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F r i d a y . 23rd February. 1979

Issue No. 510

THE NEWSPAPER OF IMPERIAL C O L L E G E

UNION

Fire in Southside W h e n R i c h a r d Ellis, an aeronautics 1 student, saw s m o k e b i l l o w i n g out u n d e r the d o o r o f a r o o m i n T i z a r d H a l l o n W e d n e s d a y m o r n i n g he a c t e d q u i c k l y i n r a i s i n g the a l a r m a n d evacuating neighbouring rooms. T h e f i r e o c c u r r e d i n r o o m 457, w h i c h b e l o n g s to A n t h o n y T h o m p s o n , a Z o o l o g y 3 student, a n d i s b e l i e v e d to h a v e b e e n c a u s e d b y a n e l e c t r i c a l fault. R i c h a r d E l l i s first smelt smoke o n staircase 5 at a b o u t 9.45 a m a n d saw a s m a l l a m o u n t o f smoke c o m i n g f r o m a level 4 light fitting. A s s u m i n g it was a short c i r c u i t he t u r n e d off the light a n d r e p o r t e d it to the w a r d e n s ' assistant, M r s . J o R i c e . O n r e t u r n i n g to level 4 he n o t i c e d that m o r e smoke was c o m i n g f r o m u n d e r the d o o r o f r o o m 457. F o r t u n a t e l y R i c k E l l i s has h a d n a v a l t r a i n i n g i n fire f i g h t i n g a n d a c t ed q u i c k l y . H e c h e c k e d that n o b o d y was i n the smoke-filled r o o m , secured the fire d o o r a n d t o ld M r s . R i c e to d i a l 999. H e then p e r s o n a l l y e v a c u a t e d staircase 5 a n d c h e c k e d f r o m a n e i g h b o u r i n g r o o m that the w i n d o w s were closed. W h e n C o l l e g e F i r e Officer B o b F o g g o n a r r i v e d he f o u n d that the fire was too b i g for h i m to d e a l with. Fire engines from Kensington, Chelsea and K n i g h t sbridge fire stations quickly. e x t i n g u i s h e d the blaze. A s a p r e c a u t i o n a r y measure the fire a l a r m was raised to evacuate Southside. B u t most residents i g n o r e d the a l a r m , a n d M r . F o g g o n said he was still t r y i n g to get people out o f the b u i l d i n g 12 m i n u t e s after the a l a r m first sounded .

photographic equipment r o o m were o n l y stained.

i n the

Mr. Foggon said that e v e r y t h i n g h a d been d o n e t o m a k e S o u t h s i d e as safe as possible. B u t some residents a n d cleaners engage i n the dangerous p r a c t i c e of w e d g i n g the doors o p e n a n d M r . F o g g o n is c o n s t a n t l y h a v i n g to r e m o v e the wedges.

T h e fire was c o n t a i n e d w i t h i n room 457 a n d damage was estimated at a r o u n d ÂŁ700. M o s t o f the c e i l i n g plaster h a d fallen d o w n a n d the r o o m w i l l need extensive r e d e c o r a t i o n . F u r n i t u r e was destroyed but A n t h o n y T h o m p s o n said that a stereo system a n d ÂŁ500 w o r t h o f

REFECTORY

There is a f u l l interior signposting system to direct residents to the nearest means o f escape f r o m the b u i l d i n g . A l s o notices i n four languages are to be p l a c e d i n a l l bedrooms t e l l i n g residents what a c t i o n to take i n the event o f a fire. M r . F o g g o n wishes to express his thanks a n d a p p r e c i a t i o n to R i c h a r d E l l i s l o r the p r o m p t a c t i o n he took i n d e a l i n g w i t h the fire.

BOYCOTT

It l o o k s l i k e there w i l l be n o n e w r e f e c t o r y b o y c o t t f o r the t i m e b e i n g f o l l o w i n g the G o v e r n o r s ' d e c i s i o n not to r e m o v e R e f e c t o r y C o m m i t t e e ' s p o w e r to fix p r i c e s . A n d C h r i s F o x , R C S U President a n d one o f the student observers at the G o v e r n o r s ' m e e t i n g , s u m m e d u p the result as 2:1 to the students.

Fire engines outside Southside yesterday morning

Instead the G o v e r n o r s d e c i d e d that t e r m l y p r i c e reviews b y R e f e c t o r y C o m m i t t e e , o n w h i c h students have s i x representatives, s h o u l d c o n t i n u e a n d r e c o m m e n d e d that t h e C o m m i t t e e c o n s i d e r o v e r a l l p r i c i n g p o l i c y rather t h a n just p u t u p prices to b a l a n c e the accounts. T h e G o v e r n o r s also decided that the use of the r e g u l a t o r to up refectory prices i n l i n e w i t h i n f l a t i o n s h o u l d c o n t i n u e a n d s h o u l d i n c l u d e increased costs o t h e r t h a n food.

T h e C o l l e g e F i n a n c e a n d E x e c u t i v e C o m m i t t e e m e e t i n g last F r i d a y was to discuss a p r o p o s a l by the R e c t o r to h a n d o v e r a l l p r i c i n g decisions to the D o m e s t i c Secretary, C a p t . J . W . G . L i n d l e y , a n d R e f e c t o r y C o m m i t t e e C h a i r m a n Prof. E i l o n .

U n i o n President M a r y A t t e n b o r o u g h s a i d that the G o v e r n o r s ' decision was better t h a n she expected a n d w e l c o m e d t h e i r c o n f i r m a t i o n of the right o f c o n s u m e r representatives to have a say i n p r i c i n g p o l i c y . She was d i s a p p o i n t e d at the r e c o m m e n d a t i o n that the r e g u l a t o r s h o u l d not be l i m i t e d to c o m p e n s a t i n g for food p r i c e i n f l a t i o n .

B u t after it b e c a m e c l e a r that there was a lot o f o p p o s i t i o n the R e c t o r d i d not p u t his p r o p o s a l to the m e e t i ng.

A b o u t 30 students l o b b i e d the G o v e r n o r s as they went i n t o their c o n t d . o n b a c k page


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D e a r S i r , - I w o u l d l i k e to clear some points w h i c h M r . W a l k e r has m a d e i n his letter i n the last issue of FELIX (no. 509) r e g a r d i n g the Islamic system. T h e m a i n confusion seems to arise f r o m a m i s - u n d e r s t a n d i n g of the differences between ideology a n d the w a y a system has to be p u t into practice. S o far, i n most countries that c l a i m to have a d a p t e d the I s l a m i c system, a very i m p o r t a n t factor, that o f e d u c a t i o n , has been missing. I n these countries the people are not e d u c a t e d a c c o r d i n g to the p r i n c i p l e s o f I s l a m but rather a c c o r d i n g to i m p o r t e d e d u c a t i o n a l systems w h i c h have been forced u p o n t h e m , ( w h i c h d o not m a t c h their s o c i a l - c u l t u r a l needs a n y w a y ) . Y e t the same people are p u n i s h e d a c c o r d i n g to I s l a m i c rules, w h i c h is o n l y a t i n y part o f the c o m pl e te I s l a m i c system. free indulgence in The drinking, gambling, sexual p r o m i s c u i t y a n d s i m i l a r activites d o not seem to be the signs o f a h e a l t h y society, a n d so a n y society s h o u l d h a v e punishment s for them. D u e to d o m i n a t i o n , (economic a n d p o l i t i c a l) o f these countries by the West, the ideology of I s l a m , has not h a d a n o p p o r t u n i t y to be given expression i n its c o m pl e te form. W i t h the r e v o l u t i o n i n I r a n a n d other such movements i n the countries o f the t h i r d w o r l d we hope the l o c a l c u l t u r a l traditions i n these countries, w i l l have the o p p o r t u n i t y to free themselves of the shackles of foreign suppression. (Whether it be W e s t e r n o r Eastern). Instead we believe the w o r l d w o u l d benefit f r o m a n atmosphere of m u t u a l respect a n d regard for the diverse c u l t u r a l t r a d i t i o n s i n different countries. S. A h m a d i

Elec. Eng.

PG

S i r , - A f t e r r e a d i n g the c o m m e n t s p n the refectory boycott m a d e i n last week's issue o f F E L I X , I w o u l d l i k e to m a k e m y p o i n t o f v i e w k n o w n . I a m one of the p e o p l e w h o ate i n Southside o n that day, at lunchtime, in defiance o f the boycott. I d i d so o n l y after a lot o f thought, a n d after r e a d i n g most of the p u b l i c i t y p u t out o n the subject. every I eat i n Southside weekday l u n c h t i m e , a n d find the quality and price quite reasonable. A t this p o i n t I w o u l d - l i k e to a d d that I a m i n favour of a c t i o n t a k e n against the mis-use of the regulator, w h i c h appears l i k e l y i n the near future, rather t h a n a c t i o n just t a k e n about present quality and prices generally. O n e o f the arguments p u t forward for supporting the boycott, a b o u t w h i c h I t h o u g h longest a n d hardest, was that I s h o u l d support the boycott to show s o l i d a r i t y w i t h the views of

no right to interfere w i t h another person's private life, or to tell t h e m what is right a n d w r o n g ; a n d as a c h i l d I too felt this way about homosexuality. I knew by m y conscience that ho m o s e x ual ity was w r o n g a n d a b n o r m a l , but I c o u l d n ' t see a reason for p r o h i b i t i n g it by L a w - u n t i l I read the B i b l e . (For a l l C h r i s t i a n s the B i b l e is o u r first a n d last line of defence in any matter of dispute: we believe it to be the absolute I hope that I have put forward standard). G o d has said in the m y views sufficiently w e l l for B i b l e , " Y o u shall not lie w i t h a M a l c o l m B r a i n to realise that the male as w i t h a w o m a n ... If a m a n people w h o ate i n Southside were lies w i t h a male as w i t h a w o m a n , not necessarily "the moron element both of t h e m have c o m m i t t e d a n who go out of their way to oppose the a b o m i n a t i o n . " (Leviticus, •views of the vast majority.", but chapter 18 v22 a n d 20 v l 3 people w i t h o p i n i o n s of their o w n . It is because of what the B i b l e says, that I believe homosexuality "SCAB" The description is a sin, w h i c h s h o u l d be a p p l i e d as a generalisation by J a n p r o h i b i t e d as m u c h as, say, incest. is derogatory a n d typifies the attitudes of extremists w h o attach F i n a l l y , I w o u l d like to say w h y to these " w o r t h y " causes, i.e. that I believe G o d abhors this act. G o d anyone w h o holds the opposite created us a n d knows o u r form v i e w to theirs s h o u l d be attacked and m a k e - u p . H e designed o u r as violently as possible, physically bodies for heterosexual or v e r b a l l y . realtionships, instituting - F i n a l l y , I w o u l d just like to a d d m a r r i a g e between a m a n a n d a that the b e h a v i o u r of the pickets woman. Sexual relationships outside Southside at l u n c h t i m e between two people of the same was excellent, a n d no effort to sex was not intended, a n d such i n t i m i d a t e was made, the pickets acts w i l l cause h a r m to the persons merely stating their case. concerned. Y o u r s faithfully, T h a n k you for y o u r time, the vast majority of I m p e r i a l College students who are dissatisifed with the service. H o w e v e r , I finally d e c i d e d that, as I personally h a d no c o m p l a i n t about the refectory service, to support the boycott w o u l d be to forego m y views i n favour of those of the majority. I d e c i d e d that this w o u l d be w r o n g a n d I t h i n k m o s t people w o u l d be reasonable enought to accept this.

:

Peter K i r k h a m , C h e m i s t r y I D e a r S i r , - H a v i n g ordered a 20 p h o t d o g (not a student-type price) in the U n i o n L o w e r L o u n g e last T h u r s d a y evening, I found one side to be u n d e r c o o k e d and i n e d i b l e u p o n t a k i n g the first bite (ugh!). I asked the b a r m a n to replace it w i t h one w h i c h was p r o p e r l y cooked. T h e answer was a p l a i n N O . W o u l d he give me m y m o n e y back? H e refused to do either o f these things because; " y o u ' v e already taken a bite out of i t . " W e l l I never. It's like t a k i n g a p a i r of faulty shoes back to a shop a n d a n assistant saying " B u t y o u ' v e w o r n t h e m . " It seems that the college bars are very keen to take y o u r m o n e y a n d offer y o u no service i n r e t u r n , no pleases or thankyous. T h e b a r m a n , R o g e r P o w n a l l c o n c e d e d o n l y one thing; to give me his n a m e , so that I " c o u l d go t h r o u g h the proper channels and make my c o m p l a i n t . " M y m a i n interest however was to eat a n edible hotdog. I n the U . S . A . that b a r m a n w o u l d have been r e p r i m a n d e d or sacked for the attitude 'the customer is always w r o n g ' . Y o u r s w i t h hunger, J . Chamberlain. M e c h . E n g . II. D e a r S i r , - I n v i e w of the recent debate o n homosexuality a n d the proposed m o t i o n likely to be discussed at the next U n i o n G e n e r a l meeting, I w o u l d like to state, or clarify, the C h r i s t i a n position on this issue. M a n y people feel that one has

Y o u say he's u n w a n t e d . B u t w h y does that give y o u the right to k i l ! h i m ? If it is permissible to k i l l the u n w a n t e d , most forms of murder, mass-killings and genocide cease to be w r o n g . Y o u say he's not yet as developed, not yet as conscious or social as a b o r n person, a n d hence less v a l u a b l e . I f that's so, a handsome, intelligent, m i d d l e class a d u l t is more v a l u a b l e t h a n an illiterate peasant or a c r i p p l e d G h e t t o negro (because he's more developed), a n d a teenager more valuable than a child. That's h o r r i f y i n g talk. A civilised society carefully protects the weak a n d vulnerable, that is, the undeveloped, a n d gives equality before the l a w to a l l . T h e factory-master used to say that his workers were merely 'dependent' on h i m a n d at his disposal. R e m e m b e r h o w often E u r o p e a n powers have argued that their colonies were 'part o f the m o t h e r l a n d a n d that n o b o d y s h o u l d interfere w i t h them? It was often c l a i m e d of the m i l l i o n s of Africans shipped across the A t l a n t i c to slavery i n A m e r i c a that they weren't really h u m a n s or that they w o u l d be better off as slaves. A p a r t h e i d rests o n the ' p r i n c i p l e ' that Blacks are less developed than Whites and therefore inferior.

J a m i e Shotter Civ. Eng. 3

W h a t the abortionist n o w says we've heard a h u n d r e d times before. T h i s is the way, a l l d o w n history, that m e n have tried to justify oppression, d i s c r i m i n a t i o n a n d rejection. T h e u n b o r n c h i l d is s i m p l y the latest v i c t i m of age-old double-talk.

D e a r S i r , - Y o u m a y be pleased to hear how interesting F E L I X is considered to be. H a v i n g spent a F r i d a y i n the college health centre 8 out of ten people v i s i t i n g me greeted me w i t h " I thought y o u might be bored. I've brought you a F E L I X ! " Congratulations! Marian Hill B i o c h e m . III.

Mr. White, in typical abortionists style, tries to suggest that b i r t h is the biggest step in the development of a c h i l d . T h e r e isn't r o o m to discuss this here but if M r . W h i t e or anyone else has the i n c l i n a t i o n to b u y or b o r r o w any of o u r leaflets from o u r weekly bookstall w h e n P A T A gets started he w i l l find that b i r t h - w h i c h occurs about four months after even the baby's eyebrows a n d eyelashes have begun to grow, is s i m p l y a n i n c i d e nt i n a n already far-advanced process.

Sir, - M r . W h i t e ' s letter ( F E L I X 508) exhibits the t y p i c a l form of wishful t h i n k i n g w h i c h m a n y abortionists adopt. T h e great lengths to w h i c h M r . W h i t e goes to try to prove that a n u n b o r n c h i l d is vastly different to a b o r n c h i l d , apart f r o m the fact that they are based on prejudice a n d not on fact, still do not give a n y satisfactory reason w h y we c a n sentence such a c h i l d to death. M r . W h i t e , y o u haven't p r o v e d that the u n b o r n c h i l d is inferior. Y o u haven't s ho w n w h y y o u c a n do things to h i m that y o u c a n ' t do to a n e w l y - b o r n infant. I s i m p l y beyond, ask y o u to p r o v e reasonable d o u b t that the c h i l d i n the w o m b is second-class. Y o u want to do the k i l l i n g , so the onus of p r o o f is o n y o u . t

You say he is merely 'dependent'. B u t so is a n infant. A n d a n y w a y , w h y s h o u l d that m e a n that y o u c a n k i l l h i m ? Y o u say he is merely part of his mother. This is biological nonsence. H e is a distinct person. Y o u d o n ' t say that his m o t h e r has 'lost' s o m e t h i n g w h e n he's b o r n , do you? o

In s i m i l a r style, the L i b e r a l C l u b ' s - latest edition of F O R W A R D ! attempts to suggest that a b o r t i o n is just a religious question. W e l l I w o u l d like to see the L i b e r a l C l u b , or anyone else for that matter, try to p i n me to a religious belief. T h e article says that "the foetus .... has no feelings on the matter at all." Is the a u t h o r of this article aware that, w i t h i n twenty five days of c o n c e p t i o n , before the mother is even likely to suspect that she is pregnant, the two sides of the c h i l d ' s b r a i n are a l r e a d y c o m i n g together a n d the c h i l d is already d o i n g some elementary t h i n k i n g ? If I were in such a position, a n d knew I was g o i n g to be t o r n to shreds by a c o n t d . on page 5


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Copy Deadlines A s i t ' s b e e n a w h i l e s i n c e I last r e m i n d e d y o u , a n d s o m e o f y o u are g e t t i n g a l i t t l e slack, I ' d l i k e to p o i n t o u t t h a t the c o p y d e a d l i n e f o r A L L m a t e r i a l to F E L I X ( i g n o r e w h a t i t says o n t h e W h a t ' s O n f o r m s ) is 5 : 3 0 p m o n M o n d a y s . A r t i c l e s etc. s h o u l d be t y p e d , d o u b l e s p a c e d , o n one side o f the p a p e r o n l y , o r v e r y n e a t l y w r i t t e n o n alternate lines.

