time whistle therefore c a m e with both s i d e s having s c o r e d

three goals e a c h . It w a s then d e c i d e d to play an extra time lasting fifteen minutes e a c h way. S o with weary players, IC a g a i n r e s u m e d the battle a n d got a beautiful fourth goal off G r a h a m from a move started by A n d y a n d A m e e t from the left. But just before the teams c h a n g e d sides, H a y e s e q u a l i z e d a l s o from a penalty corner.

Here w e are in the M e c h E n g foyer s i p p i n g coffee (?) with the F E L I X de adl i ne fast a p p r o a c h i n g . O n l y o u r red rims a n d blue s a c k s a r o u n d our e y e s give away the fact that we spent the night in a layby near C h i p p e n h a m . T h i s was the g r a n d finale of this year's surfing. We're certainly g o i n g to miss D u r i n g the s e c o n d half of the extra time, IC again took the lead t h r o u g h another C r o w e the surfing n o w its over for this year (it's like S p e c i a l , but again, Hayes drew level from a m i s s i n g b a n g i n g y o u r head against a brick penalty corner. J u s t before full time, we had wall). S o far this term we've h a d three trips. W e two penalty corners but these were s t o p p e d by the goalkeeper a n d s o w h e n the whistle had really g o o d surf a n d weather o n the first went, both teams had s c o r e d five goals e a c h . o n e w h i c h gave the new m e m be r s a very g o o d T h e o n l y other way left then to d e c i d e the i m p r e s s i o n of what surfing is about (although mat ch was by penalty strokes. IC s c o r e d all a c o m p l e t e l y false one!), despite having spent their five penalty strokes, but H a y e s only seven hours d o w n a n d seven hours back o n s c o r e d three of their five thereby l o s i n g the the w o o d e n b e n c h e s of o n e of the college's match. m i n i b u s e s (never again!). This, I must c o n f e s s w a s the toughest match w e have played this s e a s o n a n d I will congratulate all the players for h o l d i n g out. A c t u a l l y everybody played well a n d all deserve a word of praise, however, a greater share of the praise s h o u l d g o to A m e e t w h despite threats of having his fingers c r e a m e d still kept putting them d o w n (Well D o n e Ameet!) and also to lan C r o w e for his s p e c i a l s ( K e e p it up, Crowe!). T h i s victory means that we will be playing in the next r o u n d (no c o m m e n t s ) . T h a n k s to all those w h s t o o d o n the sideline a n d c o n t i n u o u s l y c h e e r e d us o n , particularly J a n , w h o s e beautiful v o i c e kept most of us g o i n g ( Thank s Jan!). . C o m m e n t : A n o t h e r s u p e r b IC performance. T e a m : P W e b b , I C r o w e , A Liles, R Davey, P H u g e s , A Rao, T D e Barr (Capt), G Forbes, J Afilaka, M S h a w a n d C Liles. Johnson

IC RFC Captain's XV vs ICU President's Guest XV: 6 - 24 T h e l o n g awaited ( c o u p l e of weeks) a n d well attended (approx 20 spectators) match between t w o c l a s s teams begain at 1:30pm last S u n d a y . It s o o n b e c a m e apparent that the weaker l o o s e play of the President's team was easily o u t w e i g h t e d by the ability of the backs, p a r t i c u l a r l y the first c a l s s halfback c o m b i n a t i o n of D y s o n (Harlequins) a n d C o t t e r (Waterloo).

the line-out ball the IC team gave a g o o d a c c o u n t of themselves.

However, Steve T o w n s h e n d ' s team o p e n e d strongly, u n l u c k y to o n l y gain a 22m dropout in a goal line s c r a m b l e . T h e g a m e settled into a rountine of ' I C R F C ' (for want of a better name) w i n n i n g g o o d lineout p o s s e s s i o n a n d the majority of the l o o s e ball but the ' G u e s t s ' b a c k s t a c k l i n g hard a n d r u n n i n g the ball at every opportunity. Indeed, a s l i p by the IC b a c k s led to Dave Lilley s n a p p i n g up a loose ball a n d s c o r i n g a fine try, w h i c h was the only s c o r e of the first half.

A s the match drew to a c l o s e a lot of niggly injuries began to o c c u r , a n d it was just after the statutory D o b k n e e injury that Larry B o t t o m l e y beat an E d d y B u d g e n tackle to score the fourth a n d final try. O n c e again M a u r i c e Cotter p r o d u c e d a magnificent kick w h i c h r o u n d e d off a fine a n d entertaining performance by him.

