Page 1

SPECIAL TRIBUTE TO EARL MOUNTBATTEN (see centre pages) —IMB^W&MMm

THE

NEWSPAPER

OF

am JL

IMPERIAL

Friday, September 14, 1979

^KL

COLLEGE

^HHI

Next Edition: October 1st (The Fresher's FELIX)

UNION N o . 526

THE C L O S E D Q U A D Plans to make Student Union Membership voluntary have been given in a press release from the Bow Group an independent conservative research group. It is also proposed to curb Union control over their funds from LEA's. Due partly to c l a i m s of m i s a p p r o priation of funds by left-wing leaders, ( i n c l u d i n g g i v i n g c a s h to s u c h o r g a n i z a t i o n s as the IRA) the Government is c o n s i d e r i n g removing control of about ÂŁ20M from the U n i o n s by giving the c h o i c e whether or not to join college unions. T h e B o w G r o u p issued a statement saying 'closed s h o p student u n i o n i s m is incompatible with a free society Automatic membership gives m o n o p o l y rights to a single student union in a university. We c o n s i d e r s u c h a m o n o p o l y to be highly undesirable'. In the editorial under the h e a d i n g leader 'The c l o s e d Q u a d ' in T h e Daily Telegraph (Wed, A u g u s t 29) the editor wrote 'Part of the problem is that in most institutions of further e d u c a t i o n the student's unions operate facilities s u c h as bars and resturants. T h e r e is no logical reason why they s h o u l d do s o : at Oxford and C a m b r i d g e these facilities a r e o p e r a t e d by t h e colleges themselves, and the students are not notably deprived thereby.'

T h e unions have also been critized for sustaining full- time 'officials' (sabbaticals) for years on end claiming that 'long suffering' L E A ' s are at present required to pay for perpetual students. T h e e x a m p l e of T r e v o r P h i l l i p s , president of N U S is given. For the N U S Dave A a r o n o v i t c h (the national treasurer) said: 'Voluntary membership c o u l d create the conditions that w o u l d turn unions in elitist bastions of extremism, exactly opposite to the intention of t h e Bow Group'. C o n c e r n i n g the allegations of misappropriation of f u n d s a N U S s p o k e s m a n said ' they' are unwarrented scare m o n g e r i n g . They're completely untrue'. There have also been rumours that the means tested grant system may be phased out with the introduction of a loan s c h e m e , as is the case in the U S A .

U n d e r this s c h e m e the government would loan money to students and would have to be payed back at a later date. S u c h a s c h e m e is planned to make those students who emmigrate s o o n after g r a d u a t i o n pay for their education.

Printers refuse to print Rag Mag The Rag Mag has been rejected by the printers because of its' o b s c e n e content. The, not u n e x p e c t e d , news was greeted by c o m m e n t s of ' I told y o u so' from students who had previewed the magazine. T h e printers are trying to find another firm to take on the job of printing the R a g M a g . T h e y hope that other units will be less sensitive to the content of Steve Marshall's latest work.


YOUR WIFE .... IS SHE CRAZY? THE KENSINGTON COMMITTEE OF FRIENDSHIP FOR OVERSEAS STUDENTS n e e d s i m m e d i a t e l y u n t i l t h e e n d of J u n e A CALM, EFFICIENT, TRAINED S E C R E T A R Y ready to help o r g a n i s e o u r e n o r m o u s s o c i a l a n d cultural p r o g r a m m e for s t u d e n t s f r o m c o l l e g e s a n d s c h o o l s all over K e n s i n g t o n , - a n d c r a z y e n o u g h to believe s h e will enjoy working with them. A c a d e m i c holidays. Pay surprisingly

LOOK WHAT I'VE DONE!

attractive.

Malcolm Brain in a classic pose. FELIX needs photographers B E F O R E Freshers's Week. If you have a camera or would like to help develop films and prints .... please come to the FELIX office. We are open most hours of the day or night!

P l e a s e t e l e p h o n e M I C H A E L S A N D W I T H at 5 8 4 - 3 9 8 9 b e t w e e n 10.30 a n d 5 . 3 0 p m M o n d a y t o F r i d a y o r c o m e a n d s e e u s at 1 5 , P r i n c e s G a r d e n s ( n e x t d o o r t o t h e Medical Centre).

BRENDAN STARS IN 'RETURN GLASSES TO BARS CAMPAIGN'!