Congratulations... to C h a r l i e N e w e n s o n his engagement

to V i n a Q u i n n ,

the

sister-tutor at B r o m p t o n H o s p i t a l , w h o m he m e t t h r o u g h his w o r k w i t h the R e d Cross. F E L I X wishes t h e m every happiness for the future. Credit M a n y t h a n k s to D a v e H . f o r t h e o r a n g e ! T . C . r o o l s yet. Cheers,

Words F u r t h e r m o r e , i t w o u l d b e v e r y h e l p f u l ( a n d might s a v e y o u r articles f r o m b e i n g cut) if the total n u m b e r of w o r d s was w r i t t e n a t t h e e n d o f t h e a r t i c l e / l e t t e r / r e p o r t e t c. University Challenge T h e r e w i l l b e a test q u i z ( w r i t t e n , as B . G . is o t h e r w i s e e n g a g e d ) for a l l those w h o w a n t to be i n the I C t e a m at 6 : 0 0 p m o n M o n d a y M a r c h 5th i n the U n i o n D i n i n g H a l l . The p u r p o s e o f t h i s is t o p i c k a t e a m w i t h k n o w l e d g e o f as w i d e a r a n g e o f s u b j e c t s as p o s s i b l e . S o t h e m o r e p e o p l e w h o p u t t h e i r n a m e s d o w n the better. N a m e s to J e n . More Deadlines R e m e m b e r that manifestos for the S a b b a t i c a l E l e c t i o n s h a v e t o b e i n b y M o n d a y 2 6 t h F e b r u a r y . F o r d e t a i l s see t h e E d i t o r i a l i n issue 5 0 7 . W h e n y o u h a n d i n y o u r m a n i f e s t o , r e m e m b e r t o s t a t e w h i c h issue ( 2 n d o r 9 t h M a r c h ) y o u w a n t it t o appear in. Adverts Advertisements larger than a S m a l l A d . will o n l y b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a t i o n i f t h e r e a d y p a s t e d - u p a r t w o r k is s u p p l i e d . T h e y w i l l b e i n c l u d e d o n l y i f s p a c e is a v a i l a b l e a n d m a y b e s u b j e c t t o e n l a r g e m e n t o r r e d u c t i o n . I f y o u a r e u n s u r e as to w h a t is r e q u i r e d t h e n c o m e a n d see m e . P a s t e - u p sheets w i t h s t a n d a r d sizes r e a d y - p r i n t e d a r e a v a i l a b l e f r o m t h e F E L I X Office. A n y o n e w a n t i n g a full page A d . o r a large s p r e a d for t h e i r c l u b / s o c i e t y s h o u l d see m e a w e e k a h e a d o f t h e n o r m a l d e a d l i n e .

DOUGHNUT DISECTION Its not often I get the chance to eat a d o u g h n u t . In fact I don't r e c a l l d e v o u r i n g a single one since I a r r i v e d at college.

John

SMALL ADS I FOR S A L E L e s P a u l C o p y . B r a n d new. Natural grain finish. Excellent c o n d i t i o n , "v. g o o d action. U n r e p e a t a b l e offer 44.95 p o u n d s o.n.o. (includes g o o d quality case). Practica SLR camera. West G e r m a n , only six months o l d . Ideal for e n t h u s i a s t i c beginner. 39.95 p o u n d s o.n.o. (includes hard c a s e a n d carry strap). Contact: Paul Johnson, Elec Eng WANTED S t r o n g helpers to assist a wheel-l c h a i r b o u n d film critic to attend press previews of new films on week-day afternoons. Reward-free viewing of new films a n d a possibility of food, etc. at press receptions. Transport p r o v i d e d . F o r further information Contact: Dave Shuker.Chem P G , (int. 4126). FOR S A L E M i n i 850, very reliable. M O T J u n e , T a x May. 250 p o u n d s o.n.o. Contact: A. Baynam, Physics 3

WANTED Editor, for ' D e b s o c B o o k of Refusals'. M u s t be p r e p a r e d to handle large volumes of c o r r e s p o n d e n c e - f u r t h e r details at Debsoc events. (Bring your Editorial Staff a l o n g too). P e r k s i n c l u d e o n e pair k n i c k e r s in the U n i o n Bar. (Don't Contact: J.M. Berry) WANTED C o p y of N e w S c i e n t i s t N o . 1139. Contact: D. Trevor-Jones, Centre for Environmental Technology. WANTED O n e S m a l l A d . N e e d not be too specific, but s h o u l d be just over one i n c h in length, preferably set on C o m p . Set 550 (orsimilar) with line length of 10 06, in M e g a r o n style, 8pt o n 9pt. A l s o wanted, a space-filler m o r e blatant (but less c o n s p i c u o u s ) than this one. Contact: John Harris, FELIX Office, before 9:00am T h u r s d a y 22nd. February.

I.C.W.A:

Yes, I was s h o c k e d at the p r i c e , b u t it was w o r t h it. A n y h o w this a r t i c l e is not about value for m o n e y . U p o n sitting d o w n w i t h the b e a u t y b e g g i n g o n a plate i n f r o n t of m e , I was r e m i n d e d of the d i s e c t i o n p r o b l e m .

EASTER

BALL

" W h a t ' s the m a x i m u m n u m b e r of pieces y o u c a n get w i t h three simultaneous cuts t h r o u g h one d o u g h n u t ? " I h a d vague memories of the s o l ut i on but was not c e r t a i n . I closed m y eyes a n d tried to p i c t u r e it but the p r o b l e m gave me a headache so I gave u p for a short w h i l e .

FRIDAY MARCH 2nd

T h e n I hit o n the idea of a c t u a l l y t r y i n g out the cuts o n a real d o u g h n u t , so I p u r c h a s e d a couple to b r i n g back w i t h me for this purpose. O b t a i n i n g the full set of pieces was not easy. After f i n d i n g that reasonably p r e d i c t a b l e cuts c o u l d be m a d e w i t h e m b e d d e d toothpicks as guides, I m a d e m y first full-scale section, o n l y to discover that no trace of two of the s m a l l er pieces c o u l d be f o u n d . ( T h e r e were plenty of c r u m b s , but I suppose they d o n ' t count.) It t u r n e d out that the r e q u i r e m e n t that three planes be cut t h r o u g h a d o u g h n u t necessitates not o n l y care i n c u t t i n g but very t h o r o u g h p r o v i s i o n against m o v e m e n t u n d e r pressure as successive cuts are m a d e . O n m y final d o u g h n u t , using steel skewers instead of toothpicks, I a c h i e v e d complete success a n d o b t a i n e d more pieces t h a n I s h o u l d but this was due to the fact that the hole was not very r o u n d . A very t h i n h u l u - h o o p - s h a p e d d o u g h n u t m i g h t m a k e c u t t i n g easier but I have not seen a n y o n sale, so this theory m i g h t be difficult to explore. John Shuttleworth

CARBARET DISCO BAR EXTENSION Tickets now available f r o m : I.C. Union Office I.C.W.A. Reps.


Page 4

WHAT'S O N I F R I D A Y 23rd February GIG A F T E R T H E FIRE plus 64 spoons - 8.00 pm. U n i o n C o n c e r t Hall. 75 p. I.C. A d v a n c e 1.00 p o u n d Door. FILM I.C. F I L M S O C - presents P r i s o n e r of S e c o n d Avenue. 220. M e m b e r s Free. N o n - m e m b e r s 20 p.

7.00 p.m. M.E.

MISCELLANEOUS T H E O P T I C S F I L M - (1 h o u r 15 minutes duration). 1.30 p.m. LectureTheatre 1, Blackett. Free. T h e e n o r m o u s l y s u c c e s s f u l c o m e d y film made by O p t i c s Postgraduates for last year's O p t i c s D i a m o n d J u b i l e e celebrations. T h e essential film for all those w h o w o nder what it is really like to do research. What goes on in a P h D e x a m ? Why is the B l a c k and D e c k e r splattered with b l o o d ? W h i c h lecturer wears plastic bin liners? Everyone very w e l c o m e .

S U N D A Y 25th February MISCELLANEOUS G U I L D S S O C C E R S I X E S - F o r more details contact C a n d G U n i o n Office. L O N D O N C O L L E G E ' S J U D O T O U R N A M E N T - 11.00. Great Hall. S p e c t a t o r s w e l c o m e . A d m i s s i o n Free. M O N D A Y 26th February CLUB ACIVITY L A T I N A M E R I C A N W E E K - 12.45 p.m. Lecture Theatre 1, C h e m . Eng. Dept. Talk about Venezuela. E X P L O R A T I O N S O C I E T Y M E E T I N G - 6 p m . Botany - Zool ogy C o m m o n R o o m . " T h e R o y a l G e o g r a p h i c a l Soci ety G u o n g - Mulu E x p e d i t i o n " C l i v e J e r m y , Botanist, British M u s e u m (Natural History); Sc i e nt i f ic C o - o r d i n a t o r of the E x p e d i t i o n . This is the R G S ' s largest,! longest, most productive a n d most diverse expedition. C O M M U N I S T S O C I E T Y M E E T I N G - on "SILICON CHIPS - The" S o c i o l o g i c a l implications of their w i d e s p r e a d use". 6.30 pm. ICWA Lounge, Union. A l l welcome. MISCELLANEOUS I.C. P H O T S O C S H O P - 12.45 - 1.15 p.m. Linstead Hall. R o o m 211. " T U E S D A Y 27th February C L U B ACTIVITY LATIN A M E R I C A N W E E K - 12.45 p m . L e c t u r e Theatre 1, C h e m . Eng. Dept. 20 p. F i l m : " T h e most painful h o u r " (Chile) I.C. C H E M . S O C . - A talk by Dr. B . J . Tighe. 5.30 p.m. Chemistry Theatre " C " . Subject - " B i o m e d i c a l P o l y m e r s " P A R A C H U T I N G C O U R S E - 6 . 3 0 - 9 . 3 0 p m . U n i o n Lower Refectory. 33 pounds for beginners. Free if y o u trained but did not jump last year. Contact J o A r m i t a g e (C a n d G U o r Elec. E n g . 2) for details. R A I L S O C T A L K - Mr. V. G o l d b e r g o n ' A m e r i c a n Railways'. 17.40. Mech. E n g . 640. Everyone w e l c o m e . M O P S O C L E C T U R E - by Prof. N . C . W i c k r a m a s i n g e (University of Cardiff) "Extraterrestrial O r i g i n s of Life". 1.15 p.m. P h y s i c s L.T.I. N A T U R A L H I S T O R Y S O C I E T Y L E C T U R E - " M a l a r i a " by Dr. Bannister. 5.30 p m . B o t a n y S e m i n a r R o o m , 2 n d floor. Free tea and biscuits. G O C L U B - weekly meeting. 7 p.m. S o u t h s i d e Upper Lounge. Free to Members. RIDING C L U B - Information, B o o k i n g s a n d U L U Riding C l u b News. 13.00- 14.00. Electrical E n g i n e e r i n g Dept. R o o m 1110. Level II. A l l welcome. I.C. P H O T O G R A P H I C S O C I E T Y - Portrait L i g h t i n g - W.H. C h a d w i c k A practical demo. 7.00 p.m. Quiet R o o m Sherfield B u i l d i n g . MISCELLANEOUS I.C. U N I O N G E N E R A L M E E T I N G - 1.30 p m . Great Hall. Motions on Cannabis, G a y Rights, U n i o n P o l i c y a n d T y r a n i c a l C l o c k s . " M O T O R B I K E C L U B " - I.C. C i u b s a n d Societies Programme, Stoic T r a n s m i s s i o n . 13.00. J C R , U n i o n , S o u t h s i d e Halls (Except Tizard ) S o u t h s i d e L o w e r T.V. L o u n g e . A S S O C I A T E D S T U D I E S E V E N T - 1.30 p m . Lecture Theatre 1 C h e m i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g . E n g i n e e r i n g in the A n c i e n t World. 2. Roman Civil Engineering. Dr. N o r m a n Smith, History of Science and T e c h n o l o g y Department, Imperial College. A S S O C I A T E D S T U D I E S E V E N T - 1.30 p.m. Re a d Theatre, Sherfield Building. The E d w a r d i a n Style. 3. T h e E d w a r d i a n Writer - H.G. Wells Don Jacobson, University College. W E D N E S D A Y 28th February C L U B ACTIVITY LATIN A M E R I C A N W E E K - 12.45 p.m. Lecture Theatre 1, C h e m E n g Dept. Talk about A c a d e m i c S i t u a t i o n in Latin A m e r i c a (speaker: WUS). LATIN A M E R I C A N W E E K - 18.30. Lecture Theatre 1. C h e m . E n g . Dept. 20 p. Film: "The D o u b l e Day" (Latin A m e r i c a n Women's Situation) W O M E N IN S C I E N C E A N D T E C H N O L O G Y - 12.30p.m. I C W A L o u n q p Judith Walker, First ICU Woman President, will speak to the group. TENPIN B O W L I N G - Meet 2.30 in entrance to A e r o (opp. U n i o n Arch). Minibus to T o l w o r t h . H a n d i c a p singles c o m p e t i t i o n : 1st week. RADIO S O C I E T Y M E E T I N G - 2.15 p.m. R.S.M. 1.47. Talk by David Chapman (G3NGK): " P o l i c e Radio Systems". Non-members welcome.

T H U R S D A Y 1st M a r c h FILM E N T S F I L M - T h e E n f o r c e r (Cert X). 6.30 p.m. M e c h . E n g . 220. 3 0 p. Clint E a s t w o o d . A s Harry C a l l a h a n . C L U B ACTIVITY L A T I N A M E R I C A N W E E K - 12.45 p.m. Lecture Theatre 1, C h e m . E n g . Dept. Talk about C e n t r a l A m e r i c a . Speaker: H u g h O ' S h a u g n e s s y . P A R A C H U T I N G C O U R S E - 6.30 - 9.30 p.m. U n i o n D i n i n g Hall. 33 p o u n d s for beginners. Free if y o u trained but did not jump last year. C o n t a c t J o A r m i t a g e (C a n d G U or Elec. E n g . 2) for details. M O P S O C L E C T U R E - by Prof. E . H . Bellamy. (Westfield College/Cern) "Structure of Elementary Particles". 1.15 p.m. P h y s i c s L.T. I. MISCELLANEOUS G U I L D S M O T O R C L U B - E c o n o - R u n . For more details contact C and G U n i o n Office. S H E Y N E L U C O C K E L E C T I O N M E E T I N G - 1 p m . Maths 340 (Huxley Building). A l l welcome. " L U N C H B R E A K " S T O I C T R A N S M I S S I O N - 13.00 and 18.00 (except J C R ) J C R , U n i o n . S o u t h s i d e Halls (Except Tizard) S o u t h s i d e Lower T V Lounge. I.C. P H O T S O C S H O P - 12.45 - 1.15. Linstead Hall. R o o m 532. A S S O C I A T E D S T U D I E S E V E N T - 1.30 p.m. Re a d Theatre, Sherfield B u i l d i n g . C o n v e r s i o n - P s y c h o l o g i c a l o r S p i r i t u a l ? Dr. David B o o t h . Reader in P h y s i o l o g i c a l P s y c h o l o g y , B i r m i n g h a m , (arranged by IC Christian Union). A S S O C I A T E D S T U D I E S E V E N T - 1.30 p.m. T h e Great Hall, Sherfield B u i l d i n g . F i l m : T h e Life that Lives o n M a n ( B B C Horizon). A S S O C I A T E D S T U D I E S E V E N T - 1.30 p.m. T h e M u s i c R o o m , 5 3 Prince's G a t e . L u n c h - h o u r concert G e r a l d T o l a n (Guitar).

Social Cultural and Amusements Board

SCAB

E N T S C o n c e r t . "After the F i r e " and "64 s p o o n s " . C o n c e r t Hall. A d m i s s i o n 75 p.

8.00 in the U n i o n

MONDAY F O L K C L U B E V E N I N G O U T . S e e C o m m i t t e e M e m b e r for Details of Venue a n d Starting Time. J A Z Z C L U B present their G u e s t s " M a r y C o n n and T h e M e r c h a n t s " , an unusual J a z z R o c k B a n d . In Stans B a r 8.30 - 11.00, a d m i s s i o n free. THURSDAY T H E E N T S F I L M , " T h e E n c o r c e r " 6.30 p.m. in M e c h . E n g . 220. A d m i s s i o n 30 p. I.C. S Y M P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A C O N C E R T . Frank - Le C h a s s e u r Maudit. B a r b e r - C e l l o C o n c e r t o O P 2 2 . Beethoven - S y m p h o n y N o. 5. 8.00 p.m. in the Great Hall. A d m i s s i o n 50 p. Tickets o n d o o r o r from members.

FRIDAY THE ENTS DISCO.