T h e s e c o n d half restarted with the G u e s t s 6-0 a h e a d a n d in a s t r o n g p o s i t i o n . T h i s was q u i c k l y c a p i t a l i s e d o n with a n o t h e r Lilley try after a fine team move involving at least three p r o p o s (?!). Despite t h e g e n e r a l s u p r e m a c y of the b a c k s , the guests forwards never really c o n t a i n e d t h e r o l l i n g m a u l i n g of t h e IC P a c k a n d w i t h T h o m a s a n d P a s c o e t a k i n g most of

18

SURF CLUB

After another excellent team move led to an i m p o s s i b l e d i l e m m a , Lilley, despite his better judgement, went over to s c o r e a third try, thus rendering him eligible to buy a jug. IC then went t h r o u g h a strong patch w h i c h led to a fine team try, s c o r e d by ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? .

The m a t c h was played in a g o o d yet competitive spirit w h i c h led to an entertaining a n d high s t a n d a r d of rugby. T h e various team members then a d j o u r n e d for light refreshement, ' R u g b y S p e c i a l ' and the IC bar night. A s p e c i a l mention must g o to J o h n W i p p (guest) w h o stayed to the last. T h a n k s to all those w h o played a n d those w h o w a t c h e d a n d ' Y a h ! B o o ! S u c k s ! ' to those w h o didn't. Bill Parry Smith

T h e middle trip was to investigate the possibility of surfing at S w a n s e a . T h e surf itself w a s very g o o d , but the lack of wet suit hire s h o p s will prevent us from g o i n g there. Not m u c h c a n be s a i d about this last trip as most p e o p l e burst into tears at the mention of it. T h e surf was m e d i o c r e to lousy, the weather not m u c h better, the local tribe and mechanical failures were hostile abundant. Believe it or not, everybody had a g o o d time, e s p e c i a l l y if they were a p e n g u i n or a masochist. Phil Clifton Mark Glascodine (Surfers) FELIX is published by the Editor, on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board. FELIX is printed on the Union premises in Prince Consort Road, London SW7. Editor: C R Palmer FELIX ISSN 0140-0711. Registered at the Post Office. Copyright FELIX 1979.

IC A M N E S T Y G R O U P It has o c c u r e d to us that there may be a n u m b e r of p e o p l e in C o l l e g e w h o w o u l d like to s e n d s o m e s e a s o n a l greetings to a prisoner of c o n s c i e n c e s o m e w h e r e in the w o r l d . A s C o s m o s D e s m o n d m e n t i o n e d last T h u r s d a y , one of the main c a u s e s of d e m o r a l i z a t i o n for a prisoner is that he feels that he has been forgotten. M o s t political prisoners aren't major n a t i o n a l or international figures; rather they are u n k n o w n p e o p l e w h o have b e c o m e involved in s o m e w a y with an o p p o s i t i o n g r o u p or have s o m e h o w c o m e to the notice of the local s e c u r i t y forces. After arrest, they have n o p r e s s u r e g r o u p actively w o r k i n g for their release a n d often remain in p r i s o n indefinately, t h r o u g h default as it were. It is for this type of p r i s o n e r that A m n e s t y is particularly a n x i o u s . B y not a l l o w i n g them to be forgotten, their well b e i n g is more a s s u r e d a n d their release more likely. A d o p t e d prisoners w h o have s u b s e q u e n t l y been released have all s p o k e n of h o w important it was to t h e m w h e n they learned that people from other c o u n t r i e s were c o n s c i u s of their situation. S o , if y o u w o u l d like to s e n d a c a r d to s o m e o n e , please g<3 a l o n g to the U n i o n Office, where w e have left a list of addresses a n d s o m e c a r d s . P l e a s e bear in m i n d that they may not be C h r i s t i a n s o r celbrate C h r i s t m a s . A l s o , n o p o l i t i c a l sentiments please, just s u p p o r t a n d best w i s h e s . Thanks.