' 1 1 M

i

J

*A

4>

>

Stevenson's Rocket rode again S c i e n c e M u s e u m o r g a n i s e d a special celebration for the Rocket. A replica steamed up a n d d o w n a straight track outside the Albert Hall. A horse d r a w n O m n i b u s took celebrities to the o p e n i n g c e r e m o n y . O u r photo s h o w s it passi ng the Royal S c h o o l of Mines.

Ron Nash Is Leaving Imperial College D o n ' t a l l c h e e r , a s R o n s a y s that in s p i t e of h i s s o a k i n g o n S h r o v e T u e s d a y , p l u s a l l t h e m i c k e y t a k i n g , h e is v e r y sorry to be leaving the C o l l e g e . T h e National W e s t m i n s t e r B a n k h a s d e c i d e d to give R o n promotion a n d have appointed T o m Cottrell in his place. L i k e R o n , T o m w i l l b e a v a i l a b l e in t h e S u b - B r a n c h t o g i v e a d v i c e o n W i l l s , T a x , I n s u r a n c e , e t c . It i s e m p h a s i s e d that y o u d o n ' t h a v e to b e a c u s t o m e r o r a m e m b e r o f t h e M i n i n g Faculty to pick T o m ' s brains. In

parting,

R o n wishes to thank

everyone

for the

f r i e n d s h i p h e h a s r e c e i v e d d u r i n g h i s s t a y a n d a s k s that this n o w be p a s s e d o n to T o m C o t t r e l l .


BEIT QUAD (Part 3) Little progress has been made since the last issue of FELIX: The Quad will not be ready for Fresher's Fair. The Queen's Lawn will be used i n s t e a d . T h e right h a n d column shows the progress to date. Students have already noticed the non-symmetric layout of the small brick walls.

FELIX GIRL MAKES GOOD

The view from the centre of the entrance archway clearly shows that the left-hand wall is nearer the centre of the Quad than the right wall.

Gill M c C o n w a y , long serving F E L I X typesetter s c o r e d a notable victory last weekend

when

she

captured

the

National W o m e n ' s S i n g l e Wicket title hed at Flax B o u r t e n , A v o n .

Gill, a top class w o m e n s cricketer, who has been k n o c k i n g at the d o o r for full E n g l a n d honours defeated the best lady cricketers in E n g l a n d t o c a p t u r e t h e title, includin g the d o y e n of the w o m e n s game R a c h a e l Heyhoe-Flint. Earlier in the year G i l l had w o n both her C l u b a n d C o u n t y (Surrey) Single Wicket C o m p e t i t i o n thus making her eligible for the finals. Last Winter she toured S o u t h A f r i c a with the English Unicorns, the ladies equivilent to the M C C , where s h e played in all three unofficial Test matches. Gill, w h o hails from N e w Z e a l n d seems certain to be a hot contester in b e c o m i n g the first overseas-born cricketer to be awarded a full E n g l a n d Test place.

Looking along the left hand wall one can see that it lines up with the centre of the small far pillar.

Gill has worked with F E LIX since 1975 and has d e c i d e d to live a country life in Hertfordshire and will leave F E LIX atthe end of the month.

H A R D S H I P

F U N D

S i n c e the massive a n d d i s p r o portionate increases in the fees for Overseas Students College has reaffirmed its d e c i s i o n to run a Hardship F u n d for those Students w h o find the increases prohibitive. This was c o m m u n i c a t e d to C h r i s Fox by C o l l e g e , and though the administration of it is still under d i s c u s s i o n A p p l i c a t i o n Forms can be obtained from C o l l e g e Registry on Sherfield Level 3. A n y o n e with problems s h o u l d consult C h r i s in the U n i o n Office - Beit Q u a d .

Looking along the right hand wall one can see that it lines up with the far right side of the pillar. A difference of over two feet.

:'


to Lord Mountbatten DAY BY SPECIAL

DAY

FEATURE

WRITTEN BY

JILL DAWSON PHOTOS

BY

COLIN PALMER E a r l M o u n t b a t t e n of B u r m a , the A d m i r a l of t h e Fleet, w a s m u r d e r e d o n A u g u s t 28th by a n I.R.A. b o m b w h i c h e x p l o d e d o n h i s boat " S h a d o w V . " H i s g r a n d s o n N i c h o l a s , a g e d fourteen, and a seventeen-year-old b o a t m a n w e r e a l s o t r a g i c a l l y k i l l e d , a n d his daughter's mother-in-law the D o w a g e r Lady B r a b o u r n e d i e d later in S l i g o hospital. M o u n t b a t t e n a n d h i s f am i ly w e r e o n their a n n u a l visit to his Irish h o m e , C l a s s i e b a w n C a s t l e , w h i c h is t w e l v e m i l e s f r o m the b o r d e r w i t h N o r t h e r n Ireland. A t the t i m e of the explosion, the boat was in Mullaghmore harbour, and local people o v e r a m i l e a w a y h e a r d the r o a r of the e x p l o s i o n . M a n y e x p r e s s e d s u r p r i s e that t h e r e w e r e a n y s u r v i v o r s at a l l , b e c a u s e the boat d i s i n t e g r a t e d c o m p l e t e l y . A trade u n i o n o f f i c i a l f r o m t h e a r e a s u m m e d up the g e n e r a l p u b l i c ' s r e a c t i o n w i t h " W h a t t hey (the IRA) d o in the n a m e of Ireland m a k e s me a s h a m e d to be c a l l e d a n I r i s h m a n . "