Page 5 ' c o n t d . from page 2 machine, poisoned slowly to death whilst the outer layer o f my skin is b u r n e d off over a period of. more than a n hour, or dragged out into the open, to have m y head p u l l e d off immediately to stop me c r y i n g , a n d tossed into a bucket along w i t h a n u m b e r o f other dead heads a n d bodies, I think I w o u l d have quite strong feelings o n the matter. T h e only difference is that I w o u l d n ' t be able to shout out, hit back, 'phone the police o r write to m y M . P . A n d that is what we - an allegedly civilised society - are takingadvantage of. T h e same article goes on to say "it should he the right of the woman to terminate her pregnancy, as it is the woman whose life is directly affected. " W h a t piffle! Y o u mean it is the convenience of the w o m a n that is affected; the only person whose Hie is affected is the c h i l d ' s - his right to life is being w i t h d r a w n . W h y should a parent be given the right to kill a c h i l d because o f convenience?? It's not the c h i l d ' : fault - the mother a n d father chose to take the risk. O f course,you do not like the term c h i l d , you prefer "foetus" because that makes people think the t h i n g i n the w o m b is something vastly different. But are you aware that by the time most abortions take place the foetus is almost identical to a new b o r n c h i l d except i n m i n o r details e.g. eyelashes (as mentioned above) a n d size? T h e last bit o f b l i n d abortionist p r o p a g a n d a was t h r o w n at us last

week by o u r ' "enlightened" president, w h o implies that it is disgusting for anyone to interfere w i t h a woman's right to kill her o w n u n b o r n c h i l d r e n . She savs that a w o m a n should not be made to support a child during pregnancy against her w i l l . Is M s . A t t e n b o r o u g h aware that we can easily use the same argument to say that affluent people should not be forced to support the poor or even be m a d e to pay to keep the old, the sick a n d the h a n d i c a p p e d from starvation. M o r e so i n this case, as it is not the fault of the taxpayer that others are in need. But i n a civilised country we a l l accept the need to make sacrifices for the benefit of others who arc in need. I n the same w a y . it is i n c o m p a t i b l e w i t h a n y civilised society to a l l o w a w o m a n to kill her children because of convenience. I w o u l d like the readers finally to consider the following extract from Doctor J O Willke's "Handbook on Abortion". " F o r two m i l l e n i u m i n o u r western culture, specifically protected by our laws, a n d deeply i m p r i n t e d into the hearts of a l l m e n has existed the absolute value of h o n o r i n g a n d protecting the right of each person to live. T h i s has been an inalienable, and u n e q u i v o c a l right. T h e only exceptions have been that of b a l a n c i n g a life for a life in certain situations o r b y d u e process o f l aw. O u r n e w permissive aborti on laws represent a complete about-

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TRIPS

t-4 march '79

6

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'KU13U '© IHI DUI1IU1 3Uim uuuoauu - KflU3aUOU IXC TOURS IXD. 18 RUPERT ST. lOADOn Ul.l. UI.OI 4S4 1306

face, a total rejection ol one of the core values o f western m a n , a n d an acceptance of a new ethic i n w h i c h life has only a relative value. N o longer w i l l every h u m a n have an absolute right to live simple because he exists. M a n w i l l now be allowed to exist only if he measures u p to certain standards of independence, p h y s i c a l perfection, o r u t i l i t a r i a n usefulness to others. T h i s is a momentous change that strikes at the root o f western c i v i l i z a t i o n . It makes no difference to vaguely assume that h u m a n life is more h u m a n post-born than preborn. W h a t is c r i t i c a l is to judge it to be, o r not to be, h u m a n life. B y a measure of " m o r e " o r " l e s s " h u m a n , one r a n easily a n d logically justify infanticide a n d euthanasia. B y the measure of economic and/ or social usefulness, the ghastly atrocities o f

i H i t l e r i a n mass m u r d e r s came to be. O n e cannot help b u t be reminded o f the anguished c o m m e n t of a c o n d e m n e d N a z i j u d g e w h o said to a n A m e r i c a n j u d g e after the N u r e m b u r g trials: " I never knew it w o u l d come to this." T h e American judge answered simply: " I t came to this the first time y o u c o n d e m n e d a n innocent l i f e . " T h e inescapable fact is that, of the a p p e a l i n g regardless slogans of " a woman's right to choose" o r the misleading talk of "foetus" o r " t e r m i n a t i o n of pregnancy" or whatever, a b o r t i o n i s m is a l l bout killing, the unjust ifyable slaughter of innocent, defenceless c h i l d r e n i n the interests o f people who b y their o w n voluntary actions have created the c h i l d in the first place. Barry Austin

THIRD WORLD FIRST Third World First works mainly with students, explaining and campaigning against the causes that lie behind world hunger, economic exploitation, and violations of human rights. Their aims are "to p u b l i c i s e t h e facts of international poverty: to support the g r o w i n g efforts of the poor to o r g a n i s e together to c o m b a t poverty a n d d e c i d e their o w n path of development; and to e x p o s e a n d o p p o s e the interests of the rich and powerful who stand in their way". It all s o u n d s very red-blooded stuff, buy they do really undertake a lot o f very worthwhile work. T h e following are t w o examples of the work o f T h i r d World First (3W1). Argentina "We shall kill as many as necessary to restore o r d e r " - s o said G e n e r a l V i d e l a in November 1975. S i n c e M a r c h 24th 1976, w h e n the military took power, he has carried out his threat. T h o u s a n d s of p e o p l e have been killed a n d i m p r i s o n e d , and 15,000 have s i m p l y 'disappeared'. S u c h repression, w h i c h the J u n t a must carry out if it is to ' s u c c e e d in its e c o n o m i c policies, has meant a drastic fall in living standards for the vast majority of Argentines, and the destruction of all o r g a n i s e d o p p o s i t i o n - whether trades unions , student o r g a n i sations, o r political parties. 3W1 is c a m p a i g n i n g to a d d Britain's v o i c e to the g r o w i n g international c o n d e m n a t i o n of t h e gross v i o l a t i o n s of h u m a n a n d d e m o c r a t i c rights in A r g e n t i n a , and c a l l i n g for: the i m p l e m e n tation of a visa p r o g r a m m e for political prisoners by the British government, a n e n d to a i d from international agencies, and a halt to the arms trade between Britain and A r g e n t i n a . Higher Education and Development M a n y students are c o n c e r n e d about the problems of underde velopment in the T h i r d W o r l d :

u n e m p l o y m e n t , extreme poverty, exploitation o f labour, etc. B u t the desire to 'do s o m e t h i n g about it' often ignores t h e fact that their own college, w h i c h s o liberally allows the time a n d r e s o u r c e s to carry o u t s u c h action, is itself helping to perpetutate i n e q u a l ities in t h e T h i r d W o r l d a n d in Britain. 3W1 h a s already b e g u n s o m e research a n d action o n these issues, and some preliminary talking points i n c l u d e : - W h o funds military and other research i n colleges, a n d w h y ? W h y is s o little money spent on research into alternative t e c h n o l o g y ? W h y the lack of activity in the student movement on international issues? Why does t h e N U S o n l y have policy on C h i l e and S o u t h Africa? If y o u w o u l d like to know more about T h i r d World First, then contact me via the U n i o n Office. Sheyne Lucock

Y O U R H E L P IS STILL N E E D E D A s l s a i d i n F E L I X a few weeks ago. if our Tuition Fee C a m p a i g n fails it will be more due to student apathy than the strength or otherwise of o u r case. T h e c h a n c e s are that most people reading this will not be affected by the fee increases, because y o u r fees are paid by s o m e o n e I else. B u t spare a thought, if y o u will, to those of y o u r colleagues, w h o I may well suffer financial hardship as a result. W e still urgently n e e d p e o p l e to take part in the lobby-a-day and the s p e a k - i n . T h e latter is at S p e a k e r s ' C o r n e r this Sunday (25th Feb.), so please c o m e along a n d take part - (we've prepared a set s p e e c h to read) - especially if y o u c a n s p e a k a foreign language. Ideally, p o p into the U n i o n Office a n d s e e J e n today, but if not, just c o m e along o n S u n d a y - any time. Sheyne Lucock External Affairs Officer


Page 6

SPONSORED 24 H O U R WALL-WASH

NER-A-CAR...BUT N O T FAR F R O M A

BIKE!

While the minds of almost everyone else in College were turned to romance (and all that that entails!) on Valentine's Day the members of I.C. Rugby Club had their minds on other dirty things - i.e. washing the walls in the Union Building. So at noon we all gathered to begin the ghastly ordeal and trooped up to the Table Tennis room. With just twenty minutes gone Ray Parkinson showed all his skill as a cleaner when he came down his ladder surveying the good work only to step straight into a bucket of detergent. So now we know he has at least one clean sock! After this things went relatively smoothly and we were making an excellent impression on the walls with our detergent and acetone for the graffiti and dirtier spots. Now a note for all those who scribble on walls. For future scribbling do not use indelible felt tip markers (unless if s green as this appears to come off more easily) - but stick to normal ink or pencil! good O n e gets a fairly impression of peoples' extreme political views while doing things like this and notices such as "Down with the fascist regime of the Shah" and "No to NF" seemed particularly prevalent. If these people spent more time airing their views through the usual channels rather than wasting our time and their felt tip ink everything would have been easier for us. (No political comment is intended here and the above notices are only examples!). Rather than give a wall to wall account of each room in the building I will just mention two that were of particular interest. During Wednesday evening we tackled the Union Refectory and were amazed at the grime on the walls. I just hope everybody appreciates how much cleaner it is now - and if they don't we have left an uncleaned square on one wall to illustrate just what it was like originally. The most amusing event came at about 2 am in the gym. Steve Townsend had placed himself precariously on top of the basketball nets to clean high up

and someone removed his ladder (the only way down). Then everyone proceeded to chuck sopping wet rags at him - and even a bucket of water! Needless to say when he finally jumped down he found a bucket and drenched both Robin Davies and Ronnie Howard! And so at noon the next day the saga finished and we surveyed the clean walls - a job well done we thought. It is too early yet to say how much we raised but it should be quite a tidy amount. Our reason for a wall-wash? We wanted to do something original and this was certainly that. All t h o s e who use the U n i o n Buildings will benefit as well as the Rag Collection, to which half the proceeds will be given. The rest is going to help pay for the rugby club Easter Tour. So at the end of the day this was a really successful event enjoyed by all those who took part. Thanks to the members of the club and to Ray Parkinson for arranging it. "Turnip"

In 1925 a m e r e (?) ÂŁ60 w o u l d have b o u g h t y o u a m o d e l ' C N e r a - C a r , p i c t u r e d above, " S o w h a t ? " ' ! h e a r y o u c r y , a l r i g h t t h e n m u m b l e . W e l l i n 1979 G u i l d s have been g i v e n one, tax free! It's not q u i t e i n the same c o n d i t i o n as the one i n the p h o t o , i n fact it's i n a c o u p l e o f h u n d r e d bits, ( a n y b o d y seen C l e m , a n d Jez.?) but it w i l l be back o n the r o a d by the t u r n o f the c e n t u r y , G o d w i l l i n g . It has been d o r m a n t for several years since it h a d a front e n d smash. It was rescued by R o g e r Serpell, w h o i n t e n d e d to restore it but never f o u n d the time, w h o has n o w given it to us. O n l y about a d o z e n N e r - a - C a r s still exist, four of w h i c h are m o d e l ' C , o n l y one of these four is r u n n i n g . W h a t the p r e s s s a i d : T h e C l a r i o n : "In the model 'C .Ner-a-Car the Sheffield Simplex Company have produced something which will give all the speed a sane man can desire, plus the riding comfort and safety which make the Ner-a-Car famous. The new Blackburne engined Ner-a-Car is probably the finest example of two wheeled comfort in the world." P o w e r e d by a B l a c k b u r n e 350 c.c. side v al ve engine, w i t h a S t u r m e y A r c h e r 3-speed gearbox, the N e r - a - C a r has a l l the usual features o f a V i n t a g e m o t o r c y c l e ; acetylene l i g h t i n g , throttle lever instead o f throttle g r i p , h a n d gear change, total loss o i l system a n d n o rear suspension. B u t the real o d d i t y of the N e r - a - C a r is the hub- st eeri ng system ( W a l l i s are the o n l y other f i r m that has p r o d u c e d H u b - s t e e r e d r o a d machines). T h i s hub-steering a n d the chassis instead o f a frame give the design it's name. T h e design speed o f the m o d e l ' C was 55 m p h . a n d at speeds like that it is best to bear i n m i n d the fact that b o t h foot a n d h a n d brakes operate on the rear wheel only. W h a t the O w n e r s

said!

"It gives me great pleasure to express my satisfaction with your Blackburne engined model 'C. I took the machine on a holiday run to Edinburgh and back. Il climbed everything in top gear and the cost for oil and petrol was 11 llOd. I had no occasion to open my tool bag or make any adjustment whatever, and on wet roads and tram lines the model 'C" is quite as safe as your earlier models, and the extra weight is hardly noticeable. After three years of riding on .Ner-a-Cars I consider your model 'C absolutely it". T h i s bike w i t h its foot w i d e m u d g u a r d a n d totally enclosed transmission was a i m e d at sales to the u p p e r classes, a m o n g the riders of N e r - a - C a r s were the E a r l o f H a d d i n g t o n , the E a r l o f F i t z w i l l i a m , the E a r l o f Bective a n d the Duchess o f M a r l b o r o u g h .

Use I.C.RADIO in your election Campaign if

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T h e N e r - a - C a r was p r o d u c e d by the Sheffield S i m p l e x C o . , C a n b u r y P a r k R o a d , K i n g s t o n o n T h a m e s f r o m 1919 to 1926 w h e n the firm s u d d e n l y closed d o w n . P e r h a p s there weren't e n o u g h E a r l s to go r o u n d . Andy Rushton

DEBATE O N STOIC Those of you who missed the showing on STOIC, of the Programme on Debating Society with scenes of violent discussion from the d e b a t e on " T h e Campaign for Homosexual Equality", please read on. The speakers for the motion that "The House Supported" the campaign were Bob Rigby and Roy Burns. They stressed the circumstances of the oppression of Gays and the aims of the campaign. Speaking against the motion Were Shlomo Godsi and Dave

Haddon. Dave quoted from the good book, though he denied that he believed in God, just the Bible! The speeches provoked further discussion from the floor to prove that the crowds weren't just there because of the camera. After a summing up speech from Shlomo and Roy, the camera and crew left for the safety of the S.T.O.I.C. Studio. The campaign has proved it had overwhelming support. John Shuttleworth Publicity Officer


Page 7

Day By

Day

3UND-UP OF LAST W E E K ' S NEW

Wednesday 14th

consultation "for the purpose of removing that threat and taking appropriate effective measures to ensure the peace and security of their countries".

Friday 16th

U.S. Diplomats attacked

Generals executed in Iran

Third World War forecast

American prestige in Iran and Afghanistan suffered setbacks when American embassies were attacked. In Teheran, the embassy was ransacked by Marxist guerrillas and its occupants were rescued by militia loyal to the Ayatollah Khomeini. The American Ambassador to Afghanistan died when security forces stormed a hotel room where he was being held by a terrorist gang demanding the release of prisoners held by the pro-Moscow regime.

Six men, five of them generals, were executed after trials by Islamic courts in Iran. At least 20 other people have been condemned to death, and many more people face trial.

Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the Russian author who is living in exile in the USA, forecast that a third world war will begin. He blamed both R u s s i a n and Western statesmen.

Concordat team set up

He said, "We are clearly moving towards a world war, yet Western Statesmen deceive that we are moving towards themselves detente."

Maudling dies Reginald Maudling died from kidney failure and haemhorrages. Mrs. Thatcher, in a personal tribute said he "brought to politics one of the most brilliant minds of his generation". Mr. Callaghan said: "He never bore malice and he was always ready to think well of his opponents as well as to defend his friends." W H Smith ban Thorpe hearing book W H S m i t h ; the newsagents and booksellers, has banned the paperback, "The Thorpe Committal", for "legal reasons". A spokesman said, "In the opinion of our legal advisers the book is calculated to prejudice a fair trial."

Thursday 15th Russian students protest over sex rules A recent issue of the Soviet Union's Young Communist League newspaper publishes a lament for the love-Mfe of Russian students.

A small group of senior ministers will have the job of making the concordat between the labour party and the unions more than just a document. It consists of the Chancellor, Mr. Healey; Mr. Foot, Leader of the house, and three other ministers. Blessing saves ex-MP A former Conservative MP "arrested" by Transkei security police said a last prayer and blessed his captors, who said they were going to shoot him. Mr. Humphrey Berkeley said his would-be assassins thought he had cast a spell over them and they fled!

Saturday 17th Ireland beat England at rugby The final score was Ireland 12 pts, England 7 pts. The game, played at Lansdowne Road, Dublin, lacked excitement. Ireland's captain, Fergus Slattery said he was never alarmed when England were in possession. They were not, he stated with chilling truth, dangerous. England have only taken I pt. from their last two games and lie fourth in the International Table. Wales just lose against France France 14 pts, Wales 13 pts was the final score. The difference of only 1 pt could have been much greater because France outplayed Wales but made hard work of capitalising on their advantage. Wales stay top of International Table with 4 pts from 3 games.

A British post-graduate student said, "It just seems more immoral because of the lack of privacy." She had her own room at her hostel in England but at a Russian provincial university she shared with three other girls, whose boy friends usually stayed the night.

Birmingham student wins National CycloCross Chris Wreghitt retained his National Open C y c l o - C r o s s C h a m p i o n s h i p at Sutton Coldfield. 100 competitors had to cope with snow-covered and iced-up -slopes of Sutton Park.

Sunday 18th

Tutankhamun, the Boy King, the most celebrated former resident of Thebes and the Valley of Kings, has inspired a giant shopping spree by his admirers in New York. Americans admit to spending more time at a Tutankhamun gift shop that at the exhibition that has been staged at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The sale of official Tut reproductions has grossed 7 million pounds profits which will be sent to the Cairo Museum and other beneficiaries.

China

to

withdraw

Monday 19th The fighting between China and Vietnam threatened to delay the sale of British Harrier jump jets to Peking as part of a trade package deal. Mr. Callaghan faced Left-wing pressure not to sell the Harriers. Duke leaves 500 million fortune The fifth Duke of Westminster, whose family fortune, estimated at 500 million pounds, probably ranks second only to that of the Queen, died peacefully today. The new Duke, Earl Grosvenor, spoke of his responsibilities for the estates which include Belgravia and Mayfair. Although he is only 27 he has already controlled much of the family wealth. Student Union funding talks open today The Government wants student unions to be more directly accountable for the 14 million pounds spent on them out of ratepayers' and taxpayers' money. They want to see a system introduced, under which a minimum per capita fee of 15 - 20 pounds would be paid to institutions by local authorities. The universities and colleges would have to negotiate any extra amount with students.

Tuesday 20th China prepared for Russian border attacks

Tutamania hits North America Russia warns Vietnam

Fixture chaos due to the postponement of hundreds of football matches has prompted the FA to consider the idea of a March to November season. Cricket and other summer games will vigorously campaign against further encroachment on their calendar by soccer.