BILLIARDS AND SNOOKER CLUB T h e t e a m o f t h e week w a s I C ' C t e a m , w h o

" C a r o l i n e ' s got n i c e legs' K e y m e r suffering f r o m a

S o 2-0 d o w n , G e n e Stevens c a m e to t h e table.

their

slight t o u c h o f C a l v e r t ' s S n o o k e r i t i s Uselessitis lost

T h i s keen physics bofT, soon b r o u g h t h i s o p p o n e n t s

o p p o s i t i o n a n d w o n 5-0 to go t o p o f the league. I

his first g a m e ever; forever o r ever. T h e tear d r o p s

ego

w o n ' t r e m i n i s c e o n the fact but it speaks for itself; so

s m u d g e d his m a s c a r a a n d his f r o t h i n g lips s p r e a d

c o n s t a n t l y e y e d b y several M i s s W o r l d c o n t e n d e r s ,

without m a k i n g a m o u n t a i n out of mole hill or a

b l u e l i p s t i c k u n t i l after a n eon's t o r m e n t , h e at last

as the next best t h i n g to A l P a c i n o , he s t r o k e d hs

t w e n t y b r e a k o u t o f A T E t e m a d i , I ' l l pass to t h e

realised he c o u l d n ' t for G o d ' s sake, p l a y b l o o d y

w a y to a b a l l b u s t i n g e x h i b i t i o n o f true u n i v e r s a l

next m a t c h .

snooker a n d w h y because o u r n u m e r o u n o p l a y e r ,

dimensions.

traumatically

a n d resolutely

confounded

T h e A t e a m p l a y e d Q M C e x p e c t i n g to get w e l l t h r a s h e d a n d ÂŤthis n e a r l y h a p p e n e d except to a 4-1 w i n . F i r s t

meandered

they

o n was D a v e

the

evil C o u n t

shattered his b o l l a c k s , i n s h o o t i n g i n t o first place. H o w c a n this recognised a l c o h o l i c d o this to t h e gentle

is c a t a s t r o p h i c a l l y n o t t h e p l a y e r to w a t c h . H i s

d e t e r m i n a t i o n . o f a bottle o f R i b e n a (that's aLr>ut

snooker is e n o u g h to bore the p a n t s off a p r e g n a n t

h o w m u c h it needs), he also w o n .

r h i n o c e r o s b u t he is g o o d w i t h t h e y e l l o w (ethnic

cuddly

Keymer.

Easy

with

the

T e a m : C Sidetrip, G M u r k y , D Crossroads, M

sadistic, m a s o c h i s t i c , b l o o d b a t h at C h a r e

Cross.

the table to p l a y s n o o k e r (I t h i n k he p e r f o r m s t h e

T h e first p l a y e r was that s u p e r h e a v y w e i g h t , B i l l y

former better). A s the Pressy, he's s u p p o s e d to set a

Bunter division brawler S Bendit. W h a t a player

just at t h e m o m e n t , so w e u n d e r s t a n d his n e r v o u s a n d n o c t u r n a l emmissive

acne

problems

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t h o u g h he f l u k e d a h i s t o r i c v i c t o r y . On

third

was M

Loudlover

H a s a n I C p l a y e r s h o w e d s u c h sheer l ack o f fibre. I f he t h i n k s the balls are r e a l l y b o l l o c k s h a p e d , I t h i n k he better just e x a m i n e his o w n for a m i n u t e o r t w o o r else j u s t start s u p p o r t i n g B r i s t o l R o v e r s . O f

whose

snooker

course, he lost m i s e r a b l y , b u ; l i k e ht s a i d : " Y o n

a b i l i t y has been c o m p a r e d to C h a r l i e W i l l i a m s

c a n ' t t each a n o l d d o g how to screw i f he doesn't

jokes a n d L e s D a w s o n ' s p i a n o p l a y i n g . B a r m a i d s

k n o w a l r e a d y " . A n d as for C h r i s C a l v e r t , w e l l I

aside. L o u d l o v e was l a u g h i n g r a u c o u s l y at his o w n

never

pla\

without

t h r o u g h o u t t h e m a t c h a n d at t h e e n d , his

(except

twice

sanjitters

mi .he c a n n i b a l i s t i c a i . d i e n c e , v i s u a l i s i n g T o m s k

,:

proceeded

<vith

tongue

in mouth

brilliance.

C h e c k i n g his t w o teeth were still i n his m o u t h , he

T h e i n f a m o u s A t e a m fought a t o u g h , g n i , i n g ,

good e x a m p l e but he's g o i n g t h r o u g h adolescence

I n t o the l i m e l i g h t c r a w l e d T o m s k , d o i n g n a t u r a l i n v ' i e s s i o n s o f a fresh t u r d . ACter some h e c k l i n g l e t w e e n t w o sheets o f b r e a d ( t u r d s a n d w i c h ) , he

Loudlover, S Titlock.

to hear that). N e x t T i t l o c k c a m e o n the t a b l e a n d t h e n c a m e to