"At its heart, for all the ceremonial, it was a family funeral for a man who was murdered"

The seventy-nine year old Earl had had a dazzling a n d varied career. In J u l y , 1965, he retired as C h i e f of the D e f e n c e Staff, a n d w a s m a d e a m e m b e r of t h e O r d e r of M e r i t . H e w a s the last V i c e r o y of I n d i a a n d t h e first G o v e r n o r - G e n e r a l of the n e w D o m i n i o n , n o w t h e R e p u b l i c . H e s e r v e d in t h e R o y a l N a v y d u r i n g b o t h world wars, w h e r e his personal c h a r m and p o w e r s of l e a d e r s h i p g a i n e d h i m m u c h a d m i r a t i o n - as an a b l e s e a m a n w h o h a d s e r v e d u n d e r h i m put it " L o r d L o u i s w a s something special. We would have followed h i m to hell and back." A g r e a t - g r a n d s o n of Q u e e n V i c t o r i a a n d a n u n c l e of P r i n c e P h i l i p , he w a s b o r n at F r o g m o r e H o u s e , W i n d s o r in 1900. B y 1916 he h a d p a s s e d t h r o u g h O s b o r n e a n d D a r t m o u t h , a n d d u r i n g t h e first W o r l d W a r he s e r v e d o n H . M . S . L i o n , H . M . S . Q u e e n Elizabeth and in submarines. After the war, Mountbatten s p e c i a l i s ed in r a d i o c o m m u n i c a t i o n s , a n d i n v e n t e d a d e v i c e e n a b l i n g s h i p s to k e e p s t a t i o n w h i c h b e c a m e s t a n d a r d in t h e R o y a l N a v y . H e b e c a m e Fleet W i r e l e s s O f f i c e r of the M e d i t e r r a n e a n Fleet in 1931, a n d in 1937 was promoted as y o u n g e s t captain.

D u r i n g the early part of t h e s e c o n d W o r l d War, he c o m m a n d e d H M S K e l l y a n d t h e Fifth D e s t r o y e r F l o t i l l a . A t t h i s t i m e he h a d t h e u n i q u e h o n o u r of h o l d i n g t h e r a n k s of A c t i n g V i c e - A d m i r a l , L i e u t e n a n t General and Air Marshal simultaneously. In t h e s u m m e r of 1943, he w a s a p p o i n t e d S u p r e m e C o m m a n d e r in S o u t h E a s t A s i a . H e c o n d u c t e d a c a m p a i g n d e s c r i b e d by S i r Churchill as "the greatest Winston c o l l i s i o n w h i c h h a s yet t a k e n p l a c e o n l a n d w i t h J a p a n . " T h e s u r r e n d e r of J a p a n e s e t r o o p s f o l l o w e d the d r o p p i n g of a t o m i c bombs on H i r o s h i m a and Nagasaki. W h e n it w a s d e c i d e d in 1947 to g r a n t i n d e p e n d e n c e to India, M o u n t b a t t e n w a s e n t r u s t e d w i t h t h e task of t r a n s f e r i n g power. A f t e r l e a v i n g I ndia in 1948, h e w a s p r o m o t e d V i c e - A d m i r a l in 1949, A d m i r a l in 1953 a n d A d m i r a l of t h e Fleet in 1956. H e w a s m a d e a V i s c o u n t in 1946, a n d E a r l M o u n t b a t t e n a n d B a r o n R o m s e y in the following year. In r e c e n t y e a r s , M o u n t b a t t e n h a s h e l p e d r a i s e d l a r g e s u m s of m o n e y for c h i l d r e n ' s charities, w o r k i n g with organisations s u c h as t h e V a r i e t y C l u b .