Sale of British Harriers to China delayed

Soviet universities abound with oldfashioned regulations, including hostel room inspections. Married girls at a hostel in Rostov University could invite their husbands to their rooms, but only for an hour a day, and never during the night. Western students attending universities in the Soviet Union say most of them are just as permissive as in the West, and that the rules are usually ignored.

Western students speak of the warmth and camaraderie of Russian student life, and to the survival of love in a cold and bureaucratic climate.

FA consider a switch to summer soccer

from

China occupied border towns in Vietnam in what Peking called "a limited punitive act" to avenge the Hanoi 'atrocities'. The Kremlin warned China to withdraw its forces from Vietnam or face the consequences. The Soviet Union said it would honour its treaty of friendship with Hanoi. The treaty commits the two countries "In the case of attack or the threat of attack" to immediate

Chinese officials told foreigners at a briefing that Soviet reaction to the conflict in Vietnam might range from threats to attacks across the border. He also said that the "limited" combat with the Vietnamese would end very soon. No premium bond draw as Ernie strikes Weekly and monthly premium bond prize draws will be halted by an indefinite strike of 60 Civil service Computer operators at Lytham St. Anne's Lanes. The strike begins on February 23rd.


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iPage 9

DISCRETIONT h e Better P a r t of? M o s t B r i t i s h IC students p r o b a b l y t h i n k that t h e i r m a n d a t o r y grant a w a r d f r o m their local education authority ( L E A ) is c e r t a i n ; a n d that at the s t a r t o f e a c h t e r m (and, m o r e u s u a l l y , later) a cheque w i l l a p p e a r i n Sherfield. G e n e r a l l y , this is the case. H o w e v e r m a n y are liable to be subject to the " d i s c r e t i o n " o f t h e i r L E A , often l e a d i n g to hassles, p a r t i c u l a r l y financial. T h e most c o m m o n occurrence of discretionary awards for I C students is for those w h o have to retake a year. T h e recent t i g h t e n i n g of p u b l i c finances has meant that it is n o w even more difficult to o b t a i n L E A b a c k i n g for a retake year, w i t h the result that m a n y have to beg finance from parents, work t h r o u g h their course, or even d r o p out. O f course, L E A finance for r e t a k i n g is subject to College a c a d e m i c reports, but there are some who are considered suitable by the College, but are u n a b l e to r e t u r n due to lack of money. T h e other major victims at I C of the discretion of L E A s are those whose homes are i n the L o n d o n area, but w h o prefer to live away from home. I n such cases, w h e n the L E A considers that a student c o u l d reasonably c o m m u t e from home every day, only a home grant is a w a r d e d . S u c h a decision is " a t the d i s c r e t i o n " of the L E A a n d is based u p o n their o p i n i o n of the p a r t i c u l a r circumstances. O f course, their interpretation of the situation m a y be w r o n g so, i f you are one of those affected, it is well w o r t h getting i n t o u c h w i t h y o u r L o c a l E d u c a t i o n Officer. T h e D E S has a d m i t t e d that i n 1977-78 local authorities underspent their budgets on discretionary awards by ÂŁ23 m i l l i o n . If y o u h o l d a discretionary a w a r d a n d are u n h a p p y about the decision, it is w o r t h c h e c k i n g whether y o u r L E A underspent last year. If so, it w i l l a d d weight to y o u r a r g u m e n t . T h e next step is to write to y o u r L o c a l E d u c a t i o n Officer, a n d if this a p p r o a c h does not b r i n g satisfactory results, try y o u r l o c a l c o u n c i l l o r . It w i l l also h e l p i f y o u c o u l d let me k n o w of any grant's problems y o u m a y have a n d of w h a t progress you achieve in t r y i n g to sort t h e m out. T i m Hillyer External Affairs Committee

Election

Elk

VM Well you all came - despite a complete lack of anything erotic (excepting me of course) at the U G M on 13th Feb. It was great - it remained quorate through the whole length of the meeting. However you have not escaped yet - due to the backlog of motions that we seem to have gathered over the past term and a half, an extra U G M has been called on 27th February (Shrove Tuesday) to try and deal with all the motions left over - Cannabis, Gay Rights, Victimisation of Celts. Although I can't promise anything erotic (excluding me) I'll try to be even more erotic than usual, and display my naked kneecaps. Elections Well we're really into election fever now and to confuse you further about all the ones going on I'll say i) Dep Reps I'm not sure exactly how many departments are going to have elections for these, for at the time of writing I still haven't heard from all the Dep. Reps, but if there is an election it will take place on Monday (26th) by ballot box for the whole of the day. II) Sabbatical Officers (yes, Deputy President is now also a sabbatical)."Papers are up for this now. Need I say more? ill) Other Officers e.g. External Affairs Off., Welfare Off. etc. Papers for these posts go up on Thursday 1st March and stay up for 8 college days. The hustings and elections occur at the Results U G M on Thursday 15th March (not a college wide ballot). Well there you go, all you wanted to know about elections but were afraid to ask. So there. Pancakes (Celtic ones) On Tuesday (which you should know is Shrove Tuesday) we have the arrival ICU Exec. vs. ICWA Pancake race around the quad, which by coincidence happens to clash with theannualtesting of the fire hoses in the Union Building. I hope everybody will be there to support the glorious exec.team as it fights the ICWA oppressors. We're using Celtic pancakes this year and not vile Anglo-Saxon ones that have been used before. After the pancakes, I hope everybody comes along to the extra U G M in the Great Hall at note 1.30 pm, and fight discrimination against Gay, Cannabis - using Celts. Well folks, that's all for this week, more literary genius next week. Mel Kinkie ICU Hon. Sec.

Speakers' Corner, Academic Affairs and Stanley Kubrick or Getting Down and Getting Hon.. T h e S p r i n g t e r m is a l w a y s the b u s y t i m e for the h o l d e r o f m y post. W i t h a s t r i n g o f college a n d u n i o n c o m m i t t e e s this has c e r t a i n l y r u n g t r u e , once a g a i n .

means that these candidates are u n l i k e l y , I trust, to be rejected before a n interview. It is this shift from the emphasis o n past e x a m results a n d b a c k g r o u n d to a c a d e m i c a b i l i t y that the U n i o n is w o r k i n g for.

In this article I hope to b r i n g y o u u p to date w i t h s o m e o f the m a i n s p h e r e s o f o u r interest a n d s o m e o f the d e c i s i o n s m a d e . L a s t l y I w i l l t h e n go o n to d e s c r i b e the j o b s o f the A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s O f f i c e r s o f college.

L a t e N i g h t Stud y

Undergraduate Applicants T h e figures for u n d e r g r a d u a t e a p p l i c a n t s as of 31st J a n u a r y , show that there has been a slight fall i n the n u m b e r s of a p p l i c a n t s to R C S a n d R S M a n d a n increase i n the n u m b e r of a p p l i c a n t s to C a n d G . O f the disciplines at I C there has been n a t i o n a l l y substantial increases i n a p p l i c a t i o n s for A e r o (11%), C i v E n g (6%), E E (17%), M e c h E n g (10%), C o m p u t i n g Courses (55%), Biology (7%) a n d Physics (9%). E l i t i s m or flexible? O f major interest at a recent A d m i s s i o n s P o l i c y C o m m . m e e t i n g was a suggestion that the college sets u p a scheme as o p e r a t i n g in 5 O x f o r d Colleges for the a d m i s s i o n of Science candidates. B as i c al ly it is this. T h e I L E A w i l l pay for special t u i t i o n for a p u p i l w h o has been accepted to one of the colleges w i t h lower grades. P u p i l s for I n n e r L o n d o n Schools are chosen o n the basis of s h o w i n g scientific a c a d e m i c a b i l i t y . A f t e r a n i n t e r v i e w the colleges w i l l give some a c o n d i t i o n a l offer. T h i s c o n d i t i o n a l offer is lower t h a n the n o r m a l level of A B B at a level o f B C C . T h u s the c a n d i d a t e , even t h o u g h his school m i g h t not have the r e p u t a t i o n of getting O x b r i d g e places n o w has the incentive to work. T h i s scheme is designed to generate m o t i v a t i o n i n selected schools a n d create o p p o r t u n i t i e s for L o n d o n p u p i l s w h o are not on the r e c e i v i n g end of a n e d u c a t i o n to m a t c h their a b i l i t y . T h e c o m m i t t e e noted the t h i n k i n g b e h i n d the scheme but saw i)that two C ' s , the entry r e q u i r e m e n t i n most depts is a realistic goal for a n y o n e ii) the d a n g e r of a " s p e c i a l " a r r a n g e m e n t w i t h one area. Y e t they accepted the U n i o n ' s view that w h a t was needed was s u c h a selecting procedure a n d special c o n s i d e r a t i o n of such candidates. T h i s

F o r those w h o have f o u n d the new, earlier, c l o s i n g of the L y o n P l a y f a i r l i b r a r y i n c o n v e n i e n t - good news. F r o m n o w o n if y o u wish to study late, R o o m 327, a C o m m i t t e e R o o m i n the Sherfield B l o c k , is a v a i l a b l e for use a n y w e e k d a y between 8:30 - 10:30 p . m . H o w e v e r , I s h o u l d a d d that y o u are asked to c o m p l y w i t h t w o conditions. F i r s t l y , as you enter the Sherfield B l o c k sign i n w i t h the security g u a r d a n d be a b l e to show h i m y o u r U n i o n C a r d . S e c o n d l y , n o food o r d r i n k s h o u l d be taken into the r o o m . A Year of Academic Affairs Papers are u p a n d flying everywhere for the jobs o l T C U A c a d e m i c Affairs Officer a n d the 3 C C U A c a d e m i c Affairs Officers. A l l very, very i m p o r t a n t jobs a n d need very m u c h to be done b y people w i t h d r i v e , c o n t i n u a l c o n c e r n a n d i m a g i n a t i o n . A l l 4 c h a i r large committees, sit o n C o u n c i l a n d the supreme B o a r d of Studies. T h u s their contacts s h o u l d spread from A c a d e m i c reps, to dep reps, to U n i o n Executives, to heads of departments right to the very top. A n active A A O instills a c o n t i n u a l a d v a n c e m e n t of student interest a n d t h i n k i n g . O n the other h a n d , a person w h o just " f i l l s " the post causes a stagnation. If you t h i n k y o u have what it takes, see the current h o l d e r of the p a r t i c u l a r post. (Bob H a r t C a n d G , Steve R u a n e R C S , K e i t h B a r k e r R S M a n d myself I C ) . V e r y briefly a little about I C U A A O . I have shown it to be more t h a n just e d i t i n g the A l t e r n a t i v e Prospectus a n d d o i n g 1001 other c o n n e c t e d jobs. M u c h time is spent p r e p a r i n g for committee meetings, w r i t i n g reports a n d letters a n d t a l k i n g policy. P u t s i m p l y it's a o n e - m a n A c a d e m i c Affairs Office; w h a t y o u don't do no one else is l i k e l y to do. It needs a good w o r k i n g r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h a lot of people, a sense of b e a u r o c r a c y a n d o r g a n i s a t i o n , a lot of d e t e r m i n a t i o n , ideas, a n d a personality that allows y o u to become c o n c e r n e d about a m u l t i t u d e o f topics. D o come a n d see me, I should hate a lot of good progress this year to be wasted. Roger Stotesbury IGU Academic Affair Officer


Page 10

LOOKING BACK...

ast summer, while returning home, I travelled by ferry from Liverpool to Belfast. Not having previously booked a berth, I registered on board and waited. Eventually, I managed to obtain a berth in a four man cabin. Retiring late, I did not see my fellow cabinmates.

L

I slept soundly, except for two occasions when I was woken by the restlessness of the traveller in the bunk opposite me. Both times I rolled over and crashed into oblivion. In the morning, I exchanged cursory nods with the other three occupants and continued about my business. I went upon deck to catch a breath of fresh sewer outlet and play moving target for the seagulls. Returning to the cabin, two of the three had gone to breakfast. The third one was just finishing shaving. 'Morning,' he said. 'Hi.' 'Your first tour?' '?????' 'First tour in Ulster?' he repeated. 'Oh, no, I live there,' I said. 'Oh.' 'Your first time?' 'Yyess. I'm a bit worried about it. Ididn't get much sleep last night.' 'Well, it's never as bad as it sounds,' I said, lying through my back teeth. What could I say to him? Join the Army, see the world, be posted to Crossmaglen and enjoy the best laxative known to man? Barely eighteen he was, just past basic training. I never asked of him where he was going or who he was. Nor he of me. We chatted about the cricket results, the weather, fishing and all sorts of other trivia. We moaned about the cost and standard of Sealink breakfasts. We left the ship together. At the terminal he went to the military exit. 'Seeya,' he said. 'Good luck,' I said, as I plodded to the civilian exit. I remembered then, that I had meant to tell him about the excellent fishing country to be found in South Armagh. But then, I reckoned he would not have much time for fishing. He probably would not be anywhere near South Armagh anyway.Even if he was, he would certainly not be there to catch fish. I will never know what happened to that young private soldier. Just eighteen, built like a tank, and scared. Wouldn't you be? Going to fight a war of shadows, where you cannot shoot except under circumstances decided by your Commanding Officer, where every smile may conceal a gun or knife, where every car might explode without warning, where just doing your job makes you a likeliertarget for a sniper's bullet. Wouldn't you be scared? And frustrated? here is a saying that when Terence O'Neill (Prime Minister of Northern Ireland during the sixties) attended society functions in England during his p r e m i e r s h i p and was i n t r o d u c e d , a diplomatic 'Who?' was the first reaction. On reply to this the next comment was 'Where?' Of course, that type of reaction may have been due solely to the man that Terence O'Neill was; however I am not so sure.

T

Until the current speight of unrest, the government of Northern Ireland was of little concern to Westminster.Parliament had little say in the affairs of the Province, preferring to behave as the ultimate absentee

landlord. Northern Ireland was governed by a perpetual one-party system of Unionist control. The Unionists, a combination of descendants of the nobility and hard line reactionaries, maintained their position, not by repressive legislation as such, but by a mixture of rigging election boundaries to their advantages (gerrymandering), allowing, under certain circumstances determined by property ownership, one person to have more than one vote to cast, by propagating the old adage of 'divide and rule', and in a country where jobs and housing have always been acute problems, keeping tight control of both their allocation.

Usually the 'Catholic Nationalist' minority got the raw end of the deal, being seen by nobility and majority alike as "a potential threat to their comfy niche and their freedom of worship (that is, those of the majority who were really concerned about religion). In the end, demands for Civil Rights became louder and louder. 'Brits Out' and 'Irish Unity' were not the immediate war cries in 1968. What was wanted badly was electoral reform, and fair allocation of jobs and housing. The IRA had not yet reappeared, having had little success with their previous campaign in the late fifties, and often Westminster was looked to as the saviour from the stagnation of fifty years of Unionist indifference and misrule. The CR Movement was a just and deserved cause. However, it went sour. Reactionary 'Protestants', believing that any electoral reform weakened their position, and opened the door to unity with the South a little wider, responded with violence. In (London) derry, notorious for appalling housing, unemployment, and gerrymandering, a peaceful CR march was disrupted by 'Protestant' thugs. Events rapidly escalated into rioting, counter-rioting and razing of whole streets to the ground. Within days the country was poised on the brink of civil war. The Royal Ulster Constabulary could no longer control the street mobs. Protestant and Catholic clergy and moderates pleaded with Westminster to intervene. The Unionist heirarchy, now anxious for some sort of law and order to return, asked for the military to

be sent in to keep the hard men of both sides apart. In the end British troops arrived in a peace keeping role.

The attacks and riots upon 'Catholic' estates by 'Protestant' gangs, gave the IRA the opportunity to appear as the peoples' police. Support grew for them in these areas, not because of their ultimate political aspirations, but because of their appearance as the only means of defence. Once the IRA had gained the confidence and support of the people, they were able to move against their real targets. Fired, as they always had been, by the watery-eyed romantism of appearing as freedom-fighters, they gradually moved from the defensive to the offensive. Quickly forgetting the original reasons for the troops being in Northern Ireland, they launched bomb attacks on anything that they considered to be "part of the British war machine" - shops, cinemas, pubs, banks. Soldiers and police were automatic targets. The intention was, and is. to bomb and shoot all trace of Britain out of the North-East quarter of Ireland. Once the remnant of imperialism had gone, the next step was a 32 country Socialist Republic. This is how I remember the current unrest beginning. Since then, there have been many attempts by successive British Governments to find an instant solution. That in itself is a gross error of judgement. In a country where memories are long, and fear of the other half remains for generations on end, any solution must be arrived at over a long period of time. Also, no solution can be imposed from Westminster, it must be arrived at in Northern Ireland itself. But with no competent politicians, with nothing better than skilled rabble-rousers for representatives, there would seem little hope of useful political activity occuring. That private soldier should have completed two tours by now - perhaps three. I am sure he is still as confused as he was when I met him. I am not surprised. I am quite confused myself as to why some Irish don't have a cause, but are prepared to fight anybody in support of it. David Crabbe

POSTGRADUATES

UNDERGRADUATES 1979 8 0 RESIDENCE HALLS &

HOUSES

HALLS & HOUSES

APPLICATION FORMS are now available from the APPLICATION

Residence Office, Room 161, Shertield Building, for-

FORMS

Residence Office, Room 161, NEW

APPLICANTS 2nd & 3rd not

had

GREEN

year a

UG Students

year

in

who

RE-APPLICANTS Postgraduates who residence - Hall

BLUE

UG

Students

who

have

in

residence

in

Hall or

had

CLOSING

FORM

DATE

-

NEW

House

FRIDAY

available from the

BLUE

FORM

year

in

have had ONE or

House

DATE - FRIDAY

16th

MARCH

ONE year APPLICANTS CLOSING

CLOSING

now

Sherfield Building, for:-

FORM have

Hall or House

RE-APPLICANTS

are

16th

YELLOW

DATE - WEDNESDAY

Ist

FORM AUGUST

MARCH

Imperial College students are eligible for two years in

Students

are

eligible

for

two

years

in

residence

returned

to

the

Residence as an Undergraduate. Completed

forms should be returned to

Sherfield Building.