Being

F r a n k e n t r i p (Chrissipooes) has

C r o s s e d o u t w h o m i g h t be the w i n d o w to w a t c h but

c o m m e n t s deleted). H e w o n (I bet y o u a l l w a n t e d

to his o w n m i n i m a l level.

down

w h i s t l e d t h e firs r e d i n to the pocket f o l l o w e d b y the vv'.iite, his cue a n d his nose. S o m e h o w , g i v i n g n i m som'- c r e d i t just for existance, he w o n a n d was ejected i r o m t h e t a b l e by a passionate

Leclezio

( w h o says, r e d b l a c k , r e d b l a c k , w h i t e is L e c l e z i o missing a break). A y a t h o l l a h L e c l e z i o fan)

w o n easily

a n d afterwards

(greatest

released h i s

hostages (his o w n t e a m mates). F i n a l score was 3-2 to I C . T e a m : A Doubleglazio. T Maladjusted, S Beans (Capt), C Pervert a n d S Bent. \

a week). C h r i s s i p n o p o o e s ,

b a c k i n g h i m u p . . ., w a ~ as E n t r i e s are r e q u i r e d for the b i l l i a r d s a n d d o u b l e s

festering c a r c u s was d e b a u c h e d a n d e x h u m e d f r o m

successful as a e u n u c h i n a b r o t h e l . H e d i d c o m e

the s n o o k e r r o o m .

(I h e a r h e w a s resurrect ed

second h o w e v e r w h i c h gets y o u a s i l v e r m e d a l i n t o

tournaments.

H e w o n o n the black (Fuck knows

O l y m p i c s b u t C h r i s , o l d fruit, o n l y gets y o u a k i c k

N o v e m b e r . T h e s e c o m p e t i t i o n s a r e r u n o v e r a few

in the g r o i n i n I C . ( Y o u ' r e groins m u s t be ^ c h n g b y

weeks d u r a t i o n . E n t r a n c e 15p, n o n - m e m b e r s 30p..

now.)

Dai Bach

afterwards). how). The

next p l a y e r for a g a m e was G e o f f

'that

WATER POLO

B u t the worst was yet to c o m e . T h e next d a y I C 2nds h a d t h e i r second m a t c h o f the season against

I C W a t e r P o l o C l u b d i d not get ofTto a g o o d start i n t h e M i d d l e s e x L e a g u e this year. I C 2 n d s h a d t h e i r first m a t c h o n N o v e m b e r 6 t h against E n f i e l d (away). I n t h e first q u a r t e r I C took some t i m e to settle against a t e a m w i t h m o r e e n t h u s i a s m t h a n s k i l l . B y t h e e n d o f the first q u a r t e r we were 3-0 d o w n a n d they scored t w o m o r e goals i n the second q u a r t e r . A f t e r the second b r e a k . I C went i n t o t h e i r stride. N i c k B u c k l a n d a n d N i c k L a s t were p l a y i n g w e l l at t h e b a c k a n d P a t P o r t e r a n d M i k e C a s e y were p a s s i n g the b a l l a c c u r a t e l y m i d - p o o l . I C

Hounslow

(away).

The

first

two

quarters

H o u n s l o w seemed to have p l a y e d a l l t h e i r o w n w a y a n d they m a n a g e d to score seven goals. H o w e v e r , in the t h i r d q u a r t e r I C p u l l e d together as a t e a m a n d s t a r t e d a t t a c k i n g fiercely. O u r v e t e r a n p l a y e r J i m W i l l i a m s scored a n e x q u i s i t e g o a l , o u r o n l y o n e o f the n i g h t (well d o n e j i m ! ) . A f t e r that, H o u n s l o w c a m e b a c k i n t o t h e a t t a c k a n d started b r e a k i n g through

yet a g a i n

I C ' s slightly

disorganized

Closing

date:

scored o u r first g o a l a n d A n d y S m i t h o u r s e c o n d . T h e o p p o s i t i o n , h o w e v e r , d i d not w e a k e n a n d they scored a g o a l at the e n d o f the first q u a r t e r a n d t w o m o r e i n t h e s e c o n d . B u t I C were n o t g o i n g to let t h e m get a w a y w i t h it. T h e defence was p a s s i n g the ball

q u i c k l y u p front

a n d Cliff

McCartney

e q u a l i s e d w i t h a l i n e shot. F i n a l l y

Tower Hamlets managed

to w i n t h e m a t c h b y

scoring a very l ucky goal. Team:

defence. T h e y scored five m o r e goals (shame!) u n t i l

S Tayler,

D Dunstone, P Hindle, O

Spooner. M M c C a r t n e r y , P M c C a r t n e y , A S m i t h ,

the f i n a l score was, d a r e I say, 1-12.