T h e Q u e e n led the n a t i o n ' s m o u r n i n g at the E a r l ' s f u n e r a l s e r v i c e , w h i c h t o o k p l a c e in W e s t m i n s t e r A b b e y o n S e p t e m b e r 5 t h . It w a s a s o l e m n a n d m o v i n g o c c a s i o n , full of the pageantry and ceremonial that Mountbatten had loved s o m u c h . The A b b e y w a s filled w i t h o n e t h o u s a n d f o u r hundred people, i n c l u d i n g every member of t h e Q u e e n ' s f a m i l y a n d m a n y f o r e i g n k i n g s a n d p r i n c e s w h o h a d c o m e to p a y t r i b u t e to t h e m u r d e r e d E a r l , to w h o m s o m a n y were related. A l s o present were two h u n d r e d veterans of B u r m a a n d a c o n t i n g e n t of s u r v i v o r s f r o m H M S K e l l y , w h i c h w a s s u n k off C r e t e in 1941. M a n y in t h e c o n g r e g a t i o n w e r e o n a list d r a w n u p by L o r d M o u n t b a t t e n of B u r m a himself.

In t h e p r o c e s s i o n , w h i c h f o l l o w e d the c o f f i n to -the A b b e y , m a r c h e d Prince C h a r l e s a n d P r i n c e P h i l i p in full n a v a l uniform, men of the B u r m a Star Association, Marine Commandos r e p r e s e n t i n g F r a n c e , Life G u a r d s , m e n of t h e K i n g E d w a r d VM's O w n G u r k h a R i f l e s , a n d M o u n t b a t t e n ' s c h a r g e r D o l l y , w i t h the Earl's boots reversed in t h e s t i r r u p s . T h e c o f f i n itself w a s b o r n e o n a R o y a l N a v y g u n c a r r i a g e p u l l e d by s a i l o r s . T r e m e n d o u s dignity and control was s h o w n , t h r o u g h o u t t h e c e r e m o n y , by t h e R o y a l F a m i l y w h o s e s e n s e of l o s s at t h e o u t r a g e o u s k i l l i n g of t h e m a n t h e y k n e w a s " U n c l e D i c k i e " is s h a r e d b y the w h o l e n a t i o n , g r i e v i n g at t h e d e a t h of " s o r a r e a man."

The insignia carried in the procession were: The Garter Cushion, The GCB Cushion (Knight Grand Cross of the Bath), The GCSI Cushion (Knight Grand Commander of the Star of India), The GCIE Cushion (Knight Grand Commander of the Indian Empire), The GCVO Cushion (Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order) and The Burmese Cushion.


WHY NOT STAY FOR

BREAKFAST

Starring George Chakiris & Gemma Craven Why not stay for breakfast (A)

S o o n e n o u g h a film had to be based on the hit stage c o m e d y 'Why not stay for breakfast' - and here it is-. T h e original script for stage was written by G e n e Stone and Ray C o o n e y , the screenplay was written by the producer, T e r r a n c e Marcel in collaboration with C o o n e y , and under the latters influence the film has retained a stage atmosphere. G e o r g e (played by G e o r g e Chakiris) is a fussy, fortyish batchelor, w h o s e life is c o n c e r n e d with thirties music and potplants, and only complicated by the presence of his sister, Helen (Yvonne Wilder) a professional h y p o c h o n d r i a c . But G e o r g i e s well-ordered life is shattered one evening by the loud rock music emanating from the apartment above, followed by a knock. Standing t h e r e is L o u i s e ( G e m m a Craven), a girl who is to play an important part in George's life.

It is refreshing to find an English actor playing a major role in an A m e r i c a n film, she has been seen previously in the B B C ' s highly a c c l a i m e d series 'Pennies from Heaven'. S h e played the part of a youn g girl very well, especially in o v e r c o m i n g the transition from being plump and pregnant to b e c o m i n g a slender mum. G e o r g e C h a k i r i s is well known from his O s c a r winning performance in 'West-side story', working with Y v o n n e Wilder (who played Helen). Both played the parts well, especially in the execution of the c o m e d y periods. O n the whole the film is very a m u s i n g , but I think it is directed towards a more mature a u d i e n c e and c o u l d prove very boring to people who expect constant humerous entertainment. Nick Grattan

CAR A I feel that the plot in this film is typical of so many films to be found in the B B C archives and s h o w n on S u n d a y afternoons. Basically the plot involves Mark Miller (played by M i c h a e l Sarrazin) travelling to contral A s i a to find Ellen J a s p e r (Jennifer O'Neill), the wayward daughter of a U S Senetor. Of c o u r s e s h e has met and married an influential local, C o l o n e l Nazrulla h (Behrooz V o s o u g h i ) . He is the N e p h e w of Sardar K h a n (Christopher Lee). Miller gets captured by two B e d o u i n s w h o take him to 6