Only correctly

Room 161,

completed

with photographs attached, will be accepted.

forms,

as

a

Postgraduate.

Completed Residence

forms should Office.

be


IF YOU'RE FED UP WITH BEING STEREOTYPED, HOW DO YOU THINK WE FEEL? Y o u ' v e p r o b a b l y n o t i c e d that a lot of p e o p l e h a v e s o m e w h a t u n r e a l i s t i c i d e a s a b o u t s t u d e n t s , a n d the w a y t hey s e e t h e m s e l v e s . While s o m e students have an equally unrealistic c o n c e p t i o n of w h a t w o r k i n g in i n d u s t r y is r e a l l y l i k e . At M a r c o n i A v i o n i c s , o n e m a n or w o m a n in e v e r y four is a g r a d u a t e , i n c l u d i n g p e o p l e f r o m t h i s >• U n i v e r s i t y , facts that s h o u l d g i v e y o u a better i d e a of what w o r k i n g in the A v i o n i c s i n d u s t r y is l i k e . When deciding which electronics company should get the benefit of y o u r e l e c t r o n i c s , c o m p u t e r s c i e n c e , mechanical, physics, maths or control engineering d e g r e e , t h e c h o i c e i s e n d l e s s . B u t no m a t t e r h o w a t t r a c t i v e t h e w o r k m a y s o u n d , t h e r e ' s a l w a y s the thought at the b a c k of y o u r m i n d : " W h a t h a p p e n s if I d o n ' t a c t u a l l y find it i n t e r e s t i n g o n c e I'm t h e r e ? " At M a r c o n i A v i o n i c s w e ' v e g o o d c a u s e to b e l i e v e that o u r p r o j e c t s a r e a s i n t e r e s t i n g a s a n y , a n d m o r e interesting than most. But w h a t r e a l l y m a k e s it w o r t h y o u r w h i l e t a l k i n g to us is a r a n g e a n d a d i v e r s i t y of a c t i v i t i e s that few e l e c t r o n i c c o m p a n i e s c a n offer y o u . W e ' v e d e v e l o p e d flight c o n t r o l s y s t e m s for C o n c o r d e , J u m b o J e t s , a n d m i l i t a r y aircraft. G i a n t a i r b o r n e r a d a r s y s t e m s a n d m i n i a t u r e t.v. c a m e r a s . A r a n g e of h e a d -

up a n d h e a d - d o w n d i s p l a y s , n e u t r o n d e v i c e s for treating cancer, electro-optic devices, air data systems, a n d m i c r o - p r o c e s s o r a p p l i c a t i o n s . In m a n y t e c h n o l o g i e s , w e ' r e a h e a d of the state of the art, a n d w e h a v e the i m a g i n a t i o n a n d the c o m m i t m e n t to d e v e l o p a d v a n c e d t e c h n i q u e s in h i g h l y p r a c t i c a l a p p l i c a t i o n s . If y o u j o i n u s , f i n d i n g y o u r s e l f s t u c k in o n e proj ect o r o n e t e c h n o l o g y is t h e last t h i n g y o u ' l l h a v e to w o r r y about. A far m o r e p r e s s i n g p r o b l e m w i l l be d e c i d i n g w h i c h of o u r 3 l o c a t i o n s y o u ' d p r e f e r to w o r k at, a n d w h i c h of m a n y p r o j e c t s y o u ' d prefer to w o r k o n . B u t w e c a n talk a b o u t that w h e n w e m e e t . In the m e a n t i m e , s e e y o u r c a r e e r s s e r v i c e to find out w h e n w e a r e v i s i t i n g y o u r u n i v e r s i t y . Alternatively contact G r a h a m R i c h a r d s , M a r c o n i Avionics Limited, Elstree Way, B o r e h a m w o o d , H e r t s . W D 6 1 R X . T e l e p h o n e n u m b e r 01-953 2030 e x t e n s i o n 3230.

MARCONI A GEC-Marconi Electronics Company


Page 12

MART'S MUTTERINGS I bet y o u w e r e a l l s i t t i n g there t h i n k i n g that you've absolutely n o t h i n g to do o n M o n d a y evenings. W e l l , after you've been to S p e a k e r s ' C o r n e r o n S u n d a y , i n o r d e r to m a k e the case a g a i n s t t u i t i o n fee i n c r e a s e s , the o b v i o u s t h i n g to do is to c o m e a l o n g a n d observe C o u n c i l m e e t i n g i n the Senior C o m m o n R o o m at 6 o'clock. T h i s is y o u r o p p o r t u n i t y to listen to the R e c t o r o f I m p e r i a l College a n d ask questions on a n y t h i n g y o u ' d l i k e to k n o w a b o u t a n d p a r t i c u l a r l y a b o u t the p r o b l e m o f t u i t i o n fees. A s y o u s h o u l d k n o w b y n o w we are a s k i n g College t h i s year not to i n c r e a s e t u i t i o n fees, a n d also to c h a r g e overseas students the s a m e rate as h o m e students. T h i s i n t o t a l s h o u l d cost College o v e r ÂŁ400,000, so we need quite a g o o d c a m p a i g n i n o r d e r to achieve this. D o n ' t forget we also w a n t y o u to l o b b y y o u r M P . Refectories T h a n k s to those h a r d y i n d i v i d u a l s w h o t u r n e d out to lobby G o v e r n i n g B o d y last F r i d a y . T h e result of the m e e t i n g was not half as b a d as it c o u l d have been, a n d the worst proposal was not passed by G o v e r n i n g B o d y . T h e Refectory C o m m i t t e e w i l l c o n t i n u e to discuss the t e r m l y r e v i e w o f prices a n d it has been referred to Refectory C o m m i t t e e e to c o m e u p w i t h a n e w regulator w h i c h w i l l take into a c c o u n t b o t h food cost increases a n d other increases o n a regul ar basis to the Refectory accounts. W h e n is a R e s i d e n t not a R e s i d e n t ? W e l l , i f y o u ' r e a L o c a l A u t h o r i t y y o u ' d p r o b a b l y r e p l y to this " w h e n y o u ' r e t r y i n g to save m o n e y " . A s y o u w i l l k n o w i f y o u ' v e been r e a d i n g m y c o l u m n r e g u l a r l y (somebody must be m a d enough), several I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e students have been refused grants because the D e p a r t m e n t o f E d u c a t i o n a n d Science d e c i d e d to c o l l u d e w i t h local authorities to c h a n g e the d e f i n i t i o n of " o r d i n a r y residents". Therefore, even t h o u g h people have l i v e d i n this c o u n t r y for three years, they are still not a b l e to get a grant. M i c h a e l A r t h u r , however, m a y have saved the d a y b y w r i t i n g a legal p a p e r o n w h i c h we have n o w received counsel's o p i n i o n w h i c h is f a v o u r a b l e towards the chances of w i n n i n g a case against a local a u t h o r i t y . If we succeed, o u r one s m a l l U n i o n w i l l have defeated the entirety o f the E d u c a t i o n authority's b u r e a u c r a c y ! Extra Union meeting A s y o u m i g h t have n o t i c ed f r o m last week's issue, I have called a n exta U n i o n m e e t i n g for next T u e s d a y , the 27th, at 1.30 p . m . i n the G r e a t H a l l . T h a t is at a later time i n o r d e r not to clash w i t h the P a n c a k e R a c e , w h i c h is a n I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e a n n u a l t r a d i t i o n . M o t i o n s o n the a g e n d a i n c l u d e c a n n a b i s a n d gay rights, to say n o t h i n g o f a late a d d i t i o n o f one c a m p a i g n i n g against t y r a n n i c a l clocks, c a l l i n g for the e n d i n g o f d i s c r i m i n a t i o n against a l l Celts. See y o u then. M a r y Attenborough President, IC U n i o n

Education & Apartheid O n T h u r s d a y 8th the I m p e r i a l College C o m m i t t e e on O v e r s e a s Students i n v i t e d S i r R o b e r t B i r l e y to speak o n the c o n t r o v e r s i a l subject o f ' E d u c a t i o n a n d A p a r t h e i d ' i n South A f r i c a . S i r R o b e r t , w h o i s one o f the l e a d i n g e d u c a t i o n a l i s t s i n t h i s c o u n t r y , was i n S o u t h A f r i c a f o r three y e a r s as V i s i t i n g P r o f e s s o r o f E d u c a t i o n at the U n i v e r s i t y o f W i t w a t e r s a n d . H e b e g a n by g i v i n g a few facts o n S o u t h A f r i c a . O f its p o p u l a t i o n 72% are A f r i c a n s , 16.75% W h i t e s , 9% C o l o u r e d s , a n d 2.25% Asians. T h e S o u t h A f r i c a n G o v e r n m e n t c a m e i n t o p o w e r i n 1948 a n d i n 1953 the B a n t u E d u c a t i o n P o l i c y was i n t r o d u c e d a n d students were seggregated by c o l o u r . H e went o n to e x p l a i n h o w most o f S o u t h A f r i c a ' s e c o n o m y d e p e n d e d o n m i g r a n t l a b o u r a n d h o w these labourers h a d to leave their families b e h i n d a n d w o r k i n S o u t h A f r i c a for a n u m b e r of years, as they were not a l l o w e d to b r i n g t h e m w i t h t h e m . H e w e n t o n to say that i n the P r i m a r y school there were a b o u t 3.5 m i l l i o n A f r i c a n s , w h i c h is a b o u t 91.4%, a n d i n contrast o n l y a b o u t 14% i n S e c o n d a r y schools. S i r R o b e r t e x p l a i n e d this by quoting a South African industrialist w h o h a d said that they h a d to teach the A f r i c a n s to r e a d a n d w r i t e so that they c o u l d read a n d u n d e r s t a n d notices a n d

instructions i n factories where they were r e q u i r e d to work. V e r y little science was taught a n d the S o u t h A f r i c a n history that was taught was c o m p l e t e l y distorted a n d the A f r i c a n c h i l d r e n , w h o d i d not believe a n y of it, h a d to l e a r n it i n o r d e r to pass e x a m i n a t i o n s . T h e teacher, p u p i l ratio for w h i t e students is 1:20 a n d for black students it is 1:52. T h e per c a p i t a

Grants, Sponsorship and Tax This is a brief survey of the way that earnings, and sponsorship and scholarship payments affect your grant and tax position. If your personal experience of what happens is different from this, I would be very interested to hear about it. Income that affects your Grant You are allowed to earn as much as you like during the vacation without it affecting the quantum of your grant entitlement. Term time earnings, however, are limited to 235 pounds and after that you lose I pound from your grant for every I pound you earn over 235 pounds. The same applies to money received by way of a scholarship or sponsorship, where the limit is 500 pounds. This is the position with Local Education Authority undergraduate grants but may be different in the case of Qther types of grant or grants from other sources. Payments that affect your tax position The general position is that scholarships are not treated as taxable income in the same way as the L.E.A. grant is treated as exempt. It is, however, up to the taxman to decide whether or not certain payments are to be treated as scholarships or as earnings which would be liable to taxation. The way that they do this is to say that payments over a certain fixed value are too big to be treated purely as monies for the purpose of assistance with education and that therefore they must be treated as income from earnings or 'offices'. This means that the whole lot is then taxable (subject, of course, to the usual personal allowances) under Schedule E of the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1970. Whether a payment is called a scholarship or sponsorship does not make any difference. The figure that they use for this purpose is 2000 pounds per annum. However, if you are in a position where, had you been getting an S.R.C. grant, you would have been paid more than this, then the exemption will apply so long as your income from your sponsorship does not exceed this S.R.C. figure. From April of this year the figure will go up to 3000 pounds per annum. Sometimes a sponsorship is given on the understanding that you will work for your sponsor during the vacations. If this is the case, that part of the money which can be attributed to the work that you do for your sponsor will count as earnings and be potentially taxable. Accommodation We are stepping up advertising for offers of accommodation and so hope to heave a few more places than usual to offer. How about a house for five in SW16, or a flat in Wandsworth with one twin-bedded bedroom, livingroom, kitchen etc. for 30 pounds per week? Contact the Welfare Centre' for these and many (well, a few) more. Hamlet Gardens Last Friday, at a meeting in Hammersmith Town Hall, some tenants from Hamlet Gardens decided to set up a Resident's Association. This is really designed to help those other than occupants of college flats (who have their own negotiating machinery through college). Most of those present at the meeting were not I.C. students. It is hoped, however that those of you who live in Hamlet Gardens will lend your support to this scheme, since, without support, it won't get very far! The initial objects of the Association are to explore the position as to Security of Tenure and Fair Rents and to assist in matters between individual tenants and the landlord. The Chairlady of the Association is Liz Hebblethwaitewho is at I.C. If you want more information about what the Association can do for you, you should contact Liz, who lives in Flat 20, Hamlet Gardens. Michael Arthur, Welfare Adviser

e x p e n d i t u r e for w h i t e students is R 644, a n d R 41.80 for b l a c k students. C o m m e n t i n g o n the p o l i t i c a l awareness o f the students, S i r R o b e r t said that most of the English speaking Universities were against the government, a n d its policies. D u e to people like Steve B i k o , a m e d i c a l student w h o was the leader of the B l a c k

conciousness movement, the A f r i c a n students are very m u c h more c e r t a i n of their p o l i t i c a l aims a n d are d e t e r m i n e d to achieve it. I n c o n c l u s i o n he stated that the A f r i c a n students were very m u c h m o r e intelligent t h a n they are m a d e out to be a n d are determined to achieve their p o l i t i c a l objectives one w a y or another. S. D i l i p k u m a r


P a g e 13

19 llirSlEilEilslEiEs^ IS I SSI 151 II

The Pimlico

incorporating Stockwell and

Connection

1979/80

El 151

the

Connection

the

Holland Park Connection

Undergraduate

Women The

a r e needed t o h e l p w i t h t h e t e a c h i n g o f p r a c t i c a l work i n S c i e n c e a n d E n g i n e e r i n g t o 11 - Ik y e a r o l d p u p i l s a t The P i m l i c o S c h o o l , t h e S t o c k w e l l Manor S c h o o l , a n d t h e H o l l a n d Park S c h o o l .

tutors

i n p a r t i c u l a r a r e needed t o t u t o r g i r l

students

w i l l be w i t h i n d i v i d u a l s a n d s m a l l g r o u p s . Tutors w i l l operate i n teaas of four or f i v e under the d i r e c t i o n and s u p e r v i s i o n o f t e a c h e r s .

tutoring

No p r e v i o u s A training

experience session

Time i n v o l v e d

Subjects

pupils.

r

is

need* w i l l be h e l d a t I . C . o n t h e S a t u r d a y t h e s t a r t o f t h e Autumn T e r m .

preceding

1 . 3 0 t o 3Âť30 a p p r o x . e a c h Wednesday a f t e r n o o n i n t h e Autumn Term a n d i n t h e f i r s t f o u r weeks o f the S p r i n g Term. i n c l u d e S c i e n c e b a s e d o n N u f f i e l d Combined Science;

taught

Engineering which c o n s i s t s mainly o f metalwork a n d woodwork. ( S t u d e n t s w i t h e x p e r i e n c e o f workshop p r a c t i c e n e e d e d t o h e l p w i t h t h i s w o r k . ) E l e c t r o n i c s a t CSE l e v e l . Further

and a p p l i c a t i o n forms a r e a v a i l a b l e

details

from

D r . S i n c l a i r Goodlad, Room 6 0 3 , E l e c t r i c a l E n g i n e e r i n g B l d g . , Imperial College. I n t e r n a l Phone 3080 ( M e s s a g e s 2 3 5 2 ) • An i n f o r m a t i o n

meeting

f o r those i n t e r e s t e d

will

be h e l d i n Room 6 0 6 ,

E l e c . L h g . B l d g . . 12.50

- 13.15

Tue.

27 F e b r u a r y


Page 14

REVIEWS I T o o M a n y Chefs

FILMS

(A)

T o o M a n y Chefs is a h a l f - b a k e d c o m e d y t h r i l l e r that was p o o r l y d i r e c t e d . T h e film started as if silent m o v i e c u s t a r d pie slapstick w o u l d be served u p t h r o u g h o u t . L o v e r s of w h i p p e d c r e a m fights w i l l enjoy w a t c h i n g gallons of sticky gook showering a r o u n d the set. G r a d u a l l y the director seemed to get bo r e d w i t h slapstick a n d tried to m a k e a c o m e d y - t h r i l l e r by u s i n g old jokes a n d a " w h o d u n n i t ? " format. T h e gourmet, M a x i m i l l i a n V a n d e r v e r e ( R o b e r t M o r l e y ) featured the "perfect m e a l " i n his m a g a z i n e . Chefs t h r o u g h o u t E u r o p e p r e p a r e d their most famous creations for each stage of the m e a l a n d the M a x i m i l l i a n was g l a d to eat a n y t h i n g they served u p . G r a d u a l l y the top chefs featured i n the m a g a z i n e are m u r d e r e d i n the style of their creations. A l l very a b s o r b i n g but after the t h i r d m u r d e r the plot became p r e d i c t a b l e . N a t a s h a (Jacqueline Bisset) realises that there is a p a t t e r n to the k i l l i n g s a n d she is the next o n the list. T h e viewer is e n c o u r a g e d to suspect one- gourmet after the first m u r d e r o n l y to be c o n t r a d i c t e d as the story continues. T h e true m u r d e r e r ... i n t y p i c a l " w h o d u n n i t " t r a d i t i o n is the person one always overlooks. B y the time the i d e n t i t y is revealed the urge to h u r r y h o m e for a good m e a l after sitting t h r o u g h two hours o f w a t c h i n g food becomes m o r e relevant t h a n p u z z l i n g out w h o was the m u r d e r e r . T h e film was d i r e c t e d i n the style of the

Natasha O'Brien (Jaqueline

Bisset j prepares her special dessert Bombe

1960's, but the s w i n g i n g sixties jet set image destroys the film. R o b e r t M o r l e y a n d the delicious J a c q u e l i n e Bisset h o l d the f i lm together but the p r o d u c t i o n team deserve to be t h r o w n in the w h i p p e d c r e a m for their poor performance. Colin Palmer

There won't be much

SEX AG FETE W e s t i ,need m o r e s t s lis and help forthe fete on May 5th. I f y o u l !r e a c l u b / s o c i gty/hall and have not thought of doing arT; /thing yet, pi gase do so and drop your name and ide" into IC UnidT Office.