K

R i b a r and P Mills.

So. I C 2 n d s started t h e i r season w i t h t w o defeats

scored o u r first g o a l , a c u n n i n g shot, after a fine

D i m i t r i V Papconstantinou

pass f r o m A d r i e n B u t l e r . W e kept t h e pressure o n

h a d n ' t been p l a y i n g b o t h m a t c h e s a w a y !

IC Water Polo Club

and

and Dimitri

K o s t a R i b a r scored o u r second g o a l , w h i c h

T e a m : D Roberts. N B u c k l a n d , N Last, P Porter,

was a n e x p e r t l y p l a c e d shot c o m i n g f r o m the half-

M

way

Papaconstantinou and J Williams.

line. E n f i e l d , h o w e v e r , hit b a c k w i t h even

m o r e strength a n d p u t t w o m o r e goals i n the net.

Casey. D C h a d w i c k . A Butler. K R i b a r , D

O n November

Spooner was

e x p e r t l y c o o r d i n a t i n g the moves o f the t e a m . M i k e

w h i c h w o u l d have been h e a v i e r i f D a v e R o b e r t s

through

23rd

o u r efforts b r o u g h t q u i c k results. M i k e M c C a r t n e y

Papaconstantinou

broke

Friday

ULU FALLS TO

IC

â&#x20AC;˘ Volleyball is one or the most popularsports in the world, more s c even than football. It is

12th it w a s I C Ists t u r n to show

not

very

widespread

in Britain, although

K o s t a scored o u r first g o a l i n the f o u r t h q u a r t e r , as

w h a t they c o u l d d o . T h e y p4a\ed a g o o d s t r o n g

many colleges do run teams. IC is one of

a final a t t e m p t to get I C b a c k i n the m a t c h ; but t h e

g a m e against T o w e r H a m l e t s ( a w a y a g a i n ! ) . T h e

these and plays one match a week in the

o p p o s i t i o n scored t w o m o r e goals to m a k e the final

I C a t t a c k p u s h e d f o r w a r d f r o m the t h r o w i n , a n d

league.

score 3-9.

Although T A B L E TENNIS

Matches two weeks ago

(no

report last

week because , even I get sick of writing this

TABLE TENNIS tremedously from last year. (Even I won 3-3 against them!)

drivel!):

Of course the most 'important' match was

IC 1 vs Exiles 5: 6-3

vs Thames Water Authority. I

the fourths

IC 2 vs Inco: 3-6 IC 3 vs E D & F M A N S & S C (what a mouthful!): 9-0.

actually won all my (two)

games (only two

because one of their players failed to arrive) for the first time this season - ah happy days!

Now last week. The firsts beat Hong Kong Students

Club

6-3, with Hong

winning 1

(ironic!), Kartick 2 and Pete 3. The seconds lost again to N A L G O (and this time it was due to an off-day for their previously top player) -

Well

after

(especially

a

particularly

boring

report

as you've all been waiting

two

weeks for it) I think I'll stop before I fall asleep. Oh!

But

I

haven't

mentioned

enough

been

previous

poor,

remembered

performances

Wednesday

on how

to

play

have

the

team

volleyball,

and

eventually gave a fine display of good class play, beating U L U by 3 sets to 2. Starting badly, only 2 points were scored in the first two sets, but IC soor. came back to win sets 3 and 4 convincingly and built up a 14-8 lead in the final set, eventually scoring the winning

point after

several

ferocious

rallies. The final score was 0-15, 2-15, 15-7, and 15-12. The Andy

team was: Suki Kalirai (court capt), Ciuksza,

Banasiak,

Henry

Szyszko,

Dave Penty, Peter

Marek

Dias-Lalcaca,

superstars so, special praise to Bob Edde (2

Lech Bogdanowicz, Tony Briers, Marc Young

The

wins for the seconds) and Hans Joseffson

(capt) and S Tarn.

thirds had their hardest match thus far, only

(who has never played in a team before) for

Thanks

winning

not losing more than 11 points out of 21 in any

supporters,

game - cheers!

Wainwright.

never mind Andy, your resignation has been accepted.

(Only

3-6

though,

6-3. Their opponents

Spencer,

however,

had

again). Marks

and

improved

go Vic

to

our

few

Tybulewicz

(but and

vocal) Carolyn

19


W H A T ' S FRIDAY 23 NOVEMBER DISCO in Bedford College Union Room at 8:30. Admission 50p and S U cards are required.