VAN

(A)

Zalfigar (Anthony Quinn) and his camel caravan. The plot then develops along a well trodden path. All of the film was set on location in Iran, and was the last film to c o m e out of Iran b e f o r e the r e v o l u t i o n . The grandios e scenery (see stills opposite) alleviate the boredom and gives the film a great visual impact, perhaps the best reason for seeing this film. A l s o s h o w n in the stills are the three main actors d o w n w a r d s they are; M i c h a e l Serrazin

(as Mark Miller, J e n n i f e r O'Neill (as Ellen Jasper) and A n t h o n y Q u i n n (as Zulfiger). A n t h o n y gave a g o o d performance as Zulfiger, a n o m a d who captures Miller. He s h o w e d his experienc e and therefore looked the most professional, perhaps to the detriment of the other actors. O n the technical side both the filming and s o u n d were of a high stand. I noted that the directions were aimed more towards the scenery and away from the actors, giving the actors a most difficult job in c o m p e t i n g with the breath taking scenergy. T h e film is due for general release in December.


wanted us to be h a p p y at his funeral and so to balance the events covered in the centre pages the F E L I X news team went to the Great British Beer Festival. The Beer was g o o d a n d c h e a p . I c o u l d knock o u r c o l l e g e B a r prices in this editorial but to-day has shown p r o m i s i n g developments in this area. We c a n help cut d o w n B eer prices by returning glasses to the B a r s a n d a major c a m p a i g n is about to be l a u n c h e d o n this subject.

EDITORIAL " N o news is g o o d news," they say. There have been no developments in the J o h n Shuttleworth legal battle against Imperial College Union. There have been many newsworthy events for o u r news team to report. S o m e have had to be left out for o n e reason o r another but their are signs that a g o o d news service will be in operation from t h e start of next term. Nick Grattan has joined J i l l D a w s o n in c o v e r i n g local a n d college news. I c a n n o t thank him e n o u g h for his help with this issue of F E L I X .

T h e c o p y deadline for the Fresher's F E L I X is next M o n d a y . W e are being s w a m p e d with Litho jobs and it is now important that y o u p r o d u c e 'camera ready' artwork if y o u h o p e to get posters printed before Fresher's Fair. Colin Palmer (Acting FELIX Editor)

This is the last F E L I X before the Fresher's E d i t i o n . M y hopes are that F E L I X will c o n t a i n a large n u m b e r of photos next year. I c a n o n l y r u n a g o o d selection of pics with the help of many p h o t o g r a p h e r s . If y o u w o u l d like to get involved in F E L I X please c o m e into the office at any time.

Thank-you to everyone who helped with this issue of FELIX including: Gill McConway lan Morse Nick Grattan Jill Dawson Karen and Jon Firth and everyone who helps beat the folding machine tonight!

N e w s c o v e r a g e of major events s u c h as the funeral of L o r d M o u n t b a t t e n c o u l d have created a very serious air to this issue of F E L I X . M o u n t b a t t e n

T H E 1979 G R E A T B E E R F E S T I V A L What ever p e o p l e may think of the aims of C a m r a , none may d i s a g r e e that the affect of their call for a return to traditional ale has been a s t o u n d i n g . T h i s is surely h i g h l i g h t e d by the annual G r e a t B e e r Festival held at A l e x a n d e r P a l a c e . S i n c e the first festival in 1977 the attendances have greatly risen, as have the n u m b e r of brewers and types of ale. T h e beer was f o u n d to be in g o o d c o n d i t i o n

(and

more

important - h i g h in a l c o h o l content). It was f o u n d that on the F r i d a y night m a n y of the ales were 'off, the remaining beer b e i n g left for the final day. W h e n s o m e bystanders (just!) were a s k e d o n w h i c h day it was best to go the a n s w e r given was 'every day'. U n f o r t u n a t e l y F E L I X w o u l d not take this advise! For t h o s e not d r i n k i n g (alot) there was the possibility to lose m o n e y p l a y i n g i m p o s s i b l e pub g a m e s , i n c l u d i n g darts on a M a n c h e s t e r c l o c k b o a r d and the Bat and trap. Live m u s i c was also

presented,

unfortunately

this

was

usually

too

o v e r w h e l m i n g . F o r those w h o enjoy a g o o d pint it was well worth a visit, as c a n be s e e n by these happy faces! The Acting

FELIX editor relaxes at the Beer Festival

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0526_A  

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0526_A.pdf

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