TE THE M A K E HIS B I G G E S T ND B S T Y E T te, whether For all those intere ed in the regarding stalls or in geneH] I organisation there will be a Rag Meeting on March h at 6:30pm i Office (Union top floor). ALL WELCO

THANKS

i) The Rugby C l u b for donating 0% of their sponsorship money (from washing w a l l s ^ to Rag. ii) Refectory Committee for donating one^] undred uring pounds to Rag from the increased bar profi the Rag Week.

* rrrsnan.'' S h o w i n g at the G a t e (Notting Hill), " I n t e r i o r s " is W o o d y A l l e n ' s new " s e r i o u s " film. It is written a n d d i r e c t e d by h i m t h o u g h , u n l i k e his earlier films, he doesn't a p p e a r in it himself. T h e film is about a m i d d l e - c l a s s A m e r i c a n family d o m i n a t e d by Eve, a depressive intellectual, a n d her 3 d a u g h t e r s (one of w h o m is p l a y e d by D i a n e Keaton) w h o m s h e deeply influenced. Eve's h u s b a n d leaves her, s u p p o s e d l y for a trial s e p a r a t i o n , returning with Pearl, a divorcee, w h o is the direct o p p o s i t e of Eve. T h e film s h o w s Eve's (and her daughters') reactions to Pearl, w h o eventually b e c o m e s their stepmother. T h e s t r u c t u r e of the film is s i m i l a r to other A l l e n films: a series of separate s c e n e s not n e c e s s a r i l y in c h r o n o l o g i c a l order, but nevertheless easy to fol low. A l l the s c e n e s are beautifully arranged a n d filmed e s p e c i a l l y the one w h e r e Eve arrives at her e x - h u s b a n d ' s w e d d i n g to P e a r l . A n a l m o s t o v e r w h e l m i n g l y powerful scene, it is a very m o v i n g c l i m a x to the film, p r o d u c i n g an a w e - i n s p i r e d s i l e n c e from the a u d i e n c e . T h e relations between various m e m b e r s of the family, portrayed with telling detail, all rang true but were p e r h a p s too o p e n : no feelings at all were hi d d e n . A s a result there was hardly any light c o n v e r s a t i o n at all until Pearl arrived to give Eve's daughters, in effect, a " c u l t u r e s h o c k " . T h i s , the s c e n e where Pearl w a s i n t r o d u c e d to two of the daughters, was brilliantly funny. It m a d e the " t o n e " of the film m u c h lighter, a n d it w a s only then that y o u realised how g o o d the p r e c e d i n g part had been. H a v i n g felt vaguely dissatisfied with A l l e n ' s earlier films, apart from the excellent " A n n i e H a l l " , I think this is easily his best film to date. Despite its s e r i o u s nature this is p r o b a b l y m o r e a c c e s s a b l e t han his c o m e d y films: the h u m o u r is m u c h s h a r p e r a n d more c o n t r o l l e d . In this film A l l e n s h o w s his true class as a director, w h i c h has not been as apparent in his earlier films. T h o u g h not as superficially e x c i t i n g as s o m e of 'the b l o c k b u s t e r films o n at the moment, it is p r o b a b l y o n e of the best films s h o w i n g in L o n d o n . G o a n d see it, it won't hurt, honest. D a v i d M c M a h o n ( P h y s i c s 3)


IPage 15

R E V I E W S — I ZZZDTHEATRE " A Fair Q u a r r e l " by T h o m a s Middleton a n d W i l l i a m R o w l e y b y the N a t i o n a l Theatre Company at the Olivier Theatre It was the R o y a l Shakespear C o m p a n y ' s " T h e C h a n g e l i n g " w h i c h I r e v i e w e d last week w h i c h t e m p t e d me into-seeing this p l a y b y the same c o l l a b o r a t i o n , a n d o n a r r i v a l at the O l i v i e r T h e a t r e I was w o n d e r i n g w h e t h e r I w o u l d be able to p a y m u c h attention to the p l a y , so impressive was the n a t u r e o f the theatre itself. I soon f o u n d , however, that the o p e n stage lent itself a d m i r a b l y to the play, a n d the actors' v a r i e d entrances from the back, front a n d sides o f the a u d i t o r i u m a n d t h r o u g h the c e n t r a l w e l l o f the stage, served to m a k e a pleasant c h a n g e from the rather mere p r e d i c t a b l e ' p r o - s c e n i u m ' situation. T h e subject m a t t e r of the play is m a i n l y based a r o u n d the ethics of d u e l l i n g , a n d i n

the times i n w h i c h the play was w r i t t e n (1616 - 1617) this was fairly t o p i c a l . J a m e s I, the " p e a c e m a k e r ' s " reign saw a distinct rise o f c i v i l d i s t u r b a n c e f o l l o w i n g a n age o f foreign hostilities; " W h e n the d r u m ' s u n b r a c e d , a n d trumpet s cease, soldiers must get p a y for to live i n p e a c e " , a n d ex-privateers a n d soldiers preyed o n the c i v i l i a n p o p u l a t i o n of L o n d o n , a n d the p r o v i n c i a l gentry d r a w n to L o n d o n at that time w h o " t u r n ' d four or five h u n d r e d acres ... into two o r three trunks of a p p a r e l " to get here (more fool them).

fool a n d wit duette, c o m m o n to plays of this era. B u t almost b e y o n g d o u b t , the finest a c t o r (in m y o p i n i o n ) to grace the stage that n i g h t was D e r m o t C r o w l e y as the s c h e m i n g a n d w i c k e d p h y s i c i a n whose sweet a n d sour role is d e m a n d i n g to say the least. T h e s u d d e n revelation that he is i n fact a viceful v i l l a i n a n d not (as he at first seems) a selfless p h i l a n t h r o p i s t is d e l i v e r e d so w e l l that it is h a r d to c o m e to terms w i t h the d i c h o t o m y , or even believe it, a n d so it was i n t e n d e d i n the play.

T h e p r o d u c t i o n o f the p l a y leaves little to be criticised a n d m u c h to the i m a g i n a t i o n (props are scarce a n d scenery is non-existent), the l i g h t i n g was good (but the facilities for this seem to be v i r t u a l l y limitless), a n d the changes o f situation are thus effected q u i c k l y a n d clearly.

T h i s leads me to point out that this p l a y has m u c h i n common with " T h e C h a n g e l i n g " , in that some of it concerns the lengths to w h i c h a m a n w i l l go to get his w a y (in lust), b u t unlike it i n that it contrives to have a good o u t c o m e , a n d the threats a n d schemes of the w i c k e d fall to n o t h i n g instead o f d a m n i n g a l l , good o r evil.

T u r n i n g n o w to the a c t i n g , I a n I r e l a n d was a s t r i k i n g R u s s e l l (father to J a n e w h o was acted w i t h some m e d i o c r i t y by H a r r i e t W a l t e r ) . F r e d P e a r s o n a n d N i c k y H e n s o n as q u a r r e l l i n g soldiers were w e l l cast a n d a d d e d flair to the p l a y as d i d M a r k W i n g - D a v e y a n d P e t e r - H u g o D a l y as c o r n i s h m e n , f o r m i n g the

T h e script itself, I t h i n k , offers m o r e i n t h e w a y o f historical interest a n d insight t h a n that of e nt e r t a i nm e nt or a r t , but the p r o d u c t i o n reinforces these latter weaknesses, a n d hence the p l a y has m u c h to offer. David M . Weston

Imperial College Folk Club meets every Monday evening of term in the Union Lower refectory. Most Mondays we have a guest act, and aim to cover the whole range of folk music with a wide variety of guests. To supplement the guests, about half of each evening is devoted to performers "from the floor" doing t h e i r own thing unaccompanied singing, ragtime guitar, poetry (!) and everything in between; anything and everything is welcome with the financial persuasion that anybody who "performs" gets in free! The first act of the term was "Dolphin Suite", a highly amusing three man band singing songs ranging from Buddy Holly to their own comic compositions. By way of contrast, the next weeks gueste were "Brian Boru", three lads playing and singing trad. Irish tunes, one member of the band spending most of the evening fighting withasetof Irish Pipes! Mr. Smith, a one man comedy act withaguitar, graced us with his presence thefolbwing week. He performed ethnic obscure, traditional material such as Bachs 'Air on a G-string' and some of Sousas marches, promptly followed by putting a black plastic bag over his head and impeisonating Al Jobon! As if this wasnotenough.oneof thefloor spots that evening was an excelent band called 'Arcadian'. They played a wide variety of instruments and entertained us with songs that covered the whole spectrum of folk music. Panic ensued next Monday afternoon when at four o'clock that evenings guest, Nigel Mazhyn Jones, 'phoned to say he couldn't get here. He 'phoned a band called 'Waterfall', who were in a some studios in the back of beyond, and asked them to play. They immediately threw everything, including the dog, into the back of a van and arrived at I.C. at about 8.30 p.m. Despite the short notice, a hectic drive in bad conditions, and a lead singer with asore throat, they turned out to be a superb replacement providing a very enjoyable evening culminating in a jam sessbn with everyone present playing something (even if it was only a beer glass). A week last Monday evening, Tony Rose, the West Countrys finest revival singer, was the guest of I.C. Folk Club. We weretostforwords about this mans talents. Sunday evening saw the first in a new series of folk music programmes on I.C. Radio. They are broadcasted between 5 and 6 p.m. and presented alternatively by Jeremy J . Farrell and Jonathan F. Clarke. Anysuggestbns for material toplayon

FIRST: J A K K O . Lead guitar and vocals. Cowriteron all material. Aged 20. Finalist in Melody Maker National Competition; Graudated (?) to Warren Harry, and finally became good enough to join the Spoons. S E C O N D : T A M . Aged 22. Keyboards, drums, co-writer. Plays synthesiser clarinet, electric piano. Father is sub-principle bass player in N.P.O. Tarn trained at the Royal Academy. THIRD: L Y N D O N . Keyboards, drums, vocals. Co-writer. Also classically trained, and from a musical family. No relation to Julie Andrews, but the 'good looking' member of the group. F O U R T H : A N D R E W . Aged 23, as is Lyndon. Bass, classical guitar, flute. Royal College of Music. A very funky person.

the programme may be given to Jerry or Jon at folk club on any Monday evening. Last Monday (19th February), we were proud to present a band by the name of "Desperate Scratch", giving us one of their last London gigs before departing for a tour of the Belgian folkscene. Remember! I.C. Folk Clubmeebevery Monday in the Union Lower refectory at around 8.15 p.m.

FIFTH: but not in order of importance, TED the trumpet player that stands at the front. ExSalvation Army rumouis incorrect but he may end up there. Hesso young for his age 21. SIXTH: ELLIOT. Chief mechanic, electrical wizard and crew boss. Assemble as above although the order may be flexible for metric punters. You should then have an extremely talented and entertaining combo, veisatile to the point of envy by other would-be musicians, and quite capable of anything. Jazz rock is the wrong description as is new wave. Very clever and exciting rock with a lot of C L A S S is more like it, and like it you will.

See them in the Union Concert Hall at 8:00 p.m. tonight. Members get in for 30 p., otheis for 60 p., and membeiships cost you ÂŁ1.00 , inclusive of one nights free entry. The exceptions are nighfe without guests when everybody gete in free, and floor performers of any sort who get in for free whenever they perform - come and try your hand! If you've any enquiries, get in touch with Jeremy J . Farrell, Physics II, or come along any Monday evening - see you there!


Page 16

SOCIETIES' PAGE W O M E N IN S C I E N C E A N D

NUCLEAR POWER AND ENERGY PLANNING The R C S U Environmental S o c i e t y arc staging two talks on I he subject oi' energy a n d its implications w i t h i n a week. T h e iirst w i l l be held on T u e s d a y 22nd February at 4 . 3 0 in the F nv i r o nm e n ta 1 Technology Lecture Theatre. 48 Princes G a r d e n s . T h i s talk is b e i n g given by M i k e F l o o d of F'riends of the F a i t h a n d is on ' N u c l e a r Power Decision M a k i n g - ease study Ferness'. T h e talk w i l l highlight ilie problems in the decision ; m a k i n g process a n d the impact p u b l i c opposition can have on the

Despite the bitterly c o l d weather, not to mention 2nd term apathy, 39 p e o p l e braved the c o l d to c o m e out and collect for J e r o m e C a n v i n ' s ' P h o n i c Ear' on Saturday. E a r l y on it didn't look very hopeful, but o n c e again our d e d i c a t e d collectors p r o v e d themselves, the total now stands at 810 p o u n d s , (with two c a n s still to be c o u n t e d ) , m o r e than e n o u g h to buy the aid. M a n y t h a n k s to all w h o turned up, to collect, count money, or even just donate. The top c o l l e c t o r s were Z o s i a Z b r z e z n i a k (who'd have guessed it...) with over 217 p o u n d s a n d P e t e H e w k i n with over 90 p o u n d s , closely f o l l o w e d by Dale H o w a r d , Katy T a t c h e l l and T a n s y H e p t o n . Life S c i e n c e s were the top department (not c o u n t i n g C h e m i s t r y who've got the advantage of Zosia), but the barrel will be shared by all w h o c a m e (date not decided yet).

Every W e d n e s d a y lunchtime a g r o u p mostly of w o m e n meets in the I C W A L o u n g e to d i s c u s s a variety of topics usually with an invited speaker.

linal outcome. The second talk is on Tuesday 27th F e b r u a r y at 5.30 again at 48 Princes Gardens, it w i l l be given by M r . J o h n Syrett, H e a d of Strategic P l a n n i n g , C E G B , he will be t a l k i n g about energy planning with reference to e n v i r o n m e n t a l problems. M e m b e r s h i p of the society is only 30 p for the r e m a i n i n g academic year, anyone interested in the society s h o u l d send a letter to the society in the C e n t r e for Environmental Technology.

I'd also like to thank the half dozen G u i l d s m e n (and w o m e n ) w h o c a m e a l o n g a n d c o l l e c t e d about 80 p o u n d s between t h e m . T h a n k y o u again for this t r e m e n d o u s response, and I hope you'll be able to meet J e r o m e when he c o m e s up for a presentation of the aid. Rachel Snee

T h e g r o u p is k n o w n as " W o m e n in S c i e n c e a n d T e c h n o l o g y " and subjects d i s c u s s e d this term have co vere d s u c h diverse themes as the Christian view of w o m e n and the position of w o m e n in Latin A m e r i c a . T h e term started on a s o m e w h a t militant note with a meeting o n a n a s p e c t of t h e W o m e n ' s L i b e r a t i o n M o v e m e n t at w h i c h t h e s p e a k e r c a m e f r o m a m a g a z i n e s o l d s t r i c t l y o n l y to w o m e n . T h e f o l l o w i n g w e e k W i S T listened to a s p e a k e r w h o runs a C h r i s t i a n c o m m u n i t y . S h e s p o k e a b o u t the C h r i s t i a n v i e w p o i n t w h i c h , s h e e x p l a i n e d , c o n s i d e r s b o t h m e n a n d w o m e n as p e r s o n s c r e a t e d b y G o d in H i s o w n i m a g e a n d t h e r e f o r e of e q u a l value. S h e d e n i e d that C h r i s t i a n i t y c o n d e m n e d w o m e n to a n i n f e r i o r r o l e in r e l i g i o u s o r s e c u l a r life. The problems faced by w o m e n in Latin A m e r i c a were the subject of an informative talk by a C h i l e a n student at a February meeting. She described the poverty and oppression of many w o m e n in the South A m e r i c a n countries and the tremendous pressure to maintain women's traditional role. For example, if a w o m a n went out to w o r k it w a s c o n s i d e r e d a r e f l e c t i o n of her h u s b a n d ' s inability to look after her. In s o m e countries it was very difficult for a w o m a n to study. St. Valentine's Day prompted d i s c u s s i o n on the appropriate

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The variety of speakers and subjects allow plenty of s c o p e for different o p i n i o n s a n d the group in no way excludes those w h o do ' not hold "militant feminist" views. Next week J u d i t h Walker, ICU's first w o m a n President, will speak to W i S T and everyone is w e l c o m e to join us. T h e meeting will be on Wednesday 28th February at 12.30 p m in the ICWA lounge.

The parachuting course for beginners will be given by B o b A c r a m a n of the RSA Parachute C l u b o n : Tues. 27th Feb. 6.30 - 9 . 3 0 . U n i o n Lower Refectory and Thurs. 1st M a r c h 6. 30- 9. 3 0 U n i o n D i n i n g Hall. The cost is 33 pounds w h i c h must be paid at the beginning of the

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CITY & GUILDS O n T h u r s d a y 15th February after s o m e delay due to a major c o c k - u p at the b o o k i n g office, the Guild's U G M was held in M e c h E n g 542. T h e main point of d i s c u s s i o n was whether political motions s h o u l d be d i s c u s s e d at G u i l d ' s U n i o n meetings. T h e general c o n c e n s u s of the meeting was that p r o c e d u r e s s h o u l d be left as they stand at the moment. M o t i o n s will r e c e i v e p u b l i c i t y for the d e b a t e to a l l o w o p p o s e r s t i m e t o p r e p a r e t h e i r d e b a t e s . If t h e m o t i o n is s u b m i t t e d l e s s t h a n t h r e e d a y s f r o m t h e d a t e of t h e m e e t i n g t h e C h a i r m a n c a n u s e h i s d i s c r e t i o n to d e c i d e if t h e m o t i o n s h o u l d b e p u t t o t h e m e e t i n g . If t h e E x e c f e e l t h a t t h e m o t i o n w o u l d b e m o r e s u i t e d t o a n I.C. U n i o n m e e t i n g , t h e y w i l l s u g g e s t t h i s t o t h e p r o p o s e r a n d if h e / s h e a g r e e s , t h e E x e c w o u l d o f f e r all p o s s i b l e a s s i s t a n c e in s u b m i t t i n g it t o a n I.C. U . G . M . H o w e v e r , e v e r y m e m b e r of G u i l d s h a s t h e r i g h t t o s u b m i t t h e m o t i o n t o a G u i l d ' s U . G . M . if t h e y s t i l l s o d e s i r e . It w a s f e l t t h a t t h e m o t i o n s h o u l d b e h e a r d at the meeting and then the m e e t i n g s h o u l d vote o n w h e t h e r the discussion should continue. The rest of t h e meeting consisted of an entertaining trial of a beer barrel, with S i m o n L e a eloquently p r o s e c u t i n g and B o b Hart defending. The barrel was found guilty of loitering for o n e and-a-half years in the G u i l d s ' U n i o n Office and was s e n t e n c e d to be placed in the I.C. U n i o n Office. The Guilds/I.F. party was a great s u c c e s s and like all G u i l d s ' events was s o l d out with many people turned away at the door. Remember, if y o u want to be sure of getting in to an event, make sure y o u b u y y o u r ticket well in advance. The Bristol 24hr pedal car race has been and gone, with G u i l d s c o m i n g a very creditable 6th against stiff o p p o s i t i o n (Rolls R o y c e came 1st and 2nd-yawn!l) and with a lack of people due to the Guilds/I.F. party held on the s a m e day.