O N

RAILWAY S O C I E T Y MEETING in Maths 340 at 5:40 with Dr N A F Smith speaking on early steam locomotives.

SATURDAY 24 NOVEMBER

C A T H O L I C S O C I E T Y C H E E S E & WINE PARTY at 5:30 in Room 231 Chem. Free. P H O T O S O C PRINT COMPETITION at 7:00 in RSM 303. Further information on Photosoc noticeboard.

B E T H N A L C O N C E R T in Union Concert Hall at 8:00. Tickets £1.50 in advance. £ 2 . 0 0 o n the door. Tickets from Ents Room lunchtimes.

U L U WOMEN'S G R O U P MEETING at 7:30 in Room 3C, U L U , Malet Street. For further details contact Merche Clark, ICWA Lounge.

MONDAY 26 NOVEMBER ICWA G E N E R A L M E E T I N G at 12:30 in ICWA Lounge, with the possible election of Mr ICWA. I C C A G MEETING at 12:30 at the top floor of the Union Building. If you are interested in doing volunteer work, come and find out what the group is doing. Richard Bull, the assistant organiser of the Kensington and Chelsea Volunary Services Bureau will be attending the meeting. E N V I R O N M E N T A L S O C I E T Y DISCUSSION at 1:00 in the Centre of Environmental Technology, 48 Princes Gardens. Mr Flux, ICI's environmental adviser will be answering questions on ICI's environmental policy. SINGERS NIGHT in the Lower Lounge at 8:00pm. Admission free. S T R A N G E FRUIT J A Z Z C O N C E R T in Bedford College Union Common Room at 8:00. Admission 75p and S U cards are required.

T U E S D A Y 27 NOVEMBER RIDING C L U B M E E T I N G in Room 1110 (level 11) Elec Eng between 1:00-2:00. Last day to book for club dinner. U G M at 1:00 in the Great Hall. Compulsory attendance. ASSOCIATED STUDIES PRESENT: 1. A lecture entitled It Always Rains in Mulu . given by Nigel Winser in the Read Theatre, Sherfield Building at 1:30. 2. A lecture on the Beast and Bridgwater by Professor A Rupert Hall in the Pippard Theatre, Sherfield Building. FILM: Last Tango in Paris at 5:30 and 8:00 in Bedford College Tuke 97. Admission 25p and 30p, S U cards required.

WEDNESDAY 28 NOVEMBER IC S N O O K E R C O M M I T T E E MEETING at 1:00 in Snooker Lounger, third floor Union Building. H A M S O C T A L K given by Pat Hawker (G3VA) on the design of simple radio receiving at 2:30 in Elec Eng 508. T A L K S O N BY 1979 EXPEDITION L E A D E R S with be given at 6:15 in lecture theatre 408 Elec Eng. COLOUR GROUP DEMONSTRATION between 8:00 and 11:00pm. Meet in the old darkroom. L O N D O N VINTAGE J A Z Z O R C H E S T R A C O N C E R T in Stan's Bar at 8:30.

THURSDAY 29 NOVEMBER

M O P S O C L E C T U R E by Dr H G Leventhall (Chelsea) on Active Attenuators for Noise in Physics Lecture Theatre 3 at 1:15. A S S O C I A T E D STUDIES P R E S E N T : 1. Film: Victoria and Albert at 1:15 in the Great Hall, Sherfield Building. 2. Lunch-hour concert with Elizabeth Wilson (cello) and Kathrom Sturrock (piano) in the Music Room, 53 Prince's Gate. T A L K BY L O R D F L O W E R S on Energy and the Environment at 4:30 in the Consort Gallery. GLIDING C L U B MEETING at 5:30 in Aero 254. N U C L E A R POWER D E B A T E at 7:00 in Physics Lecture Theatre 1. BROWNSVILLE B A N N E D (folk) at 8:30 in Bedford College Union Common Room. Admission 80p and S U cards are required.

FRIDAY 30 NOVEMBER DISCUSSION O N C H E M I C A L A S P E C T S O F FARMING AND F O O D P R O D U C T I O N at 7:00 in Physics Lecture Theatre 1. DISCO A N D GIG FOR ENVIRONMENTAL WEEK WITH B R O T H E R S K at 8:30 in Union Building. Tickets on sale in ICU Office for 75p. DISCO at 8:30 in Bedford College Union Common Room. Admission 50p.