T h e y will be more than happy to chat to y o u . S u n d a y 25th F e b - S O C C E R S I X E S . T e a m s to C l i v e Whiteside, M e c h E n g 3. Free transport to Harlington a n d free barrel for the winners! Saturday 3rd M a r c h - J O I N T C C U M O N O P O L Y RAG STUNT. Go r o u n d all the real places on the M o n o p o l y B o a r d solving clues etc. Sunday 4th M a r c h - E L E C T I O N BAR NIGHT where all the candidates s h o w how g o o d they are at yard d r i n k i n g and boat racing and also get a c h a n c e to chat to the voters. Tuesday 6th M a r c h - I N T E R C C U S W I M M I N G G A L A . C o m e on y o u G u i l d s m e n , get training and put y o u r name up on the board in the G u i l d s ' U n i o n Office. A l s o see J o A r m i t a g e or B r u c e Willis to find out all about it.

Elections Papers for all the G u i l d s ' E x e c positions go up on Monday 2*6th Feb. Please d o see the present members of the E x e c about any job that y o u may be interested in WHAT

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THIS H O U S E D O E S NOT BELIEVE IN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY O r so the motion went anyway. The debate itself was very a m u s i n g with strong arguments being presented by both the p r o p o s i t i o n and opposition. M i k e P i c k u p o p e n e d with an amusing, indeferent a n d lively s p e e c h for the p r o p o s i t i o n . Unfortunately this was q u i c k l y d i s m i s s e d by M i c k Berry who o p e n e d for the o p p o s i t i o n in a very a m u s i n g speech: Chris Russell seconded the motion with a talk on comprehensive education and how equal p p p o r t u n i t y did not work in practice. This was followed by the s e c o n d e r against the motion J o h n Shuttleworth. T h e m o o d of the debate was now getting very tense after two very serious s p e e c h e s and so we found

JUDO J u d o was developed in J a p a n at the end of the last century, from the martial art ju-jitsu. The intent was to obtain a sport w h i c h , whilst retaining the agressiveness and form of personal combat d i d not have as its object the injury of the opponent. In this, judo has s u c c e e d e d magnificiently. With the aim of t h r o w i n g the opponen t onto the specially p a d d e d mats used (or in g r o u n d w o r k , w i n n i n g by means of either a hold down, or s u b m i s s i o n from a stranglehold or armlock), it is an intensely competitive fighting sport, while the i n c i d e n c e of injuries is no greater than in sports s u c h as rugby or football. This S u n d a y (25th February), I.C. J u d o C l u b is staging the first of what is hoped to be an annua l

a little relief w h e n Daphne Websper, w h o c h a i r e d the event, c a l l e d o n C o l i n P a l m e r to speak for the m o t i o n . A very a m u s i n g speech followed w h i c h left S h e y n e L u c o c k , the final s p e a k e r for the motion, with an easy road to persue his o p p o n e n t with a very impressive and impromptu s p e e c h . Q u e s t i o n s from the floor were c o n f u s e d a n d often a s k e d to the w r o n g team. After a s u m m i n g up s p e e c h from both sides, the result was " T h i s H o u s e D o e s Believe in E q u a l O p p o r t u n i t y " . Never m i n d , all w h o went were very a m u s e d by it all. David Haddon Vice-Chairman of Debating Society

event - the L o n d o n C o l l e g e s Invitation T o u r n a m e n t . T a k i n g p l a c e in the Great Hall (11.00 start), it will feature s o m e of the top student judokas (judo "players") in L o n d o n . I.C. has a very g o o d c h a n c e of w i n n i n g , the more so s i n c e one m e m b e r of our team, O w e n Tutty, is the under 60 k g British Universities c h a m p i o n , i However, we will be facing s o m e fierce competition, especially from Q . M . C . and K i n g s C o l l e g e , both of w h o m will fieldvery strong teams. Whatever the o u t c o m e , it ought to be an enjoyable day, seeing some exciting fights. Spectators are welcome, all the more if they'll b e ' c o m i n g to cheer on the I.C. teams. Steve Morris P.S. If you w o u l d like to k n o w more about judo, ring me on int. 4234, or c o m e along to the u n i o n gym any Tuesday or Thursday at ! 6.30 p.m.

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I.C. 2nds 13 - Neptune 3 I.C. 2nd t e a m o p e n e d t h e i r M i d d l e s e x L e a g u e a c c o u n t w i t h a g a m e against N E P T U N E , a ne w t e a m i n the league. In the first q u a r t e r , I.C. took s o m e t i m e to settle against a t e a m w i t h m o r e e n t h u s i a s m t h a n s k i l l . H o w e v e r the b a l l w o r k e d u p to D a v e C h a d w i c k twice, who w a s " s i t t i n g " i n f r o n t o f goal. W i t h a w e a k defender on h i s b a c k , he h a d no t r o u b l e s h o o t i n g I.C. i n t o a 2-0 l e a d . T h i s was p u l l e d b a c k after two m i x u p s i n the L C . defence. A f t e r the first break, I.C. were into their stride. N i c k B u c k l a n d a n d Steve M a d d e n were p l a y i n g well at the back, a n d P a t P o r t e r a n d B o b B r a d l e y were finding C h a d w i c k w e l l w i t h t h e i r passes. So well i n fact, that he a d d e d a n o t h e r five in this q u a r t e r . A f t e r h a l f time, w i t h the score 7-2 to I.C., the pressure was kept o n . N i c k B u c k l a n d f o u n d t i m e to s w i m u p a n d shoot h o m e , Pat P o r t e r was left u n m a r k e d i n front of goal a n d a d d e d another. W i t h C o l i n D a l e a n d D i m i t r i P a p a c o n s t a n t i n o u s w i m m i n g into space o n the wings, it was easy to pass f o r w a r d to D a v e C h a d w i c k , w h o scored 3 i n this q u a r t e r , to m a k e his personal t a l l y ten! T h e last q u a r t e r saw a game N e p t u n e getting i n t o the game more. t . C . ' s o n l y goal came f r o m C o l i n D a l e , w h o was given a second c h a n c e after s w i m m i n g t h r o u g h w i t h the b a l l . N e p t u n e also got one back-one of the few times they managed to trouble goalkeeper M a r k C h e r r y . T h e final score, 133 to I C . A w i n w e l l e a r n e d t h r o u g h a lot o f hard work. Team: M. Cherry, N. Buckland, S. Madden, P. Porter, B. Bradley, J. Williams, D. Chadwick, C. Dale, D. Papaconstantinou.

I.C. 2nds 6 - A m p h i b i a n s 7 Last Friday, I.C. p l a y e d the r e p l a y of their 2 n d r o u n d L o n d o n K n o c k o u t M a t c h against A m p h i b i a n s . D u e to h a n d i c a p p i n g , I . C . started the game 4-1 d o w n . A depleted t e a m started off w e l l , w h e n Pete M c C a r t n e y twice scored w h e n I . C . were a m a n up. Before the e n d o f the first q u a r t e r , M i k e M c C a r t n e y p u l l e d back the t h i r d goal, a n d it seemed, as i n the first game, as if I.C. w o u l d go t h r o u g h . I n the second q u a r t e r p l a y was very close w i t h n u m e r o u s chances b e i n g created, a l t h o u g h no goals were scored. P a u l H i n d l e a n d D a v e D u n s t o n e were p e r f o r m i n g well i n . defence, g i v i n g reserve goalkeeper Steve T a y l e r a good deal of protection. T h e t h i r d q u a r t e r started the scoring a g a i n , A m p h i b i a n s scoring twice before M i k e M c C a r t n e y scored after a q u i c k l y taken free t h r o w . T o w a r d s the e n d o f the q u a r t e r A m p h i b i a m s went further ahead, but A n d y S m i t h scored from a n a r r o w angle to m a k e the score 7-6 to A m p h i b i a n s . In the last q u a r t e r it seemed as if I . C . must score. A m p h i b i a n s were a m a n d o w n three times. Pete M c C a r t n e y hit the b a r , a n d f r o m the r e b o u n d , sent his second shot against the bar. N u m e r o u s shots went just over the goal o r w i d e , but i n the e n d a well d i s c i p l i n e d A m p h i b i a n s team h a d h u n g o n i n a n e x c i t i n g match. Team: S. Tayler, P. Hindle, McCartney, A. Smith, M. Rockingham, D. Chadwick.

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CROSS C O U N T R Y Before s i n k i n g into the u s u a l t i r a d e o f in-jokes a n d d i s c u s s i o n o f m e m b e r s ' u n u s u a l habits it is w o r t h a r e m i n d e r that the I C C C are staging the A n n u a l Hyde Park Relay tomorrow, February 24th. T h i s is r e g a r d e d as the p r e m i e r R o a d R e l a y for Students i n B r i t i a n , a n d p o s s i b l y E u r o p e . T h e r e are over 120 6 m a n t e a m s , i n c l u d i n g 20 f r o m a b r o a d , entered. E a c h lap is 3 m i l e s l o n g a n d passes a l o n g the edge o f the Serpentine. T h i s year's race promises to be very close with strong teams entered from L o u g h b o r o u g h , West L o n d o n Institute of Higher Education, Cologne and B i r m i n g h a m . T h e defending c h a m p i o n s , L o u g h b o r o u g h are b r i n g i n g E u r o p e a n 800m bronze medallist, Sebastian C o e , a n d several other internationls i n c l u d i n g J o h n Davies, the c u r r e n t B r i t i s h Students C h a m p i o n , w i l l be r a c i n g . A s for l o c a l heroes, L o n d o n U n i v e r s i t y s h o u l d be i n the first ten, a n d on their home g r o u n d I C w i l l be fielding such stars as " G r a n n y " C l a r k e (for the 9thconsecutive year), "Mittens" Morton, " B e v e r l y " K i r k , " S h u n t e r " Acford and " K o o l k a t " K e l l y , a n d we hope to finish i n the first 30. T h e r e w i l l also be guest appearances by a n u m b e r of notorious o l d boys i n a n a l l stars team. C o m i n g to the point, we need a lot of help, so if you're free t o m o r r o w afternoon, a n d w a n t a free tea, report to the R e c e p t i o n by the M a i n U n i o n Staircase at 2:00 p m - we really w i l l be grateful. C h a n g i n g the subject, we are n o w well into the R o a d R e l a y . Season a n d o n W e d n e s d a y 14th we went to C a m b r i d g e for the S e l w y n College R e l a y . T h e 2.2 m i l e course was p a r t i a l l y obscured by snow a n d we h a d to fight gale-force winds a n d snow showers t h r o u g h o u t the afternoon. T h i s seemed to have little effect on Ian M o r t o n w h o h a d sobered up after parties i n S c o t l a n d , a n d shot r o u n d i n 10-56 to h a n d over i n 3 r d position. U n a c c u s t o m e d to b e i n g so near the front, B r y a n A c f o r d lost 3 places, but still went " E y e b a l l s O u t " to record 1119. N e x t off was " M a r a t h o n M a r k " P i c k a r d w h o r a n strongly to p u l l us back to fourth w i t h a time of 11-20. O n S a t u r d a y a s m a l l , but elite, b a n d deserted the d u b i o u s delights of College M i n i b u s e s for the more r a n d o m horrors of British R a i l ' s " F l y i n g B a n a n a s " . A f t e r a 1 h o u r late a r r i v a l at Bristol, o u r chauffeur ( M i c k ' s Brother) took us to the course, w h i c h was frozen solid a n d p a r t i a l l y covered i n snow, and would obviously be very treacherous. T h e race started h a l f - a n - h o u r late, to give the t a r d y R e a d i n g T e a m time to change. O v e r the tough 6 m i l e course, it was the " o l d f i r m " of M o r t o n a n d A c f o r d who saved the day, p e r f o r m i n g superbly to finish 19th a n d 25th respectively. M i c k K e l l y h a d a n oiTday a n d was forced to d r o p out, but the team was c o m p l e t e d by a below par B a n a n a (non-flying variety) H a r r i n g t o n in 61st a n d Ian A l v e y i n 64th. T h i s was the 3rd race in the R e e b o k S o u t h e r n Universities L e a g u e , a n d we n o w lie 8 t h , 100 pts b e h i n d O x f o r d Poly, w h o look set to w i n the College's Trophy. M e a n w h i l e , the ' B ' team were p r i v i l e d g e d to w e l c o m e back the C l u b C a p t a i n , Ian A l v e y , after a l o n g absence. Ian came r o u n d i n 12-09 to h a n d over to T i m H a y w a r d i n 2 2 n d place, w h o gained one position, a l t h o u g h his time of 13-11 was somewhat disappointing. S i d (R.I.P.)

f

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; " " T A B L E TENNIS I think I'll start this week with the first team yet a g a i n . A s o n T u e s d a y they furthered their hopes for p r o m o t i o n c o n s i d e r a b l y : - they inflicted a 7-2 (home) defeat o n N . A . L . G . O . w h o h a d , in the previous three weeks, beaten all the top three teams in their division (4). This w i n was achieved by regulars K u m a r and L a k h a n i , a n d s e c o n d team star - A n d y Tye, leaving the top league p l a c i n g s wide o p e n . M e a n w h i l e the 2nd team p l a y e d : E X I L E S V (Home), winning 6 - 3 H e l p e d by the team spirit of the o p p o s i t i o n (none of w h o m had met before), the s e c o n d s w o n yet again, staying on top of d i v i s i o n 5. A n d y w o n 3 again, F a r z i n w o n 2, a n d poor little R o l a n d (minus his bat - left by Jeff Stean at G a i n s f o r d ) , w o n o n l y 1 - A a a a h ! I.C. Ill v G A I N S F O R D Vl(away) Despite the 1-8 score, was not a terribly d e m o r a l i s i n g defeat, as they are clear at the top of the league (excuses, excuses!) and S t e a n d i d i m p r o v e on h i s previous performance against the s a m e team, by w i n n i n g a set! (Ian Reed and I a l s o "played"). I.C.

IV

v

B A R B I C A N C . C . II (home)

This s h o u l d have taken place o n Friday, o n l y B a r b i c a n arrived o n W e d n e s d a y (their mistake) a n d then p o s t p o n e d the fixture. A n d finally, I w o u l d like s e r i o u s (that's a laugh!) s u g g e s t i o n s (preferably written on p o u n d notes - or fivers, etc.) as to an alterego, p e r s o n a , n o m - d e - p l u m e or alias for next term. (Yes, W o n d e r W o m a n was suggested, several times, a n d the idea is u n d e r consideration!?!). Super (for the moment) Hewk T E N P I N BOWLING Last Saturday saw London's first win in the League for at least three years, beating Portsmouth. Even so, the 9-1 score-line was a slight disappointment, considering the almost total domination of the home side. After a walkover by the ladies team and a comprehensive 4-0 win for the firsts, and with both the second and third teams leading 2-0, Portsmouth staged a comeback. The thirds managed to hold on, for a 4-0 win, but disappointing bowling from the seconds led to a 2-2 draw, thus dropping a point. O n the whole, L o n d o n b o w l e d to average individually, apart from a s u p e r b series from E d m o n d N g . His first g a m e of 258, without d o u b t a c l u b record, heralded a fine 625 series. T h i s excellent result meant the team travelled d o w n to P o r t s m o u t h for the return, with h o p e s of a n o t h e r g o o d result. It was not to be. W h i l e the firsts a n d s e c o n d s both w o n easily, the h o m e team s e e m i n g to take little interest in the match, a depleted third team a n d the (full-strength) ladies team were u n a b l e to p r o d u c e any s h o c k s . A measure of the s e c o n d s win is that they did better than Portsmouth's firsts, d u e mainly to a c o n s i s t e n t series from B r i a n M a c G o w a n with 190,187, 187 games. T h e final result was a 5-5 draw against the weakest team in t h e d i v i s i o n . T h e s e m at c he s c o m p l e t e the c l u b ' s league fixtures for the year. Despite a great improvement in performances, c o m p a r e d to the last few years, d u e mainly to consistent, h i g h - s c o r i n g results from the firsts, o n l y third p o s i t i o n was reached in the league. However the top teams, S o u t h a m p t o n and B r u n e i , rely m o r e on strength in depth, so the best individual London bowlers have good c h a n c e s in t o u r n a m e n t s in the next few weeks.