M E E T I N G T O R E J U V E N A T E N E T B A L L at 12:30 in S C R . If unable to attend contact Cathy James via RSM letter rack or Union Office. N A T HIST S O C L E C T U R E by David Partridge and Duncan Garrood on last summer's expedition to Lapland in botany basement lecture theatre at 12:45. H A N G GLIDING C L U B MEETING at 12:45 in Mech Eng 342. FIRST E V E N T O F E N V I R O N M E N T A L WEEK: A talk given by Tom Burke on the Greening of Britain at 1:00 in Mech Eng 220. INFORMAL MEETING O F T H E CHRISTAIN S C I E N C E ORGANISATION at 1:00 in 2nd year seminar room. POSITIVE A L T E R N A T I V E S T O ABORTION (PATA) will be presenting an address given by the Rev David Johnson at 1:00 in the Union Concert Hall. T A L K BY DAVID A L T O N , MP, Liberal Spokesman on Housing and Environment in Mech Eng 640.

IC P O S T G R A D U A T E DINNER Tk^ $oth T U E S D A Y 27 N O V E M B E R oAnniversary 7:30 FELIX "Dinner In Union Dining Hall FRIDAY DECEMBER 7th Cost £6 per head with three Can'I be missed' Meet for sherry at 7:00pm in Southside SCR, for the FEIJX Dinner which willcourse be meal, wine and port and given in the Southside Senior Dining Hall al 7:30pm. disco and free beer after. Tickets £6.00. Cheques made payable to Imperial College Publications Board (FELIX). Tickets from ICU Office.

SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER ICWA DISCO WITH T H E MIXDIX at 7:00 in Union Lower Refectory. Beer after 11:00. Tickets 50p in advance or 75p on the nigfjt from ICWA lounge.

MONDAY 3 DECEMBER ENV S O C T A L K at 1:00 in the Centre for Environmental Technology, 48 Princes Gardens with Mr Macintosh from Shell C h e m i c a l s talking on his c o m p a n y ' s approach to environmental issues.

FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER B E D F O R D C O L L E G E CHRISTMAS BALL at 8:00 (until 2:00) with The Jags, plus support band, jazz band and free food. Tickets £3.30, advance sales only. Dress - jackets, unless you're fancy dress. Tickets

Performances on 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th

TV

In Union Concert Hall at 7:30pm. Tickets available from DramMic Storeroom or any Dramsoc member or on

A Play by 'f/ John Whiting

based on Ihe book by Aldous Huxley

A D R A M S O C PRODUCTION


A p r o g r a m m e of lectures, talks a n d d e b a t e s o n a s p e c t s of e n e r g y r e s o u r c e s , c o n s e r v a t i o n a n d land use. It is a u n i q u e c h a n c e t o q u e s t i o n t h e p e o p l e that matter. A l l events a r e o p e n t o e v e r y o n e . I M P E R I A L

C O L L E G E

U N I O N ' S

E N V I R O N M E N T A L W E E K AT IMPERIAL COLLEGE

THURSDAY 29th NOVEMBER 1.00pm M E C H E N G 220, EXHIBITION ROAD, SW7. Introduction and talk; The Greening of Britain. In t h e l a s t t e n y e a r s t h e r e has been a massive r e t h i n k on the way we should t r e a t our environment. Expanding i n d u s t r y , enormous i n c r e a s e s i n the g e n e r a t i o n o f energy and t h e r a p i d spread o f c i t i e s have had a great impact on our a v a i l a b l e r e s o u r c e s . The adverse r e s u l t o f t h i s impact by p o l l u t i o n , the r i s i n g p r i c e o f o i l , l e a d i n g t o the expansion o f t h e n u c l e a r i n d u s t r y and a need f o r i n c r e a s i n g l y e f f i c i e n t a g r i c u l t u r a l p r o d u c t i o n made people i n c r e a s i n g l y aware that environmental d e c i s i o n s and l e g i s l a t i o n were d i r e c t l y a f f e c t i n g them. V a r i o u s o r g a n i s a t i o n s were s e t up t o i n v o l v e people more i n environmental i s s u e s . F r i e n d s o f t h e E a r t h (FOE) i s probably the most w e l l known, best informed and most a c t i v e o f these groups. I t i s a p p r o p r i a t e t h a t ICU's Environmental Week i s b e i n g opened by a t a l k from Tom Burke who was c l o s e l y i n v o l v e d i n s e t t i n g up FOE and was one o f t h e i r f i r s t d i r e c t o r s . He i s going t o g i v e an o v e r a l l view o f the environmental landmarks o f the l a s t t e n y e a r s and t h e i r r e l e v a n c e t o the p r e s e n t environmental scene. T h i s w i l l h e l p you put a l l t h e f o r t h c o m i n g d i s c u s s i o n s o f Environmental Week i n t o c o n t e x t .

.30pm CONSORT GALLERY, SHERFIELD BUILDING. Energy and the Environment with The Lord Flowers The L o r d F l o w e r s , R e c t o r o f I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e r s Chairman of the Royal Commission


r e p o r t i n g on Energy and the Environment, and former Chairman of the Energy Commission. His a u t h o r i t y on the s u b j e c t i s unquestionable. T h i s t a l k i s bound to give an i n s i g h t i n t o the working of the Commission and the problems t h a t need to be t a c k l e d . It w i l l furthermore be one man's p r a c t i c a l approach to a dilemma t h a t c a r r i e s w i t h i t the f u t u r e of our s o c i e t y .

7.00pm PHYSICS LT1, PRINCE CONSORT RD, SWT. The Nuclear Power Debate O n the o p e n i n g day of I C U ' s E n v i r o n m e n t a l Week, M r L G B r o o k e s (from the A t o m i c Energy Authority) will p r o p o s e the m o t i o n : " T h i s house believes that nuclear p o w e r is the energy s o u r c e of the future". The motion will be s e c o n d e d by D r G o d d a r d (from M e c h E n g at IC) and o p p o s e d by Professors Jeffery (Birkbeck C o l l e g e ) a n d S c o r e r (Maths at IC). F o l l o w i n g the 'Three M i le Island Disaster" the nuclear controversy has flared up afresh. After about three or four years of use, U r a n i u m fuel is

w i t h d r a w n from the thermal nuclear reactor and the waste remaining after p r o c e s s i n g to recover plutonium is highly radioactive. S h o u l d this waste be 'vitrified' (stored as s o l i d 'glass')? It s h o u l d ideally remain u n d a m a g e d for up to 1,000 years and withstand temperature variations between 0 and 100 d e g r e e s centigrade. C a n we afford to invest our energy future in n u c l e a r p o w e r ? C a n we afford not to? Come

and hear these

experts

examining

the

arguments.

FRIDAY 30th NOVEMBER 7.00pm PHYSICS LT 1,PRINCE CONSORT RD, SW7. Chemical aspects of Farming and Food Production With 50,000 h e c t a r e s o f l a n d i n B r i t a i n being l o s t each year to roads and expanding towns, e f f i c i e n t a g r i c u l t u r a l p r o d u c t i o n i s a growing n e c e s s i t y i n B r i t a i n . In f a c t we are remarkably s u c c e s s f u l and are with Holland,the most e f f i c i e n t farmers i n Europe. But what i s the c o s t ? Energy i n t e n s i v e f e r t i l i s e r s have to be used i n i n c r e a s i n g q u a n t i t i e s , p e s t s are becoming r e s i s t a n t to the chemicals used a g a i n s t them, not to mention n i t r a t e contaminatio n of our water s u p p l i e s , s e r i o u s impact on our w i l d l i f e and l o s s of a t t r a c t i v e hedgerows. What i s the a g r i c u l t u r a l f u t u r e f o r Britain? ICU's Environmental Week P r e s e n t s Mr. R.G. Hughes (Senior Agronomist) and Dr. J . McGuinness ( S e n i o r S c i e n t i f i c O f f i c e r ) from ADAS and Mr. Widdowson from the S o i l A s s o c i a t i o n , i n what promises to be a l i v e l y and i n f o r m a t i v e d i s c u s s i o n on the "Chemical Aspects o f Farming and Food P r o d u c t i o n " .

8.30pm UNION B U I L D I N G , PRINCE CONSORT RD, SW7. Rock for the Environment Gig and Disco FUTURE

EVENTS

Weekend 1st/2nd December - We shall be leaving C o l l e g e at 10:30am to go to Holly St, Hackney in order to expand an adventure playground. Monday 7pm - Discussion on London's future transport policy. Tues 1pm - Discussion on 'What to Conserve?'

Tuesday 7pm - General discussion on environment and the third world. Wednesday afternoon/evening - The big Environmental Fair with stalls, displays, films and speeches. Thursday 1 pm - Big names discuss 'An Energy Future for Britain?' Thursday 4:30pm - Lord Kennett on E E C and the environment.


http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0535_A