P a g e 19

KRUGBY

Rugby Reach

Firsts Final

L C . lst 21 R O Y A L F R E E lst

0

A s h o l d e r s o f the G u t t e r i d g e C u p I.C. R u g b y were d i s a p p o i n t e d to say the least after a t e r r i b l e p e r f o r m a n c e i n the f i r s t r o u n d p u t us out o f t h i s y e a r ' s c o m p e t i t i o n . A s a w a y o f s h o w i n g that the t e a m c a n s t i l l p l a y we have m a d e it o u r goal to w i n the Plate C o m p e t i t i o n i n s t e a d a n d the above score n o w m e a n s we have r e a c h e d the f i n a l . So a l l t h i n g s going w e l l we w i l l b r i n g b a c k another t r o p h y to be d i s p l a y e d i n the U n i o n Office. T h e t e a m was not as strong as it m i g h t have been w i t h c a p t a i n R a y P a r k i n s o n i n j u r e d a n d a new front r o w set u p . E v e n so the line u p was still strong a n d there was every reason for confidence. A n d w h a t a start I . C . m a d e ! A l m o s t i m m e d i a t e l y from the kick off . R o y a l F r e e w o n a s c r u m o n l y to lose the b a l l after a t r u l y m o n u m e n t a l dri ve f r o m I . C . h a d pushed t h e m back a full ten yards! T h i s set the trend for the m a t c h because a n excellent display from the forwards w o n nearly a l l the line-outs a n d m a n y o f the srummages. H o w e v e r , i n the loose the pack was not as good, t h o u g h w i n n i n g the majority of the ball, a n d this was p r o b a b l y due to the lack of m a t c h practice recently a n d the need for a professional coach. A l l that r e m a i n e d for us to do was to score a n d the points came q ui t e slowly. Early on Ronnie Howard d o w n e d the b a l l for a try o n l y to be d e n i e d by the referee w h o was c l e a r l y i n error. W e kept g o i n g t h o u g h a n d the first score came after a good m o v e m e n t i n the three-quarters was put over for a try i n the corner. T h i s was q u i c k l y followed by a penalty u n d e r the posts from M . C o t t e r , p l a y i n g at full back for the day. T h e second-half c a r r i e d o n as the first h a d done w i t h I . C . o n the attack most o f the time a n d the score b e i n g elevated to the above total after a final flourish brought m o r e points for us. R i c h a r d S m a r t scoring a real b u l l d o z e r try f o l l o w i n g a penalty close to their line h a d a n excellent m a t c h , a n d Steve D e b n e y must also be m e n t i o n e d for a good performance o n the w i n g (he usually plays centre or fly-half). A l l that remains to report of this m a t c h are the celebrations. T h e U n i o n B a r was graced w i t h two " z u m b a s " from RayP a r k i n s o n a n d skipper for the day Steve T o w n s e n d - what m o r e need I say! Stay w i t h me t h o u g h for there are two m o r e matches to be reported! I.C. l s t 6 S A R A C E N S 3rds

13

T h i s was the m a t c h p r e c e d i n g the a b o v e game by the way. A f t e r so m a n y c a nc e l l ed games recently everyone was a m a z e d to find this m a t c h still o n . A q u i c k ' p h o n e c a l l to A r t h u r c o n f i r m e d this so we set off for H a r l i n g t o n even t h o u g h we were one p l a y e r

short at this time (so were the seconds). I n the e n d I a n T a y l o r , the second's c a p t a i n , m a n a g e d to d r a g his r e m a i n i n g player out of bed i n E v e l y n G d n s , a n d lent one of his players to us. T h u s w i t h a full team we a r r i v e d a n d , yours truly - c a p t a i n for t h e d a y d u e to R a y P a r k i n s o n ' s h a m s t r i n g injury - set about g i v i n g the t e a m talk. A l l m y cool a u t h o r i t y was shattered though when I rummaged f r a n t i c a l l y t h r o u g h m y kit b a g to find I h a d forgotten m y boots! W e took the field to face Saracens (I b o r r o w e d some boots) a n d the m a t c h began. Saracens s e e m e d to be p e r p e t u a l l y o n the attack but some good t a c k l i n g i n the backs d e n i e d a l l their attempts. T h e forwards, t h o u g h m u c h lighter t h a n o u r opponents, m a n a g e d to w i n us a fair a m o u n t of b a l l t h o u g h m u c h of this was spoiled by their two very good flankers. W e held t h e m well a n d by halft i m e we were a c t u a l l y 6-0 i n the lead after two good penalty goals from " D o b b e r s " - w h o was s t a n d i n g i n at fly h a l f for the absent E d d y B u d g e n . I . C . h e l d out w e l l i n the secondh a l f but w i t h about 20 minutes to go Saracens scored twice to g a i n t h e m the points to w i n the m a t c h , a n d a d d i n g a penalty goal. This was not a bad performance from I . C . i n v i e w of the o p p o s i t i o n a n d the fact that a spirited fight back i n the last ten minutes almost brought us a c o u p l e of tries. N e x t week I.C. l s t 13 SIDCUP 10 S. T o w n s e n d

Dear Students, - I have received certain requests to help various people by trying to extract both information and money out of you. So here goes: 1. There is a movement in College which is attempting to get a professional injury fixer to reside at College, in the future, in the hope that nagging little injuries can be cured as soon as possible. But before we can be granted this luxury facts have to be gathered to ascertain whether enough students are kept out of sport or other recreational activities for any length of time to warrant such action. So could any of you readers who have been injured this session please jot down on a piece of paper what the injury was, how it was caused, how long it lasted, what steps you took to cure it and how it was eventually cured and send it along to the Union Office care of me or Daphne Websper. 2. Be warned that in the near future questionnaires will be circulated around college in an attempt to find out what sort of student uses the U.L.U. buildings and what improvements you would like to see in the U.L.U. buildings which might provoke you into going there more often. 3. I should be able, shortly, to get hold of cheap 'Speedo'

swimware and leisure ware, any profits going towards sending a Water Polo team to the World Student games in Mexico. So if you want high quality goods at a low price then find me in the Union Office every (well someapologies to Chem PG) lunchtime between 12.30 and 1. Also, if any of you are interested in seeing Water Polo matches between U.L.U. team and an American team (thegames should be televised) in mid-April for only 75 p I will be able to order you some. 4. This is aimed purely at the c o l l e g e s p o r t y types . T h e University of London Sport's Council is holding a large 'ball' on Saturday March 3rd. The tickets are 3.50 pounds per head, which includes a buffet and a late night disco run by Capital Radio. The point of the 'ball' is to get as many sportsmen and women as ! possible from all of London's colleges to be able to communicate with one and other on friendly terms and maybe even have some fun. So if any sportsmen (especially stoats) and women are out there reading this and you want a ticket then come and get me as soon as possible because there is a limit of 600 which could go very quickly. Love and affection, Clyde O. A C C Chairprimate

SECONDS DEFEAT WESTFIELD I.C. 2ND's 8

WESTFIELD 1'STS

0

The side looked like it was down to the usual number of players, as I didn't get up in time. Well, I forgot the match was in the morning. I eventually made it to Harlington a few minutes late. Anyway, I've no idea who won the toss, but we kicked off. The ball seemed to like their end because it stayed there most of the first half. After about fifteen minutes our numbers were cut down to size when Chriss Hughes-Narborough went off for a while with an aggrevated knee injury, probably caused originally by his epic convertion in last term's Goldsmiths' match. Andy Pearce, meanwhile, had intercepted a pass, and broken free. Unfortunately, he was brought down five yards short of the line. The first half finished, with us actually letting Westfield get inside our 22. In the second half, they had the advantages of both the sun and the wind, but this had no effect, as after ten minutes, Andy Pearce got our first try. His convertion attempt,however, did not have the length to reach from the touchline. Within a short spaceof time, a ruck formed on their line and, after five minutes, Roger Butters decided to lift the ball out and score. Sadly, again the convertion attempt (taken from about the same place) did not have the length to score. The pressure continued until after twenty five minutes of the second half, the match suddenly ended. Liam Gartside

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Page 20 c o n t d . from front page

SABBATICAL G O A H E A D

m e e t i n g i n a n a t t e m p t to demonstrate students' o p p o s i t i o n to the R e c t o r ' s proposals.

The establishment o f a sabbatical Deputy President o f I m p e r i a l C o l l e g e U n i o n t o o k a step f o r w a r d l a s t F r i d a y w h e n the C o l l e g e G o v e r n o r s v o t e d to a l l o w the U n i o n a f o u r t h sabbatical position.

I C U n i o n presented a paper, w r i t t e n b y E x t e r n a l Affairs Officer S h e y n e L u c o c k , to the m e e t i n g w h i c h also o u t l i n e d the U n i o n ' s a r g u m e n t s against the i n c l u s i o n o f non-food costs i n the regulator. T h e P a p e r said that costs such as wage increases c o u l d be a c c o u n t e d for i n the t e r m l y price reviews.

A s expected they d i d not g r a n t the U n i o n a n y a d d i t i o n a l m o n e y to pay for the post. T h e U n i o n is still i n v e s t i g a t i n g means o f r a i s i n g the m o n e y from existing i n c o m e b u t is confident that e n o u g h cash i n available. T h e College's rel uct ance to p a y for four sabbaticals seems to stem from a lack of u n d e r s t a n d i n g o f the need for a s a b b a t i c a l F E L I X E d i t o r . T h e y consider that F E L I X c o u l d be p r o d u c e d o n a p a r t - t i m e basis. , B u t there w i l l be n o c h a n g e i n the status of the F E L I X E d i t o r as his j o b is l a i d d o w n i n the U n i o n b y e laws. U n i o n President M a r y A t t e n b o r o u g h is d r a f t i n g a job d e s c r i p t i o n for the n e w s a b b a t i c a l D e p u t y President to present to I C U n i o n C o u n c i l a n d a U n i o n G e n e r a l M e e t i n g . H i s j o b w i l l i n c l u d e that of J u n i o r Treasurer. T h e setting u p o f the f o u r t h s a b b a t i c a l post still has to o v e r c o m e one final h u r d l e , n a m e l y a vote to change U n i o n b y e laws at the U n i o n Meeting on 8th M a r c h . U n i o n Secretary a n d election R e t u r n i n g Office M i k e E l k i n has, however, a n t i c i p a t e d the U n i o n ' s d e c i s i o n a n d has i n d i c a t e d o n the D e p u t y President n o m i n a t i o n p a p e r that the position is to b e c o m e s a b b a t i c a l f r o m 1st J u l y . E l e c t i o n s for the four posts of President, H o n o r a r y Secretary, F E L I X E d i t o r a n d D e p u t y President a r e to take place o n 12th a n d 13th M a r c h i n a C o l l e g e - w i d e ballot. T h e hustings m e e t i n g w i l l be o n 8th M a r c h a n d n o m i n a t i o n papers were posted last M o n d a y i n the U n i o n L o w e r Lounge.

NEWS IN BRIEF TUITION FEES The t u i t i o n fees c a m p a i g n which starts next week is progressing moderately well a c c o r d i n g to E x t e r n a l Affairs Officer S h e y n e L u c o c k . B u t m o r e students are needed to take p a r t i n the s p e a k - i n at Speakers' C o r n e r o n S u n d a y . T h i s is the first p u b l i c event o f the campaign. I C U n i o n is c a l l i n g for the C o l l e g e not to increase t u i t i o n fees next October a n d to b r i n g overseas students' fees d o w n to the h o m e student rate. F o r the rest o f this t e r m students w i l l be l o b b y i n g t h e i r M P s i n W e s t m i n s t e r a n d there w i l l be a l o b b y o f the C o l l e g e Governors on 23rd M a r c h . The External Affairs C o m m i t t e e is expected to issue a press release today to be sent to the n a t i o n a l press o u t l i n i n g the U n i o n ' s c a m p a i g n a n d its aims. T h e C o m m i t t e e is also s e n d i n g letters to f o r m e r overseas students of- the C o l l e g e to seek their s u p p o r t for the U n i o n ' s d e m a n d s . HAMLET

GARDENS

A b o u t 50 residents o f H a m l e t â&#x20AC;˘Gardens flats a t t e n d e d a m e e t i n g called by Imperial College U n i o n last F r i d a y to set u p a residents' association. T h e residents, w h o w e r e mostly not I C students, discussed v a r i o u s p r o b l e m s they h a d w i t h the landlord, London Property Services, a n d elected Liz

Hepplethwaite o f F l a t 20 as C h a i r p e r s o n o f the association. M o s t o f the residents are licensees a n d the i d e a was s p a r k e d off b y the w o r k o f I C U a n d Welfare Adviser M i c h a e l A r t h u r i n d e a l i n g w i t h student licensees. ELECTIONS V o t i n g takes place o n M o n d a y i n the elections for d e p a r t m e n t a l representatives w he r e v er more t h a n o n e c a n d i d a t e has been nominated. T h e s e are the first elections for next year's U n i o n posts. A l l d e p a r t m e n t a l representatives a r e members of I C U n i o n C o u n c i l . LIBERALS' INTERNAL CONTROVERSY L o n d o n L i b e r a l students a r e c a l l i n g for v o l u n t a r y m e m b e r s h i p of student u n i o n s as a l o n g t e r m a i m , but a d m i t that this w o u l d be unworkable i n practice now. Sheyne L u c o c k , I C U E x t e r n a l Affairs Officer and a Vice C h a i r m a n o f the L o n d o n U n i o n of L i b e r a l S t u d e n t s (LULS), in favour of this spoke c o n t r o v e r s i a l p r o p o s a l at the L U L S A n n u a l General Meeting o n T h u r s d a y last week. H e w a s surprised w h e n the r e s o l u t i o n was carried. Gavin Grant, a Liberal on N U S E x e c u t i v e , has c o n d e m n e d L U L S for a d o p t i n g such p o l i c y . Sheyne L u c o c k t h i n k s he is overr e a c t i n g a n d stresses that v o l u n t a r y m e m b e r s h i p is a l o n g term aim.

Refectory C o m m i t t e e is to discuss the w o r k i n g o f the r e g u l a t o r i n line w i t h the G o v e r n o r s ' r e c o m m e n d a t i o n at its m e e t i n g o n 1st M a r c h .

PROGRAMMING CHANGES O N IC R A D I O T h i s l u n c h t i m e ' s m e e t i n g o f the I.C. R a d i o P r o g r a m m e P l a n n i n g C o m m i t t e e d e c i d e d to m a k e m a j o r c h a n g e s to the f o r m a t o f the S t a t i o n ' s w e e k d a y p r o g r a m m i n g . T h i s i n v o l v e s the r e p l a c e m e n t o f the c u r r e n t s p e c i a l i s t m u s i c p r o g r a m m e s b e t w e e n 9.00 a n d 11.00 p . m . w i t h a d a i l y , b r o a d - b a s e d p r o g r a m m e o f m u s i c w h i c h , i t i s expected, w i l l c a r r y a h i g h p r o p o r t i o n o f requests. Specialist p r o g r a m m e s w i l l r u n f r o m 6.00 to 7.00 p . m . , m a k i n g a t y p i c a l d a i l y s c h e d u l e of: 5.00 p . m . 6.00 p . m . 7.00 p . m . 9.00 p . m . 11:00 p . m . 1.00 a . m .

Good Evening Specialist M u s i c Viewpoint New Programme Through Midnight Closedown

T h e reasons for these changes a r e the d i s a p p o i n t i n g response to the specialist p r o g r a m m e s a n d the d e m a n d for m o r e general m u s i c p r o g r a m m i n g for the late e v e n i n g i n the bars. T h e s e changes w i l l not affect the p r o p o r t i o n o f n o n - m u s i c content i n the p r o g r a m m e s ; this w i l l c o n t i n u e to increase g r a d u a l l y . It is h o p e d that most o f the specialist p r o g r a m m e s w i l l r e t u r n i n the near future, i f a d e m a n d c a n be d e m o n s t r a t e d . A full d e t a i l e d schedule w i l l be p u b l i s h e d o n S a t u r d a y as u s u a l . John Allen Station M a n a g e r H e has p o i n t e d out that this p o l i c y is l i n k e d to the U n i o n of Liberal S t u d e n t s ' c a l l for a student wage to replace the grant. R e c e i v i n g a wage w o u l d m a k e o f the w i d e r students part c o m m u n i t y a n d p u t a n e n d to their status as a " p r i v i l e g e d e l i t e " , i n their view. T h e wage w o u l d be fixed by " t h e c o m m u n i t y " , i n accordance with L i b e r a l policy the reform of local for government. I n this context Sheyne L u c o c k felt that v o l u n t a r y student u n i o n m e m b e r s h i p w o u l d be desirable. B u t i f p u t into p r a c t i c e n o w the unions w o u l d n o longer be able to p r o v i d e a n y student facilities as not e n o u g h people w o u l d j o i n . Sheyne L u c o c k is expected to stand for the post o f C h a i r m a n o f the U n i o n o f L i b e r a l Students. I f elected L i b e r a l students a r e u n l i k e l y to have a d u l l year. C O U R T ACTION? Imperial College U n i o n m a y be t a k i n g a l o c a l e d u c a t i o n a u t h o r i t y to c o u r t o v e r the d e n i a l of grants to students affected b y the change i n o r d i n a r y residence qualification.

The U n i o n ' s legal advisers t h i n k that the U n i o n stands a g o o d c h a n c e of w i n n i n g b u t is u n l i k e l y to be g r a n t e d legal a i d . T h e a c t i o n w o u l d be a test case for w h i c h legal a i d is not n o r m a l l y granted. T h e U n i o n is to a p p r o a c h the C o l l e g e a n d the U n i t e d K i n g d o m C o u n c i l for Overseas S t u d e n t Affairs ( U K C O S A ) for financial assistance. a r e six I C students There affected b y the new r u l i n g a n d the e d u c a t i o n authorities i n v o l v e d are I n n e r L o n d o n , Dorset, H e r t s , Barnet a n d Shropshire. T h e Union would be proceeding against one o f t h e m t h r o u g h the student c o n c e r n e d . NOISE BRINGS POLICE Police visited the Union B u i l d i n g last S u n d a y e v e n i n g f o l l o w i n g c o m p l a i n t s by residents of Q u e e n A l e x a n d r a H o u s e about noise f r o m a concert. T h e concert was p u t o n b y E n t s i n the U n i o n C o n c e r t H a l l a n d featured "Punishment of Luxury".

F E L I X is published by the Editor, on behalf of the Imperial College Union Publications Board. Editor: J.L.

Harris

Business Manager: R.D.

Crabbe

F E L I X ISSN 0140-0711. Registered at the Post Office. Copyright F E L I X 1979.

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0510_A  

http://felixonline.co.uk/archive/IC_1979/1979_0510_A.pdf

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